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Duly noted. I'll still watch TSRoD if I ever run across it but only to be able to say I did. And that pairing of dinner and a movie thing sounds awesome.


Fri Oct 26, 2018 12:34 am
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boojiboyhowdy wrote:
Oh yes. I need to watch the other two I have DVR'd, Frankenstein Created Woman and Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed as well as The Horror of Frankenstein (which stars Ralph Bates in place of Cushing) and Frankenstein and the Monster From Hell. But I have watched The Curse of Frankenstein, The Revenge of Frankenstein and The Evil of Frankenstein.

Cushing does do an outstanding job as the Baron and he and Lee as life long friends did seem to bring out the best in each other.

As far as the Dracula Hammer films go I've seen Dracula (1958), The Brides of Dracula, Dracula: Prince of Darkness, Dracula Has Risen from the Grave, Taste the Blood of Dracula and Dracula A.D. 1972.

I still need to catch Scars of Dracula, The Satanic Rites of Dracula and The Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires.

Frank MB Destroyed is the bees knees.
I have seen exactly the Dracula movies you've seen and haven't seen the others due to the "Urgh, yuck" opinions I have seen of them over the years. Sooner or later I have to do it out of completionism.


Fri Oct 26, 2018 12:52 am
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Wooley wrote:
Frank MB Destroyed is the bees knees.
I have seen exactly the Dracula movies you've seen and haven't seen the others due to the "Urgh, yuck" opinions I have seen of them over the years. Sooner or later I have to do it out of completionism.

Scars and Golden Vampires are good watched. Scars has a very strong ending and Golden is a wonderful collaboration with Shaw Brothers. Cushing and Kung Fu. It's a mix that you need.

Satanic Rites is like a strange Bond rip off that gives Dracula apocalyptic goals and is best to be seen and shrugged at.

FCW and FMBD are indeed the bee's knees. I enjoyed Monster from Hell too but it was needless and the monster design was atrocious.


Fri Oct 26, 2018 2:40 am
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Frankenstein Created Woman - 6.5/10 - For those who felt previous Frankenstein incarnations weren't near sexy or esoteric enough. Playboy model (Miss August - 1966) Susan Denberg stars and it brings the cleavage but not till towards the end of it's running time. Lots of guillotine and walking stick fu and plenty of wine drinking. Let's see, what else? The plot is certainly original. Without giving too much away it involves caged up souls and pre-plastic surgery and fops in top hats and (in a somewhat smaller role) a gimped up Baron played, once again, by Peter (more {less actually in this case} Cushing for the pushin') Cushing. Fun fact: This is one of Martin Scorcese's favorite movies.


Fri Oct 26, 2018 5:25 am
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Satanic Rites is like a strange Bond rip off that gives Dracula apocalyptic goals and is best to be seen and shrugged at.


This is pretty accurate. Every step of the way, you have the most baffling story decisions made for what's ostensibly a Dracula film.

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Fri Oct 26, 2018 5:35 am
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ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Scars and Golden Vampires are good watched. Scars has a very strong ending and Golden is a wonderful collaboration with Shaw Brothers. Cushing and Kung Fu. It's a mix that you need.

Satanic Rites is like a strange Bond rip off that gives Dracula apocalyptic goals and is best to be seen and shrugged at.

FCW and FMBD are indeed the bee's knees. I enjoyed Monster from Hell too but it was needless and the monster design was atrocious.

I am that guy that just totally didn't get the appeal of FCW. :shifty:


Fri Oct 26, 2018 6:18 am
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Macrology wrote:
In addition to my samurai movie night, a friend (who is a far better cook than me, hard as I try) has started a Good Food Bad Movie night on a mostly-weekly basis. This is one of the first ones we watched.

Which receipe did you match up with Satanic Rites?

Macrology wrote:
Vampire's Kiss

Chocolate almonds and mescaline?

Macrology wrote:
Zatoichi and the Doomed Man - Okinawa soba (I was really pleased with this dish)

I'm not familiar with this variation of soba.

Macrology wrote:
Zatoichi and the Chess Expert - Slow cooked honey garlic chicken with broccoli

As both a film and meal, this is the one that makes me the hungriest right now.


Fri Oct 26, 2018 7:24 am
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We may have watched Satanic Rites before he thought to pair the movies with food. Or it may have been chili, which is one of his go-to meals.

Based on my pretty cursory knowledge, Okinawan food in general departs from the rest of Japanese cuisine in a lot of ways. Ingredients are different, there's a lot of mainland (Thai and Chinese) influence. The Okinawa soba didn't use traditional soba noodles but a special egg noodle (which I couldn't find, so I subbed udon instead). The broth is a mix of dashi and pork broth, topped with fish cakes, pickled ginger, and shoyu pork.

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Fri Oct 26, 2018 10:08 am
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I liked Kings of Summer a lot more than I expected to. The story of two boys (and their weird friend) who are each fed up with their parents (Joe is tired of his father's bitterness; Patrick feels smothered by his oddball, fussy parents), and decide to build themselves a house in the woods and live "as men".

I really enjoyed the performances by the three main boys, but especially Moises Arias as Biaggio, the strange kid who at first simply tags along with them. He consistently delivers amazing lines ("Today I met a dog who taught me how to die" or "Do you know we've been walking for half a mile? I can tell by how much we've bonded.") and how he did it without breaking I do not know. The three main characters are ably supported by a slew of recognizable comedic actors including Nick Offerman (as Joe's dad), Megan Mullally and Marc Evan Jackson (as Patrick's parents), Allison Brie (as Joe's sister), Eugene Cordero (as Joe's sister's boyfriend), Mary Lyn Rajskub and Thomas Middleditch (as the local police), and even cameos by Kumail Nanjiani, Tony Hale, and Hannibal Burress. The film is very funny, but it's also a good look at the complications of teenage friendships (especially when a romantic triangle develops) and the way that we can sometimes take on the worst traits of our parents.

I appreciated that when it came to the romance angle, the film did not take an "us versus them" attitude. Kelly, the girl who Joe likes, obviously likes Patrick. The movie is able to walk the line between letting us feel sorry for Joe (who feels like he has been betrayed) and also recognize that his response to Kelly's "betrayal" (because they were never actually dating) is immature and cruel. Kelly isn't a main character, but she's treated as much more than a plot device or a one-dimensional villain.

I would say that the only downside to the film is the filpside of having so many big names and familiar faces. It was almost distracting at points (like when the takeout is delivered and the deliveryman is . . . Kumail Nanjiani!). There are a lot of lines that were clearly improvised, and while they are funny, that loose sense of comedy is sometimes a bit jarring against the emotional drama going on in the woods.

Overall I thought that the film was really strong and came to a satisfying conclusion.


Also, I'm about halfway through Lady in the Lake (I'm home sick from work today) and I'm not super digging it. The first person point of view is a novelty, but one with diminishing returns. This version of Marlowe, as written goes beyond snarky and into bitchy. The character (in his many incarnations) can be enjoyably misanthropic, but in this film he comes off more as misogynistic. None of the supporting performances are really doing much for me either.


Sat Oct 27, 2018 12:17 am
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Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed - 7.5/10 - I consider this a stronger entry in the Frankenstein/Hammer library than Frankenstein Created Woman for instance, simply because Peter Cushing is afforded more screen time. The character of the Baron was always a nattily dressed, arrogant sociopath but here he takes a tremendous leap into full blown psychopathy by revealing himself to also
be capable of rape.
It’s not like they didn’t warn you right there in the title after all. Cushing never disappoints as he imbues his character with a vileness that was always there but concealed under a layer of analytical zeal and cold discipline. But the real pleasant surprise was Freddie Jones as Dr. Richter. Or rather the person he eventually becomes at the end. He makes the most of his brief time on screen and comes close to stealing the picture with an affecting, convincing performance. And the rousing, practically operatic ending would have been a fitting way to end the franchise. But there are at least two more entries.


Sat Oct 27, 2018 2:39 am
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boojiboyhowdy wrote:
Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed - 7.5/10 - I consider this a stronger entry in the Frankenstein/Hammer library than Frankenstein Created Woman for instance, simply because Peter Cushing is afforded more screen time. The character of the Baron was always a nattily dressed, arrogant sociopath but here he takes a tremendous leap into full blown psychopathy by revealing himself to also
be capable of rape.
It’s not like they didn’t warn you right there in the title after all. Cushing never disappoints as he imbues his character with a vileness that was always there but concealed under a layer of analytical zeal and cold discipline. But the real pleasant surprise was Freddie Jones as Dr. Richter. Or rather the person he eventually becomes at the end. He makes the most of his brief time on screen and comes close to stealing the picture with an affecting, convincing performance. And the rousing, practically operatic ending would have been a fitting way to end the franchise. But there are at least two more entries.

:up:


Sat Oct 27, 2018 3:53 am
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boojiboyhowdy wrote:
Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed - 7.5/10 - I consider this a stronger entry in the Frankenstein/Hammer library than Frankenstein Created Woman for instance, simply because Peter Cushing is afforded more screen time. The character of the Baron was always a nattily dressed, arrogant sociopath but here he takes a tremendous leap into full blown psychopathy by revealing himself to also
be capable of rape.
It’s not like they didn’t warn you right there in the title after all. Cushing never disappoints as he imbues his character with a vileness that was always there but concealed under a layer of analytical zeal and cold discipline. But the real pleasant surprise was Freddie Jones as Dr. Richter. Or rather the person he eventually becomes at the end. He makes the most of his brief time on screen and comes close to stealing the picture with an affecting, convincing performance. And the rousing, practically operatic ending would have been a fitting way to end the franchise. But there are at least two more entries.


There's only one, Monster From Hell. The other one is a remake/spoof of Curse.


Sat Oct 27, 2018 6:23 am
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Boo! A Madea Halloween (F)

I was gonna give it more of a D because aside from the insufferable caricatures that are Tyler Perry's characters and entourage, it was mostly not that bad. That twist though. What a pointless movie.

Also, Lexy Panterra is a smokeshow.


Mon Oct 29, 2018 4:24 am
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Seriously, is there any of these Madea films worth the time?

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Mon Oct 29, 2018 5:01 am
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I usually like giving people a chance, but after this one, I doubt any of his Madea movies are worth the time. It's a character born bad.

I'll watch For Colored Girls eventually though, which is apparently by him.


Mon Oct 29, 2018 5:08 am
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Thief wrote:
Seriously, is there any of these Madea films worth the time?
Outside of the ads on TV, I haven't seen a single frame of his work. Nor do I ever plan to.

*harrumpth...*


Mon Oct 29, 2018 10:21 pm
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John Dumbear wrote:
Outside of the ads on TV, I haven't seen a single frame of his work. Nor do I ever plan to.

*harrumpth...*




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Mon Oct 29, 2018 11:44 pm
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Goon: Last of the Enforcers - 6/10 - I may have to amend my rating once I rewatch the original Goon but as it stands it was better than break even. I do remember being pleasantly surprised and really liking the original based mostly on Sean William Scott's performance as Doug Glatt. He's back and so is another positive, Liev Schreiber as Ross Rhea as well as Kim Coates. Lot's of F-bombs. Lots. Jay Baruchel directs this one and is also back onscreen mostly for fart and poop jokes. If you liked the first then by all means check this one out too. It's not as good though.


Tue Oct 30, 2018 6:41 am
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The Sisters Brothers - 8/10

Too bad this western has already been lost in the shuffle because, if nothing else, it has some terrific performances, especially from non-Sisters Jake Gyllenhaal and Riz Ahmed, raising the slight frustration that a film that had made their story the center would perhaps have been superior. But the scruffy brothers have to carry the day, and although the film doesn't always maintain a comfortable balance between its humor and its sentimentality, it looks gorgeous and is blessed with an excellent Desplat score. Bonus point for my completely not recognizing Carol Kane.


Tue Oct 30, 2018 9:01 am
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boojiboyhowdy wrote:
Goon: Last of the Enforcers - 6/10 - I may have to amend my rating once I rewatch the original Goon but as it stands it was better than break even. I do remember being pleasantly surprised and really liking the original based mostly on Sean William Scott's performance as Doug Glatt. He's back and so is another positive, Liev Schreiber as Ross Rhea as well as Kim Coates. Lot's of F-bombs. Lots. Jay Baruchel directs this one and is also back onscreen mostly for fart and poop jokes. If you liked the first then by all means check this one out too. It's not as good though.



Pretty much how I felt. Loved the first one but this one just doesn't quite come together and it feels like they missed a few chances to expand it.

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By the time we got to Woodstock we were half a million strong
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Turning into butterflies above our nation


Tue Oct 30, 2018 11:20 am
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Carnival of Souls - 6/10 - This is supposed to be a cult classic and I can see why the pervasive and very effective feeling of dread running throughout most of the film would lead to that belief. It has an 85% Tomatometer rating but everything else about the movie marks this as a low budget (17,000 total budget) and amateurish (Total crew of six counting the director Herk Harvey, who plays the main ghoul) production with ongoing editing and Foley artist errors. The acting is barely passable and the whole thing feels like an extended Twilight Zone episode. But then with all the religious elements that are included it could also be one of those bizarre and cheesy Chick tracts brought to life. It's worth watching if you can discount the shabbier aspects and instead focus on the overall ambience of disquiet.


Fri Nov 02, 2018 5:29 am
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boojiboyhowdy wrote:
Carnival of Souls - 6/10 - This is supposed to be a cult classic and I can see why the pervasive and very effective feeling of dread running throughout most of the film would lead to that belief. It has an 85% Tomatometer rating but everything else about the movie marks this as a low budget (17,000 total budget) and amateurish (Total crew of six counting the director Herk Harvey, who plays the main ghoul) production with ongoing editing and Foley artist errors. The acting is barely passable and the whole thing feels like an extended Twilight Zone episode. But then with all the religious elements that are included it could also be one of those bizarre and cheesy Chick tracts brought to life. It's worth watching if you can discount the shabbier aspects and instead focus on the overall ambience of disquiet.

Aw man, I dig that movie.


Fri Nov 02, 2018 5:36 am
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Whoa whoa whoa let's not say things we can't take back.

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Fri Nov 02, 2018 6:31 am
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DaMU wrote:
Whoa whoa whoa let's not say things we can't take back.


He just said he dug the movie, it ain't that bad.


Fri Nov 02, 2018 8:37 am
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Charles wrote:

He just said he dug the movie, it ain't that bad.


Just having a bit of hyperbolic fun. :) I liked Fallen Kingdom and The Last Jedi, I can't be in the business of judging outlier opinions.

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Fri Nov 02, 2018 8:56 am
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DaMU wrote:

Just having a bit of hyperbolic fun. :) I liked Fallen Kingdom and The Last Jedi, I can't be in the business of judging outlier opinions.

As long as you don't praise the Predator, I can forgive it.

I had a bit of Cage marathon: Vampire's Kiss, Red Rock West, and Dog Eat Dog. The first two were great. The last was a watchable mess. Good use of a sick day.


Fri Nov 02, 2018 9:30 am
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On the Vampire's Kiss DVD there's a commentary track with the director and Nic Cage and it makes the film even better. There are excerpts from it on Youtube. I highly encourage you to check them out.

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Fri Nov 02, 2018 9:32 am
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Macrology wrote:
On the Vampire's Kiss DVD there's a commentary track with the director and Nic Cage and it makes the film even better. There are excerpts from it on Youtube. I highly encourage you to check them out.

I plan to acquire the DVD. I read that Cage did an intentionally bad and inconsistent accent because he felt the character would put one on to impress people. It elevated the performance and made Keanu in Dracula even funnier as they sound very similar.


Fri Nov 02, 2018 9:40 am
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That movie really is peak Cage.

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Fri Nov 02, 2018 1:12 pm
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Theater of Blood (Much Ado About Murder) - 8/10 - This featured both Vincent Price's and Diana Rigg's favorite roles as father and daughter Edward and Edwina Lionheart. I want to say it's a more polished attempt at the "mad genius takes creative revenge on the people who wronged him" theme of his two previous Dr. Phibes movies. But maybe that's not the right word. Those other two had so much going for them, including Robert Fuest's direction. This one maybe wasn't as macabre but it made up for it with a strong cast especially Price's performance. It was good to see Ian Hendry and Rigg reunite onscreen after appearing together on The Avengers. All in all an adept and creative horror movie.


Sat Nov 03, 2018 2:08 am
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The Night Comes For Us was great. The plot is a tad convoluted for what amounts to a perfunctory gangster plot with brotherhood themes and the action isn't quite as sharp as the Raid films but it's still sizably above the majority of most modern martial arts films and blows Tjanhjanto's previous "Headshot" out of the water. It has the best female vs. female martial arts fight since Michelle Yeoh fought Zhang Ziyi in Crouching Tiger and has a degree of brutality that stands above the Raid films and would drop Chang Cheh's jaw. I wish it were tightened up a bit and hard more focus but it's pure genre and should please fans martial arts cinema while slaking thirst for the Raid 3.


Sat Nov 03, 2018 5:43 am
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The Last Man on Earth - 6.5/10 - George Romero himself has stated that he used this as the blueprint for his own Night of the Living Dead. It's an Italian production with suspect dubbing and a shoestring budget. But it does have Vincent Price who brings some sorely needed gravitas to the proceedings. I don't know what kind of movie it would have been if Hammer studios had gone ahead and filmed their planned version with Fritz Lang directing but I would have loved to have seen that. As it stands there is an effectively bleak tone permeating the whole film and this is probably helped along by the incongruous Italian locales. It's certainly better than the Charlton Heston version The Omega Man and despite it's budgetary shortcomings, more heartfelt than the I Am Legend Will Smith entry. I still haven't seen the direct to video 2007 version I Am Omega with Mark Dacascos though.


Sat Nov 03, 2018 7:26 am
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boojiboyhowdy wrote:
It's certainly better than the Charlton Heston version The Omega Man

I dunno. Omega Man has its charms.


Sat Nov 03, 2018 11:20 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
I dunno. Omega Man has its charms.

I like how zany it is.


Sat Nov 03, 2018 12:01 pm
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It's not a boring film.

Except for the few times it is.

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Sat Nov 03, 2018 1:52 pm
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Jinnistan wrote:
I dunno. Omega Man has its charms.

I grew up loving The Omega Man.


Sat Nov 03, 2018 4:01 pm
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boojiboyhowdy wrote:
The Last Man on Earth - 6.5/10 - George Romero himself has stated that he used this as the blueprint for his own Night of the Living Dead. It's an Italian production with suspect dubbing and a shoestring budget. But it does have Vincent Price who brings some sorely needed gravitas to the proceedings. I don't know what kind of movie it would have been if Hammer studios had gone ahead and filmed their planned version with Fritz Lang directing but I would have loved to have seen that. As it stands there is an effectively bleak tone permeating the whole film and this is probably helped along by the incongruous Italian locales. It's certainly better than the Charlton Heston version The Omega Man and despite it's budgetary shortcomings, more heartfelt than the I Am Legend Will Smith entry. I still haven't seen the direct to video 2007 version I Am Omega with Mark Dacascos though.



Vincent Price is just so damned entertaining to watch.

Then there's Will Smith.

He's... uh... there. Doing thangs.

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By the time we got to Woodstock we were half a million strong
And everywhere was a song and a celebration
And I dreamed I saw the bomber death planes riding shotgun in the sky
Turning into butterflies above our nation


Sat Nov 03, 2018 10:31 pm
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Death Proof wrote:


Vincent Price is just so damned entertaining to watch.

Then there's Will Smith.

He's... uh... there. Doing thangs.

Aw, HELL NO!


Sun Nov 04, 2018 1:24 am
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Wooley wrote:
Aw, HELL NO!



earf?

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By the time we got to Woodstock we were half a million strong
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And I dreamed I saw the bomber death planes riding shotgun in the sky
Turning into butterflies above our nation


Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:47 am
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I'll be honest, I partly based my comparison between The Last Man on Earth and The Omega Man on something I read Heston had said after viewing TLMoE. He described it as "incredibly botched, totally unfrightening, ill-acted, sloppily written and photographed." He might have been making a perfectly valid point but then to have him go out and churn out his own cheesy version smacks of hubris. And I remember liking TOM too when I watched it as a kid. Maybe we can all agree that the ideal version of Richard Matheson's novel has yet to be filmed. But then, like I said earlier, I still haven't watched I Am Omega with Mark Dacascos.


Sun Nov 04, 2018 3:55 am
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Death Proof wrote:


earf?

It bugs me that the mean is Earf when he clearly pronounced the word correctly.


Sun Nov 04, 2018 4:41 am
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Yeah, it is weird how that's caught fire.

Also, I thought Will Smith did a good job in I Am Legend. I don't think any of the adaptations have matched the original book, but his film is (mostly) a good faith effort, and his work holds the film up.

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Sun Nov 04, 2018 8:38 am
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DaMU wrote:
Also, I thought Will Smith did a good job in I Am Legend. I don't think any of the adaptations have matched the original book, but his film is (mostly) a good faith effort, and his work holds the film up.


Yeah, count me in as someone else who had no issues with his work on that film. I haven't seen it in a while, but I remember thinking he was pretty good, and the scene where the dog towards the last act was a highlight. Overall not a film or performance I feel drawn to, but far from a bad film and far from his worst efforts.

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Sun Nov 04, 2018 10:01 am
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Post The Matrix (Wachowskis, '99)

Image

Welcome to the real world.

The world at the end of the 20th century was united in celebration, marvelling at such phenomena as the birth of the modern Internet, connecting mankind further than ever before in the history of the world, which served as a contrast to the tremendous, simultaneous anxiety many people felt at as the new millennium, and the spector of Y2K and an accidental revolt by the same machines that connected us, approached, creating a singular moment in time that was ripe for a film to tap directly into these various wonders and anxieties, "plugging" straight into the zeitgeist and creating a bonafide cultural phenomenon in the process, while also, on a fundamental level, just being an iconic, kick-ass piece of pop entertainment, leaving an impact on pop culture very few films have ever made. That movie in question? None other than The Wachowskis' The Matrix, a mind-warping blend of Western cyperpunk, East Asian-style action, and pure cinematic entertainment, one of the defining films of the decade, and one of my personal favorite movies of all time, easily.

At least, The Matrix was one of my favorite films of all time at that time, back when I was still a pre-teen, had basically never viewed any other movies in any sort of "serious" manner, and had no real idea of what truly constituted a great film. And so, revisiting it for the first time in a long time, after nearly 2 decades and God knows how many rewatches over the years, certain issues with the film have arisen since I first viewed it at the naive age of 12, including the fairly cliched, worn-out Chosen One/Man Vs. Machine/Hero's Journey elements of the basic narrative, the once mind-blowing bits of reality-questioning philosophy the film contains now feeling rather basic and beginner's level, a lot of the dialogue and character interactions feeling stilted and unnatural (though that also kind of suits the film's heightened reality at times), or the embarrassingly trendy, "1999"-ness of the overall aesthetics, including the obviously dated technology depicted within (brick phones for the win!), the fact that almost every major character wears some version of the ubiquitous combo of designer leather jacket plus Cool Guy sunglasses, all while listening to a soundtrack full of the most late-90's electronica, industrial, and heavy metal you'll probably ever hear in any one film. Heck, even the much-vaunted "bullet time" effects, one of the film's biggest claims to fame at one point, haven't aged the best, and that's without even comparing them to the countless number of parodies they inspired throughout pop culture soon afterward.

So yeah, The Matrix certainly isn't a perfect movie on the whole, so I can't really say it's one of my favorites of all time anymore... however, despite its various flaws, it is still a pretty great movie, and one I still enjoy very much. Why, you may ask? Well for starters, it's one thing to take influence from anime, cyberpunk literature, film noir, philosophy studies, H.R. Giger-ish production design and biomechanical body horror, gothic architecture, and Hong Kong action cinema, and it's quite another thing to synthesize ALL of those disparate elements into one coherent, digestible, and entertaining whole. However, The Wachowskis managed to do just so here, going from one mind-blowing image, concept, or whiz-bang special effect to the next, whether it be Neo's complete envelopment by a bizarre liquid mirror leading into a nightmare-ish awakening to endless pods of humans being "harvested", our hero actually bending physical reality itself after achieving a sort of ultimate digital transcendence, or the final half hour of the film being pretty much nothing but absolutely stellar, non-stop action, going from one of the most iconic slow-motion shootouts in film (sorry John Woo!) to a spectacular helicopter rescue/crash, to one of the best hand-to-hand fight scenes in Hollywood history (a lot of which was performed by Keanu Reeves and Hugo Weaving themselves, the million-dollar actors having undergone uncommonly intense training by none other Hong Kong cinema legend Yuen Woo-ping, a fact which makes the potentially fetishized Orientalism of an earlier sparring match in a rather sterotypical dojo go down a little easier).

And, while some people lament how heavy The Matrix goes on the mayhem towards in the end rather than going in a more thoughtful, cerebral direction, in my opinion, it's refreshing to see an Action movie contain any sort of philosophical elements at all, and the sugar-coating of action helps the pill of philosophy the film contains go down easier in the end, and also helps the film serve as a gateway to get the fans interested in its headier influences, so its ultimately a net positive in the end (besides, considering the muddled execution of the endless philosophizing in Reloaded, maybe it was for the best that the Wachowskis kept it simple their first time around). So, while The Matrix isn't necessarily an original film on the whole (or at least not as original as a lot of its rabid fanbase percieved it to be after its release), it's still one hell of an imaginative, entertaining, and visual-entrancing experience regardless, basically serving as Star Wars for millennials (and greatly overshadowing the actual Star Wars that came out that year to boot). And, while The Wachowskis have never come anywhere close to reaching the heights of this film (and may never get another chance to, from the looks of things), if you can, just forget about all the baggage that's laden their career ever since, relax, and just let The Matrix free your mind, baby.
Favorite Moment: Bending reality
Final Score: 9

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Sun Nov 04, 2018 12:06 pm
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I don't know if it was a Godfatheresque realization, but I'll never forget going to see that in theaters. I knew I liked movies beforehand but seeing The Matrix was maybe the most fun I had in a theater at that point in time.

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State of Siege |Gavras, 1972| +
Deadpool |Miller, 2016| +
Z |Gavras, 1969| -
The Confession |Gavras, 1970| +
Missing |Gavras, 1982| +
The Revenant |Inarritu, 2015| +
The Hateful Eight |Tarantino, 2015| +

+ Recommended


Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:14 pm
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Death Proof wrote:


earf?

Will Smith's catch-phrase for his entire career, at least in my head. I never saw the movie so I don't know if he said it in that film, but I just picture him saying that about zombies of whatever.


Sun Nov 04, 2018 3:15 pm
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Post Re: The Matrix (Wachowskis, '99)

Stu wrote:
Image

Welcome to the real world.

The world at the end of the 20th century was united in celebration, marvelling at such phenomena as the birth of the modern Internet, connecting mankind further than ever before in the history of the world, which served as a contrast to the tremendous, simultaneous anxiety many people felt at as the new millennium, and the spector of Y2K and an accidental revolt by the same machines that connected us, approached, creating a singular moment in time that was ripe for a film to tap directly into these various wonders and anxieties, "plugging" straight into the zeitgeist and creating a bonafide cultural phenomenon in the process, while also, on a fundamental level, just being an iconic, kick-ass piece of pop entertainment, leaving an impact on pop culture very few films have ever made. That movie in question? None other than The Wachowskis' The Matrix, a mind-warping blend of Western cyperpunk, East Asian-style action, and pure cinematic entertainment, one of the defining films of the decade, and one of my personal favorite movies of all time, easily.

At least, The Matrix was one of my favorite films of all time at that time, back when I was still a pre-teen, had basically never viewed any other movies in any sort of "serious" manner, and had no real idea of what truly constituted a great film. And so, revisiting it for the first time in a long time, after nearly 2 decades and God knows how many rewatches over the years, certain issues with the film have arisen since I first viewed it at the naive age of 12, including the fairly cliched, worn-out Chosen One/Man Vs. Machine/Hero's Journey elements of the basic narrative, the once mind-blowing bits of reality-questioning philosophy the film contains now feeling rather basic and beginner's level, a lot of the dialogue and character interactions feeling stilted and unnatural (though that also kind of suits the film's heightened reality at times), or the embarrassingly trendy, "1999"-ness of the overall aesthetics, including the obviously dated technology depicted within (brick phones for the win!), the fact that almost every major character wears some version of the ubiquitous combo of designer leather jacket plus Cool Guy sunglasses, all while listening to a soundtrack full of the most late-90's electronica, industrial, and heavy metal you'll probably ever hear in any one film. Heck, even the much-vaunted "bullet time" effects, one of the film's biggest claims to fame at one point, haven't aged the best, and that's without even comparing them to the countless number of parodies they inspired throughout pop culture soon afterward.

So yeah, The Matrix certainly isn't a perfect movie on the whole, so I can't really say it's one of my favorites of all time anymore... however, despite its various flaws, it is still a pretty great movie, and one I still enjoy very much. Why, you may ask? Well for starters, it's one thing to take influence from anime, cyberpunk literature, film noir, philosophy studies, H.R. Giger-ish production design and moments of biomechanical body horror, gothic architecture, and Hong Kong action cinema, and it's quite another thing to synthesize ALL of those disparate elements into one coherent, digestible, and entertaining whole. However, The Wachowskis managed to do just so here, going from one mind-blowing image, concept, or special effect to the next, whether it be Neo's complete envelopment by a bizarre liquid mirror leading into a nightmare-ish awakening to endless pods of humans being "harvested", our hero actually bending physical reality itself after achieving a sort of ultimate digital transcendence, or the final half hour of the film being pretty much nothing but absolutely stellar, non-stop action, going from one of the most iconic slow-motion shootouts in film (sorry John Woo!) to a spectacular helicopter rescue/crash, to one of the best hand-to-hand fight scenes in Hollywood history (a lot of which was performed by Keanu Reeves and Hugo Weaving themselves, the million-dollar actors having undergone uncommonly intense training by none other Hong Kong cinema legend Yuen Woo-ping, a fact which makes the potentially fetishized Orientalism of an earlier sparring match in a rather sterotypical dojo go down a little easier).

And, while some people lament how heavy The Matrix goes on the mayhem towards in the end rather than going in a more thoughtful, cerebral direction, in my opinion, it's refreshing to see an Action movie contain any sort of philosophical elements at all, and the sugar-coating of action helps the pill of philosophy the film contains go down easier in the end, and also helps the film serve as a gateway to get the fans interested in its headier influences, so its ultimately a net positive in the end (besides, considering the muddled execution of the endless philosophizing in Reloaded, maybe it was for the best that the Wachowskis kept it simple their first time around). So, while The Matrix isn't necessarily an original film on the whole (or at least not as original as a lot of its rabid fanbase percieved it to be after its release), it's still one hell of an imaginative, entertaining, and visual-entrancing experience regardless, basically serving as Star Wars for millennials (and greatly overshadowing the actual Star Wars that came out that year to boot). And, while The Wachowskis have never come anywhere close to reaching the heights of this film (and may never get another chance to, from the looks of things), if you can, just forget about all the baggage that's laden their career ever since, relax, and just let The Matrix free (and blow) your mind, baby.
Favorite Moment: Bending reality
Final Score: 9

It's a landmark film. I struggle to understand any other interpretation.


Sun Nov 04, 2018 3:17 pm
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I can acknowledge the impact of The Matrix, but I've never been a fan. It has some cool moments, but the dialogue is atrocious at times, and I've always felt its attempts at philosophical analysis to be weak and half-baked. Plus, the only performance that's worth a watch is Hugo Weaving.

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Mon Nov 05, 2018 12:30 am
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The Matrix is decent, but I feel like it's pretty overrated. Some of the religious symbolism is really obvious, the action looks over-the-top and like ragdoll physic by today's standards, and the ending conflict was resolved by a truly cheesy deus ex machina.

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Top 30 Favorite Films of All Time


Mon Nov 05, 2018 12:46 am
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Suspiria remake is greatest film of all time, Im on my way to see it for the third time in as many days, cannot get enough


Mon Nov 05, 2018 1:02 am
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