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Takoma1 wrote:

I don't think it's quite that innocuous.

I mean, do you get the impression that
he ever really moved out in any sense of the word? Yeah, he clearly was off in the army or whatever, but their relationship feels more lived-in than just "younger person moves in with elderly relative".

But I really don't think it's sexual in any sense other than the impression I got that his childhood messed up his chances to have a normal romantic/sexual relationship.

I think it's interesting that there are no women (of any significance) in the film of any comparable age to the protagonist. None. There's his elderly mother. There are girls. But in this man's world, they don't really exist.

Good observations.
I agree that there's a bit of emotional depth to his relationship with his mother. I imagine their experiences with his father caused them to become closer to each other. I agree that there isn't enough evidence to imply an affair of any kind though.

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Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:03 am
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12 Angry Men still holds up on rewatch.

Overlord is far from high art but it’s an entertaining action horror piece with some great gore effects and solid performances.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 12:30 pm
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Takoma1 wrote:

While I disagree with it, I do think that you have to consider that:

1) The film explicitly references the film Psycho, which centers on a very unhealthy relationship between mother and son and also (less obviously), when he comes home at the beginning the mom is watching Fuller's Naked Kiss (something I only realized because by coincidence I had just watched it like a week before I watched Never Really There)

2) He has clearly become the "man of the house" following his father's violent departure. In film (not in real life, that I'm aware--but in media like Mr. Mercedes), this sometimes creates a sexually charged relationship between mother and son.


I don't think that's the case at all, though. The film is ambiguous enough that it's not the kind of thing you can explicitly disprove, but that reading just feels wrong to me.

I do think that
he and his mother have a unique and deep bond that was forged in the fire of the father's abuse of them. I find it very easy to believe that his character may have never experienced real romantic or sexual intimacy, and that his mother is "the woman" in his life. Their dependence on each other may not be all that healthy, but I never read it as being sexual. If anything, it seems like mutual caretaking--especially with scenes like him cleaning up after she gets water all over the bathroom floor.


What I found myself most picking up on and most appreciating in my second viewing of the film was the way that
characters and their "effects" are so frequently separated. In the very beginning, for example, when he's drinking from the fountain but then it pans back and he is gone bu the fountain is still running before it eventually stops. But also in scenes where we hear voices from characters who are not on screen. In terms of the themes of a person's impact on the world, what it means to be present, what is a dream and what is real, and so on, those moments were really popping out to me.


Yes,

Unrequited Oedipal was more my vibe. Unhealthy and domineering but also tender and loving. A dual mix that greatly contributed to his psychosis and stunted view of women. I did however, feel like he may have had a relationship with a little girl, given the low mixed audio in the beginning with his "are we doing this?" comments that gave a distinctly taboo sexual vibe.

I just didn't feel like he and his mother were actually phsycially intimate, just that the domineering father had driven them into a toxic co-dependency.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 1:18 pm
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Avengers: Infinity War

Wow.
I saw this a few times in the theater, but as always with these movies, I bring so much expectation and fret too much over whether they're getting it right. Tonight, just watching it as a movie and as a culmination of the journeys of all these characters (so far), I was nearly dumbstruck by how good it was.
Of course, what has always made the Marvel movies work even when they don't is the characters. Some of that is writing, and some of it is acting, but the thing that cannot be overlooked is casting. Hemsworth, Evans, and Downey, obviously, but also Johansson (she may not be the Black Widow a lot of people were looking for, but she has made the character), Tom Holland, Bradley Cooper (making possibly the hardest character for the audience to buy one of the most fun), Saldana (man does she move me in this), Bettany and Olsen, Boseman (so regal), of course Hiddleston, Pratt... I mean, it's really astonishing the people they have gotten and how perfectly they have used them. I mean, Pom Klementieff? Where the hell did she come from? But she's so perfect for the way they've written Mantis. They just do it over and over again. M'Baku could have been a total throwaway character but no, they got Winston Duke and now there's another powerful presence on the screen with all these others. I was stuck tonight by how powerful this is for the movies and especially this one.
But I'm not sure they've ever nailed it so hard as they did with Josh Brolin as Thanos. It's just unbelievable. He's so goddamn good. For my money, he may be the best cinematic villain of the 21st Century.
And it's not just the casting in this case, to be sure, it's that they understood two things: Marvel has had a bit of a villain problem (until recently, I guess, since we got Hela, Killmonger, and Thanos back-to-back-to-back) and movies with villains are only as good as their villains and they've been building this movie for a decade, so Thanos must not only be a great villain but a great character. And he is. He is so compelling and he works on so many levels, as a threat, as a deliverer of awesome villain-dialogue, but most importantly as sympathetic, damn-near bordering on anti-hero.
And with all these great characters and actors, they are able to deliver credible emotional moments that have weight and are genuinely moving. Man, I almost lost my shit in the theater at the moment of Gamora's realization, but here on fourth viewing, it's every bit as powerful, if not more so.
Anyway, I thought it was as good a fantasy epic as I've seen since probably The Fellowship Of The Ring.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:00 pm
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Wooley wrote:
Avengers: Infinity War

Wow.
I saw this a few times in the theater, but as always with these movies, I bring so much expectation and fret too much over whether they're getting it right. Tonight, just watching it as a movie and as a culmination of the journeys of all these characters (so far), I was nearly dumbstruck by how good it was.
Of course, what has always made the Marvel movies work even when they don't is the characters. Some of that is writing, and some of it is acting, but the thing that cannot be overlooked is casting. Hemsworth, Evans, and Downey, obviously, but also Johansson (she may not be the Black Widow a lot of people were looking for, but she has made the character), Tom Holland, Bradley Cooper (making possibly the hardest character for the audience to buy one of the most fun), Saldana (man does she move me in this), Bettany and Olsen, Boseman (so regal), of course Hiddleston, Pratt... I mean, it's really astonishing the people they have gotten and how perfectly they have used them. I mean, Pom Klementieff? Where the hell did she come from? But she's so perfect for the way they've written Mantis. They just do it over and over again. M'Baku could have been a total throwaway character but no, they got Winston Duke and now there's another powerful presence on the screen with all these others. I was stuck tonight by how powerful this is for the movies and especially this one.
But I'm not sure they've ever nailed it so hard as they did with Josh Brolin as Thanos. It's just unbelievable. He's so goddamn good. For my money, he may be the best cinematic villain of the 21st Century.
And it's not just the casting in this case, to be sure, it's that they understood two things: Marvel has had a bit of a villain problem (until recently, I guess, since we got Hela, Killmonger, and Thanos back-to-back-to-back) and movies with villains are only as good as their villains and they've been building this movie for a decade, so Thanos must not only be a great villain but a great character. And he is. He is so compelling and he works on so many levels, as a threat, as a deliverer of awesome villain-dialogue, but most importantly as sympathetic, damn-near bordering on anti-hero.
And with all these great characters and actors, they are able to deliver credible emotional moments that have weight and are genuinely moving. Man, I almost lost my shit in the theater at the moment of Gamora's realization, but here on fourth viewing, it's every bit as powerful, if not more so.
Anyway, I thought it was as good a fantasy epic as I've seen since probably The Fellowship Of The Ring.



Great writeup.


And I totally lost it when Spider-Man disintegrated.

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Wed Dec 05, 2018 7:51 am
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Charles Longboat Jr. wrote:
12 Angry Men still holds up on rewatch.


The original?


Wed Dec 05, 2018 8:11 am
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Shirkers

Doco about a Singaporean filmmaker returning to her homeland to find footage from her long-lost film recorded back in the mid-nineties. Writer, director, star, teen, she was sure it was going to be the Breathless of Singapore, but the movie vanishes and her life drifts elsewhere. When the case cracks open again, she seizes the moment to make a film about the film, her love of film, the experience of her and her gang and an inquiry into what the fuck happened. It's about the friends you make along the way, one of whom is a manipulative much older man of uncertain origin at once mentor and parasite. Mystery! Nostalgia! Regret! Pretty good.


Wed Dec 05, 2018 9:29 am
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ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Yes,

Unrequited Oedipal was more my vibe. Unhealthy and domineering but also tender and loving. A dual mix that greatly contributed to his psychosis and stunted view of women. I did however, feel like he may have had a relationship with a little girl, given the low mixed audio in the beginning with his "are we doing this?" comments that gave a distinctly taboo sexual vibe.

I just didn't feel like he and his mother were actually phsycially intimate, just that the domineering father had driven them into a toxic co-dependency.


I don't know.

The way that he
get so uncomfortable when the girl starts kissing him in the car didn't imply to me a man repressing any urges so much as him not wanting to engage with her in that way. Again, it's not something that's directly refuted by anything in the film, but I never had the impression that any sexual desire was really part of his character.

On the other hand, I suppose that if he had abused a little girl, killing all of the male abusers could be seen as a way of vicariously atoning for that crime and also punishing that part of himself. There are no abused girls in the backstory that we see, so him having been a party to that could be an explanation.

But the film seems to offer us an "origin" for his desire to save little girls--namely the dead girls in the van.


Wed Dec 05, 2018 11:48 am
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Death Proof wrote:


Great writeup.


And I totally lost it when Spider-Man disintegrated.

Yeah, great moment. Kudos to the actor for improvising it.


Wed Dec 05, 2018 1:02 pm
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I never know whether to post original Netflix movies here or in the television thread.

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs - 8/10 (overall) - It's a shame this didn't have a longer theatrical run before it was released on Netflix. Given the locales I think a big screen would have added so much more to the experience. I'll go ahead and rank the stories in order of preference.

1. The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
2. The Girl Who Got Rattled
3. All Gold Canyon
4. The Mortal Remains
5. The Meal Ticket
6. Near Algodones


Thu Dec 06, 2018 3:15 am
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I really wasn't vibing with Suburbia for about the first 20 minutes or so. But as the relationship between the teens became more clearly sketched out it made a better impression.

At times I didn't care for the way that the film seemed to play the teens' actions as just mischief (and, sorry, but sexually assaulting someone, even if they are a priss, isn't something charming). The film played a lot better when it recognized the teens' dysfunction as a reaction to the more "refined" dysfunction of the adults around them and made nods to the hypocrisy in the community. I also liked the moments when the film acknowledged more nuance in the teens, such as Skinner correcting another kid's grammar, or the relationship between him and his policeman step-father.

I appreciate that the ending packs a punch, but to me it felt a bit abrupt.


Thu Dec 06, 2018 8:45 am
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About a third of the way through The Big Country and, man, Gregory Peck. The guy has so much presence.

Also, I am a sucker for films about how sometimes pacifism and coolheadedness are better markers of masculinity than shows of gunplay, see also Destry Rides Again.


Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:43 am
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"You wanted me?"

"I did before you were born."

Sick burn, Burl Ives!


Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:01 am
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Takoma1 wrote:
About a third of the way through The Big Country and, man, Gregory Peck. The guy has so much presence.

You ever seen Duel in the Sun? It's not quite a Fonda in Once Upon a Time in the West turn, but if you ever wanted to watch him play a real sonofabitch, it's worth seeking out.

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Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:42 am
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Rock wrote:
You ever seen Duel in the Sun? It's not quite a Fonda in Once Upon a Time in the West turn, but if you ever wanted to watch him play a real sonofabitch, it's worth seeking out.


I have not. I'll add it to the list.


Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:39 pm
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Takoma1 wrote:

I don't know.

The way that he
get so uncomfortable when the girl starts kissing him in the car didn't imply to me a man repressing any urges so much as him not wanting to engage with her in that way. Again, it's not something that's directly refuted by anything in the film, but I never had the impression that any sexual desire was really part of his character.

On the other hand, I suppose that if he had abused a little girl, killing all of the male abusers could be seen as a way of vicariously atoning for that crime and also punishing that part of himself. There are no abused girls in the backstory that we see, so him having been a party to that could be an explanation.

But the film seems to offer us an "origin" for his desire to save little girls--namely the dead girls in the van.



I'm not married to the idea but there were just some things that stuck out to me:

he aforementioned audio played at the beginning of the film being the biggest one. Maybe I just misheard but the "are we really doing this?" And the rustling of clothes was unmistakable. It has sexual purpose but I can't be sure to what direction (perhaps this is why the other reviewer interpreted it as incestuous).

There is the victimization parallels between all the women he encounters (tourists, sex slaves and his mother) are all portrayed with similar shots (feet shots in particular) and sometimes are outright subjective fantasy (the tourist crying when he puts his lens on her... Why would they ask him anyways?!?!) or both his mother and the girl slipping into the lake.

This combined with his overt aggression towards men he sees as abusers and his own clearly self destructive tendencies. He clearly wants to die and on multiple occasions comes close to doing so and it made me wonder if he sees himself as a victimizer just like his father. This seemed to align with the suicide before he runs off with the girl. There's a degree of guilt in there and the opening sounds seem to only fit if they add a sexual element. Of course, I may have misheard and it's my own Freudian troubles knocking at the door but it was compelling while I watched. The film seems to have great strength at inspiring interpretation.


I also watched Straight Story, thus finishing Lynch's filmography. It was wonderful.


Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:03 pm
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Been watching the Rocky flicks I haven't seen before, and so far it's been a reliably descending scale:

Rocky II - B
Rocky III - C+
Rocky IV - C (or maybe an A+ for its '80s decadence and absurdity)

Of the ones I've seen previously:

Rocky - A
Creed - A-
Rocky Balboa - B+

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Thu Dec 06, 2018 3:39 pm
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I think the best thing I can say about Fast Company is that Cronenberg is clearly a decent Craftsman even when he clearly has no passion for the project, no money (Corman production), and is clearly making it just to get his foot in the door. It's got quirk with theme songs and montages, they seemingly filmed real racers and pulled off some decent explosions along the way but it's just so dramatically empty. At times it felt like a very unfunny Talladefa Nights. The only real performance in the thing seems to be from John Saxon as the film's villain and he seemed to only have been there for a couple of days filming.

This one is only for completists but as a completist, I will say this set was a bargain. It came with the titular Fast Company and had Stereo and Crimes of the Future (his first student film's) as special features. They're all just for completists but now I've only got Rabid and M. Butterfly before I close out this filmography till his next project, just like Lynch.


Fri Dec 07, 2018 10:16 am
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ThatDarnMKS wrote:


I'm not married to the idea but there were just some things that stuck out to me:

he aforementioned audio played at the beginning of the film being the biggest one. Maybe I just misheard but the "are we really doing this?" And the rustling of clothes was unmistakable. It has sexual purpose but I can't be sure to what direction (perhaps this is why the other reviewer interpreted it as incestuous).

There is the victimization parallels between all the women he encounters (tourists, sex slaves and his mother) are all portrayed with similar shots (feet shots in particular) and sometimes are outright subjective fantasy (the tourist crying when he puts his lens on her... Why would they ask him anyways?!?!) or both his mother and the girl slipping into the lake.

This combined with his overt aggression towards men he sees as abusers and his own clearly self destructive tendencies. He clearly wants to die and on multiple occasions comes close to doing so and it made me wonder if he sees himself as a victimizer just like his father. This seemed to align with the suicide before he runs off with the girl. There's a degree of guilt in there and the opening sounds seem to only fit if they add a sexual element. Of course, I may have misheard and it's my own Freudian troubles knocking at the door but it was compelling while I watched. The film seems to have great strength at inspiring interpretation.


I'm about halfway through a really lazy rewatch, but I might have to restart and keep these ideas in mind.

I read his action as being more about a
fear that he would turn into his father. When the girl goes to kiss him in the car, he says "You don't have to do that". If someone was afraid of giving into baser impulses, that doesn't feel like the wording I'd expect.

I saw his distance from women (and the girls he rescues) as being a result of his abuse, possibly out of fear of how he might behave in a sexual relationship.


I do think I'll need to look specifically through this lens, because the idea that
he'd raped or molested a girl never occurred to me at all and so those overtones/undertones weren't at all on my radar.


Fri Dec 07, 2018 11:35 am
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Takoma1 wrote:
Sick burn, Burl Ives!

Little known fact: Burl was the first man to play the dozens with banjo. Ice-cold bluegrass assassin.


Fri Dec 07, 2018 12:06 pm
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ThatDarnMKS wrote:
I think the best thing I can say about Fast Company is that Cronenberg is clearly a decent Craftsman even when he clearly has no passion for the project, no money (Corman production), and is clearly making it just to get his foot in the door. It's got quirk with theme songs and montages, they seemingly filmed real racers and pulled off some decent explosions along the way but it's just so dramatically empty. At times it felt like a very unfunny Talladefa Nights. The only real performance in the thing seems to be from John Saxon as the film's villain and he seemed to only have been there for a couple of days filming.

This one is only for completists but as a completist, I will say this set was a bargain. It came with the titular Fast Company and had Stereo and Crimes of the Future (his first student film's) as special features. They're all just for completists but now I've only got Rabid and M. Butterfly before I close out this filmography till his next project, just like Lynch.


I think the only Cronenberg features I haven't gotten around to are Fast Company, Shivers, and The Brood. He's someone who rewards thoroughness. Even his (very) rough early work has a fascination to it, for someone with the right mindset.

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Fri Dec 07, 2018 3:52 pm
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Macrology wrote:
I think the only Cronenberg features I haven't gotten around to are Fast Company, Shivers, and The Brood. He's someone who rewards thoroughness. Even his (very) rough early work has a fascination to it, for someone with the right mindset.
I can't vouch for the other two (although, judging by the IMDb synopsis, Shivers sounds intriguing) but you should definitely check out The Brood.


Fri Dec 07, 2018 11:57 pm
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I just now saw this so it counts. I had no idea they were planning on releasing the new Avengers trailer.

Avengers: Endgame

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuOvmyuYFMo


Sat Dec 08, 2018 1:08 am
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Macrology wrote:

I think the only Cronenberg features I haven't gotten around to are Fast Company, Shivers, and The Brood. He's someone who rewards thoroughness. Even his (very) rough early work has a fascination to it, for someone with the right mindset.


All three are worth watching. Shivers and The Brood are Cronenberg doing what he did best at the beginning of his career, creating cerebral and smutty horror/sci fi hybrids. There two of my favorites ever by him, because that is sort of my thing. Fast Company will not give any one the cure for a Cronenberg jones, but I think it is a decent character study, if not an always successful one. Still, it is interesting seeing him in completely unfamiliar territory, trying to do something with a topic so contrary to anything he's ever done before.


Sat Dec 08, 2018 1:42 am
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Correction: I totally have seen The Brood. I even remember it reasonably well. It's pretty good.

I think I was jumbling up its plot with a different title last night.

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Sat Dec 08, 2018 2:27 am
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All caught up after making it through Rocky V with my mind intact (more intact than Rocky's anyway), and the count stands at

1. Rocky
2. Creed
3. Rocky Balboa
4. Rocky 2
5. Rocky III
6. Rocky IV
7. Rocky V

The slow descent after the first film was so reliable it was borderline linear.

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Sat Dec 08, 2018 5:42 am
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ThatDarnMKS wrote:
I'm not married to the idea but there were just some things that stuck out to me:

he aforementioned audio played at the beginning of the film being the biggest one. Maybe I just misheard but the "are we really doing this?" And the rustling of clothes was unmistakable. It has sexual purpose but I can't be sure to what direction (perhaps this is why the other reviewer interpreted it as incestuous).


Are you talking about the very first audio in the film? Because if so I just watched the frist few minutes last night and
the captions on the version I watched suggested that it is the voice of Joe's father speaking, and the rustling sound is the sound of him putting the dry-cleaning bag around his neck.


Sat Dec 08, 2018 7:23 am
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Takoma1 wrote:

Are you talking about the very first audio in the film? Because if so I just watched the frist few minutes last night and
the captions on the version I watched suggested that it is the voice of Joe's father speaking, and the rustling sound is the sound of him putting the dry-cleaning bag around his neck.


That is indeed the audio in question. I’m fully aware of the possibility that I misheard what was being said due to the low mix and purposeful abstract nature. Mind telling what was said?


Sat Dec 08, 2018 7:34 am
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Regarding Here:

I think I lean more toward Takoma in that I think
Joe is decidedly not a sexually functioning human being. Profoundly impotent, in fact. And the clear cause of this complex of impotence and guilt is in his powerlessness to protect his mother from his father. I saw no indication of sexual relationship between Joe and his mother (at best, one may be able to see some suggestion that she would have preferred one), and I think that the ending of the film would lose a lot of weight if Nina didn't recognize Joe as sexually harmless.


Sat Dec 08, 2018 8:47 am
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ThatDarnMKS wrote:

That is indeed the audio in question. I’m fully aware of the possibility that I misheard what was being said due to the low mix and purposeful abstract nature. Mind telling what was said?


According to the caption (and Amazon Prime captions are hit or miss, but these ones seem to match what I'm hearing):

**We hear the sounds of the train. There is a loud crunch sound.**
**All the voices/sounds over a black/underwater background**

Young Joe Whispering: 15

Adult Joe: 50

Young Joe Whispering: 14

Adult Joe: 49

Young Joe Whispering: 13, 12

Joe's father: Stand up straight.

Young Joe Whispering: 11

Joe's Father: Stand up straight

Young Joe Whispering: 10, 9

Joe's Father: Stand up. Only fucking pussies and little girls slouch.

Young Joe Whispering: 8, 7

Adult Joe: 43

Young Joe Whispering: 6

Adult Joe: 42

Young Joe Whispering:5

Adult Joe: 41

Young Joe Whispering: 4

Adult Joe: 40

Young Joe Whispering: 3

Adult Joe: 39

Young Joe Whispering: 2

Adult Joe: 38

Young Joe Whispering: 1

Adult Joe: 37

Joe's Father: You must do better. You must do better.

**Then the hard cut to the adult Joe inside of the bag. **

Joe's Father: Say it.

**Shot of young Joe's face**

Young Joe Whispering: I must do better, sir.

**Back to adult Joe who pulls the bag off of his head**


Sat Dec 08, 2018 9:16 am
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First Reformed - 7/10

Paul Schrader is the biggest problem here. Making his first watchable film after 20 years may have dropped expectations considerably. Or maybe it's the lack of recognition that the script is a pitiful mash-up of Winter Light and Country Priest, which can only result in comparing just how little esoteric grace Schrader is capable of than Bergman or Bresson. It would, of course, be unfair to compare Schrader to these masters, except for the sad fact that Schrader himself is begging for it here in inappropriately unsubtle strokes. Hawke? I absolve, as he gives as terrific performance as the script allows. The film's novel twist from its classic hosts is in considering the complicity of organized religion toward climate change (although an evangelical setting would have sharpened the point). This refers to the nuclear anxiety in Winter Light but misses the ultimate irrelevance of politics in that film's message. Not having the philosophical sensitivity of a Bergman or Bresson, Schrader does what Schrader does, which is to indulge and romanticize more external (and obvious) forms of flagellation.


Sat Dec 08, 2018 9:22 am
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Macrology wrote:
Correction: I totally have seen The Brood. I even remember it reasonably well. It's pretty good.

I think I was jumbling up its plot with a different title last night.


:up:


My favorite Cronenberg.

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Turning into butterflies above our nation


Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:05 am
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The Other Side of the Wind - 9.5/10

The good news is that it seems pretty clear that this film succeeds as the final masterpiece of Welles' career. The asterisk over its prolonged journey to completion is more elaborate but hardly less qualifying than the other sad examples of compromised Welles projects (Ambersons, Arkadin, Touch of Evil) where we can recognize their significance without the benefit of seeing what Welles had actually intended us to see.

The film, in concept, lends itself a number of rationales to excuse its rougher edges, being about at least one unfinished film within another. This allows for a more haphazard, semi-documentary approach which forgives much of the more slapdash editing of shots which barely match from those shot years apart. The film's theme is essentially about an unfinished film, reflected as an unfinished life, which also lends weight to its more manic montage associations and the heavy meta-mythologizing of the artistic process. F For Fake, which was shot in the cracks of Wind's early recess, is obviously not like any other Welles film in style and form, and Wind will satisfy those most who have been fascinated by whether F was a fluke, a toss-off experiment, or a new-found narrative aesthetic that Orson unfortunately did not have the resources to explore. Wind answers in the latter, sharing the comic rhythms and associative editing of Fake (Welles proves to be a master of reaction shots) while expanding on its subprofundities of perception in wise and wistful ways.

The crudeness of the film takes some getting used to. The film uses multiple stock (20 years before Oliver Stone was vogue), and much of the film is split between some really cruddy 16 millimeter film that don't look like it's aged very well (which covers most of the "documentary" element) and some gorgeously evocative B&W, which seems to have been reserved for some of the more intimate scenes and moments (especially those involving Lilli Palmer as a veteren screen femme). The blurring of all of these distinctions is much of the point, and one of the film's better jokes is in how it places the cameras of auteurs and the cameras of tabloids on an equal footing. The film is filled with inside jokes. John Huston plays a Welles-esque director, although I suspect there's quite a few jabs at Howard Hawks, and even Huston himself, thrown in there. Giving him a compliant teenage assistent is only mildly amusing, but having her resemble Cybill Shepard is a scream, and wearing an Archie Bunker T-shirt to boot? Priceless.

The best looking footage is the luscious 35 millmeter shots from the unfinished film within a film which is intended as a Zabriskie Point parody. Welles shares Antonioni's infatuation with hippie culture and the sexual revolution, and makes ample use of his lovely muse Oja Kodar (seemingly a mix of Edwige Fenech, Meg Tilly and a jaguar). Welles has said that this was supposd to be the kind of "art film" that he was incapable of doing, but I believe that the film's final shot is one that would likely be among Antonioni's most famous had he thought of it.


Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:12 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
Regarding Here:

I think that the ending of the film would lose a lot of weight if Nina didn't recognize Joe as sexually harmless.


Strongly agreed.

I think that an incredibly cynical reading would be that
she sees him as someone she can manipulate (sexually or otherwise), but that's just not the vibe that I get from the interactions between them.


Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:11 am
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boojiboyhowdy wrote:
I just now saw this so it counts. I had no idea they were planning on releasing the new Avengers trailer.

Avengers: Endgame

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuOvmyuYFMo


Thanks for the link. Strangely, the trailer does not have me hyped. We all know that the great reset is coming, so it doesn't seem like there are stakes here. This kind of sums it up for me

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wn5K9S3kNo4


Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:25 am
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Melvin Butterworth wrote:
Thanks for the link. Strangely, the trailer does not have me hyped. We all know that the great reset is coming, so it doesn't seem like there are stakes here. This kind of sums it up for me

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wn5K9S3kNo4
Speaking of underwhelming trailers the new Captain Marvel one isn't really doing it for me either. They'll probably come out wih a better second one before too long.


Sat Dec 08, 2018 2:29 pm
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Sorry to Bother You (2018) - 8/10

At the heart of this satiric film lies an analysis of capitalism, or, more specifically, the puppeteers controlling our culture and turning people into corporate slaves. While this seems like a simple idea at first glance, this film has a ton of information which can be unpacked from it. It feels like every scene is loaded with satire and double meanings since the world the film takes place in is shown to be a highly exaggerated, absurdist mirror version of our own world. While capitalism remains at the heart of this film, it appears to touch on other aspects such as scenes where Cash's desk drops into the houses of the people he calls, how he's able to sell more at his job by using a "white voice", or how he starts saying the N-word while rapping in front of a group of people at a party. While some people may criticize this approach as unfocused, I didn't feel like an excessive amount of focus was taken away from the capitalism angle. I think it was still at the forefront of the film in terms of its thematic power. Once you begin to grow accustomed to the films unconventional tone, however, the final act pulls the rug out from under you to such great of an extent that it actually manages to make the rest of the film look rather tame by comparison. While I can understand someone being taken out of the film due to how extreme the satire gets, I don't think satire really has a set limit as to how exaggerated it can be allowed to get. Sure, the tone changes, but that doesn't mean it betrays the film which came before it since it's still technically a continuation of the capitalism themes. I also don't think that Riley was going for realism in the sections of the film before the twist. Overall, this film is definitely worth watching, because while its themes may be pretty simple, what makes them stick out is their memorable execution.

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Sat Dec 08, 2018 2:50 pm
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Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Sorry to Bother You (2018) - 8/10
I liked this, also. Stanfield is terrific and the film is clever and surreal and very dark. I'm looking forward to seeing it again, since I know I didn't catch all the gags/barbs the first time. "Is cash green?"

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Sat Dec 08, 2018 5:52 pm
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Jinnistan wrote:
The Other Side of the Wind - 9.5/10

The good news is that it seems pretty clear that this film succeeds as the final masterpiece of Welles' career. The asterisk over its prolonged journey to completion is more elaborate but hardly less qualifying than the other sad examples of compromised Welles projects (Ambersons, Arkadin, Touch of Evil) where we can recognize their significance without the benefit of seeing what Welles had actually intended us to see.

I think it's safe to say that had this been completed when it was supposed to be, the ensuing decades would've seen it come to be revered. Not just because it's great, which it is, but it's also so full of film-making in-jokes and other directors in small (and big) roles, the kind of stuff that really gets a cinema buff aroused. It's unfortunate that the various asterisks attached to it will always be there.

One thing I'm not clear on: Touch of Evil has the infamous memo as the basis for the later edit, but I haven't heard how explicit Welles' instructions were regarding the final cut of Wind. I've watched They'll Love Me When I'm Dead and that wasn't addressed. All I know is that there were 100 hrs or so of footage. Given that no one shot seems to last longer than 5 seconds, that means this one is all about the editing. I was pleased to find that in terms of rhythm it felt very much like a Welles film, so I don't know whether to credit the restoration folks for nailing that so well, or if it's because Welles made his intentions explicitly clear.

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Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:53 pm
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
I liked this, also. Stanfield is terrific and the film is clever and surreal and very dark. I'm looking forward to seeing it again, since I know I didn't catch all the gags/barbs the first time. "Is cash green?"

I should probably revisit it as well. So much went on in it that I may have missed a few set pieces.

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Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:00 am
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Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Sorry to Bother You (2018) - 8/10

At the heart of this satiric film lies an analysis of capitalism, or, more specifically, the puppeteers controlling our culture and turning people into corporate slaves. While this seems like a simple idea at first glance, this film has a ton of information which can be unpacked from it. It feels like every scene is loaded with satire and double meanings since the world the film takes place in is shown to be a highly exaggerated, absurdist mirror version of our own world. While capitalism remains at the heart of this film, it appears to touch on other aspects such as scenes where Cash's desk drops into the houses of the people he calls, how he's able to sell more at his job by using a "white voice", or how he starts saying the N-word while rapping in front of a group of people at a party. While some people may criticize this approach as unfocused, I didn't feel like an excessive amount of focus was taken away from the capitalism angle. I think it was still at the forefront of the film in terms of its thematic power. Once you begin to grow accustomed to the films unconventional tone, however, the final act pulls the rug out from under you to such great of an extent that it actually manages to make the rest of the film look rather tame by comparison. While I can understand someone being taken out of the film due to how extreme the satire gets, I don't think satire really has a set limit as to how exaggerated it can be allowed to get. Sure, the tone changes, but that doesn't mean it betrays the film which came before it since it's still technically a continuation of the capitalism themes. I also don't think that Riley was going for realism in the sections of the film before the twist. Overall, this film is definitely worth watching, because while its themes may be pretty simple, what makes them stick out is their memorable execution.


some dude at work was just talking about this.... it sounds appealing but also a little too close to home to my current situation that I'm not even sure I could stomach it. plus it'll be harder to prove to people that I'm not some leftist ideologue when I'm watching anti-capitalist entertainment for pleasure.

the stuff I do at the warehouse I work at is quite physical so I often wonder if I am turning into a (work)horse. every time someone compliments me for my hard work I just feel even more like shit. but at least if the managers like me I won't have as hard a time having my mistakes excused. or if I want to take a random sick day.


Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:19 am
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Oxnard Montalvo wrote:

some dude at work was just talking about this.... it sounds appealing but also a little too close to home to my current situation that I'm not even sure I could stomach it. plus it'll be harder to prove to people that I'm not some leftist ideologue when I'm watching anti-capitalist entertainment for pleasure.

the stuff I do at the warehouse I work at is quite physical so I often wonder if I am turning into a workhorse. every time someone compliments me for my hard work I just feel like shit. but at least if the managers like me I won't have as hard a time having my mistakes excused.

Damn. That sounds like a pretty rough job.

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Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:33 am
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it's not fun but if I had a choice between that and a call center, I'd still choose the warehouse. at least in the warehouse I can pretend I'm a playable character in some really repetitive videogame.


Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:35 am
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Oxnard Montalvo wrote:
it's not fun but if I had a choice between that and a call center, I'd still choose the warehouse. at least in the warehouse I can pretend I'm a playable character in some really repetitive videogame.

Well, I hope it becomes easier for you to tolerate in the future.

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Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:38 am
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no, hope that it burns down so I can watch more movies. then I'll make my way traveling from bar to bar, winning movie trivia contests, and living off of gift cards.


Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:41 am
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boojiboyhowdy wrote:
I just now saw this so it counts. I had no idea they were planning on releasing the new Avengers trailer.

Avengers: Endgame

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuOvmyuYFMo

Yeah, they got me again with this. Again, Marvel shows why their films are so successful and DCs suck all the ballz. It's all about the characters and their humanity and the spectacle is just fun window-dressing. Even when DC tries this they just make things worse.
(I mean, with time to look back, Green Lantern is actually a better movie than Justice League.)
But I digress, Marvel stings me with this and now I just can't fucking wait.


Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:41 am
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boojiboyhowdy wrote:
Speaking of underwhelming trailers the new Captain Marvel one isn't really doing it for me either. They'll probably come out wih a better second one before too long.

Yeah, after the two Captain Marvel trailers, a title I was extremely excited about, I am more worried than ever that Marvel is finally going to drop the ball, hard, and unfortunately with a property that need to succeed with for at least two really good reasons.


Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:43 am
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Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Sorry to Bother You (2018) - 8/10

At the heart of this satiric film lies an analysis of capitalism, or, more specifically, the puppeteers controlling our culture and turning people into corporate slaves. While this seems like a simple idea at first glance, this film has a ton of information which can be unpacked from it. It feels like every scene is loaded with satire and double meanings since the world the film takes place in is shown to be a highly exaggerated, absurdist mirror version of our own world. While capitalism remains at the heart of this film, it appears to touch on other aspects such as scenes where Cash's desk drops into the houses of the people he calls, how he's able to sell more at his job by using a "white voice", or how he starts saying the N-word while rapping in front of a group of people at a party. While some people may criticize this approach as unfocused, I didn't feel like an excessive amount of focus was taken away from the capitalism angle. I think it was still at the forefront of the film in terms of its thematic power. Once you begin to grow accustomed to the films unconventional tone, however, the final act pulls the rug out from under you to such great of an extent that it actually manages to make the rest of the film look rather tame by comparison. While I can understand someone being taken out of the film due to how extreme the satire gets, I don't think satire really has a set limit as to how exaggerated it can be allowed to get. Sure, the tone changes, but that doesn't mean it betrays the film which came before it since it's still technically a continuation of the capitalism themes. I also don't think that Riley was going for realism in the sections of the film before the twist. Overall, this film is definitely worth watching, because while its themes may be pretty simple, what makes them stick out is their memorable execution.


Solid film. I’m astounded that Riley pulled off what he did on a $3 million budget, especially in the final act.


Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:58 am
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Zama (2018) - 8/10

A remarkable film which is, at times, funny, absurd, and infuriating. Zama, a Spanish officer who's awaiting a transfer to Buenos Aires, thinks he has authority in his current residence, when in reality, he's commonly disrespected by the governors who have a way of ignoring his requests by trying to dodge around them or requiring for him to do other tasks first. As the film progresses and the passage of time is shown by how he slowly ages before our eyes (shown by his hair turning gray and his face developing wrinkles), his life begins to feel like an inescapable, absurdist nightmare. Martel doesn't attempt to paint him as a sympathetic character though as scenes such as how he had an affair with a native woman or an early scene where he spies on a group of naked women by the beach only to slap one of them after he's discovered reveal his character flaws. The visuals and the sound of this film are also pretty interesting. Martel often fills the film with disorienting sounds and visuals which feel like they don't belong in the setting the film takes place in. Instead of coming off as jarring, however, they reflect Zama's state as being a man out of time. Then, there's the shocking final act. It's a disturbing outcome for Zama, yet still darkly humorous as he wouldn't have had to endure any of it if he had been allowed to transfer. Overall, I found this to be a complex and compelling film, and I imagine that I'll pick up on new details once I rewatch it.

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Sun Dec 09, 2018 3:18 am
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Barking Dogs Never Bite was my last Bong Joon-Ho film to watch and it held up to his legacy as one of the top contenders for best South Korean directors (Park Chan-Wook, Lee Chang Dong, Kim Jee Woon and a rising Kim Ki Duk, as I'm not quite familiar enough with his work to give a fair comparison) and one of my personal favorite directors. That said, this is a "does the dog die" sensitive crowds worst nightmare. I don't consider myself particularly sensitive over dog violence in movies but this was harsh to an unexpected degree. I highly recommend it but it comes with that warning. Even the opening of the film placing a "No Animals Were Harmed in the Making of this film" does little to lessen the impact and I legitimately wonder how they did some scenes WITHOUT at least harming the animals.

Regardless, it's a great dark comedy that feels almost Coen influenced in the amount of misunderstandings, incompetence and quirk on display.


Sun Dec 09, 2018 3:53 am
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