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Gone With The Wind is a really really really really really really long movie. It somehow seems longer than four hours on third viewing. I'm probably done with it, now, though. Unless someone converts it to 3D.

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Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
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Mon May 07, 2018 6:51 am
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Rock wrote:
I haven't seen Justice League, but I agree that Marvel is going about this shared universe thing more intelligently than DC (comparing Civil War and its conflict of values between characters we've grown attached to versus the rushed clash of titans in BvS).

I like that there were character moments, but I think they needed some downtime to work. I think the Russos have been pretty good with them on the whole, but I think back to that driving conversation between Cap and Black Widow in Winter Soldier or the Trouble Man bit in that same movie and how those scenes landed because the movie was able to slow down for them.

No, I really do hear what you're saying, if you're not invested in this whole story-line like I am, I could see it being problematic because it's really a big special-issue culmination of so many other stories and does not really have that much of a traditional arc, it's more like the last act of a 19-act story.
So I really do understand where others could be at.
All that said, do NOT see Justice League until it gets MST3K'd. And it should, it's literally at the 1950s, bad special-effects, vampires meet alien insects kinda bad.

Edit: I would add that I did feel that the movie would have benefitted from being 10-20 minutes LONGER with more dialogue and character time. There's a lot of stuff in the various trailers, for example, that was really good that got cut from the movie.


Mon May 07, 2018 8:12 am
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I can understand why someone wouldn't enjoy Infinity War due to its pacing, but I think it works in the way that it was really easy to follow, despite containing over 20 main characters. I had no idea how the film was not going to feel overstuffed or incoherent before watching it, but they managed to pull it off just fine. I also thought the movie did a good job at mixing character moments into all of the action scenes, so I feel like there are many moments to catch your breath. And yes, the ending is as good as it's made out to be. I had a couple issues with the film as a couple of the characters didn't do much in the film or disappeared from the film for an awfully long period of time, but I'm not going to rate this film any lower than a 7/10, because it definitely accomplished quite a lot.

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Mon May 07, 2018 9:18 am
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Into the Night - 6/10. This is a "one crazy night" movie from 1985 starring Jeff Goldblum as Ed, a white-collar worker whose dissatisfaction with his job and marriage has him feeling like an insomniac zombie. After driving to the airport one night, presumably to follow a coworker's (Dan Aykroyd in a cameo) advice to hightail it to Las Vegas, he crosses paths with and becomes the unwitting accomplice of Diana (Michelle Pfeiffer), a jewel thief on the run. While Ed's bout of suburban malaise makes him empathetic and a worthy audience surrogate, his journey with Diana only ends up being mildly diverting. For one, it pales in comparison to similar movies about ordinary people in extraordinary situations like Hitchcock's North by Northwest and even a movie that came out in the same year, Scorsese's After Hours. Also, all of the actors seem curiously detached as if they all had one eye on the script and one eye on what they could buy with their paychecks. Besides Aykroyd, there are many other cameos from the likes of David Cronenberg, Jim Henson and David Bowie, but my reactions to all of them were more shrug than exclaiming "that was awesome!" While it's a better movie than Roger Ebert's one-star review suggests, it's still more enjoyable for the nostalgic aspects Janson mentioned in his '80s thread (the synth-blues score, superfluous nudity, color scheme, etc.) than for its content.

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Mon May 07, 2018 11:29 pm
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ski petrol wrote:

TWBB
Zodiac
NCFOM


Late, but this is my take.

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Mon May 07, 2018 11:33 pm
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Tully is kind of strange one, although not for the most part; it's just that, there's a particular curveball of a story development that comes near the end of its (mostly) straightforward, ultra-domesticated, slice-of-life narrative that's rather unexpected, especially coming in this kind of a film, one that's never particularly telegraphed, either in the marketing or by the film itself, although... it isn't really what I'd call the good kind of unexpected, as this development didn't add much to my appreciation of the film, just serves to make a point that, in context, is rather redundant, and just seems to be a pointless distraction in the grand scheme of things.

It's a minor shame, as, besides that one odd element, Tully is quite a good testament to the migraine-inducing, often-underappreciated rigors of middle class financial struggles, maintaining a decent marriage, and of course, parenting, particularly young motherhood, with Charlize Theron putting in an extremely unglamorous, emimently real performance as Marlo, a perpetually put-upon mother of three who seems about to crack underneath her myriad daily stresses, until she finds an unexpected savior in an odd, but almost unbelievably kind and helpful nanny named, of course, "Tully". The two serve the film's backbone, as Diablo Cody's writing renders their relationship (and everyone else, for that matter) in relatable, character-insightful, and consistently emphathic terms, never resorting to easy scapegoating or strawmanning of any the flawed, everyday people who inhabit the film, and placing emphasis on a refreshingly dramatic overall tone, one that goes light on the quirk (although the dialogue is occasionally unnaturally snappy and heavy on the pop culture references, but not overly so). It's not the kind of film that seems to scream at you to go see it on the big screen like the latest Star Wars or Marvel blockbuster, but I still have to say that I'm fairly glad I did anyway.

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Tue May 08, 2018 12:37 pm
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Paddington - 8/10. If you are feeling anxious our pessimistic about the state of our world right now, this movie is just the reprieve you need. It gave me feelings of optimism and wonder I haven't felt since I watched the last Wallace and Gromit short. It follows a typical origin story format: Paddington leaves his home in the South American jungle for London, a family adopts him, his clumsiness and ignorance of modern life get him into trouble, he becomes the target of a revenge-bent taxidermist (Nicole Kidman), etc. While the story has a familiar ring, there are well-placed moments of unpredictability and the quality of the filmmaking and acting - I especially liked Peter Capaldi's hilarious turn as a weaselly neighbor - make up for it. In addition to its charm, the reason why it's such a breath of fresh air for these times is that Paddington is accident-prone, out of place and, well, a talking bear, but his adoptive family comes to accept and love him for these reasons. It's the kind of movie you wish our world’s leaders should sit down and watch, preferably together.

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Thu May 10, 2018 11:45 pm
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And the second one is even better.


Fri May 11, 2018 12:06 am
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Slentert wrote:
And the second one is even better.
I've heard good things. I couldn't bear it if this movie received a mediocre sequel.

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Fri May 11, 2018 1:16 am
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Torgo wrote:
I've heard good things. I couldn't bear it if this movie received a mediocre sequel.

Aw, c'mon...


Fri May 11, 2018 4:57 am
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Wooley wrote:
Aw, c'mon...
It had to be done. :D

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Fri May 11, 2018 5:16 am
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Torgo wrote:
It had to be done. :D

Fair.


Fri May 11, 2018 6:26 am
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Werner Herzog's Signs of Life does such a good job of evoking the dullness of its heroes' daily lives that it often feels pretty dull itself. It follows a group off German soldiers occupying the Greek countryside during WW2, forgoing any sense of actual conflict you focus on the rhythms of county country life. The problem is that Herzog's point of view on the action is too detached to evoke his interest in the material, and when the hero finally freaks out (after doing fuck all for 80% of the runtime), he's no Klaus Kinski.

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Sat May 12, 2018 12:51 pm
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Rock wrote:
Werner Herzog's Signs of Life does such a good job of evoking the dullness of its heroes' daily lives that it often feels pretty dull itself. It follows a group off German soldiers occupying the Greek countryside during WW2, forgoing any sense of actual conflict you focus on the rhythms of county country life. The problem is that Herzog's point of view on the action is too detached to evoke his interest in the material, and when the hero finally freaks out (after doing fuck all for 80% of the runtime), he's no Klaus Kinski.

I was disappointed my Herzog set didn't come with this one. It starts with Even Dwarfs Started Small. Upon later reflection, it seems as though this is his first true to himself flick.


Sat May 12, 2018 2:02 pm
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Game Night B-

Two Pulp Fiction references! I enjoyed this film for the most part.


Sat May 12, 2018 3:27 pm
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William Lustig's "Vigilante" is a better Death Wish that any of the Death Wish films.


Sun May 13, 2018 7:06 am
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ThatDarnMKS wrote:
William Lustig's "Vigilante" is a better Death Wish that any of the Death Wish films.


See what you did there? Now I'm gonna have to track this down. I do like the original Maniac.


Sun May 13, 2018 7:17 am
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ThatDarnMKS wrote:
William Lustig's "Vigilante" is a better Death Wish that any of the Death Wish films.

It's good (the drama is will handled and I like the performances by Forster and Williamson), but the ending goes a little too far for me. It's probably appropriate for the genre, but given the relatively nuanced earlier sections, I can't endorse it.

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Sun May 13, 2018 7:18 am
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ski petrol wrote:

See what you did there? Now I'm gonna have to track this down. I do like the original Maniac.


The movie made me decide to acquire the rest of his output. I've got a copy of Relentless on the way and found Hit List on YouTube as it doesn't appear to have a DVD or Blu-ray release. After that, I'll only have Uncle Sam, some tv movies and some pornos if I want to be a completist.

Right now, between this, Maniac and the Maniac Cop trilogy, I think he may be my favorite American B-List 80s filmmaker. Carpenter is hard to qualify in that conversation as I'd argue he's A list.

Lustig just has such a great sense of style, violence and music. He avoids the pitfalls of genre films, like excessive exposition or forced character moments and just strips them down to the bare necessities and indulges in those moments.


Sun May 13, 2018 7:24 am
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Rock wrote:
It's good (the drama is will handled and I like the performances by Forster and Williamson), but the ending goes a little too far for me. It's probably appropriate for the genre, but given the relatively nuanced earlier sections, I can't endorse it.


I think it intentionally goes to far.
The film does have nuance that's often missing in Death Wish inspired films and really calls into question the value in what he's doing and then he goes too far. I think Lustig is purposely being provocative and creating something audiences will respond to in a way that speaks to their own ideology and morality.

If it didn't have the counterbalance of the rest of the film, I'd chalk it up to the typical fascist ideology of these films but here, it feels like he asking the audience instead of taking a hard stance.


But who knows. They 80s were weird and sort of awful about this stuff.


Sun May 13, 2018 7:28 am
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One of my favorite 80s b-list directors has always been Abel Ferrara. I absolutely adore the original Bad Lieutenant. However with his long time association with Cannes and art-house fans I have a hard time putting a tag on him. I guess Carpenter would be up there.

According to IMDB Lustig has over 100 producing directors. Quite prolific.


Sun May 13, 2018 7:28 am
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ski petrol wrote:
One of my favorite 80s b-list directors has always been Abel Ferrara. I absolutely adore the original Bad Lieutenant. However with his long time association with Cannes and art-house fans I have a hard time putting a tag on him. I guess Carpenter would be up there.

According to IMDB Lustig has over 100 producing directors. Quite prolific.

Yeah. Ferrara is another one that probably in certain eras of his career could qualify but he managed to break into the arthouse crowd and do wider appeal flicks. If it was just Ms. 45 and Driller Killer style stuff, he'd be in the conversation.

Lustig, however, remained squarely in the B-List exploitation niche. He's a lot like Jack Hill in that he did way more than reasonable with what he was given. Hill is probably the closest parallel I can think of for a director with immense talent but never broke out for whatever reason.

Lustig also apparently runs the Blue Underground DVD/Blu Ray company, so I have him to thank for some high quality releases of some of my favorite exploitation films, namely Italian releases.

I'm hoping his and Refn's production of the remake of Maniac Cop, to be directed by Hyams takes off. I'm a fan of all involved and while I love Maniac Cop 2, I feel like the first one could definitely be improved upon.


Sun May 13, 2018 7:33 am
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Jack Hill as in the guy who directed Coffy and Foxy Brown? I like him.


Sun May 13, 2018 7:47 am
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ski petrol wrote:
Jack Hill as in the guy who directed Coffy and Foxy Brown? I like him.

Yessir. He also did Switchblade Sisters, the Big Bird Cage, the Big Doll House and Pit Stop. I would recommend all to fans and Pit Stop is probably the closest he came to doing a legitimate drama.

I hear Spider Baby is also worth checking out but I haven't gotten to it yet.


Sun May 13, 2018 7:51 am
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Spider Baby is out there. TCM shows it every once in a while.


Sun May 13, 2018 7:53 am
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ski petrol wrote:
Spider Baby is out there. TCM shows it every once in a while.

I'm holding out for finding the Arrow Blu for cheap. Gotta feed the addiction.


Sun May 13, 2018 7:58 am
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ThatDarnMKS wrote:
I'm holding out for finding the Arrow Blu for cheap. Gotta feed the addiction.


Hmm. I just found a Spider Baby TV series that only lasted 5 episodes. There's very little info on it except one person in the cast. However it does have the keywords comedy/horror. I need to track this down.


Sun May 13, 2018 8:00 am
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Unhinged C

S subpar horror that borrows a lot from Psycho without the famous shower scene. Well there is a shower scene but no one gets fatally stabbed. There is some hilarity and the pacing is well done and there are a few gruesome kills but overall an average affair.


Sun May 13, 2018 8:00 am
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ThatDarnMKS wrote:
I was disappointed my Herzog set didn't come with this one. It starts with Even Dwarfs Started Small. Upon later reflection, it seems as though this is his first true to himself flick.
Out of curiosity, did that set also include Aguirre? I know it probably did, being one of his most famous movies, but I ask because I remember recommending it you over a decade ago back at The Other Backstabbing Place, and, being one of my favorite movies, you can understand my curiosity as to whether you've seen it yet, right...?

:oops:

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Sun May 13, 2018 10:53 am
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Stu wrote:
Out of curiosity, did that set also include Aguirre? I know it probably did, being one of his most famous movies, but I ask because I remember recommending it you over a decade ago back at The Other Backstabbing Place, and, being one of my favorite movies, you can understand my curiosity as to whether you've seen it yet, right...?

:oops:


It does. Been a fan of Aguirre for years now. Half a decade maybe more? Dove into Herzog pretty heavily though I still haven't watched Fitzcarraldo yet. More due to length than anything else.


Sun May 13, 2018 11:11 am
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ThatDarnMKS wrote:

It does. Been a fan of Aguirre for years now. Half a decade maybe more? Dove into Herzog pretty heavily though I still haven't watched Fitzcarraldo yet. More due to length than anything else.


That's one I also need to see. Fitzcarraldo. Also Cobra Verde which I have.


Sun May 13, 2018 11:13 am
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ThatDarnMKS wrote:

It does. Been a fan of Aguirre for years now. Half a decade maybe more? Dove into Herzog pretty heavily though I still haven't watched Fitzcarraldo yet. More due to length than anything else.

You seen Heart of Glass yet? Some days I think that might be my favourite.

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Sun May 13, 2018 1:26 pm
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Rock wrote:
You seen Heart of Glass yet? Some days I think that might be my favourite.

Yes. Quite a fan of it. It's certainly one of his most dream like. I'm not sure I quite believe in hypnotism beyond the placebo effect but his hypnotizing of actors certainly created some very peculiar and unique performances. Have you seen Kasper Hauser, Stroszek and Woyzeck? He's got a handful of contenders and that's not even counting his docs. Herzog is just a dude that cherns out flicks that stick in my head.

On a separate note, I just watched Secret Sunshine. I'm starting to distrust Lee's titles. After this and Poetry, I feel like Oasis and Peppermint Candy will be far more soul crushing than their Mary Poppins-esque lyric titles would suggest. This makes me doubly suspicious of his newest, Burning.

It was great though.


Sun May 13, 2018 3:02 pm
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You didn't like Secret Sunshine? Oasis is my favorite. His latest is currently in Main Competition at Cannes this week. I can't wait to see it. It's been so long since Poetry.


Sun May 13, 2018 3:36 pm
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ski petrol wrote:
You didn't like Secret Sunshine? Oasis is my favorite. His latest is currently in Main Competition at Cannes this week. I can't wait to see it. It's been so long since Poetry.

I thought it was great. I was just amused by how bleak and depressing SK films are and Lee in particular. I own Oasis but haven't watched it. I'm sure it'll put me through the wringer as well.


Sun May 13, 2018 3:55 pm
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I guess I'll add "Shoot the Piano Player" to my list of "I was dumb to wait this long to see it." Many years ago, I had it recorded on my DVR and the DVR got wiped so I never resought it out until I recently nabbed a region B Truffaut collection.

I loved his riffing on noir tropes and the improvisation. Just everything neat about French Crime cinema and French New Wave in a slim, 82 min package.


Mon May 14, 2018 6:54 am
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ThatDarnMKS wrote:
I guess I'll add "Shoot the Piano Player" to my list of "I was dumb to wait this long to see it." Many years ago, I had it recorded on my DVR and the DVR got wiped so I never resought it out until I recently nabbed a region B Truffaut collection.

I loved his riffing on noir tropes and the improvisation. Just everything neat about French Crime cinema and French New Wave in a slim, 82 min package.


Truffaut's best, probably.

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Mon May 14, 2018 10:51 am
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ThatDarnMKS wrote:
I guess I'll add "Shoot the Piano Player" to my list of "I was dumb to wait this long to see it." Many years ago, I had it recorded on my DVR and the DVR got wiped so I never resought it out until I recently nabbed a region B Truffaut collection.

I loved his riffing on noir tropes and the improvisation. Just everything neat about French Crime cinema and French New Wave in a slim, 82 min package.


I watched it a few years ago and afterward I was really surprised that it isn't a title I'd heard a lot about. Now that I'm aware of it I spot it on film lists from time to time, but I feel like it deserves a much higher profile.


Mon May 14, 2018 11:08 am
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With its mix of mythology and satire, Philip Kaufman's The Great Northfield Minnesota Raid is a bit like The Right Stuff. It's not as good as that movie, but compares well to other revisionist westerns. As far as movies about the James- Younger gang go, I prefer it to The Long Riders, as it's less one-note, and the complications in its climax are more interesting.

I also admired how downbeat Spielberg's War of the Worlds is, with every development stressing the fallibility of its human characters and futility of cooperation and gumption in these situations. Cruise and Fanning are very good, with the former subverting his usual assured persona to strong results. (His scene trying to prep his children to leave immediately after the first attack is some of his best work. ) the ending is disappointingly neat, and Spielberg fails to play it up as the cruel joke it should be, but I think the movie's biggest failing is its lack of arc. After two fairly traumatic hours, the movie stumbles sideways into its ending, instead of leading to it in any meaningful way.

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Mon May 14, 2018 11:11 am
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Rock wrote:


I also admired how downbeat Spielberg's War of the Worlds is, with every development stressing the fallibility of its human characters and futility of cooperation and gumption in these situations. Cruise and Fanning are very good, with the former subverting his usual assured persona to strong results. (His scene trying to prep his children to leave immediately after the first attack is some of his best work. ) the ending is disappointingly neat, and Spielberg fails to play it up as the cruel joke it should be, but I think the movie's biggest failing is its lack of arc. After two fairly traumatic hours, the movie stumbles sideways into its ending, instead of leading to it in any meaningful way.

I agree with your assessment but I think I thought that final act was so poor and that the exercise ended up being a waste of such rich source material that I am much less charitable toward the film and generally have nothing good to say about it.


Mon May 14, 2018 11:16 am
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Rock wrote:
the ending is disappointingly neat,

bingo

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Mon May 14, 2018 11:24 am
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Takoma1 wrote:

I watched it a few years ago and afterward I was really surprised that it isn't a title I'd heard a lot about. Now that I'm aware of it I spot it on film lists from time to time, but I feel like it deserves a much higher profile.


Given how ubiquitous 400 Blows and Jules et Jim are, I would expect it to feel more prominent. I suspect it's because it's considerably more American influenced and "genre" that it's often not held quite alongside them.

I loved the way in which he just kept injecting random interactions and human emotions into the noir plot. It utterly transformed it into something fresh.

I do think that the climax becomes more conventional and is less interesting than watching everything else unfold, though I can't think of a better one.


Mon May 14, 2018 12:56 pm
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ThatDarnMKS wrote:
I thought it was great. I was just amused by how bleak and depressing SK films are and Lee in particular. I own Oasis but haven't watched it. I'm sure it'll put me through the wringer as well.


Oasis is my favorite and pretty hardcore. Peppermint Candy is also really good. I haven't seen a bad Lee film.


Mon May 14, 2018 1:33 pm
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Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors - B+ - Evocative, excellent camerawork, no doubt much of the symbolism and cultural value went over my head, but the classical tragic love storyline anchors the film and allows it time to develop its own interests. There's a match-cut here from a young boy disrobing his white shirt to his adult version holding a white flag, and an equally playful transition where a sorceror's orgasm tilts up to a tree bursting into flame (did Pleasantville borrow its orgasm tree from this?).

His Girl Friday - B+ - The screwball dialogue comes fast and furious and makes for a joyful ride where I constantly felt like I was two steps behind, racing to keep up with the wit. I wasn't too keen on how cavalierly the flick tosses Hildy's betrothed to the side, not because he's a great guy, but because he's a human poker chip that the two leads trade between each other, and that seemed sorta low. Their reunion at the end didn't feel like a renewal of love so much as a relapse. They deserve each other, I guess. Hawks makes wonderful use of his master shot framing and keeping the actors familiar and easy in each other's company.

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Tue May 15, 2018 1:29 am
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The Sea Hawk (1940) - 8/10

Michael Curtiz and Errol Flynn make a formidable pair even when kind of retreading the ground of Captain Blood. But this is what they do and they do it well.
Aided by very strong supporting performances (more later) and noteworthy cinematography, this is as worthy a swashbuckler as one needs.
Claude Rains and Henry Daniell (Toddy, from The Body Snatcher) may be typecast here, but they do their jobs and do them well, yet the movie is nearly stolen, in my opinion, by Flora Robson as Queen Elizabeth. She brings a real humanity to the monarch without losing any of her power.
Finally the movie climaxes, as it must, with a good swashbuckle between the heroic Flynn and the traitorous moustache-twirler du jour that is shot so that it's actually more fun to watch their shadows duel than the actors themselves.
Anyway, next time you need a wildly historically inaccurate but perfectly rousing swashbuckler, you need look no further.


Tue May 15, 2018 4:08 am
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Scaramouche - 9/10

I actually watched this a long time ago but forgot to mention it. Scaramouche is a really enjoyable period swashbuckler featuring the charismatic Mel Ferrer and my first look at Stewart Granger who was surprisingly good (he kinda looks too tall and handsome to actually be able to act, but act he does).
Ferrer's Marquis de Mayne is the deadliest swordsman in France, second only to his own instructor. When tasked with ridding France of a revolutionary, the Marquis finds himself in a years-long game with the revolutionary's best friend (Granger) who is no swordsman, but begins training, first under the tutelage of the Marquis' own instructor, and later the master who taught the instructor. To remain in hiding, Granger assumes the guise of well-known theater actor Scaramouche, who hides behind a mask, and a second-life as a Deputy in the National Assembly where he daily changes the always absent DeMayne until the inevitable final duel must come.
This became one of my favorite swashbucklers on the very first watch, a year or two ago, and, while the sexual politics of the time may turn off some, I recommend it for those in the mood for a swashbuckle.


Tue May 15, 2018 4:28 am
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Brewster McCloud - 7/10 - Robert Altman's followup to M*A*S*H. Not in it's league of course but it still shows flashes of brilliance with the trademark overlapping dialogue and off kilter characters. Most of the cast was also in M*A*S*H with the exception of Shelley Duvall who makes her screen debut here. Worth watching.


Tue May 15, 2018 4:42 am
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boojiboyhowdy wrote:
Brewster McCloud - 7/10 - Robert Altman's followup to M*A*S*H. Not in it's league of course but it still shows flashes of brilliance with the trademark overlapping dialogue and off kilter characters. Most of the cast was also in M*A*S*H with the exception of Shelley Duvall who makes her screen debut here. Worth watching.
I think my favorite aspect of this one is Michael Murphy's parody of Bullitt as a vain and ineffectual detective who's as concerned with the stylishness of his turtleneck selection as he is with the case.

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Tue May 15, 2018 4:51 am
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BL wrote:
I think my favorite aspect of this one is Michael Murphy's parody of Bullitt as a vain and ineffectual detective who's as concerned with the stylishness of his turtleneck selection as he is with the case.
Yeah. I like how at the end there he's shown to have been wearing colored contacts.


Tue May 15, 2018 4:53 am
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Wooley wrote:
The Sea Hawk (1940) - 8/10

Nice, my mom's always been a huge Errol Flynn fan so I grew up watching these (some of his Westerns too). Haven't seen The Sea Hawk in ages though. I didn't realize Toddy McFarland was in it, that's an added incentive to watch it again. We also used to watch one called The Master of Ballantrae, but having just looked it up I see that it's from the 50s, so I wonder if that one's as good as I thought it was as a kid. Errol would've been sorta long in the tooth at that point.

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Tue May 15, 2018 9:57 am
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