It is currently Sat Oct 21, 2017 11:12 pm



Reply to topic  [ 424 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 9  Next
 L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties 
Author Message
User avatar
Reply with quote
 L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Image

There is a scene at the very beginning of Carlo Lizzani's forgotten La Vita Agra (The Sour Life), in which we are first introduced to the film's grumpy protagonist, Luciano, played by an infectious Ugo Tognazzi in his prime, as he wades through the bustling crowds of Milan's iconic "Centrale" railway station. In thick winter overcoat and scarf, he alights the packed escalators that lead up to the platforms, seemingly unchanged 50 years hence, and makes his way to a waiting carriage. Upon locating his significant other, a dark-eyed mistress played by the illuminating Giovanna Ralli, Tognazzi's character begins to make gestures through the closed window, urging and eventually pleading her not to leave. The woman's expression remains implicit, and the train begins to chug away. Just at this moment, a young man appears, throwing an evidently forgotten suitcase up towards someone in an adjacent window. In the scuffle, our protagonist is bumped rather strongly on the head by the hefty case, but the thrower can do nothing but shrug his shoulders. So Luciano trudges away from the scene, picking his way through the sudden wave of passengers that mill around him. "What a blow, guys...", he suddenly remarks above the surrounding din, turning his sparkling gaze to the camera before continuing: "No, I mean, what a blow it is when after a year together she suddenly leaves." This is the magic of sixties cinema in Italy, and few knew its secrets as intimately as the stocky but charming Tognazzi.

This thread represents my attempt at honouring the Età d'Oro or Golden Age of Italian cinema, which to be honest is a term that could be applied to any of a handful of different periods, including not only Neorealism in the forties but also the country's first international successes, released towards the beginning of the 20th century: Giovanni Pastrone's Cabiria in particular, which premiered in 1914 at the White House in front of Woodrow Wilson and his staff, later inspiring Federico Fellini's character of the same name. 26 films shall be featured over the course of the thread: one for each letter of the alphabet, with an emphasis on domestic products. That is, avoiding foreign directors or productions that took place outside of Italy, including the wave of spaghetti westerns that appeared during the sixties, most of which were conceived in Spain, and the slew of Roman epics such as Quo Vadis? and Ben-Hur that were made by foreign hands at Mussolini's purpose-built Cinecittà studios during the prosperous fifties. Despite these external influences and their warping of the Italy's cinematic landscape, bringing new fashions, trends and words to the country's shores, one must also remember that the Italian alphabet is however missing a few letters: J, K, W, X and Y. Hence, some liberties were taken in the construction of this A to Z. Nevertheless, I hope you enjoy this journey as much as I do, and would hope that some readers might also join me in my endeavours as things play out.

ImageImageImageImageImageImageImage
ImageImageImageImageImageImageImage
ImageImageImageImageImageImageImage
ImageImageImageImageImageImageImage
ImageImageImageImageImageImageImage
ImageImageImageImageImage
ImageImageImageImageImage

Image

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Mon May 10, 2010 12:51 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Now we're talking.


Mon May 10, 2010 12:56 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

I love it already.


Mon May 10, 2010 1:00 am
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

I'm excited for this thread. Loved the first post. I'm pretty much a novice on Italian cinema so this should be a good learning experience as well.

_________________
Way cooler than Wil


Mon May 10, 2010 1:16 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Image

Through miserable open spaces he stumbles, feet dragging in the dirt. His lope is slouched, somehow lackadaisical, betrayed by the stunted nature of his physique and permanently puckered face to give the overall impression of a grown child looking for mischief. Indeed, if there were any tin cans in his path rather than dust, rocks and rubble, you could easily imagine him using them as an outlet for his visibly mounting frustration towards life in this, one of Rome's poorest suburban districts. This is Vittorio "Accattone" (a nickname meaning vagabond, scrounger or good-for-nothing) Cataldi, played by Franco Citti, the titular character of Pier Paolo Pasolini's 1961 debut. Poverty, usually manifested in hunger, is a subject that inspired much of Pasolini's work, and as such is responsible for some of its more memorable moments. In Uccellacci e Uccellini (The Hawks and the Sparrows), for example, there is the embattled old mother who locks her hungry children in an upstairs room for days at a time, yelling: "Go back to sleep, it's still dark!" whenever they begin to stir. Here, however, it can be easily summed up using one of the film's more potent lines: "Hey, kid who gave you the habit of eating? That starving father of yours?" One can literally read the generations of hunger and oppression on the faces of those involved, and they are faces that must have seemed alien to Pasolini when he first visited Rome in the mid-forties.

We must remember that Accattone represents Pasolini's very first foray into film, something the man himself pointed out as a significant hindrance, so is rather rough around the edges when compared to the work of his peers. Nevertheless, it has been hugely influential, and from the very beginning, causing many of those it influenced to react in extremely different ways. Bernardo Bertolucci, who was assistant director on the film, stated that he thought he was witnessing the birth of a new breed of cinema at the time, whereas Federico Fellini pulled out of funding the film because he believed just the opposite. Pasolini's approach to poverty, coupled with his conscious use of stark landscapes and inexperienced actors, caused many critics to label Accattone as Neorealist when it was first released. Rather than use this neorealism to illustrate Italy's current economic state, however, Pasolini instead provides an almost constant drip of religious connotations - something that would define his later work - turning his protagonist into a subproletarian Christ-like martyr, who in his inability or refusal to become part of the social landscape through which he so ungracefully ambles - shunning not only a life of kerb-side lounging but also one of honest work - actively challenges the country's social structure. Accattone's death, and his final, almost relieved sentence, therefore becomes a sacrifice to aid Rome's transition to modernity. It is his disintegration, his refusal to integrate into what Pasolini viewed as an almost stagnant culture, that in the end saves him.

Image Image

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Mon May 10, 2010 1:25 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

I've only seen one Pasolini film to date (Porcile) and I don't think I was ready for it personally. I am looking forward to going back to that film at some time and some of his other work. I remember liking parts of Porcile a lot and other parts not so much.

_________________
Way cooler than Wil


Mon May 10, 2010 1:32 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

lackadaisical.

_________________
White Heat • The Tatami Galaxy • Kaiba • The House is Black • Pursued
"It seems to me, the time has come to walk the right way, on the wrong path and there is only one way we won't get lost...-Let's forget each other but let's not forget..." - N.Nikolaidis


A Film By...Sprinter's ListSubtitled (in memories)Poster Extravaganza


Mon May 10, 2010 1:42 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

I didn't like Accattone very much, but Mamma Roma was great.

_________________
“Cinema is neither an art nor a technique, but a mystery.” ~ Godard


Mon May 10, 2010 1:44 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Rdog wrote:
I've only seen one Pasolini film to date (Porcile) and I don't think I was ready for it personally. I am looking forward to going back to that film at some time and some of his other work. I remember liking parts of Porcile a lot and other parts not so much.

I've not seen Porcile personally but it's difficult to know where to start with Pasolini. Films like Accattone and Mamma Roma are slightly more accessible than, say, Uccellacci e Uccellini or Salò, but then you're always going to lose something in translation. It's difficult. The English subtitles for Uccellacci e Uccellini, for example, are so minimal that many of the puns and idiosyncrasies are lost. On top of that, if you're not aware of the political and social climate in Italy during that period, you're going to miss most of the references, nods and jabs that Pasolini lays out. I'd suggest perhaps starting with something like Accattone, if possible, simply because it represents the start of his film career.

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Mon May 10, 2010 1:50 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

JediMoonShyne wrote:
I've not seen Porcile personally but it's difficult to know where to start with Pasolini. Films like Accattone and Mamma Roma are slightly more accessible than, say, Uccellacci e Uccellini or Salò, but then you're always going to lose something in translation. It's difficult. The English subtitles for Uccellacci e Uccellini, for example, are so minimal that many of the puns and idiosyncrasies are lost. On top of that, if you're not aware of the political and social climate in Italy during that period, you're going to miss most of the references, nods and jabs that Pasolini lays out. I'd suggest perhaps starting with something like Accattone, if possible, simply because it represents the start of his film career.


Okay. I'll check out Accattone when I decide to watch Pasolini. As an American I'm interested in learning about Pasolini's films but as you said there are some things that will go over my head simply because I do not know the social standpoint of some things that happened in Italy at certain times.

_________________
Way cooler than Wil


Mon May 10, 2010 1:53 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

It's amazing, really, that both Ugo Tognazzi and Franco Citti are in Casotto. It's like your entire life was a build up to watching that film.

_________________
yours truly,
kayden kross.


Mon May 10, 2010 2:19 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Image

Image Image Image Image
Image Image Image Image
Image Image Image Image

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Mon May 10, 2010 2:52 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

I'm not interested, but thanks anyway.

_________________
2014 in Film: top 25


Mon May 10, 2010 2:59 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Vasco wrote:
I'm not interested, but thanks anyway.

E vai a quel paese!

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Mon May 10, 2010 3:07 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Ahhh, (B) Cinema.

_________________
LEAVES come from TREES
Retired


Mon May 10, 2010 3:23 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Neat.

_________________
no longer on hiatus from movies(!)

next projection | twitter | frames within frames
| letterboxd


Mon May 10, 2010 4:09 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

you put us all to shame.

_________________
Everything around me is evaporating. My whole life, my memories, my imagination and its contents, my personality - it's all evaporating. I continuously feel that I was someone else, that I felt something else, that I thought something else. What I'm attending here is a show with another set. And the show I'm attending is myself. Fernando Pessoa

Live. Laugh. Love. - Freddy Krueger


Mon May 10, 2010 4:26 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

The Gospel According to St. Matthew was pretty good. Oedipus Rex was unimpressive. My Passolini cupboard is rather bare.

_________________
"I hate the dark, the sharks liars. And the stems of cherry..."

Like Someone in Love (Kiarostami, 2012) 4/10
Killing Them Softly (Dominik, 2012) 2/10
The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (Pal/Levin, 1962) 6/10
The Dark Past (Mate', 1948) 7/10
New Rose Hotel (Ferrara, 1998) 3/10


Mon May 10, 2010 5:17 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
 

Pasolini is me
'Accattone' you'll be


Now I know what Morrissey was referring to when he wrote those lyrics. I'll need to see the movie to see if they're just in there because they sound cool or actually weigh in on the meaning of the song. Well, that and the movie sounds pretty good. Fantastic thread, Jedi. Will there be any Bava?

_________________
Recently Ogled
The Road C+
Beetlejuice D
The Ghost Writer B
Zodiac A-
Easy A B


Mon May 10, 2010 6:39 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re:

Birdie Num Nums wrote:
Pasolini is me
'Accattone' you'll be


Now I know what Morrissey was referring to when he wrote those lyrics. I'll need to see the movie to see if they're just in there because they sound cool or actually weigh in on the meaning of the song. Well, that and the movie sounds pretty good. Fantastic thread, Jedi. Will there be any Bava?

Ooh, which song is this?

I'm not the biggest Bava fan, considering the fraction of his work that I have seen, but what would you have me watch?

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Mon May 10, 2010 6:54 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
 

JediMoonShyne wrote:
Ooh, which song is this?

I'm not the biggest Bava fan, considering the fraction of his work that I have seen, but what would you have me watch?

Song: "You Have Killed Me" off of Ringleader of the Tormenters

Bava: Black Sunday, Black Sabbath, Blood and Black Lace, The Girl Who Knew Too Much... I think those are generally considered the standouts of his work in the 60's.

_________________
Recently Ogled
The Road C+
Beetlejuice D
The Ghost Writer B
Zodiac A-
Easy A B


Mon May 10, 2010 7:01 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Re:

JediMoonShyne wrote:
Ooh, which song is this?


"You Have Killed Me"

_________________
"I hate the dark, the sharks liars. And the stems of cherry..."

Like Someone in Love (Kiarostami, 2012) 4/10
Killing Them Softly (Dominik, 2012) 2/10
The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (Pal/Levin, 1962) 6/10
The Dark Past (Mate', 1948) 7/10
New Rose Hotel (Ferrara, 1998) 3/10


Mon May 10, 2010 7:02 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re:

Birdie Num Nums wrote:
Song: "You Have Killed Me" off of Ringleader of the Tormenters

Bava: Black Sunday, Black Sabbath, Blood and Black Lace, The Girl Who Knew Too Much... I think those are generally considered the standouts of his work in the 60's.

The Girl Who Knew Too Much is the only one of those I have shortlisted currently, under "R", of course. Looks good.

Image

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Mon May 10, 2010 7:03 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Image

Like much of Pier Paolo Pasolini's earlier written contributions to the world of film, Mauro Bolognini's Il Bell'Antonio (translated variously as The Beautiful Antonio or Antonio, the Great Lover) couldn't be further removed from his later work as a director. This, Pasolini and Bolognini's penultimate collaboration in a screenwriter-director relationship spanning five films and five years, from 1957 to 1961 (Marisa La Civetta, Giovani Mariti, La Notte Brava, Il Bell'Antonio and La Giornata Balorda), was also their most commercially successful release, thanks largely to the popularity of the Vitaliano Brancati novel upon which it is based. The pair's decision to move Brancati's narrative setting from the height of fascism to the Italian present day, though maintaining the geographical setting, helps create an old-worldly feeling in which the lingering after-effects of fascism in the south are only amplified. These after-effects, among them the myth that masculinity and virility are man's most treasured values, are illustrated through Bolognini's father character, who actively fosters his son's widespread reputation with women by boasting of his apparent exploits to all those in earshot. When the truth is finally revealed, and everyone comes to discover that Antonio isn't even man enough to consummate his own marriage, his father's world and all the crude values that support it suddenly crumble to the ground, finally ending in tragedy for all involved.

Mastroianni's Antonio, who is actively feminized by Bolognini throughout the film - dwelling on his pretty eyes, long lashes, unobtrusive mouth and generally immaculate appearance - draws an interesting parallel to the almost opposite character he played in Federico Fellini's La Dolce Vita, also released in 1960. Bolognini stresses his protagonist's passive qualities, his ease in the presence of male friends, which hints at the character's possible homosexuality though never declares this openly. Looking at some of the director's other works - La Viaccia, Agostino and Senilità, to give but three examples - Bolognini is very much concerned with creating portraits of men who are suffering: inept, impotent, incapable or simply alienated by their destiny. There are some passing resemblances to the work of Visconti, but Bolognini appears more interested in using these male characters to reflect or comment upon particular social perceptions. His young character in La Corruzione, for example, which was released a few years after this, is fresh from boarding school and sets out into the world with the aim of becoming a priest, only to be knocked back by his own industrialist father who believes in a different kind of discipline. Just as with La Corruzzione, Il Bell'Antonio ends with that defiantly un-masculine act of shedding tears, showing Mastroianni's character weeping silently and impassively in the reflection of a darkened mirror as his friend's voice escapes unheard from an idle telephone nearby.

Image Image

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Mon May 10, 2010 7:55 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Faces, shadows.


Mon May 10, 2010 8:02 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

wat

Needs more Rossellini.

_________________
Please TRIP and Die


Mon May 10, 2010 9:33 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Image

Image Image Image Image
Image Image Image Image

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Mon May 10, 2010 3:20 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Question: would people prefer it if I included a synopsis with each write-up?

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Mon May 10, 2010 6:01 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Epistemophobia wrote:
Faces, shadows.


Husbands?

_________________
Please TRIP and Die


Mon May 10, 2010 6:03 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Trip wrote:
Husbands?

Image


Mon May 10, 2010 6:09 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

I see a Fulci there!

_________________
White Heat • The Tatami Galaxy • Kaiba • The House is Black • Pursued
"It seems to me, the time has come to walk the right way, on the wrong path and there is only one way we won't get lost...-Let's forget each other but let's not forget..." - N.Nikolaidis


A Film By...Sprinter's ListSubtitled (in memories)Poster Extravaganza


Mon May 10, 2010 11:44 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Image

It isn't difficult to figure out why most film adaptations fail. Frequently, when considering well-loved pieces of literature, we often find that the film in question does not live up to the standard we have imposed upon it ourselves by reading the book; we have created our own world, our own faces and settings for these characters, meaning that any other take on the material (perhaps even by someone more experienced or attentive than ourselves) will be immediately and perhaps even subconsciously rejected. More importantly than this, however, is that film is often derived from literature simply by studying, translating and then producing said content for the screen. Indeed, very rarely are the most faithful adaptations also the most comprehensive or convincing. The most impressive and long-lasting adaptations are those in which the adaptors overlook words and narrative elements in favour of capturing the essence of what it is being written. This is the approach Bologna-born filmmaker Valerio Zurlini employed when taking on the work of popular novelist Vasco Pratolini; first with Le Ragazze di San Frediano (The Girls of San Frediano) in 1954, and then Cronaca di Familiare (Family Diary), released some seven years later. Based on Pratolini's semi-autobiographical tale, Cronaca di Familiare is told, regretfully, by Marcello Mastroianni's character Enrico as he looks back on a life (or lack thereof) with his younger brother Lorenzo, played by the young French actor Jacques Perrin.

The difference between Pratolini's two brothers is illustrated using a number of subtle techniques by Zurlini and his co-writers: most notably in the way these brothers are dressed. Enrico is swathed throughout in a dark winter coat, reflecting his own brooding personality, and is prone to terrible outbursts of coughing. The innocent Lorenzo, however, is dressed in a long beige coat with patterned socks and leather shoes that must have been considered outgoing at the very least. His light hair and light coat represent the warmth and luxury in which he was lucky enough to be raised; an upbringing which has left him with a positive yet somewhat deluded outlook, and one that isn't clouded like his older brother's. In this, his first full-length colour film, Zurlini uses the paintings of Giorgio Morandi and Ottone Rosai to devise a colour scheme (weathered greys, olive greens, pale blues, and dark browns) that aptly complements this sad tale of loss and regret. Cinematographer Giuseppe Rottuno only furthers this by employing deliberate and slow (albeit very little) camera movement. Cronaca di Familare therefore resembles a subdued but quietly poetic painting, in which colour bursts forth only in the expressions, glances and gestures of the two main characters. Indeed, while the film slips on occasion into uneasy melodrama, thanks largely to an overwrought and rather ungainly score, it is saved by the performances of Mastroianni and Perrin; their chemistry, in which words are not required to depict the love shared between their two characters.

Image Image

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Tue May 11, 2010 12:52 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Sinister wrote:
I see a Fulci there!

Beatrice Cenci? I've not seen it. Good?

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Tue May 11, 2010 1:58 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

JediMoonShyne wrote:
Beatrice Cenci? I've not seen it. Good?

Probably. I have it in my hard drive for over 2 years. :oops:

_________________
White Heat • The Tatami Galaxy • Kaiba • The House is Black • Pursued
"It seems to me, the time has come to walk the right way, on the wrong path and there is only one way we won't get lost...-Let's forget each other but let's not forget..." - N.Nikolaidis


A Film By...Sprinter's ListSubtitled (in memories)Poster Extravaganza


Tue May 11, 2010 2:27 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Kayden Kross wrote:
It's amazing, really, that both Ugo Tognazzi and Franco Citti are in Casotto. It's like your entire life was a build up to watching that film.

Before watching it, I felt as though my whole life had been leading up to that particular moment.

After watching it, I realised just how very useless my life had become.

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Tue May 11, 2010 4:36 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Image

Image Image Image Image
Image Image Image Image
Image Image Image Image
Image Image Image Image

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Tue May 11, 2010 6:22 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

World Champ from Sweden will be watching.

_________________
"I'd prostitute my talents if it would further my cause, steal if there was no way out, kill my friends or anyone else if it would help my art."
Letterboxd.


Tue May 11, 2010 6:24 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Armin wrote:
World Champ from Sweden will be watching.

Can the World Champ guess what's coming up next?

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Tue May 11, 2010 6:31 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

JediMoonShyne wrote:
Can the World Champ guess what's coming up next?

The letter D.

_________________
Everything around me is evaporating. My whole life, my memories, my imagination and its contents, my personality - it's all evaporating. I continuously feel that I was someone else, that I felt something else, that I thought something else. What I'm attending here is a show with another set. And the show I'm attending is myself. Fernando Pessoa

Live. Laugh. Love. - Freddy Krueger


Tue May 11, 2010 6:35 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

JediMoonShyne wrote:
Can the World Champ guess what's coming up next?

Dolce? :shifty:

World Champ is going to sleep, with his shiny belt around his waist.

_________________
"I'd prostitute my talents if it would further my cause, steal if there was no way out, kill my friends or anyone else if it would help my art."
Letterboxd.


Tue May 11, 2010 6:35 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Philosophe rouge wrote:
The letter D.

Sharp as a tack, as always.

Hint: "We would like to thank Piero Tizzoni for allowing us use of his pink beach on the island of Budelli, in Sardinia."

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Tue May 11, 2010 6:53 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Things are happening here & I like them.

_________________
letterboxd | ribbon says so | i got musicals | voluptuous vessel


Tue May 11, 2010 7:52 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Il deserto... pinko

_________________
"So, you see, he was condemned to walk in darkness a quadrillion kilometres (we've adopted the metric system, you know)..."
██████████████████████████████████████████The Devil, The Brothers Karamazov


Tue May 11, 2010 7:55 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

This is a great thread, Jedi.


Tue May 11, 2010 8:24 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Marcello's in everything, isn't he?

_________________
“Cinema is neither an art nor a technique, but a mystery.” ~ Godard


Tue May 11, 2010 10:01 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

Pathétique wrote:
Marcello's in everything, isn't he?

I know, right?

He was just greedy.

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Tue May 11, 2010 3:20 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

A Jedi thread is always welcomed.

Opinion of La legenda del pianista sull'oceano?

_________________
I like the scent of this new forum.

Recent watches:
El Angel Exterminador-8/10
Married Life-6.5/10
Doomsday-7/10
Bright Star-7.5/10
Hurt Locker-7/10
Oldboy-9/10


Tue May 11, 2010 3:25 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

thewandy wrote:
A Jedi thread is always welcomed.

Opinion of La legenda del pianista sull'oceano?

I'm not usually too fond of Tornatore but I must admit, it looks interesting.

Perhaps if I make a nineties thread. :P

Have you seen any of the films featured thus far?

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Tue May 11, 2010 3:42 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

JediMoonShyne wrote:
I'm not usually too fond of Tornatore but I must admit, it looks interesting.

Perhaps if I make a nineties thread. :P

Have you seen any of the films featured thus far?


Nope. Right now my available leisure time is few and far between my work, and the movies I've recently watched are all Asian or horror movies. But maybe a few might pop up that I recognize; anyways I'll just add this to my enormous backlog of films I am supposed to watch.

_________________
I like the scent of this new forum.

Recent watches:
El Angel Exterminador-8/10
Married Life-6.5/10
Doomsday-7/10
Bright Star-7.5/10
Hurt Locker-7/10
Oldboy-9/10


Tue May 11, 2010 3:46 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: L'Età D'Oro - An A to Z of Italian Cinema in the Sixties

LEAVES wrote:
Ahhh, (B) Cinema.

I still haven't worked out what this is supposed to mean.

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Tue May 11, 2010 4:37 pm
Profile WWW
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 424 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 9  Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 21 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware.