It is currently Thu Oct 19, 2017 4:25 pm



Reply to topic  [ 68953 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 1375, 1376, 1377, 1378, 1379, 1380  Next
 Recently Seen 
Author Message
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Izzy Black wrote:
NewRoseHotel


That, too!

I miss you, Izzy. :heart:

_________________
no longer on hiatus from movies(!)

next projection | twitter | frames within frames
| letterboxd


Fri Jun 23, 2017 7:02 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
I don't think that Tarkovsky films are heavily based around humanity and life though (or at least, the films I've seen from him). This movie is heavily based on dehumanization. "Stalker" is heavily based on the consequences of desire. "The Mirror" is heavily based on the concept of death as we appear to see instances of a man's life while he's on his deathbed. "Solaris" is about the impact space exploration has on the human condition. If I watch some of his other movies, I might change my opinion. However, based on what I've seen from him so far, I wouldn't say that humanity and life are major themes of his movies.

Is it too much of a stretch to say that a theme of dehumanization would need to begin with the fact that it is humanity that is lost? And don't you need to show the humanity in order to show that it is gone or reduced? I think you'd at least need to begin with the assumption that there is such a thing as humanity. And, if so, does that mean that both humanity and the loss of humanity would be the theme(s) Tarkovsky examines? :)

_________________
"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread. Catalog Rounds 1-3
Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)
Images will disappear about 13 Feb 2018 forever.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

The Future Unreels will also lose all its images on the same day. But just think about how many images Jedi has on Photobucket, and the other posters here.


Fri Jun 23, 2017 9:46 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Gort wrote:
Is it too much of a stretch to say that a theme of dehumanization would need to begin with the fact that it is humanity that is lost? And don't you need to show the humanity in order to show that it is gone or reduced? I think you'd at least need to begin with the assumption that there is such a thing as humanity. And, if so, does that mean that both humanity and the loss of humanity would be the theme(s) Tarkovsky examines? :)

I see what you're saying. If you're going to show a character losing humanity in a film, you initially need to show that character having humanity before it's lost. However, I wouldn't say that simply having humanity is a significant portion to the movie's themes. When you consider how much time is devoted to Andrei losing humanity and becoming dehumanized, having humanity doesn't seem important to the film's themes at all. I wouldn't say that one of Tarkovsky's intentions was to examine someone having humanity. The main focus of the film in terms of its thematic brilliance is to examine someone losing humanity. And, like I said, I feel both filmmakers make simple, yet grand stories (this is the main reason why I hold this viewpoint).

_________________
"I don't like your jerk off name, I don't like your jerk off face, I don't like your jerk off behavior, and I don't like you...jerk off."

-The Big Lebowski (1998)


Fri Jun 23, 2017 12:39 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

See if you can get a copy of Ivan's Childhood to watch. That is, if you haven't already seen it. This is Tarkovsky's first feature, and it's one that he took over when it was in progress. I've never read anything that tells me how far along the film was when he took it over as a directorial project, not even the Criterion Collection DVD or Bluray packages. It's interesting because it's different, but very much like all Tarkovsky's other films (I've seen all but one of those he is credited with between 1956 and 1979).

I also noticed a couple of additions to the IMDb filmography since I last checked the list several years ago. I suppose there is research into just what this man did behind the veil that the West saw around the Soviet Union. It amazes me that someone "behind the Iron Curtain" was able to make the kinds of films that he did.

_________________
"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread. Catalog Rounds 1-3
Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)
Images will disappear about 13 Feb 2018 forever.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

The Future Unreels will also lose all its images on the same day. But just think about how many images Jedi has on Photobucket, and the other posters here.


Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:17 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Gort wrote:
See if you can get a copy of Ivan's Childhood to watch. That is, if you haven't already seen it. This is Tarkovsky's first feature, and it's one that he took over when it was in progress. I've never read anything that tells me how far along the film was when he took it over as a directorial project, not even the Criterion Collection DVD or Bluray packages. It's interesting because it's different, but very much like all Tarkovsky's other films (I've seen all but one of those he is credited with between 1956 and 1979).

I also noticed a couple of additions to the IMDb filmography since I last checked the list several years ago. I suppose there is research into just what this man did behind the veil that the West saw around the Soviet Union. It amazes me that someone "behind the Iron Curtain" was able to make the kinds of films that he did.

I'll consider watching it.

_________________
"I don't like your jerk off name, I don't like your jerk off face, I don't like your jerk off behavior, and I don't like you...jerk off."

-The Big Lebowski (1998)


Sat Jun 24, 2017 11:42 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Fist Fight is dumb but fun. Spy is clever and really funny.

_________________
This Is My New Blog. There Are Many Like It But This One Is Mine
Shitty Film Thread
Follow Me On Twitter If You Aren't Doing So Already
The MadMan Reserved 31 Seats
"I think its time we discuss your, uh....philosophy of drug use as it relates to artistic endeavor." -Naked Lunch (1991)


Sun Jun 25, 2017 3:00 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

M (1931) - 9/10

Oddly enough, the only reason I watched this movie as fast as I did was because I found its short title to be eye catching while looking for different films to watch. I also like crime dramas, so I decided to watch this movie as I was expecting something Hitchcock-esque. However, I liked it all of Hitchcock's films that I've seen as it's not just a well-made crime drama, but a smart one.

A child murderer named Hans Beckert has just killed his third victim, Elsie Beckmann. With little evidence, the police decide to raid and question psychiatric patients with a history of violence towards children. In fear of the police ruining business, an underground boss named Schranker decided to assemble a group of crime lords to start their own manhunt.

On the surface, this movie seems like a simple, well-made crime drama. However, the movie has a deeper meaning concerning people fighting against a corrupt environment. The police force in the film were flawed as they staged raids with little to no evidence. They were the reason why the gang lords organized their own manhunt. That manhunt came with its own law force. However, that's not to say that what they did was moral, because they also created an unfair kangaroo court to try Hans Beckert. They were more concerned with killing him themselves rather than turning him over to the police. Despite this, however, the fact that the citizens were more successful than the police in catching the child murderer shows how faulty the actual police force was. Essentially, this film is about a corrupt "law force" forming in the midst of another one.

As many other critics have pointed out, Peter Lorre gave a magnificent performance. The reason his performance was so unsettling was how his character turned from a heartless killer to someone terrified by the thought of being killed. The final act where he begged for his life was chilling as we got to see another side of Beckert that we hadn't witnessed before. I don't believe that many other actors would've been able to make that scene work as well as he did. Even though Lorre didn't become truly spectacular until the 2nd half, I wouldn't describe his performance as bland, because he still sent chills down my spine when he would talk to the kids he planned on killing. Also, even his whistling was slightly unsettling. On top of Lorre's great performance, the final act was also powerful as Beckert's monologue for why he kills people is both haunting and thought provoking. The scene also shows the flaws with the court system the criminals established, showing that they aren't any better than the police force in the film.

This movie has one of the best openings I've ever seen in recent years. It does a great job putting us right in the middle of the action. It starts off with several kids chanting about a murderer in a courtyard, a scene which shows us how many of the children are oblivious to how dangerous the killer really is. The scene then shows one of the girls coming home when she comes across a wanted poster for the murderer. Suddenly, we witness one of the most unsettling and remarkable character introductions of all time as Beckert's shadow moves in front of the poster. It's a clever way of introducing us to the killer not just because of its creativity, but also because the film doesn't show Beckert's face right away. There are also a couple unsettling shots in the opening that work due to their subtlety such as Elsie's ball rolling out of the bushes and her balloon getting lost in a set of telephone wires.

The sound in this film was both impressive and revolutionary. Quite a few scenes stuck out due to their use of sound. An example can be found in the opening shot as we heard a girl talking before the film revealed its first shot. The technique of showing dialogue or sound before a film starts off is still used in movies today such as "Hunger", "The Tree of Life", and "Whiplash". However, a truly suspenseful moment was when Beckert pursued a young girl in the streets. The camera was only focused on her, but we heard Beckert's whistling in the background getting louder and louder. There were other instances in the film which made the camera feel alive. An example of this was how we heard the sounds of different objects before they would come into view. This can be seen in the car horns as we heard them before they entered the shot. It felt like the movie was actually taking place in real time. While this may seem like nothing today, it was really innovative back then. The sound design in the film was way ahead of its time.

In conclusion, this movie was a remarkable film. It's both a deep and well-made crime drama which impressed me for a number of reasons. It has a deeper meaning, great acting, a haunting 2nd half, and innovative sound design. A few people criticized the movie for trying to get you to sympathize with a child murderer. However, I don't think the movie is asking for sympathy as much as it is asking for understanding. Regardless, it's one of the best crime films I've ever seen.

_________________
"I don't like your jerk off name, I don't like your jerk off face, I don't like your jerk off behavior, and I don't like you...jerk off."

-The Big Lebowski (1998)


Wed Jun 28, 2017 12:04 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post It Comes At Night (Shults, '17)

Image

The most important thing, we never go out at night.

A sick, elderly man, his body covered with bloody sores, his chest wheezing with a painful reluctance, sits hunched over on a bed inside a dim, depressing cabin, as indistinct figures wearing gloves, their faces and voices almost completely obscured by gasmasks, the sound of their filtered breathing seeming almost like a sick, twisted parody of the man's, load him onto a wheelbarrow as if he were a pile of rotten mulch, wheel him out to a shallow grave in the surrounding woods, place a pillow over the man's face, press a pistol against that, pull the trigger, and immediately pour gasoline over the fresh corpse, quickly immolating it. Who was the man in question you may ask? The family's grandfather.

This is the world of Trey Edward Shults' It Comes At Night, a small, hopeless world of fear, paranoia, and terrifying sicknesses, both physical and psychological. It takes place shortly after a new, unnamed plague has apparently wiped out civilization as we know it, as a family of (formerly) four takes refuge inside the aforementioned boarded-up cabin, hoping to eke out some sort of meager, tenuous continued existence in the woods, and desperately praying that the same hideous disease that destroyed the rest of humanity doesn't find its way into their bleak little corner of the world. All of that changes, however, when the family unexpectedly stumbles upon another family of survivors, whom they decide to let live with them in exchange for helping to maintain and protect their decrepit domicile, and... that's basically it as far as most of the major plot details go.

So yeah, not a particularly complicated film story-wise, but then again, It Comes At Night doesn't have to be; rather, it works well as an intensely atmospheric mood piece, getting us deep inside the mindset of people living out what they almost surely know are their last days in a middle of nowhere "refuge", with nothing but tiny electric lanterns providing a meager, hushed light at night, and even the days aren't very bright inside, with the boards covering most of the windows in the hope of blocking out the outside world.

It's a world that might as well have blinked right out of existence as far as we know, since, besides one quick excursion away from the cabin, we never see any real signs of a devastated humanity, just the dismal interiors of the cabin and the surrounding woods, but then again, we don't need to see anything more; like I said before, It Comes At Night is a movie that thrives on an intimately intense atmosphere. It's a film that slowly gets under your skin with its elegant, subtly creeping cinematography, unnerving, continually pounding ambient soundtrack, and its aura of a dark, twisted fear that ultimately consumes every single one of its characters. You can criticize it for being too simple or ambiguous, or say that most of its nightmare sequences are needless and shoehorned in to force the film into seeming more horrific (which is a fair point), but for an hour-and-a-half, I was deep inside of its dark, hopeless world, and all that's enough as far as I'm concerned.
Favorite Aspect: the atmosphere
Final Score: 8

_________________
Letterboxd


Sat Jul 01, 2017 4:59 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

I want to see It Comes at Night so badly. I feel like it has a lot of potential to be one of the best horror films of the 2000's and the 2010's. Unfortunately, I can't see it in any of the theaters where I live as I don't turn 18 till August 23rd.

_________________
"I don't like your jerk off name, I don't like your jerk off face, I don't like your jerk off behavior, and I don't like you...jerk off."

-The Big Lebowski (1998)


Sat Jul 01, 2017 6:06 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

You can go see it if an adult takes you, can't you? "Unless accompanied by an adult" used to be on the R-rated tag.

_________________
"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread. Catalog Rounds 1-3
Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)
Images will disappear about 13 Feb 2018 forever.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

The Future Unreels will also lose all its images on the same day. But just think about how many images Jedi has on Photobucket, and the other posters here.


Sat Jul 01, 2017 6:19 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

My sister tried going to the theaters before with my mom, but she wasn't allowed to enter. The theaters around my house have gotten stricter over the years.

_________________
"I don't like your jerk off name, I don't like your jerk off face, I don't like your jerk off behavior, and I don't like you...jerk off."

-The Big Lebowski (1998)


Sat Jul 01, 2017 6:39 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

How did you get here, Popcorn, most people are way past the age of 18

you could always buy the ticket for the G movie and walk into the R one


Sat Jul 01, 2017 6:44 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Image

sry pops

_________________
Letterboxd


Sat Jul 01, 2017 7:01 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Joss Whedon wrote:
How did you get here, Popcorn, most people are way past the age of 18

you could always buy the ticket for the G movie and walk into the R one

I originally created a RT account a few years ago to review Danny Boyle's Sunshine. Over the years, I got more interested in movies as I slowly got into classic/foreign films. I eventually discovered the forum on Rotten Tomatoes. Eventually, Stu showed me this place.

I could always buy a ticket for a different movie only to walk into this one. However, it's not like there's a rush to see this movie. I might just wait for it to be released on DVD.

_________________
"I don't like your jerk off name, I don't like your jerk off face, I don't like your jerk off behavior, and I don't like you...jerk off."

-The Big Lebowski (1998)


Sat Jul 01, 2017 11:30 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
I originally created a RT account a few years ago to review Danny Boyle's Sunshine. Over the years, I got more interested in movies as I slowly got into classic/foreign films. I eventually discovered the forum on Rotten Tomatoes. Eventually, Stu showed me this place.

I could always buy a ticket for a different movie only to walk into this one. However, it's not like there's a rush to see this movie. I might just wait for it to be released on DVD.

Stu's a pretty good person from my experience. It's great to have you here


Sat Jul 01, 2017 2:02 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Joss Whedon wrote:
Stu's a pretty good person from my experience. It's great to have you here

Thanks.

_________________
"I don't like your jerk off name, I don't like your jerk off face, I don't like your jerk off behavior, and I don't like you...jerk off."

-The Big Lebowski (1998)


Sun Jul 02, 2017 1:10 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Joss Whedon wrote:
Stu's a pretty good person from my experience. It's great to have you here
Aw, thank you so much, Joss :heart: And I 2nd the notion that having PR here now is a good thing; welcome aboard, buddy!

_________________
Letterboxd


Mon Jul 03, 2017 8:59 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Days of Heaven (1978) - 9/10

I've always liked how Malick films have an otherworldly feeling to them. "The Tree of Life" is still my favorite Malick film, but this was still impressive. It had a unique and swiftly feeling to it which had a great impact on me. Since I was impressed by it, I'm going to probably check out "Badlands" as well since it also looks interesting.

After a steelworker named Bill accidentally kills his boss in a fight, he, his wife, Abby, and his daughter, Linda flee to the Texas panhandle where they join a farm and pose as brother and sister to avoid gossip. However, after the farmer falls in love with Abby, that action begins to brew jealousy and trouble.

The editing had a lasting impact on me. Most of the scenes of dialogue are short as they only consist of a few lines between the characters before the movie changes to another scene. Those short scenes of dialogue make the movie feel like it's always in motion. It's a creative way of telling its story, because it commonly feels poetic. It appears to move from one scene to another in a swift fashion that I haven't seen done the same way before. This method of storytelling was not only unique, but it did a great job at engaging me. With that being said, the film is not easily absorbed in one viewing as it's easy to miss certain character motivations if you don't pay full attention to what goes on in the film. The editing in this movie reminded me of the discontinuity editing is Godard's "Breathless". Both films evoked similar feelings in terms of their editing.

All the Malick films I've seen have delivered on their cinematography. This film was no exception. The outdoor shots were breathtaking largely because most of the film was shot during golden hour (the period during sunrise and sunset). The slight redness of the skies not only made the film feel atmospheric, but it also immersed me into the backbreaking work which had to be done around the farm. Despite just looking nice, I also felt like the cinematography showed how insignificant the characters were. I first noticed this when the film would show several people working while the house would be far off in the distance. On top of those shots, there were also many shots of the horizon, wheat stems blowing in the breeze, and close-ups of different insects. I couldn't help, but think that the characters were parts of a larger whole. The contrast between the camera focusing on immense scenes of nature and mixing in character drama by showing short clips near the middle or ends of conversations showed that the protagonists were tiny specks in the vast agricultural setting the film took place in.

On top of that, there are also several great visual set pieces. The most famous of which is the locust swarm. Its arrival is menacing as first, we hear eerie sounds and music followed by a few locusts in a kitchen followed by thousands of locusts in the wheat fields. Like many other critics have pointed out in the past, this scene signals the beginning of the end. Another great scene which I don't feel is brought up enough is when Bill takes Abby out of the bedroom while she's sleeping with the farmer. This is a vital scene as it's the first to reveal Bill's hatred of the farmer's relationship with his wife. What I like about that scene is after the 2 leave, we see a shot of a gazebo the characters stayed in earlier. Only this time, however, the color pallet of that shot is dull and gray, almost like the movie is warning us that the film will only go downhill from there.

Some people complained that the story was too slight. However, I disagree. It may seem like a simple story on the surface. However, there are a few layers of subtlety to the film which make it stick out. I mainly liked the subtle delivery of the character motivations, because, in my opinion, that's the best way a film can utilize subtlety. An important scene in terms of the motivations is how Bill persuading Abby to marry the farmer is lightly touched on. It can be easy to miss the dialogue which reveals that if you're not paying full attention (I missed it on my first viewing). However, once you pick up on that scene, you start to notice several preceding subtle scenes which lead up to it. Once you pick up on that, it becomes impossible to look away from the film. Another subtle scene was how one of Linda's friends leaves the farm only to come back later in the film. Her reappearance is sudden, but necessary. Because of this, I'd say that the story aspect is also well-done. Anyways, what I have to say to the people who criticized the movie for this reason is to try watching it again with what I said in mind, because if you do, you may appreciate the movie more.

In conclusion, I thought this film was superb. On top of the great cinematography, visual set pieces, and subtlety, Malick's decision to make most of the scenes of dialogue short helped to make this film feel poetic and mysterious at times. The funny thing is that I was putting off seeing Malick's older work for quite some time. I honestly don't know why I waited so long. Maybe I didn't think he would top "The Tree of Life" or something. I don't know. However, I'm going to check out "Badlands" soon as this film blew me away.

_________________
"I don't like your jerk off name, I don't like your jerk off face, I don't like your jerk off behavior, and I don't like you...jerk off."

-The Big Lebowski (1998)


Fri Jul 07, 2017 1:00 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Baby Driver (Wright, '17)

Image

Wait- I gotta start the song over.

While Edgar Wright is one of the most stylistically distinctive directors working today, as of late, it feels like he's been stuck in a bit of a creative rut. Yes, I enjoyed every entry in the so-called "Cornetto Trilogy", but by the time 2013's The World's End rolled around, and we got yet another quirky relationship comedy wrapped inside of a loving genre parody, I was starting to get a bit fatigued with the whole deal. Fortunately, while I'm still disappointed that the suits at Marvel refused to let Wright inject his undeniable personality into the rather homogenous "MCU" with AntMan, Baby Driver is still a strong consolation for that cinematic loss, and a welcome shake-up to Wright's still-young career.

The basic plot of Baby Driver should be familiar to anyone who's ever seen any "One Last Job" films; a criminal who's The Best At What He Does (the titular "Baby Driver") plans to ride into the sunset with his Designated Love Interest (Lily James's innocent, naive Girl Next Door Deborah) after he pulls off his OLJ (the robbery of an armored truck) for his local criminal boss (Kevin Spacey's superior, perpetually in control Doc), a boss who's in the habit of making people Offers They Can't Refuse. Of course, just when Baby Thought He Was Out, They Pull Him Back In, he quickly gets In Over His Head and absolutely Nothing Goes According To Plan, and he has to go on the run from both the fuzz and his fellow thieves as he discovers that Getting In's A Lot Harder Than Getting In, and blahblahblah yaddayaddayadda seen it all before.

But Wright obviously knows we've seen all this before, and doesn't try to pretend otherwise (at one point, Baby literally even says his next heist will be his "one last job"). Instead, Baby Driver displays a refreshing sense of self-awareness about the familiarity of its cliches, while also refusing to coast on them, injecting some new life into the ever reliable Crime Thriller both through its unique, unusual protagonist, as well as through applying Edgar Wright's hyperactive, idiosyncratically one-of-a-kind style to the genre, all while Wright takes steps to avoid simply repeating what's worked for him before. Ansel Elgort of The Fault in Our Stars and the Divergent series takes a much-needed break from the Young Adult adaptations to portray Baby, the painfully young but supernaturally-gifted driver, who uses his various IPod mixes as both the soundtrack to the heists he facilitates, as well as an escape from them, attempting to avoid seeing or hearing any innocents being harmed by his "coworkers" by just dancing in his seat to the beats in the hopes of keeping his hands clean (a hope we all very well know will be dashed by the end of the film).

Baby's relationships with the other characters form the heart of the film, whether it be the way he takes care of his deaf foster father who is far too old to look after him anymore, his uneasy, Stockholm Syndrome dynamic with Doc, or his love story with Deborah, the waitress at a local diner. Rather than just being the obligatory Girl Of The Film, Wright takes the time to properly, genuinely develop their relationship, whether it be showing the two of them bonding over their mutual love of music and a desire to just hit the road and leave it all behind, or the true sympathy she shows when she learns that his mother died in a car crash when he was a child (while he was in the car, with a 1st-generation IPod that he now carries with him as a memento), or the way she loyally waits for him at the diner all night, after he promises (futilely) to make one final getaway with her.

All these small (but essential) details results in BD easily having the best character development a Wright film has had since Shaun Of The Dead, which, along with the surprisingly complex, detailed plot, and unexpectedly serious tone here, helps to create the freshest work from this director since, well, that acclaimed debut. Don't get me wrong, there are still some moments of levity and comic relief here, but for the most part, Baby Driver can hardly be called a parody of anything, as it plays its Crime Thriller tropes rather straight, and, unlike most of Wright's previous material, when the characters are supposedly in life-or-death situations here, they actually act as if they are, resulting in a Crime film as legitimately thrilling as anything Michael Mann ever put his name on.

Finally, I would be remiss if I didn't praise Wright for retaining his signature directorial style and taking it in a different, more action-oriented direction here. Of course, his in-your-face, hyperactive-but-focused style, with its energetic, constantly active editing, cinematography, and neat little visual gimmicks, and his always perfect, mood-setting song choices do a lot to spice up the calmer scenes, but it really shines during the action, as the dusty story beats are brushed off by the musical ones, and it becomes harder & harder to tell if the last beat came out of Baby's ever-present IPod, or from a nearby gunshot. This movie really does have some of the finest action scenes (with all-practical stunts!) since Fury Road, and Wright simultaneously livens up both this tired old genre, and his own personal style, with what is one of the best movies of the year so far. Don't let this Baby drive away from you.
Favorite aspect: the action
Final Score: 8.25

_________________
Letterboxd


Sat Jul 08, 2017 3:09 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

It's a terrific film, I think Wright doesn't get enough credit for his craft. The World's End was a great film, he manages to create a real character with addiction problems in Simon Pegg and pulls it off wonderfully. It may be one of the best films about addiction, it's not overly dramatic like Leaving Las Vegas or silly like Requiem for a Dream. Pegg is simply craving social contact, the alcohol is filling that gap that he has, the fear of being lonely, the fear of not knowing what is going to happen when you become sober, all ring true. The film is certainly his most mature work.


Sat Jul 08, 2017 3:26 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Just saw Sofia Coppola's version of The Beguiled. It's not a bad film (it's surprisingly funny), but it's inferior to the 1971 Siegel/Eastwood version in just about every way.

I will say it's prettier than the original. . . but even that I mean as a criticism.

_________________
Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.


Sat Jul 08, 2017 4:16 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Spider-Man: Homecoming (Watts, '17)

Image

Can't you just be a friendly neighborhood Spider-Man?

I admit, I had almost negative interest in Spider-Man: Homecoming prior to it's release; I was never a big fan of the overly campy Sam Raimi trilogy (2 was the only one I really liked), I avoided the first Amazing Spiderman out of apathy for another origin story so soon, and everything I heard about Amazing 2 made me (and a lot of other people) stay far, far away. Fortunately, that film's failure had a silver lining, as it lead Sony to share the character's film rights back with Marvel in order to steer the franchise back on course, leading to the release of the Homecoming you see before you. Its title obviously refers to the fact that, despite playing a supporting role in 2016's strong Captain America: Civil War, this is the webbed one's very first solo film within the "Marvel Cinematic Universe", but, of course, despite the MCU never even coming close to releasing a bomb in 9 years and a whopping fifteen film's, that alone didn't guarantee the success of Homecoming, since I was never the biggest MCU fan (heck, I (I didn't even like the first Avengers). However, despite my inconsistent relationship with both the previous Spidermans and the Marvel films, and an overall fatigue with the superhero movies that have been dominating Hollywood in the decade & a half since the original film's release, director Jon Watts still managed to deliver a rather fresh and entertaining new start for your friendly neighbourhood Spiderman here, proving that you can teach an old spider new tricks... or something.

After a flashback to the backstory of the film's antagonist (Michael Keaton's The Vulture) and an amusing little recap of Spidey's involvement in the events of Civil War (done from the novel angle of Peter Parker filming Instagram-style selfie vids), the (Iron) man himself Tony Stark drops Peter back off in his home swinging grounds of Queens, with a shiny new suit, and an exhortation to just be a "friendly neighborhood Spiderman" for the time being, and not try to bite off more than he can chew. And refreshingly, both Peter and the film itself manages to do just that for the 1st half, "grounding" him in, well, his local neighborhood, showing Peter struggling to balance the duties of being just another high schooler who has to worry about studying, bullies, and how the girl of his dreams feels about him, alongside his "extracurricular activity" of being Spiderman after class, lifting up an entire row of lockers to access his stash of web fluid and webbing his backpacks up behind dumpsters (which still doesn't prevent them from getting stolen) as he apprehends petty bike thieves, use his plentiful downtime to send multiple, unresponded-to texts to Tony's assistant in the hope of being let inside the Avengers loop, and just generally try prove his worth as a hero to the (sometimes justifably) not-always appreciative locals.

And, instead of every action scenes here constantly taking place high up amongst the skyscrapers and cityscape that define Spiderman's hometown, Homecoming balances sort of the large-scale setpieces you've come to expect from Spiderman (such as him using his webs to steer a massive, crashing cargo plane, attempting to hold together the Staten Island Ferry as it splits in half, and a truly "spectacular" scene set all the while on top of a crumbling Washington Monument) alongside action beats set in far more domesticated, mundane locations, such as a robbery inside a small local ATM, a Ferris Buller-style chase in a sleepy residential neighborhood (a cinematic similarity the film itself acknowledges in an amusing little aside), and a fight that takes place on the bus parking lot of the local school while the film's titular 80's themed homecoming dance goes on inside, unaware of the chaos occuring outside.

It is this dichtomy, this contrast between Spiderman's larger, more typical superheroics and the unexpected, down-to-Earth relatablity of Peter's dilemmas, both in and out of the costume, that ultimately makes Homecoming successful, and a relative breath of fresh air in an overdone, incredibly overcrowded genre. Don't get me wrong, as this isn't a perfectly film or anything; at times, it overrelies on using its connections to the larger MCU as a story crutch, some of the characterizations were lacking (such as Peter's incredibly cliched, one-dimensional school bully, or Zendaya's annoyingly "ironic", pointlessly off-putting MJ), and the overall film can't help but help but have a general air of familiarity if you've seen any number of modern superhero movies, but despite all that, Spider-Man: Homecoming was still a fun, entertaining time at the local cinema, and one I wouldn't hesitate from recommending you swing on in to check out.

Best Moment: If I'm nothing without this suit, I don't deserve to have it.

Final Score: 8

_________________
Letterboxd


Sat Jul 22, 2017 2:26 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Jon Watts. That's the director. Think you were thinking Marc Webb.


Sat Jul 22, 2017 6:13 pm
Profile YIM
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Ace wrote:
Jon Watts. That's the director. Think you were thinking Marc Webb.
Sry, fixed :oops: Anyway Ace, did you like the movie?

_________________
Letterboxd


Sun Jul 23, 2017 12:47 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

yes I did. A few moments that define Spider-Man in the movie made it for me. Mainly the ending.


Sun Jul 23, 2017 4:31 am
Profile YIM
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Ace wrote:
yes I did. A few moments that define Spider-Man in the movie made it for me. Mainly the ending.
Plus...
...dat shot of Peter sharing his reflection in the puddle with his mask... *drool*

_________________
Letterboxd


Sun Jul 23, 2017 2:53 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Detroit (Kathryn Bigelow)

_________________
Read Write Hand


Wed Jul 26, 2017 9:37 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Captain Oats wrote:
Good review, wanna see; how did it compete overall quality-wise with the other 2 movies in the recent Bigelowssance?

_________________
Letterboxd


Thu Jul 27, 2017 2:56 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Stu wrote:
Good review, wanna see; how did it compete overall quality-wise with the other 2 movies in the recent Bigelowssance?

Zero Dark Thirty's a better overall film, but the middle hour of this is the best thing she's directed since Strange Days.

_________________
Read Write Hand


Fri Jul 28, 2017 3:31 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Keaton did a great job as the Vulture. He even channeled Nicholson in some scenes, particularly the one where he stared down Spiderman.


Fri Jul 28, 2017 3:57 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Joss Whedon wrote:
Keaton did a great job as the Vulture. He even channeled Nicholson in some scenes, particularly the one where he stared down Spiderman.
The twist in his character halfway through was so good.

_________________
Letterboxd


Fri Jul 28, 2017 2:57 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Dunkirk (Nolan, '17)

Image

All we did was survive... but maybe that's enough.

On May 26th, 1940, almost half a million Allied troops stood stranded on a grey, chilly beach in the north of France, as the German war machine furiously blitzkrieged its way toward them across the country, and indeed, the entire continent. Only about 20 miles of the English Channel lay between those stranded men and the salvation of their homeland, so close that on a clear day, you can see the white cliffs of Dover from the other side, but for the hundreds of thousands of men waiting on that beach, it might as well have been on another planet. That beach's name? Dunkirk.

Christopher Nolan's film of the same name is the story of the evacuation of those troops, shown from the viewpoints of the men who were on the ground, at sea, and in the air there, showing the event from almost every concievable angle, both military and civillian alike. While such a cinematic undertaking would be more than ambitious enough as is, Nolan goes one step further with Dunkirk, and resharpens his fascination with non-linear storytelling and playing around with our cinematic concept of time, by interweaving together every single story thread and presenting them simultaneously here, meaning that the scenes of an hour-long dogfight with Tom Hardy's low-on-fuel RAF pilot, struggling to protect the troops on the beach below from the enemy planes above, are intercut with the story of the week-long escape of those troops from that beach.

With this unusual structure, Dunkirk compresses the already dramatic event down to its most dramatic moments, basically becoming one long, cinematic climax for 2 hours straight, an experience that could've (should've) became tedious and exhausting very, very quickly, but under Nolan's immersive, skillfully intense direction, it's what is instead what distinguishes and raises up Dunkirk as a war film, lifting it high, high above most of its peers in the often tired, overcrowded genre. For the most part, Nolan avoids the cliche of shoehorning in unnecessary backstory for the characters here, with no scenes of the frontline grunts sitting around and talking about how much they miss their family or their high school sweetheart or their sleepy little town back home, just so the film can act like it did something to make us care about these men just before they inevitably get blown away a minute later.

Instead, the primary method the film connects us with its characters is to simply place us in their boots, sometimes literally, with cinematographer Hoyte van Hoytema's up close and personal POV perspectives (which contrasts nicely with his epic, aerial MOVIE shots here), and make us feel what they felt waiting for rescue from that ugly, godforsaken beach, and what it must've been like to see the sight of an enemy plane rapidly diving towards your defenseless position, to hear the whir of an incoming shell that may be the last thing you ever hear, to feel the apocalyptic shudder of a ship that's just been torpedoed by an invisible enemy, just before the cold ocean rushes in and cuts every light onboard off, leaving you desperately flailing for a way out, literally drowning in darkness.

It is this intense, personal immersiveness that gives Dunkirk its great cinematic power, and left me constantly feeling as though I was on the verge of having a heart attack right there in the theater (but in a good way, at least, as good as a heart attack can feel). And, while one can criticize this for having certain historical & military inaccuracies, for mostly "Britwashing" the evacuation of the multi-national forces off the beach, or giving in somewhat to a more traditional sentimentality towards the end (a sentimentality that I would argue the film earns through its mostly unglamorous depiction of warfare), all of that pales far, far in comparison to what this gets right. All in all, Dunkirk is one of the purest, most memorable cinematic experiences I've ever had, and as far as I'm concerned, is THE film of the year to date. Thank you, Mr. Nolan, thank you so very much.
Favorite aspect: the overall intensity
Final Score: 8.75

_________________
Letterboxd


Mon Jul 31, 2017 11:04 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

28 Days Later (2002) - 9/10

Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later" is my favorite zombie film by far. It may not be as popular as some of the other zombie classics out there, but I think it rises far above all of them. It's not only an entertaining and well-done zombie film, but a smart film which has a deeper meaning.

After a group of animal activists release a chimpanzee with a dangerous virus, a zombie virus breaks out. 28 days after that incident, Jim, a bicycle courier, awakens from a coma only to have to fight for his survival along with a few other survivors he runs into.

My favorite aspect of this film is its political allegories. Its political allegories give an example of what the government/military would do in a situation like this. Boyle is saying that if a zombie outbreak were to ever happen, the government, soldiers, and politicians would be safe in a bunker while the rest of the world would be left to fight for themselves. You could probably get some help from the army, but they may want to get rid of you or other people traveling with you. They might even have violent intentions towards the people they keep with them. The military soldiers we saw in this movie went to unsettling lengths. They tried to rape Selena and Hannah, killed their own soldiers for disagreeing with their actions, and, most importantly, kept one of their fellow soldiers who turned into a zombie alive and chained up so they could see how long it would take for him to starve (an action which resulted in their deaths). Also, the final scene is delightfully ambiguous, because it makes you wonder whether the military will even try to rescue anyone else.

The character arcs of Jim and Selena are also impressive as the 2 of them appear to swap personalities over the course of the film. When we are first introduced to the characters, Jim appears to be terrified of the zombies while Selena seems like a strong, fearless female lead. After she kills Mark early on, she tells Jim that if he ever turns, she will kill him in a heartbeat. After they discover two more survivors named Frank and Hannah, Selena appears to show little interest for helping them. Over the course of the film, however, she slowly befriends and accept them. The most important aspect of her change, however, is how she slowly develops a relationship with Jim as she said she would never do so early on in the film. As for Jim, on the other hand, he changes from fearing the zombies to becoming increasingly violent throughout the film. His first instance of violence is when he kills a zombified boy. However, the most notable instance of violence is when he kills several military soldiers in the final act of the film. This shows that threats to his life or threats to other people he cares for can bring out his animalistic instincts. My favorite moment surrounding their character arcs is how Jim reunites with Selena after he kills Corporate Mitchell. The scene where he gouges Mitchell's eyes out with his fingers is probably the most gory scene from the film (or, at least, in my opinion it is). It shows how much the outbreak has effected him. The moment when he reunites with Selena is very interesting though. Early on in the film, Selena said that she would kill him in a heartbeat if he were to turn into a zombie. However, the fact that she refuses to kill him (even though she clearly thinks he's infected) shows that both hers and Jim's character arcs are complete. I think that what director Danny Boyle is saying here is that you may try to act a certain way if you're put in a situation like this. Over time, however, the apocalypse will gradually bring out your true colors to a point where they will eventually be uncontrollable.

On top of its deeper meaning, I also found it to have several memorable and brilliant scenes. The first of which were its shots of a deserted London. I thought it was impressive that director Danny Boyle was able to make all of those highly populated areas of the city look deserted. From what I read, Boyle had the streets closed off at 4:00 am and sometimes had only a couple dozen minutes to film. Another great scene is when Jim kills all of the remaining soldiers in the bunker as this scene is both suspenseful, but, like I said above, it shows the character arcs of Jim and Selena at their finest. Also, the song "In the House, In a Heartbeat" was well-written and memorable. It's one of my favorite soundtracks for a horror film. It fit the movie really well. Personally, I didn't have any major issues with this movie. I thought it was all masterfully done.

In conclusion, this is one of my 10 favorite films from the 2000's, because of its deeper meaning. As I said, this is my favorite zombie film of all time (I even like it more than the original "Night of the Living Dead", which I actually consider to be overrated). I thought its sequel "28 Weeks Later" was alright, but in my opinion, this movie is the best that particular genre of film is ever going to get. I strongly recommend it.

_________________
"I don't like your jerk off name, I don't like your jerk off face, I don't like your jerk off behavior, and I don't like you...jerk off."

-The Big Lebowski (1998)


Mon Jul 31, 2017 10:34 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post War For The Planet Of The Apes (Reeves, '17)

Image

I did not start this war... but I will finish it.

I admit it, I'm not particularly familiar with the Planet Of The Apes series; I maybe caught the last 5 minutes of the iconic 1968 original one Christmas morning back when it was still the 20th century (which, in my relatively short lifetime, feels like an eternity ago), and am mostly aware ot it through parodies and references in general pop culture. So yes, that means I've never seen so much as a single frame from any of the mostly-forgotten original series sequels, and while I saw 2001's Tim Burton "reimagining" of Apes twice in the theater for some reason (hey, I was a kid!), it's been prequel'd out of the timeline for a while, so it's no longer relevant (thankfully). Heck, the just-okay reviews for the initial Apes prequel, Rise Of, kept me from bothering to check it out, but thankfully, Matt Reeves' sequel, 2014's excellent Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes, functioned as a callback-light, mostly-standalone entry that stood on its own two cinematic feet, and fortunately for us, Reeves has returned to finish out this trilogy strong with War For The Planet Of The Apes, a movie that more than made me care for these damn dirty apes, and then some.

If you're unfamiliar with the ongoing story of the Apes prequels, or if you just need a little refresher, films follow the story of "Caeser", the leader of a clan of ultra-intelligent apes (natch) who were the result of an experiment by some evil biotech company (also natch). Ironically, the viral-based drug that made the apes what they are today is also what paved the way for them to inherit the Earth, as the so-called "Simian Flu" wiped out approximately 99.8% of the planet's current rulers, namely, us. In Dawn, despite some initially strong tensions, Caeser attempted to lead his clan to coexist with a nearby colony of human survivors, but relations between the two factions naturally "devolved", so to speak, and what remains of the military was called in to try to wipe out the apes at the end of that film, leading to the "War" that's been waging for some time at the beginning of this one.

But the surprising thing about War is how it avoids just being an unnecessary prequel to a classic film that never needed it, but rather, simply uses the setup of that famous "apes rule the Earth" scenario as a vehicle for showing us Caeser's personal struggles to keep his clan alive and together in the face of a genocidal enemy species. As he grapples with an inner hatred, the memories of a tortorous past, and an overwhelming desire for vengeance against humans growing inside of his simian heart, it really is remarkable how much I came to care for the pain of a non-human, completely computer-generated character who often communicates in nothing more than a quick grunt, subtitled sign language, or merely a look in his ever more expressive eyes. Of course, a lot of credit has to go to the effects wizards at WETA, but they wouldn't have anything to work off in the first place if it weren't for the motion-captured work of Mr. Gollum himself, Andy Serkis, whose tortured, weary performance shines through strong here, even if the man himself is never physically glimpsed.

Matt Reeves & company refuse at any point to treat Caeser's character as some sort of dehumanized, CGI party trick, instead, rendering him more human than most of the actual humans here, who, for the most part, are either completely silent, militantly antagonistic, or almost literally faceless during the slightly deus ex machina-y climax. Not all of them are so blank, however, as Woody Harrelson makes for the perfect foe for Caeser as "The Colonel", a rogue military leader whose forces have turned into more of a cult under his leadership, almost looking up to him as God on Earth, the man who will surely lead what's left of their endangered species to salvation from becoming an extinct one, no matter the cost (and it turns out to be very high indeed).

The Colonel is absolutely a character who qualifies as the technical term of "crazy", but not in any shallow, one-dimensionally Hollywood way; not to spoil the best plot point of the film, but there's a fairly clever and unexpected development here that, when taken in concert with humanity's already desperate situation in the first place, renders The Colonel's motivations, if not quite sympathetic, at the very least, more than understandable. It is this overall level of depth, the rich characterizations, epic direction, and haunting, post-apocalyptic atmosphere that turns War For The Planet Of The Apes into something truly special, as a highly satisfying end to this trilogy, and one of the best movies of the year so far. Of course, Hollywood's already planning on making yet another unnecessary sequel to this, yet again not knowing when to just leave a good thing well enough alone already, but no matter what the future holds for this cinematic Planet, this War. at least will be one to remember.
Favorite moment: The Colonel's fate
Final Score: 8.5

_________________
Letterboxd


Sun Aug 06, 2017 1:27 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Prematurely posted my in-progress review for that earlier (a post I couldn't delete, for some reason), but I edited in the final version just now, so it's all cool.

_________________
Letterboxd


Sun Aug 06, 2017 3:38 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Nice review. I also liked this movie quite a lot. It's my favorite in the modern trilogy so far. I didn't care too much about Rise, I enjoyed Dawn quite a bit, and I loved this movie. I really hope that another sequel doesn't get made though. This trilogy has had a great run of improving each time, and I'd rather have it remain like that.

_________________
"I don't like your jerk off name, I don't like your jerk off face, I don't like your jerk off behavior, and I don't like you...jerk off."

-The Big Lebowski (1998)


Sun Aug 06, 2017 10:28 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

But, but...what if a fourth one was also even better?

_________________
"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread. Catalog Rounds 1-3
Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)
Images will disappear about 13 Feb 2018 forever.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

The Future Unreels will also lose all its images on the same day. But just think about how many images Jedi has on Photobucket, and the other posters here.


Mon Aug 07, 2017 3:36 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Stu,
I enjoyed your observation about War because what I was thinking was that in Dawn (which is the latest one I've seen of the trilogy so far) the troubles begin when some of the apes start acting like humans.

Justifiable, I guess by the fact that the species share 96% of our DNA.

_________________
"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread. Catalog Rounds 1-3
Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)
Images will disappear about 13 Feb 2018 forever.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

The Future Unreels will also lose all its images on the same day. But just think about how many images Jedi has on Photobucket, and the other posters here.


Mon Aug 07, 2017 3:42 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Gort wrote:
But, but...what if a fourth one was also even better?

I'd be pleasantly surprised.

However, I don't know how someone could make a fourth film, because everything seemed to wrap up in this movie. The ending to this movie is a great way to finish off the timeline in my opinion. I don't think it's necessary to make more films.

_________________
"I don't like your jerk off name, I don't like your jerk off face, I don't like your jerk off behavior, and I don't like you...jerk off."

-The Big Lebowski (1998)


Mon Aug 07, 2017 6:19 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

I found some Godfather-ish elements about War. It was subtle but just small things at first but really feels like they had this trilogy mapped with The Godfather in mind.


Mon Aug 07, 2017 9:08 am
Profile YIM
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Nice review. I also liked this movie quite a lot. It's my favorite in the modern trilogy so far. I didn't care too much about Rise, I enjoyed Dawn quite a bit, and I loved this movie. I really hope that another sequel doesn't get made though. This trilogy has had a great run of improving each time, and I'd rather have it remain like that.
Thank you :oops: I don't know if I'll ever get around to checking out Rise, considering the weaker reviews and the fact that I already know the broad strokes of its story, but I'm very happy with the last two Reeves-helmed entries.
Gort wrote:
But, but...what if a fourth one was also even better?
Of course, that isn't impossible, but I'd rather Hollywood just leave well enough alone for once and avoid making a disappointing sequel at all, which is pretty much an inevitablity if they don't quit eventually.
Gort wrote:
Stu,
I enjoyed your observation about War because what I was thinking was that in Dawn (which is the latest one I've seen of the trilogy so far) the troubles begin when some of the apes start acting like humans.

Justifiable, I guess by the fact that the species share 96% of our DNA.
Thank you too. And yeah,
it seems like almost all of the apes got along fundamentally well even after being experimented on by humans; it took further mistreatment by various humans over the course of the series to turn them vengeful.

_________________
Letterboxd


Tue Aug 08, 2017 1:33 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Stu wrote:
Thank you :oops: I don't know if I'll ever get around to checking out Rise, considering the weaker reviews and the fact that I already know the broad strokes of its story, but I'm very happy with the last two Reeves-helmed entries.

Rise was alright, but I wasn't too impressed with it. It just seemed too rushed. The other 2 films are much better.

_________________
"I don't like your jerk off name, I don't like your jerk off face, I don't like your jerk off behavior, and I don't like you...jerk off."

-The Big Lebowski (1998)


Tue Aug 08, 2017 2:25 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

It's the beginning of Caesar's Arc. Like The Godfather 0.5/1 for the Trilogy. Then it goes full Godfather in in Dawn and War.

I think the next movies would do well to skip a few generations of Apes and see them stray from Caesar wanted.


Tue Aug 08, 2017 4:09 am
Profile YIM
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

That moment where you see the tears well up in Cesar's eyes during the Colonel's speech is astonishing. The character arc of Serkis was beautiful and the last moment he had on screen couldn't be more perfect.


Tue Aug 08, 2017 6:20 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

What I liked about the ending of War is how it's more about
Caeser's personal character arc, and less about being another prequel to the original Apes film, and keeps things ambigious as to how this ape society will turn out. If you're a continuity purist who insists the events of this film leads into the original film thousands of years later, you can believe that the future ape leaders decided at some point to start enslaving the now-primitive human species, but if you want a happier ultimate ending to this society, you can believe that, even though apes are now the dominant species on the planet, they still co-exist happily with what's left of man, maybe treating them more like beloved pets than slaves (as they were playing with the little girl at the end, after they'd reached their paradise). We'll just have to wait and see how the sequel will screw that up, possibly : P

_________________
Letterboxd


Tue Aug 08, 2017 2:38 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Oh it was definitely about Caesar's arc. How world weary he became. And how much like Koba he was willing to become. And that last showdown with Colonel was so powerful even though very little is said. It was acted brilliantly by both actors.


Tue Aug 08, 2017 3:04 pm
Profile YIM
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Rise is actually a lot of fun. I re-watched it recently. The relationship between Caesar and James Franco's character is strong - and informs what happens later in the trilogy. No, it doesn't have the operatic sweep of the later entries, but it works really well as an origin story.


Wed Aug 09, 2017 2:38 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

It does because that relationship comes into play win Dawn. And you see why Caesar chooses to help Jason Clarke's character. Fun tidbit. They were originally going to show/tell you his character's fate in War but they decided not to.


Wed Aug 09, 2017 3:03 am
Profile YIM
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Ace wrote:
It's the beginning of Caesar's Arc. Like The Godfather 0.5/1 for the Trilogy. Then it goes full Godfather in in Dawn and War.

I think the next movies would do well to skip a few generations of Apes and see them stray from Caesar wanted.

Probably the best bet will be to show what led up to the events of the original Planet of the Apes.

_________________
"I don't like your jerk off name, I don't like your jerk off face, I don't like your jerk off behavior, and I don't like you...jerk off."

-The Big Lebowski (1998)


Thu Aug 10, 2017 12:14 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Probably the best bet will be to show what led up to the events of the original Planet of the Apes.


I think a time jump is necessary. The evolution of the ape society will be great to watch.


Thu Aug 10, 2017 1:04 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 68953 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 1375, 1376, 1377, 1378, 1379, 1380  Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Ace and 22 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware.