It is currently Tue Dec 11, 2018 10:31 pm



Reply to topic  [ 72321 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 1442, 1443, 1444, 1445, 1446, 1447  Next
 Recently Seen 
Author Message
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Jinnistan wrote:
I liked it, but I can't say I'm eager to see it again soon.


I was on the fence about a rewatch, because it was kind of intense on several fronts (violence, sexual abuse, depression, etc) for me the first time.

But as soon as I was about two minutes in I was like "Yes." I already noticed several things in the first few minutes that I see tie thematically into the whole film.

Thief: It was directed by a woman if you haven't fulfilled that category of your challenge yet. :)


Sun Nov 25, 2018 8:33 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Takoma1 wrote:
Thief: It was directed by a woman if you haven't fulfilled that category of your challenge yet. :)


Really?? I was about to see it the other day, but skipped it because I thought it didn't fit any category. Thanks! :D

EDIT: Now I remember why. I already saw Lady Bird for that category. Back to the drawing board.

_________________
--- UNDER CONSTRUCTION ---


Sun Nov 25, 2018 8:41 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Jinnistan wrote:
I liked it, but I can't say I'm eager to see it again soon.


I liked it as well, but it didn't have any real permanence in my mind, considering how stark and strange a movie it was. I only watched it less than a week ago, holed up in a hotel for work, with nothing else to occupy my mind but the bottle of wine I also charged to room service, and by the next morning it had entirely left me.

But all of this probably has much more to do with the deterioration of my brain and memory, and less to do with the quality of the film. Which I vaguely recall approving of as it was happening.


Sun Nov 25, 2018 9:01 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

crumbsroom wrote:

I liked it as well, but it didn't have any real permanence in my mind, considering how stark and strange a movie it was. I only watched it less than a week ago, holed up in a hotel for work, with nothing else to occupy my mind but the bottle of wine I also charged to room service, and by the next morning it had entirely left me.

But all of this probably has much more to do with the deterioration of my brain and memory, and less to do with the quality of the film. Which I vaguely recall approving of as it was happening.


The visual and emotional elements of the
sequence in the lake
have really stuck with me--one image in particular from that sequence made a pretty big impression. As has the ending scene in
the diner
.


Sun Nov 25, 2018 9:32 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Beware of Potential Spoilers below for Annihilation

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
The film makes it abundantly clear that the Shimmer and their experience their is analogous to the experience one undergoes during random trauma. Even the manner in which the Shimmer operates is through seemingly randomized change. Beauty and horror are intertwined through this experience. Saying "it's a given that she's changed" isn't true. Nothing in cinema "is a given" unless it is given to the audience. They push the idea to it's logical conclusion because without the glimmer in the eye, they've dropped the analogy. Her emotional and change of character has to manifest in the analogy which is why the eye glimmer is there. It announces with a microphone that she has been changed by the Shimmer externally, internally and existentially. Even if she were a clone, the thematic purpose is not undermined. In essence, it's the same as the ending of Inception. It doesn't matter whether he's in a dream or not, the idea, inspiration and desire to be happy with his family was incepted into him. The thematic truth of these scenes remains whether or not they are ambiguous in regards to definite events.


You seem to take it that the Annihilation needs the gag in question or else the audience not only won't "get it," and that this as a formal necessity which is required to sustain the vehicle via the tenor. But is this message really there? And if it is, is this something that audience needed to get? And did the gag in question signal the message that you think it signals?

As for the first question, it seems to me that the film is about destruction and decay as a magnet. That is, it's not simply random trauma, but self-destruction as a design feature. It's something built into us as a drive, biologically and psychologically, a drive that terrifies us as much as it attracts us.*
The trauma for the protagonist is not random. She gets lonely. Emotional decay caused by absence. She cheats. A self-destructive choice. Her husband finds out and is hurt. More decay. He makes self-destructive choice to take a high-risk assignment. Protagonist follows him out of loyalty and guilt. Both are looking for transformation.


As for the second question, if we cannot definitively answer the first question affirmatively, then this question already falls. Supposing that your reading is correct in the sense that this is a preferred ("right" or "more right") reading, then we need to ask if the audience needs closure on the question. It is true that if you want your audience clearly to arrive at a particular conclusion, then you have to provide them with hints, clues, cues, and possibly even direct exposition. Not all artworks, of course, are "closed" by the evidence. What's more, artworks are not necessarily damaged by lack of closure. Think of, for example, the lack of closure regarding glimmering eyes in Blade Runner. Why do we need closure on this particular point? And we should also consider that the price of "surety of closure" is that we might rip the delicate fabric of the dream by overemphasizing the point. No one likes to be beat over the head with "the message." Turning again to Blade Runner, think of the exposition where Deckard over-explains the meaning and significance of Batty's sacrifice. Think of Deckard's leaden narration that weighs down the rest of the film. Is it worth it to get your point across at the expense of puncturing aesthetic purity (and even reality) of your tale? This is a lesson I think that today's SJW scriptwriters need to take into greater consideration, as they so often beat the viewer over the head with the message (Sabrina on Netflix is rife with this painfully overt coding).

Finally, I am not sure the drum riff gag at the end of the film signals what you think it signals. It is very common conventional feature of horror and science-fiction tales to have a THE END - OR IS IT? gag at the end which simply signals that the danger is not past. Even if the intended message is to preserve a balance between vehicle and tenor and to sustain the tenor via the vehicle, the formal/conventional cue here (which is driven by genre expectations) is that of a simple gag. Thus, even if we feel the need to have the audience clearly hear the fall of the tree in the forest, they may not be perceiving the sound we want them to hear, thus denying us closure.

*In a larger sense, self-destruction and decay is which is a feature of all lifeforms and the universe itself as entropy. The whole universe is tilting toward decay. Outside of Brownian motion, patterns of life are the most notable exception to the rule of universal decay. Life organizes and increases complexity in its arrangement of matter. Life's great trick is to turn decay in on itself for advantage. Mutation, an "error" in the perfection of a signal, when combined with reproduction can accidentally/contingently transfer fitter genes to off-spring via natural selection. The genetic shuffling of sexual reproduction is the same trick. However, the introduction of the next generation implies the need for the older generation to get out of the way--thus death and decay in the individual organism is a necessary feature for life to temporarily win its contest to stave off death and disorganization.


Sun Nov 25, 2018 9:57 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Takoma1 wrote:

The visual and emotional elements of the
sequence in the lake
have really stuck with me--one image in particular from that sequence made a pretty big impression. As has the ending scene in
the diner
.

Also, the I've Never Been to Me scene definitely sticks out.

_________________
Top 30 Favorite Films of All Time


Sun Nov 25, 2018 9:57 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Takoma1 wrote:

I was on the fence about a rewatch, because it was kind of intense on several fronts (violence, sexual abuse, depression, etc) for me the first time.

But as soon as I was about two minutes in I was like "Yes." I already noticed several things in the first few minutes that I see tie thematically into the whole film.

The parallel of self-abnegation and redemption is the most striking theme. A rewatch may elucidate some of the more fragmentary flashback stuff, because we never really get a clear understanding of the acts of abuse he witnessed as a child (however this cursury glance makes it even more disturbing in its repression).

I also like the use of "Angel Baby", which is like what Blue Velvet does for "In Dreams" by taking an innocently lovely song and giving it much darker implications, not merely through ironic contrast but by applying an unforeseen context to its lyrics.


Sun Nov 25, 2018 5:32 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

The Killing (1956) - Wow.


Mon Nov 26, 2018 1:34 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Wooley wrote:
The Killing (1956) - Wow.

Yes, it's quite amazing.

_________________
Top 30 Favorite Films of All Time


Mon Nov 26, 2018 1:39 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Wooley wrote:
The Killing (1956) - Wow.

Between this and Maltese Falcon, both of which I rewatched for this Noirvember, I'm convinced that Elisha Cook Jr. was the best character actor of that generation.


Mon Nov 26, 2018 3:29 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Wooley wrote:
The Killing (1956) - Wow.


I have some minor issues with it, but it's a great film, no doubt about it.

_________________
--- UNDER CONSTRUCTION ---


Mon Nov 26, 2018 6:23 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Did some more research for the New Hollywood project recently by watching Dressed To Kill for the first time, and, while part of me found myself somewhat enjoying its heightened, giallo-esque sensibilities, and (as always) De Palma's signature flashy, ostentatious style, the rest of me was mostly just turned off by its melodramatic, soap opera-ish vibe, dated, blatantly transphobic overtones, and its unnecessarily sleazy, lurid tone, which is obnoxious even by the standards of an erotic Thriller. Not a bad film, but it wasn't as good as it should've been, and certainly not one of De Palma's best.

_________________
Recently Reviewed


Mon Nov 26, 2018 3:09 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

More (slightly spoiler-y) thoughts on The Homesman:

This film gets better and better the more I think about it. The tonal sleight of hand is astounding, and it's understandable that it throws a lot of people off, but I've finally realized what it's doing and everything fits into place. All throughout the film, the story sets up the reliable old Western tropes we've come to expect -- the resourceful pioneer woman, the roguish drifter, oodles of folksy charm -- only to upend them with jarring interludes of insanity and violence and callousness, shattering any sense of familiarity and laying bare the emotional desperation that pervades the American frontier. Everything gets turned inside out. Briggs has a moment of dramatic righteous vengeance, but when you realize all they did was turn him away from their hotel, he feels less like Shane and more like a petty mass murderer. The final shot is a bleak reenvisioning of quintessential Americana: George Caleb Bingham's Jolly Flatboatmen in Port. Even the journey itself is an inversion of the Western, since their wagon full of hysterical cargo is traveling eastward. Every step in the narrative is a harsh, meticulous deconstruction of the genre.

Also, critics pegging this as a feminist film (or, even more weirdly, criticizing it for not being a feminist film) are totally missing the point.

_________________
Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.


Mon Nov 26, 2018 4:03 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Thief wrote:

I have some minor issues with it, but it's a great film, no doubt about it.

Well, the narration was a terrible call by the studio, but I just let that go like I did with Blade Runner for 13 years or whatever it was.


Mon Nov 26, 2018 8:59 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Wooley wrote:
Well, the narration was a terrible call by the studio, but I just let that go like I did with Blade Runner for 13 years or whatever it was.


Exactly! A bit from my review, which I wrote last year...

Quote:
Some minor complaints, the narration felt a bit awkward and maybe even unnecessary. Second, the distant approach doesn't give a lot of space for audiences to connect with the characters, but I don't think that was Kubrick's intentions anyway. His intention is to get us all amped up with the preparations and make us wonder "will they make it? or will they fail?" and in that, he succeeds. The swift direction and the tense score keeps us in the edge of our seats all the time.


https://letterboxd.com/thief12/film/the-killing/

_________________
--- UNDER CONSTRUCTION ---


Mon Nov 26, 2018 11:26 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Pottersville is a merely sporadically funny comedy and not that great overall, but it's still worth watching for how odd it is. Michael Shannon plays Maynard, an aww shucks good guy and general store manager in a sleepy American small town. After catching his wife (Christina Hendricks) and the sheriff (Ron Perlman) canoodling in furry costumes, he goes on a bender, dresses as Bigfoot and runs through the streets. Naturally, Maynard's antics catch the attention of reality show host and phony Australian Brock Masterson (Tom Lennon). Ian McShane is also along for the ride as the free-spirited town drunk. It has a thin premise that could barely sustain a sitcom episode, much less a 90-minute movie, the comedy - maybe except for the furry jokes - rapidly loses its luster and the only reason I can think of for it being labeled as a Christmas movie is to improve its visibility on Netflix. Even so, I still recommend it for the strangeness of seeing a cast of so many "that" people, most of who play against type, gather for such a curious occasion. I'll never look at any of them the same way again, but it's not like I'm complaining or anything.

_________________
Last Great Movie Seen
T2 Trainspotting (Boyle, 2017)


Mon Nov 26, 2018 11:28 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Thief wrote:

Exactly! A bit from my review, which I wrote last year...



https://letterboxd.com/thief12/film/the-killing/

Did you already know that the Kubrick made the film without narration but the studio worried it was too obtuse and demanded it be added after the film was in the can?


Mon Nov 26, 2018 11:53 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Wooley wrote:
Did you already know that the Kubrick made the film without narration but the studio worried it was too obtuse and demanded it be added after the film was in the can?


Nope. Good to know that. Have you seen Killer's Kiss?

_________________
--- UNDER CONSTRUCTION ---


Mon Nov 26, 2018 11:56 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Yeah, the narration kind of sucked at times.

"At exactly 3:45 on that Saturday afternoon in the last week of September..." Ugh.

It's a minor flaw on something so great. I just pretend it's not there when I watch it.

_________________
Top 30 Favorite Films of All Time


Tue Nov 27, 2018 12:24 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Thief wrote:

Nope. Good to know that. Have you seen Killer's Kiss?

Yes, I saw it on the Criterion disk. It was pretty good all around with solid acting, characters, and suspense. I also really liked the mannequin scene in the end. Creative set design there. Its ending is a little weak, but I'd still recommend it even though, besides Kubrick's early documentary shorts, it's my least favorite of his films which I've seen so far.

_________________
Top 30 Favorite Films of All Time


Tue Nov 27, 2018 12:28 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Yes, I saw it on the Criterion disk. It was pretty good all around with solid acting, characters, and suspense. I also really liked the mannequin scene in the end. Creative set design there. Its ending is a little weak, but I'd still recommend it even though, besides Kubrick's early documentary shorts, it's my least favorite of his films which I've seen so far.


The thing is that there's also some studio meddling there as well.

_________________
--- UNDER CONSTRUCTION ---


Tue Nov 27, 2018 12:40 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Thief wrote:

The thing is that there's also some studio meddling there as well.

Out of curiosity, what is it?

_________________
Top 30 Favorite Films of All Time


Tue Nov 27, 2018 12:42 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Out of curiosity, what is it?


The ending. United Artists bought the film from Kubrick, but insisted on the "happy ending". They also paid an advance for his next film so, you know, gotta give some to get some.

_________________
--- UNDER CONSTRUCTION ---


Tue Nov 27, 2018 12:57 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Thief wrote:

Nope. Good to know that. Have you seen Killer's Kiss?

I have not, but after The Killing, I just may.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 1:04 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Thief wrote:

The ending. United Artists bought the film from Kubrick, but insisted on the "happy ending". They also paid an advance for his next film so, you know, gotta give some to get some.

Interesting. Didn't know that.

_________________
Top 30 Favorite Films of All Time


Tue Nov 27, 2018 1:09 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Anyways, what do you guys think of the ending to First Reformed?
I've been thinking about it, and while I feel confident about a few details, I'm still a bit uncertain on a couple others. So far, the best explanation I can give to it is that it's symbolic to the death of Jesus. The barbed wire Toller wraps around himself is symbolic of Jesus's crown of thorns. The white cloth he puts on afterwards is symbolic of the white cloth the soldiers tore off of Jesus's body and gambled away. In addition, Jesus's death allowed people to change. Toller's death symbolizes that, through death, comes a realization to take better care of the planet. While I'm not sure on the meaning of Mary kissing Toller, I know that she could be named after Jesus's mother or Mary Magdalene, one of Jesus's followers. This could be a hint of what Schrader was going for. It may also have something to do with the intimacy shown in the rite he had with her in a previous scene.

Overall, I thought the rest of the film was really good. I'm just a bit fuzzy on the ending.

_________________
Top 30 Favorite Films of All Time


Tue Nov 27, 2018 1:31 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Between this and Maltese Falcon, both of which I rewatched for this Noirvember, I'm convinced that Elisha Cook Jr. was the best character actor of that generation.

I've gotten weird looks because the film ranks so high among my Kubrick favorites. It isn't an important film, but a supremely fun one. Cook is great, but I also love Timothy Carey and Kola Kwariani. The whip-crack script and the pioneering non-linear plotting are exciting, and "Toto" is a goddamn scream.
That final look on Hayden's face is worth four times the price of the disc.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 1:37 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Jinnistan wrote:
I've gotten weird looks because the film ranks so high among my Kubrick favorites. It isn't an important film, but a supremely fun one. Cook is great, but I also love Timothy Carey and Kola Kwariani. The whip-crack script and the pioneering non-linear plotting are exciting, and "Toto" is a goddamn scream.
That final look on Hayden's face is worth four times the price of the disc.

I also love Carey in it. His odd cadence and demeanor really make him stand out, which gives his vignette more weight despite it's relative brevity. He feels like a proto-Stormare.

Why don't you consider it important?


Tue Nov 27, 2018 2:42 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Why don't you consider it important?

I italicized the word to indicate a more formal sense of importance. It does not have the sociopolitical significance of Paths of Glory, Lolita, Strangelove, Clockwork Orange. It was not a landmark philisophic gamechanger in the way of 2001. And it doesn't dwell in the realm of deep themes the way these films, as well as Barry Lyndon, Full Metal Jacket or Eyes Wide Shut does. It's a fairly straight-ahead crime-noir that is excellent at exactly what it does and never assumes to be much more than that.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 2:53 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Timothy Carey is great in everything. Has anyone seen The World's Greatest Sinner?

_________________
Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 3:38 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Macrology wrote:
Timothy Carey is great in everything. Has anyone seen The World's Greatest Sinner?

I haven't just seen it. I've been blinded by its shimmer.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 4:11 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

I liked Carey in The Killing. Didn't like him in Paths of Glory. I felt that he botched the emotions on several key scenes there.

_________________
--- UNDER CONSTRUCTION ---


Tue Nov 27, 2018 4:14 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Jinnistan wrote:
I italicized the word to indicate a more formal sense of importance. It does not have the sociopolitical significance of Paths of Glory, Lolita, Strangelove, Clockwork Orange. It was not a landmark philisophic gamechanger in the way of 2001. And it doesn't dwell in the realm of deep themes the way these films, as well as Barry Lyndon, Full Metal Jacket or Eyes Wide Shut does. It's a fairly straight-ahead crime-noir that is excellent at exactly what it does and never assumes to be much more than that.


I think the narrative structure was unique enough at the time and influential enough to earn it the distinction of being comparatively important to it's other works, given that I've seen it's structure cribbed from countless times on film and television, from DePalma to Tarantino.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:44 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:

I think the narrative structure was unique enough at the time and influential enough to earn it the distinction of being comparatively important to it's other works, given that I've seen it's structure cribbed from countless times on film and television, from DePalma to Tarantino.

I agree, but I believe this is why the film usually can't elbow its way into the conversation with his more praised films.


Wed Nov 28, 2018 9:52 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

On another noir note, I watched Spderbergh's The Good German. I had missed that he'd filmed it full frame, using only incandescent lighting and intercut actual old footage from the 40s and used all manner of classic filmmaking techniques like rear projection in order to make the film as close to a classic noir as possible. Cate Blanchett is marvelous as always and Clooney tries to cement his place as our era's Cary Grant. Apparently this film is not held in particularly high esteem which I hope changes in time. It's one of the few homages that manages to retain a true fidelity to it's subject rather than feeling like an impression of an impression (here's looking at you, 80's homages!). Anyone else dig this?


Thu Nov 29, 2018 12:35 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Rampage - 4/10 - Some people will probably say that this is a perfect example of a popcorn movie. A turn-your-brain-off-and-enjoy-the-ride spectacle. But I found it really hard to sit through. This could easily have been directed by someone like Stephen Sommer who seems to specialize in this kind of dumbassery. I was going to say that if Dwayne Johnson keeps making these kinds of stinkers then his acting gig could be cut short. But since there seems to be a devoted audience for it then he might well build a long career on them. The best moments came while trying to figure out if Johnson wasn't also an entirely CGI creation.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:10 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

You Were Never Really Here was a heck of a film.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:32 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
You Were Never Really Here was a heck of a film.

It also improves greatly upon rewatches as you start to pick up on double meanings to various scenes. It's a strong contender for my favorite film of this year so far.

_________________
Top 30 Favorite Films of All Time


Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:53 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

boojiboyhowdy wrote:
Rampage - 4/10 - Some people will probably say that this is a perfect example of a popcorn movie. A turn-your-brain-off-and-enjoy-the-ride spectacle. But I found it really hard to sit through. This could easily have been directed by someone like Stephen Sommer who seems to specialize in this kind of dumbassery. I was going to say that if Dwayne Johnson keeps making these kinds of stinkers then his acting gig could be cut short. But since there seems to be a devoted audience for it then he might well build a long career on them. The best moments came while trying to figure out if Johnson wasn't also an entirely CGI creation.

It's funny you say this, it's how I felt about the new King Kong. Edit: Sorry, Skull Island. A lot of people thought it was good popcorn, but I thought it was unacceptable. It should have been a much better movie than it was, even with exactly the cast and crew and everything else exactly the same. It wasn't what it was because it was a great execution of low-brow intent, it was actually poor at script-level, which is the foundation, and therefore failed from the ground up.

Edit again: I kind of agree with you about Johnson. It's time for him to do some real work. He has talent and some skill. It's time to test it. And certainly time to take at least one turn off the same ferris-wheel.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:31 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

I thought Dwayne Johnson gave a good performance in Pain & Gain. Wasn't he planning to do a Doc Savage movie written and directed by Shane Black? That would've been awesome.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:52 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Woman In The dunes, 1964 (B)

Very relaxing to watch for the most part, but I just don't get it.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:05 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
You Were Never Really Here was a heck of a film.


Yup. And like PR says, it's very rewarding on a rewatch.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:35 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Wooley wrote:
It's funny you say this, it's how I felt about the new King Kong. Edit: Sorry, Skull Island. A lot of people thought it was good popcorn, but I thought it was unacceptable. It should have been a much better movie than it was, even with exactly the cast and crew and everything else exactly the same. It wasn't what it was because it was a great execution of low-brow intent, it was actually poor at script-level, which is the foundation, and therefore failed from the ground up.

Edit again: I kind of agree with you about Johnson. It's time for him to do some real work. He has talent and some skill. It's time to test it. And certainly time to take at least one turn off the same ferris-wheel.
I was going to say that even though he might be able to build a sustainable career on weak cheese like Rampage and Skyscraper, he would inevitably grow tired of slumming and try and stretch his acting muscles.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:14 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Slentert wrote:
I thought Dwayne Johnson gave a good performance in Pain & Gain. Wasn't he planning to do a Doc Savage movie written and directed by Shane Black? That would've been awesome.
That does sound pretty freakin' awesome. I always wished they'd make a decent Doc Savage adaptation. The Ron Ely 70's version was sorely lacking in just about everything. A glorified TV movie.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:19 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

The Incredibles 2

I liked it a good bit. Not as strong as the first as the new villain is about equal but few of the other new characters are particularly inspiring (I did like Void's existence, but she didn't get much too say).
The biggest problem was Jack-Jack. When they went that route with him at the end of the first film I thought it was really problematic and this film showed why. The time that was wasted on him could have been used to make other actual characters more interesting when really all it did was give Mr. Incredible something to do so that he wasn't out of the story completely (which he pretty much was as far as the main story is concerned). And it really didn't add much to the movie other than a few chuckles. Violet's romantic subplot ultimately kinda leads nowhere too, another area that could have been better addressed if the Jack-Jack business hadn't been there or hadn't been so prominent. The movie just wasn't as tightly put together as its predecessor but still certainly had plenty of charm, mostly because of Holly Hunter.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:19 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Takoma1 wrote:

Yup. And like PR says, it's very rewarding on a rewatch.


I'm planning on getting the Blu Ray and rewatching it eventually. May ask for it for Christmas. I picked up on a lot retrospectively but I believe you both that there's probably a whole host of stuff I missed.

That said, I read a review on IMDb (likely where I went wrong) that said what felt like an off the wall interpretation:

His mother and he were having an incestuous affair


That caused me to question if I'd missed something. That was just nonsense, right or do I need to accelerate my rewatchi?


Tue Dec 04, 2018 9:58 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

I don't remember You Were Never Really Here implying that
they were in an affair
. I don't think that was part of Ramsay's intentions. What evidence did the user list to back up that interpretation?

_________________
Top 30 Favorite Films of All Time


Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:16 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

ThatDarnMKS wrote:

I'm planning on getting the Blu Ray and rewatching it eventually. May ask for it for Christmas. I picked up on a lot retrospectively but I believe you both that there's probably a whole host of stuff I missed.

That said, I read a review on IMDb (likely where I went wrong) that said what felt like an off the wall interpretation:

His mother and he were having an incestuous affair


That caused me to question if I'd missed something. That was just nonsense, right or do I need to accelerate my rewatchi?


While I disagree with it, I do think that you have to consider that:

1) The film explicitly references the film Psycho, which centers on a very unhealthy relationship between mother and son and also (less obviously), when he comes home at the beginning the mom is watching Fuller's Naked Kiss (something I only realized because by coincidence I had just watched it like a week before I watched Never Really There)

2) He has clearly become the "man of the house" following his father's violent departure. In film (not in real life, that I'm aware--but in media like Mr. Mercedes), this sometimes creates a sexually charged relationship between mother and son.


I don't think that's the case at all, though. The film is ambiguous enough that it's not the kind of thing you can explicitly disprove, but that reading just feels wrong to me.

I do think that
he and his mother have a unique and deep bond that was forged in the fire of the father's abuse of them. I find it very easy to believe that his character may have never experienced real romantic or sexual intimacy, and that his mother is "the woman" in his life. Their dependence on each other may not be all that healthy, but I never read it as being sexual. If anything, it seems like mutual caretaking--especially with scenes like him cleaning up after she gets water all over the bathroom floor.


What I found myself most picking up on and most appreciating in my second viewing of the film was the way that
characters and their "effects" are so frequently separated. In the very beginning, for example, when he's drinking from the fountain but then it pans back and he is gone bu the fountain is still running before it eventually stops. But also in scenes where we hear voices from characters who are not on screen. In terms of the themes of a person's impact on the world, what it means to be present, what is a dream and what is real, and so on, those moments were really popping out to me.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:33 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Yeah, their relationship likely doesn't extend any further than
just him taking care of someone who might need the occasional help.
My parents did a similar thing by letting my mom's mother move into our house after her husband died. I'm sure lots of people do it.

_________________
Top 30 Favorite Films of All Time


Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:41 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Recently Seen

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Yeah, their relationship likely doesn't extend any further than
just him taking care of someone who might need the occasional help.
My parents did a similar thing by letting my mom's mother move into our house after her husband died. I'm sure lots of people do it.


I don't think it's quite that innocuous.

I mean, do you get the impression that
he ever really moved out in any sense of the word? Yeah, he clearly was off in the army or whatever, but their relationship feels more lived-in than just "younger person moves in with elderly relative".

But I really don't think it's sexual in any sense other than the impression I got that his childhood messed up his chances to have a normal romantic/sexual relationship.

I think it's interesting that there are no women (of any significance) in the film of any comparable age to the protagonist. None. There's his elderly mother. There are girls. But in this man's world, they don't really exist.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:55 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 72321 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 1442, 1443, 1444, 1445, 1446, 1447  Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Thief and 28 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware.