It is currently Thu Aug 16, 2018 10:47 pm



Reply to topic  [ 71304 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 1417, 1418, 1419, 1420, 1421, 1422, 1423 ... 1427  Next
 Recently Seen 
Author Message
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
It's not just you. The film commicates it's story through name drops of characters we don't know or see briefly and regularly introduces new but seemingly unconnected characters. It all came together pretty cleanly and it felt like eventually the plot was fairly straightforward. It felt more like a Yakuza film than a wuxia in terms of plot delivery and those usually play out better on rewatch once I know the particular beats.



Okay--I still need to go back and finish it. I kept getting about 40 minutes in, feeling like I'd missed something really important, and rewinding back about 20 minutes. I'll just go ahead and watch it all the way through and just pick up what I can.


Wed Jul 18, 2018 1:40 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Sorcerer -8.5/10

People wonder why I don't like crossing bridges.

_________________
State of Siege |Gavras, 1972| +
Deadpool |Miller, 2016| +
Z |Gavras, 1969| -
The Confession |Gavras, 1970| +
Missing |Gavras, 1982| +
The Revenant |Inarritu, 2015| +
The Hateful Eight |Tarantino, 2015| +

+ Recommended


Wed Jul 18, 2018 2:58 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

I just watched one of the worst movies I've ever seen. To Die, To Sleep is the story of a young man who befriends a girl who commits suicide. This sends him into a downward spiral, but he is helped by an . . . unemployed roadie who follows him home to the house where he lives alone despite being 17 years old. Yes, a middle-aged roadie goes home with a 17 year old boy and tries to get him to want to live. The secret? Jesus.

Maybe the best (worst?) scene was the young man riding down the road on a motorcycle. He then pulls up to a church and walks inside, where a man is playing an electric guitar (the church is empty) and singing a song called "He is still here". The young man takes off his cool jacket and sits down and grooves along to the song.

Okay, how did this film end up in my DVD queue? Well, it's been on there a long while, and all I can think is that it stars Noah Hathaway, who played Atreyu in Neverending Story and I must have wanted to see what he was like as an older actor.

This movie is too dumb for me to be angry about the way that it frames suicide (as a problem that besets idle youth who just don't have enough of that good ol' religion!). The nicest thing I can say for it is that deep down I think that someone who made this movie had good intentions.


Thu Jul 19, 2018 12:39 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Bad Frank was an interesting little action-thriller. A man with a history of explosive violence is trying to lead a decent life with the help of his wife, AA, and medication. When he witnesses a murder he decides to do the right thing and report it to the police, but the killers retaliate by kidnapping his wife. Throw in a lot of stress and an expired prescription on those meds, and things go downhill very quickly.

I had a mixed reaction to this film, in part because I couldn't really tell if the writer/director was being clever in subverting the tropes you usually get with this type of movie, or just wanting to have things both ways. Frank, the lead character, is a violent man. He's the protagonist of the film and he comes off as more of a "good guy" in comparison to the more brutal men threatening his wife and friend, but he's still got some serious issues.

The problem is that the film tries to keep sympathy with Frank in some frustrating ways. For example, Frank kidnaps the daughter of the man who has his wife hostage. At one point (MODERATE SPOILERS) Frank
sleeps with her (despite knowing her as a child, which, gross!). But this happens after we the audience (but not Frank) learn that the wife is actually cheating on Frank. With this context, Frank sleeping with the daughter seems like far less of a transgression, despite his point of view being that he's cheating on his wife who's been hurt and kidnapped.


Furthermore, a lot of the film revolves around the peril of both the wife and the daughter who has been kidnapped. But as literally the only two women in the story (with the exception of a female friend who has like two lines of dialogue), they are both given odd "they deserved it!" elements. When it's convenient for the plot, Frank's wife is especially dumb--he pretty explicitly tells her that a man is dangerous and just a day later she casually has a conversation with this same man while totally disregarding Frank's panic on the phone when he realizes she's with this guy--and it's frustrating that the film doesn't give the women any positive attributes to balance out the characters. This stands in contrast to the male secondary characters who are far more sleazy, but are allowed to be funny or loyal. I think that dehumanizing the female characters in this way is meant to make the audience be able to enjoy a dark humor in the way that Frank mistreats both of them, but I think that this is a miscalculation because in my opinion it weakens the film's message and the power of its dark ending.

Something that did make it stand out from other low-budget films of a similar type is that it does not cram the screen full of torture sequences or blood splatter or rape in an attempt to be "edgy". When the violence does happen it is largely off-screen, but generally speaking its impact is still strongly felt in the narrative. This is a movie that is questioning what it means for a person to be "bad" and violent, and the film stays on the right side as it walks the line between portraying action-violence and fetishizing it.

I think that this movie had some interesting intentions in terms of subverting the "bad guy as good guy" type action films or even the "civilized man turns feral when loved one is threatened" genre. I like the way that it frames the idea that a man capable of a certain type of violence and/or cruelty wouldn't just be able to flip a switch and be a normal loving husband/father. I rolled my eyes a lot during this movie, and I wish it had done just a bit better at committing to what it was after.


Fri Jul 20, 2018 9:45 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Bullitt is an interesting film given the context of its time (1968). The first time I saw it I thought it was good but dated and owed maybe a little too much to The French Connection given its gritty depiction of a cop (Frank Bullitt in this film vs. Jimmy Doyle in TFC). Then I saw it again and realized that it precedes The French Connection and this gave me a new outlook on the film. I can't think of a film before Bullitt that fits into the "gritty cop-film" genre that most attribute to TFC unless maybe we were to look at something like Glen Ford in The Big Heat as a sort of progenitor of the cop who doesn't care and is willing to go as far is it takes. I guess TFC is more realistic in that its cops are kinda just average guys whereas Frank Bullitt is a bit larger than life in his heroics even if he does wake up looking and feeling like shit in the morning.
Anyway, I have a new outlook on this movie and like it more now than I ever have.
That reminds me, The Big Heat is pretty awesome too.


Fri Jul 20, 2018 12:12 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Wooley wrote:
Bullitt is an interesting film given the context of its time (1968). The first time I saw it I thought it was good but dated and owed maybe a little too much to The French Connection given its gritty depiction of a cop (Frank Bullitt in this film vs. Jimmy Doyle in TFC). Then I saw it again and realized that it precedes The French Connection and this gave me a new outlook on the film. I can't think of a film before Bullitt that fits into the "gritty cop-film" genre that most attribute to TFC unless maybe we were to look at something like Glen Ford in The Big Heat as a sort of progenitor of the cop who doesn't care and is willing to go as far is it takes. I guess TFC is more realistic in that its cops are kinda just average guys whereas Frank Bullitt is a bit larger than life in his heroics even if he does wake up looking and feeling like shit in the morning.
Anyway, I have a new outlook on this movie and like it more now than I ever have.
That reminds me, The Big Heat is pretty awesome too.


I saw it for the first time a couple of years ago and it became an instant favorite.

BTW, I haven't seen The French Connection. Should probably get on that.

_________________
--- UNDER CONSTRUCTION ---


Fri Jul 20, 2018 12:25 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Thief wrote:

I saw it for the first time a couple of years ago and it became an instant favorite.

BTW, I haven't seen The French Connection. Should probably get on that.

I think it's gotta be seen, man. And I dug it, but you really gotta put yourself right there in the time and appreciate what you're seeing as being something really different for the time.


Fri Jul 20, 2018 12:31 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

I'm also strongly advocating the film Mystery Street (1950) starring Ricardo Montalban in the role that cements him to me as a legitimately good actor and star who was likely held back only by his heritage. Also starring Elsa Lanchester in a fine performance without the shocking hair.
Movies just a totally solid little seedy crime film, carried by Montalban.


Fri Jul 20, 2018 12:35 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

And while I'm at it, boy did I love The Bank Dick (1940).
I've seen W.C. Fields in films before but it's been a long time, like 20 years. Watching this was a great treat. The man was a true artist.
And the movie is truly funny.


Fri Jul 20, 2018 12:36 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Thief wrote:
BTW, I haven't seen The French Connection. Should probably get on that.


The French Connection was not what I was expecting it to be, and as a result my experience with it was a bit of a let down. I think that the images and discussion around it lead you think you're getting something different from what it actually is. And what it is is fine and influential, but I wish I hadn't gone in with the expectations that I had. I probably owe it a rewatch. I know this might sound sacrilegious, but I thought it was kind of boring.


Fri Jul 20, 2018 12:43 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Takoma1 wrote:

The French Connection was not what I was expecting it to be, and as a result my experience with it was a bit of a let down. I think that the images and discussion around it lead you think you're getting something different from what it actually is. And what it is is fine and influential, but I wish I hadn't gone in with the expectations that I had. I probably owe it a rewatch. I know this might sound sacrilegious, but I thought it was kind of boring.
I've always felt similarly about it; not a bad movie by any stretch of the imagination, and that car chase is one of the best in cinema history, but besides that, I felt it was a surprisingly slow, dry, sterile, and stylistically detached police procedural, never really getting me involved with what was going on, and leaving me not really caring about any of the characters, or what would happen next in the story. It kind of feels to me like it partly just became a classic maybe because critics found its level of grit refreshing for the time, and overlooked its flaws in the process. That being said, it has been over a decade since I last watched it, so maybe I owe it a rewatch as well.

_________________
Recently Reviewed: You Were Never Really Here


Fri Jul 20, 2018 12:56 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Wooley wrote:
Bullitt is an interesting film given the context of its time (1968). The first time I saw it I thought it was good but dated and owed maybe a little too much to The French Connection given its gritty depiction of a cop (Frank Bullitt in this film vs. Jimmy Doyle in TFC). Then I saw it again and realized that it precedes The French Connection and this gave me a new outlook on the film. I can't think of a film before Bullitt that fits into the "gritty cop-film" genre that most attribute to TFC unless maybe we were to look at something like Glen Ford in The Big Heat as a sort of progenitor of the cop who doesn't care and is willing to go as far is it takes. I guess TFC is more realistic in that its cops are kinda just average guys whereas Frank Bullitt is a bit larger than life in his heroics even if he does wake up looking and feeling like shit in the morning.
Anyway, I have a new outlook on this movie and like it more now than I ever have.
That reminds me, The Big Heat is pretty awesome too.

I like how the car chases in both The French Connection and Bullitt play like extensions of their respective styles. The French Connection is frantic and almost claustrophobic in how the geography constricts the action, while Bullitt evokes supreme confidence and uses an understated approach that trusts in the power of the cars and drivers. Less influential, but Friedkin sort of does it again in To Live and Die in L.A., whose relative excess reflects in the expansiveness and maddening escalation of its chase.

_________________
"We're outgunned and undermanned. But you know somethin'? We're gonna win. You know why? Superior attitude. Superior state of mind." - Mason Storm


Fri Jul 20, 2018 12:59 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

A Sternberg threesome:

The Docks of New York-7/10
Underworld-7/10
The Last Command-9.5/10

Is the new boxset w/ Dietrich worth a blind buy?

_________________
State of Siege |Gavras, 1972| +
Deadpool |Miller, 2016| +
Z |Gavras, 1969| -
The Confession |Gavras, 1970| +
Missing |Gavras, 1982| +
The Revenant |Inarritu, 2015| +
The Hateful Eight |Tarantino, 2015| +

+ Recommended


Fri Jul 20, 2018 3:05 pm
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

I unabashedly love Bullitt and The French Connection. I tend to lump them in with Dirty Harry but I will posit that Siegel's own Madigsn predates them all in the gritty cop genre and was certainly the testing ground in which he found Coogan's Bluff and Dirty Harry. It's also his love letter to the Naked City, though those cops played be the rules.


Fri Jul 20, 2018 4:40 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
I unabashedly love Bullitt and The French Connection. I tend to lump them in with Dirty Harry but I will posit that Siegel's own Madigsn predates them all in the gritty cop genre and was certainly the testing ground in which he found Coogan's Bluff and Dirty Harry. It's also his love letter to the Naked City, though those cops played be the rules.


Coogan's Bluff is such garbage, though. I was shocked at how thoroughly unenjoyable every element of it was. "But it's so gritty!" "How brave to have such an unlikable lead!". Whatever.


Fri Jul 20, 2018 10:47 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

The Seven-Ups guys. The Seven-Ups. Whenever The French Connection and Bullitt are cited this should at least be mentioned.


Fri Jul 20, 2018 11:51 pm
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Takoma1 wrote:

Coogan's Bluff is such garbage, though. I was shocked at how thoroughly unenjoyable every element of it was. "But it's so gritty!" "How brave to have such an unlikable lead!". Whatever.


I like Coogan's Bluff. I didn't find him particularly less likeable than his cinematic progeny, Harry Callahan. I thought the notion of taking an old west Sheriff, stripping him of his gun, and dropping him into a modern (60's) city worked in very much the same way a film like Demolition Man does. It as themes and moments that are staunchly opposed to my own political beliefs but I think that's befitting the mindset of the anachronistic old west characterization. His distaste for everything around him, in particular the Hippies, was comical.

It also has one of the best barroom brawls I've seen.

It's strange that added a .44 Magnum and an analog for the Zodiac made the film far more successful.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 1:12 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
I like Coogan's Bluff. I didn't find him particularly less likeable than his cinematic progeny, Harry Callahan. I thought the notion of taking an old west Sheriff, stripping him of his gun, and dropping him into a modern (60's) city worked in very much the same way a film like Demolition Man does. It as themes and moments that are staunchly opposed to my own political beliefs but I think that's befitting the mindset of the anachronistic old west characterization. His distaste for everything around him, in particular the Hippies, was comical.


It's not the unlikable nature of the character, it's the film's implication that his way is the "right" way. To me it reeked of painfully cringeworthy "real man" fetishization (including him cheating on his girlfriend). Even setting him aside, any movie that thinks "ugly women don't get raped!" is a funny joke can take a long walk off a short pier.

Two action scenes aside, I found nothing to like in it and the comedy felt far too broad to actually be funny.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 2:23 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Takoma1 wrote:

It's not the unlikable nature of the character, it's the film's implication that his way is the "right" way. To me it reeked of painfully cringeworthy "real man" fetishization (including him cheating on his girlfriend). Even setting him aside, any movie that thinks "ugly women don't get raped!" is a funny joke can take a long walk off a short pier.

Two action scenes aside, I found nothing to like in it and the comedy felt far too broad to actually be funny.


As I said, the film is in many ways diametrically opposed to my political views and personal philosophy. I find the insistence that this is "correct" to be uniform across tons of the action genre, which usually have positive views of police brutality, fascism, misogyny, vigilantism and other things I find abhorrent. This does mean I don't find the perspective fascinating, especially when employed the way Siegel does here and in DH, which is perhaps even more morally bankrupt.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 2:58 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
This does mean I don't find the perspective fascinating, especially when employed the way Siegel does here and in DH, which is perhaps even more morally bankrupt.


As a point of view that actively hurts people (and specifically hurts already marginalized groups like women, people of color, LGBTQ+ populations), I find it hard to even observe when it's presented as valid or even preferable. To romanticize it in film--or to render it harmless via "comedy"--is gross to me.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 3:15 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

I think Coogan's Bluff is hilarious, but for largely unintentional reasons. It makes a great double feature with Wild in the Streets, another "comedy" where its intended laughs are far less funny than its dated "youth panic" mongering. Coogan botches pretty much everything Dirty Harry gets right about this kind of character as a reaction to his times.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 3:28 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Takoma1 wrote:

The French Connection was not what I was expecting it to be, and as a result my experience with it was a bit of a let down. I think that the images and discussion around it lead you think you're getting something different from what it actually is. And what it is is fine and influential, but I wish I hadn't gone in with the expectations that I had. I probably owe it a rewatch. I know this might sound sacrilegious, but I thought it was kind of boring.

It is kind of boring.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 3:51 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Rock wrote:
I like how the car chases in both The French Connection and Bullitt play like extensions of their respective styles. The French Connection is frantic and almost claustrophobic in how the geography constricts the action, while Bullitt evokes supreme confidence and uses an understated approach that trusts in the power of the cars and drivers. Less influential, but Friedkin sort of does it again in To Live and Die in L.A., whose relative excess reflects in the expansiveness and maddening escalation of its chase.

Yes, this is a good pickup.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 3:52 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

boojiboyhowdy wrote:
The Seven-Ups guys. The Seven-Ups. Whenever The French Connection and Bullitt are cited this should at least be mentioned.

I always thought of that as studio using Scheider to cash in on the popularity of The French Connection, but I haven't seen it in years.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 3:55 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Wooley wrote:
I always thought of that as studio using Scheider to cash in on the popularity of The French Connection, but I haven't seen it in years.
The director was the producer on The French Connection (and Bullitt) and the casting carried over way past the point of star power, where those two movies are some actors' only credits. Roy Scheider, Bill Hickman, Tony Lo Bianco, Sonny Grosso (one of the two real-life detectives from the French Connection case, and Scheider is basically playing a version of him in both movies), Benny Marino, Randy Jurgensen, and I may be missing some others, all show up in both movies, so I think Philip D'Antoni just had a small company of New York actors he was working with at the time. The movies also had the same editor, the same stunt coordinator and the same composer.

_________________
"It's OK to have beliefs, just don't believe in them." — Guy Ritchie


Sat Jul 21, 2018 4:10 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Wooley wrote:
And while I'm at it, boy did I love The Bank Dick (1940).
I've seen W.C. Fields in films before but it's been a long time, like 20 years. Watching this was a great treat. The man was a true artist.
And the movie is truly funny.

:up: :up:
I'm very much a fan. If you're looking for more I'm your guy. :)

_________________
Captain's Log


Sat Jul 21, 2018 5:08 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Takoma1 wrote:

As a point of view that actively hurts people (and specifically hurts already marginalized groups like women, people of color, LGBTQ+ populations), I find it hard to even observe when it's presented as valid or even preferable. To romanticize it in film--or to render it harmless via "comedy"--is gross to me.

I can't fault you for feeling that way. I always struggle with stuff like this because regardless of intent, I can't help but feel that scenes like this, where an asshole character cracks an asshole joke, feel honest to the characterization. It's unsavory but I just don't tend to condemn stuff over comedy, even failed, offensive comedy.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 6:54 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
I can't fault you for feeling that way. I always struggle with stuff like this because regardless of intent, I can't help but feel that scenes like this, where an asshole character cracks an asshole joke, feel honest to the characterization. It's unsavory but I just don't tend to condemn stuff over comedy, even failed, offensive comedy.


There's a difference between a character making a joke and a film making a joke. It's not just Eastwood's character making the joke--the entire scenario is created by the film and the actress playing the victim is over the top, the police officer taking the report is rolling his eyes, Eastwood basically looks boggle-eyed at the camera. It's not a way of regarding people that I can (or want to) connect with.

EDIT: And just in case it's not clear, I'm saying that subjectively speaking, films lose value for me when they dehumanize people, and in particular when they dehumanize vulnerable people.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 7:04 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Takoma1 wrote:

There's a difference between a character making a joke and a film making a joke. It's not just Eastwood's character making the joke--the entire scenario is created by the film and the actress playing the victim is over the top, the police officer taking the report is rolling his eyes, Eastwood basically looks boggle-eyed at the camera. It's not a way of regarding people that I can (or want to) connect with.

EDIT: And just in case it's not clear, I'm saying that subjectively speaking, films lose value for me when they dehumanize people, and in particular when they dehumanize vulnerable people.


That's why I tried to deleniate between intention and characterization. For instance, I sort of struggle with the famous Dead ____ Storage scene in Pulp Fiction. The film doesn't seem to be condoning the mindset, but it still props it up as something that's funny enough to say that it gives it its own sequence, despite that it doesn't seem like Jimmy would have the guts to say that to Jules nor would Jules smile like it's silly.

But from my comfy place of wonderful privilege, I tend to shrug it off. It's a joke I don't care for but I find it interesting for other, likely unintentional reasons. Same with the strange fixation on rape Eastwood films of that era have. But I'm gradually coming to the conclusion that I'm probably just a bad person.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 7:30 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
That's why I tried to deleniate between intention and characterization.

But from my comfy place of wonderful privilege, I tend to shrug it off. It's a joke I don't care for but I find it interesting for other, likely unintentional reasons. Same with the strange fixation on rape Eastwood films of that era have. But I'm gradually coming to the conclusion that I'm probably just a bad person.


I also try to separate between a film's intention and characterization within a film, so I understand where you're coming from with that. I watch plenty of movies that star killers or other unsavory characters.

I would be interested to hear what you find interesting about that moment. To me it feels like a joke that the film is telling, and I find that joke both mean-spirited and unfunny. I can see how there's a sort of fascination with the casual racism and sexism that was just blatantly out there in older films. The "heroic" rape scene in High Plains Drifter is sort of repulsively fascinating. But I don't ever find myself wanting to revisit it, or even think about it.

Also, sidenote, I'm having kind of a rough day/week and I feel like I might be more snippy than I'm meaning to be. I am trying to have a genuine conversation here, so I hope you aren't feeling patronized or attacked.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 7:50 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Takoma1 wrote:

I also try to separate between a film's intention and characterization within a film, so I understand where you're coming from with that. I watch plenty of movies that star killers or other unsavory characters.

I would be interested to hear what you find interesting about that moment. To me it feels like a joke that the film is telling, and I find that joke both mean-spirited and unfunny. I can see how there's a sort of fascination with the casual racism and sexism that was just blatantly out there in older films. The "heroic" rape scene in High Plains Drifter is sort of repulsively fascinating. But I don't ever find myself wanting to revisit it, or even think about it.

Also, sidenote, I'm having kind of a rough day/week and I feel like I might be more snippy than I'm meaning to be. I am trying to have a genuine conversation here, so I hope you aren't feeling patronized or attacked.


No patronizing. Just sardonic observations about myself that I keep struggling with lately. Like the recent James Gunn getting fired for 10 year old tweets. I'm instinctively bothered by that and am unbothered by crass humor.

With Coogan’s Bluff, the joke itself just adds to the general anachronism of Coogan and how the whole film seems to operate as both an ideological and filmmaking response to counter-culture.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 9:02 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

"Because storin' dead n's isn't my business". I fucking love that scene.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 9:40 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ski petrol wrote:
"Because storin' dead n's isn't my business". I fucking love that scene.

I don't buy Jules being cool with that and smiling.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 9:57 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
I don't buy Jules being cool with that and smiling.
I kind of buy it as part of his decision to step away from this life. If you view every scene as Jules coming to realize he's surrounded by assholes, then his path-of-least-resistance approach kind of makes sense. I'd smile too if I knew I'd never have to see that asshole again.

_________________
"It's OK to have beliefs, just don't believe in them." — Guy Ritchie


Sat Jul 21, 2018 10:20 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

BL wrote:
I kind of buy it as part of his decision to step away from this life. If you view every scene as Jules coming to realize he's surrounded by assholes, then his path-of-least-resistance approach kind of makes sense. I'd smile too if I knew I'd never have to see that asshole again.

There are a lot of ways to convey that though and I've gone back to rewatch the scene to specifically address this point and he's smirking like it's legitimately funny. There's not an ounce of subtle "I'm done with this" and I really wish there was. A squint. A laugh of exasperation. But he's just so damn cool about it while Jimmy yells at him and flings around the hard R.

I think it's more troubling too that it's Taranrino himself as Jimmy. If he cast a black actor, problem instantly solved. If he emphasized the Jules is only putting up with this because of his situation, then great. But it's just there for laughs, including Jules own. I chalk it up as one of the very few tells that it's a sophomore effort (if we don't count My Best Friend's Birthday)


Sat Jul 21, 2018 10:38 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
There are a lot of ways to convey that though and I've gone back to rewatch the scene to specifically address this point and he's smirking like it's legitimately funny. There's not an ounce of subtle "I'm done with this" and I really wish there was. A squint. A laugh of exasperation. But he's just so damn cool about it while Jimmy yells at him and flings around the hard R.

I think it's more troubling too that it's Taranrino himself as Jimmy. If he cast a black actor, problem instantly solved. If he emphasized the Jules is only putting up with this because of his situation, then great. But it's just there for laughs, including Jules own. I chalk it up as one of the very few tells that it's a sophomore effort (if we don't count My Best Friend's Birthday)
Don't get me wrong; when I say I can "kind of" buy it, I mean there's a legitimate narrative justification for Jules to act the way he does in that scene. The more troubling aspect is that Tarantino felt the need to structure that scene with himself as the N-word spouter in the first place. You can't help but feel he's reveling in the excuse to get away with that transgression, and Spike Lee was right to call him out on that. In other words, I accept Jules would act that way in that scenario, but Tarantino's intent in framing that scenario in precisely the way he does is much more suspect. I don't think it's wrong because it's a betrayal of Jules's character; I think it's wrong because it's wrong regardless of how Jules reacts and regardless of how well I can empathize with Jules's reaction.

_________________
"It's OK to have beliefs, just don't believe in them." — Guy Ritchie


Sat Jul 21, 2018 10:47 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

If Quentin Tarantino was that much better as a director he would have never cast himself in any of his movies in the first place. Just sayin.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 11:32 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

BL wrote:
Don't get me wrong; when I say I can "kind of" buy it, I mean there's a legitimate narrative justification for Jules to act the way he does in that scene. The more troubling aspect is that Tarantino felt the need to structure that scene with himself as the N-word spouter in the first place. You can't help but feel he's reveling in the excuse to get away with that transgression, and Spike Lee was right to call him out on that. In other words, I accept Jules would act that way in that scenario, but Tarantino's intent in framing that scenario in precisely the way he does is much more suspect. I don't think it's wrong because it's a betrayal of Jules's character; I think it's wrong because it's wrong regardless of how Jules reacts and regardless of how well I can empathize with Jules's reaction.


I think we're more or less on the same page but do you think that had Taratino focused on the nuance of Jules reaction in that scene rather than the comedy. that the scene would.cease to be "wrong?"


Sat Jul 21, 2018 2:27 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
I don't buy Jules being cool with that and smiling.

I thought that was specifically intended to signify that Jimmie and Jules had history that was tight enough that Jimmie and Jules talked that way between each other, thereby giving additional character development that did not have to be expository and that, like the briefcase, would be left a mystery to the audience.


Sat Jul 21, 2018 3:17 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Wooley wrote:
I thought that was specifically intended to signify that Jimmie and Jules had history that was tight enough that Jimmie and Jules talked that way between each other, thereby giving additional character development that did not have to be expository and that, like the briefcase, would be left a mystery to the audience.


That's the way I've always seen it.

_________________
She's been dying and I've been drinking and I am the Rain King


Sat Jul 21, 2018 9:22 pm
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Wooley wrote:
I thought that was specifically intended to signify that Jimmie and Jules had history that was tight enough that Jimmie and Jules talked that way between each other, thereby giving additional character development that did not have to be expository and that, like the briefcase, would be left a mystery to the audience.

And that I do not buy that given everything I've seen about Jules and the ton of a conversation. The scene may be a joke but Jimmy isn't joking. He's pissed. Get pissed and yell a hard R N-word at your closest black friend. See if he/she is all bashful smiles.


Sun Jul 22, 2018 2:58 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
And that I do not buy that given everything I've seen about Jules and the ton of a conversation. The scene may be a joke but Jimmy isn't joking. He's pissed. Get pissed and yell a hard R N-word at your closest black friend. See if he/she is all bashful smiles.

Jules is a hardened killer and a very self-confident man and has no problem putting Vincent in his place, I suspect if Jimmie's tone toward him were out of line for their friendship, Jules woulda told him so. I wouldn't talk that way to any black friend, but I don't have Jimmie and Jules' relationship, which could be practically anything given the context of the movie.


Sun Jul 22, 2018 3:48 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Wooley wrote:
Jules is a hardened killer and a very self-confident man and has no problem putting Vincent in his place, I suspect if Jimmie's tone toward him were out of line for their friendship, Jules woulda told him so. I wouldn't talk that way to any black friend, but I don't have Jimmie and Jules' relationship, which could be practically anything given the context of the movie.

I think asking me to accept that a self confident killer with no problem putting people in their place wouldn't have any problem with Jimmy talking to him like that shows a gross misunderstanding of racial relations, the character or both. You wouldn't talk to your friend like that because that type of relationship doesn't exist and especially with someone like Jules.


Sun Jul 22, 2018 4:54 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
I think it's more troubling too that it's Taranrino himself as Jimmy.


Whatever the intention of the scene (and specifically of casting himself in that role), it has always come across to me as a particularly gross example of using power (in this case as a writer/director) to indulge in personal wish fulfillment. It's up there with directors who cast themselves as a lead character and then write in an explicit sex scene with a much younger actress. Or (to go back to our earlier topic) Clint Eastwood filming himself as a man who threatens to rape two different women but is somehow sexually irresistible to them.

I'm always kind of fascinated with how directors film themselves and the kind of characters they play in their own movies. Sometimes it feels like they have a deep intimacy with what they are trying to convey (someone like Shane Carruth, for example), while other times they just seem to enjoy giving themselves permission to say "cool" lines or put their hands on a pretty actress.

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
No patronizing. Just sardonic observations about myself that I keep struggling with lately. Like the recent James Gunn getting fired for 10 year old tweets. I'm instinctively bothered by that and am unbothered by crass humor.


Well, you probably connect with Gunn on a more personal level. You're a young man, working in the film industry, interested in thriller/horror content. You know it's hard work, and you can probably viscerally imagine how angry and hopeless you'd feel if you did achieve success and something you wrote on the internet 10 years ago took it all away from you.

To me, there is a difference between humor that is crass and humor that is mean-spirited. And in the case specifically of Coogan's Bluff, at the time I watched it I was helping to fund raise for a shelter/center that assisted local victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. I was very aware at the time of how attitudes toward female victims meant a lot of people continuing to be in dangerous situations, or not being believed, or even being mocked.

I think that what you're saying is that you are able to laugh at the joke in Coogan's Bluff because its sexism is so outlandish, and that you're aware that you aren't laughing with it. And I understand that, because there are times that people say things that are so ridiculous that laughter feels like the only response. For some people (myself included), even laughing at a joke like this isn't possible, because the belief behind it is still present today and is still actively harming people.

I don't think it's a sign of you being a bad person or somehow an implicit endorsement of what the movie is saying. I think it's a reality that we often have much stronger emotional reactions to things that happen to people with whom we more easily identify.


Sun Jul 22, 2018 5:32 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Isle of Dogs B

So very Wes Anderson and the best movie of 2018 I've seen so far. Yoko Ono voices a character named Yoko Ono-san.


Mon Jul 23, 2018 8:35 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ski petrol wrote:
Isle of Dogs B

So very Wes Anderson and the best movie of 2018 I've seen so far. Yoko Ono voices a character named Yoko Ono-san.


Probably my favorite of 2018 so far by quite a big margin.

_________________
State of Siege |Gavras, 1972| +
Deadpool |Miller, 2016| +
Z |Gavras, 1969| -
The Confession |Gavras, 1970| +
Missing |Gavras, 1982| +
The Revenant |Inarritu, 2015| +
The Hateful Eight |Tarantino, 2015| +

+ Recommended


Mon Jul 23, 2018 9:54 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:

I think we're more or less on the same page but do you think that had Taratino focused on the nuance of Jules reaction in that scene rather than the comedy. that the scene would.cease to be "wrong?"
I think if Tarantino had focused on Jules' reaction, he wouldn't have cast himself in the scene, and that may be the whole problem. A better actor would have fed Jackson better reactions. Acting is reacting, and Tarantino can't act. The fact that Tarantino the director can't recognize that about Tarantino the actor tends to fuck things up for him. (See also Django Unchained.)

_________________
"It's OK to have beliefs, just don't believe in them." — Guy Ritchie


Mon Jul 23, 2018 9:58 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Spectral - 7/10 - This is a Netflix offering and it's actually not bad. They didn't skimp on the budget and the cast, despite not being A-list, is uniformly up to snuff. The plot involves elite soldiers up against seemingly other worldly forces. But it's explained in a relatively satisfying way with a heavy emphasis on science. The closest movie that it reminded me of was The Darkest Hour (the Emile Hirsch one set in Russia, not the Churchill biopic with Gary Oldman) but this one is the far better movie watching experience.


Tue Jul 24, 2018 6:39 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Wooley wrote:
I thought that was specifically intended to signify that Jimmie and Jules had history that was tight enough that Jimmie and Jules talked that way between each other, thereby giving additional character development that did not have to be expository and that, like the briefcase, would be left a mystery to the audience.


This is also the impression that I got from the scene as well. Jules says Jimmie was his "old partner", and his whole demeanor when calling him and when talking at the house is very laid-back and chill with Jimmie.

Of course, I don't have the same purview of the use of the N-word as some of you might have cause here that's not much of an issue, so maybe that's another reason why I perceive the dialogue in a different way.

_________________
--- UNDER CONSTRUCTION ---


Tue Jul 24, 2018 8:15 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Deathstalker 2's attitude of "B-movie garbage and we know it!" was just enough to keep me entertained. It's beyond meta ("I don't expect you to talk, I expect you to die!"), and at times the fact that every actor delivers his/her lines with a smirk can get a little old. But ultimately it did make me laugh. I had started to watch the first Deathstalker a while back, but the hero being a sexual predator kind of killed the joy in that one.


Tue Jul 24, 2018 12:26 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 71304 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 1417, 1418, 1419, 1420, 1421, 1422, 1423 ... 1427  Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Thief, Torgo and 19 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware.