It is currently Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:24 pm



Reply to topic  [ 1436 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ... 29  Next
 Fitness 
Author Message
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Derninan wrote:
I enjoy those games! Basketball's my strongest sport, and I can hold my own. But yeah...so many selfish fuckers in those games, it's really discouraging. When I get in a game and the team is actually playing, you know, team ball, it's like heaven. So much fun. The high school kids are less selfish, overall, than the older group of guys. Kids who grew up in the 90s had it bad for role models; guys like LeBron James and Steve Nash are bringing unselfish basketball back to the limelight.
Or maybe it's all those movies making fun of the NYC pickup games' players for being ball hogs. Nah, I doubt they'd let it get to them. LeBron can't be a good influence on enforcing traveling.

_________________
LEAVES come from TREES
Retired


Sun Jun 06, 2010 7:16 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Vivacious J wrote:
Netflix Instant has a bunch of exercise stuff to watch. Most of the stuff I bookmarked is geared toward women but there's probably manly stuff in there too. Not that I've ever watched any of it, just found a bunch and saved them a year ago. ha.


Regarding your post before this quoted one - I've heard of/agree with pretty much everything you wrote there. Sadly I think a lot of it comes down to grocery bill, so many of the things you mention that I'd love to subscribe to are a bit out of reach.

I haven't actually looked on Netflix Instant for exercise videos... I should!

QGG wrote:
Gel pads and electric waves. Hmm.


Hehe, yeah... It was during a very lazy time in my life when I had a very poor diet and I happened to catch that infomercial... I got drawn in by a killer price. Of course it did nothing but create really strange (and yeah, surprisingly powerful if ineffective) sensations in my abs. It's a funny conversation piece more than anything else :P

Dern wrote:
From what I've heard/read, stretching after exercise is much more important than stretching before exercise. I need to stretch more, I feel like it's the part of my routine I neglect the most.


I almost never stretch before exercising, so I'm happy to hear many people saying it's unnecessary and even counteractive. I do need to stretch more a la Dern here, though... I do seriously neglect it. The DROM Immaculate is talking about... I'd like to think I partake in that before my workout but I think it'd be more truthful to say I get caught up in conversation and worry more about that than the pre-exercise stuff... then just hop into my initial cardio and gogogo.

Anyway... woke up just a bit ago... took my multivitamin (yeah, I do seem to pee most of it out but for only 4 cents a day I figure it can't hurt), two glucosamine pills and, why not, two grams of fish oil (oh, and my happy pill but that's not for this thread...) and nabbed a decent amount of carbs/protein for breakfast... aiming to hit the community gym for hopefully at least 90 minutes 2 hours from now after which I'll return and chomp down some protein then repeat in an hour. Wonder when my whey is gonna show up... Amazon Super Saver Shipping is so slow :P

_________________
we told you what to dream
twitter
letterboxd
last.fm


Sun Jun 06, 2010 11:24 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Interesting, I suppose...

Maria Cheng (AP) for MSNBC wrote:
Running on empty may not be such a bad idea after all.

Though many athletes eat before training, some scientists say that if you really want to get rid of more fat, you should skip the pre-workout snack.

Several studies suggest exercising while your body is low on food may be a good way to trim excess fat. In a recent paper, European researchers found that cyclists who trained without eating burned significantly more fat than their counterparts who ate.

Muscles usually get their energy from carbohydrates, which is why athletes like Lance Armstrong and Michael Phelps scarf down enormous amounts of food before a race. But if you haven't eaten before exercising, your body doesn't have many carbohydrates in reserve. That forces it to burn fat instead, scientists say.

"When you exercise (after fasting), your adrenaline is high and your insulin is low," said Peter Hespel, a professor of exercise physiology at the University of Leuven in Belgium. "That ratio is favorable for your muscles to oxidize (break down) more fatty acids." Hespel said that people who exercise without having eaten burn more fat than they would if they had grabbed a bite beforehand.

In a study published in April, researchers at the University of Birmingham and elsewhere assigned seven people to cycle three days a week, followed by an intense session an hour later without eating. Another seven people followed the same regimen, without the instruction to fast.

Though members of the group that didn't eat performed worse on the intensive training, they burned a higher proportion of fat to carbohydrates than the group that ate. The results were published by Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, the journal of the American College of Sports Medicine.

In a 2008 study, Hespel and colleagues tested the effects on men who did endurance training without eating versus those who ate. In the athletes who hadn't eaten, the researchers found a spike in the amount of proteins needed to process fat, meaning their bodies had been primed through fasting to burn more fat.

Hespel recommends people do this kind of training before breakfast, since eating carbohydrates interrupts the process of metabolizing fat for about six hours afterward.


The full article is here: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/37492881/ns/health-fitness/ and it concludes with this:

Quote:
Others were more skeptical and said people shouldn't exercise without having at least a small snack first.

"I think it's actually a pretty bad idea," said Dr. Alexis Chiang Colvin, a sports medicine expert at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York who has worked with professional football and hockey teams.

"If your blood sugar is low, you could wind up getting dizzy and you might not be able to exercise as well as if you were well-nourished," she said. Colvin recommended having something small like a banana before training. She also warned the strategy might make people more prone to injury and that eating was important so the body would have enough nutrients to recover from a bout of exercise.

Hespel acknowledged the method wasn't for everybody and that aside from the pain of struggling through an exercise session while hungry, there are other potential pitfalls.

"When you postpone breakfast to exercise, it is possible you might eat more afterwards," he said. "People exercising (without eating) need to respect all the normal strategies of weight control like not overeating."

Daniel Kobbina, a personal trainer who also runs a martial arts school in London, said the method requires discipline — but it works.

"If you train on an empty stomach, you'll see that six-pack a lot sooner," he said.


There's also an article on there claiming exactly what Immaculate was saying - stretching before a workout is counteractive.

_________________
we told you what to dream
twitter
letterboxd
last.fm


Mon Jun 07, 2010 12:16 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

6'. Used to be close to 190lbs. So, overweight. Started to exercise and eating healthier. Plus, I had then recently been diagnosed with a hernia and acid reflex (which is not much of a concern anymore), on top of living with a physically disfigured jaw which made eating (and speaking) more of a chore (I still have it, for now). Went down to like 150-160lbs, where I stayed for a few years - most of high school. Finishing my last year of high school now, and I'm up to 170s now. I'd like to get back into exercising again. I'm not fat by any means, but there's definite noticeable flab that I could do without. Also, a lot of my jeans are tight on me now, and that sucks. Losing some mass would be a lot more cost-friendly than buying more clothes.

_________________
Rate Your Music / MUBI


Mon Jun 07, 2010 1:21 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

From face-pictures I've seen of you, Trev, it seems like you're naturally slim... bone structure-wise, that is. I take after my father's side of the family in that I'm a little more broad... I dunno what an ideal weight would be for me at 6' 2" but in high school when I was a few inches shorter I was 150-155. I'm kinda talking out of my ass here because I dunno what bone structure or whatever has to do with anything, but y'know... um... yeah. I need to find my camera charger so I can get a picture up here.

I got back from my workout about half an hour ago and loaded up on a cup of cottage cheese and a banana. Immediately before the workout I had a Powerbar. There's a relatively decent stroll to/from the community gym so that's sort of a warm-up/cool-down (I wear my weighted gloves and do a sort of pseudo-power-walk) but I also did two rounds on the hardest course on Antigrav before heading out. In the gym I worked myself harder than I have in probably 10 years with 45 minutes on the random setting of the elliptical, trying to keep the RPM (or whatever that number indicates) at least above 65 most of the time. I then did all the freeweights/chest presses I could handle, upping the weight a few notches from what I'm used to doing. I'm still not counting reps but I'm trying to go until I can't go n'more, taking a break then going again... I'm getting better at kicking my ass to the limit, I think. I did some ab work when I got home... leg lifts, crunches and... curls? The thing where you sorta crunch your legs up into your chest... small but powerful.

Two questions for anyone...

Showers - as nice as it is to take a cold shower after a hard workout, I've heard that it's better for your muscles to take a warm one... so that's what I've been doing. What's your insight on the matter?

Working out twice in a day - beneficial? Or would it be better to just work your ass into the ground then recover? Having the baby does make two excursions to the gym a near impossibility (and there are some days during the week where I won't be able to make it down at all) but obviously there are things that can be done at home as well.

_________________
we told you what to dream
twitter
letterboxd
last.fm


Mon Jun 07, 2010 3:18 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

There are two surefire ways to burn fat: don't eat at all and don't eat and then exercise. Oh, also liposuction. I don't think any of them belong in a 'fitness' thread, though.

_________________
LEAVES come from TREES
Retired


Mon Jun 07, 2010 5:55 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Sorry for the day delay.
Mod Hip wrote:
Totally understood. I'm 6' 2", currently 198#... a month ago I was 210# but I've been drilling myself with cardio and doing crunches/freeweights when I can. I'm trying to lose some extra weight and tone... don't really feel the need to become a musclebeast but it'd be nice to get some definition in my upper body.

The amount of muscle you put on is based on many factors so the odds of you, or anyone, become overly muscular without trying to are slim to nil. More specifically, you need to eat with the specific intention of getting big, as your metabolism directly correlates to body weight in an individual without metabolic syndrome. In this, you would have to eat more and more calories in order to sustain any new lean tissue (skeletal muscle) that may result from lifting weights but, as long as you're not eating to become huge, you won't ever become huge regardless of how much resistance training you do. In addition to your cardio work, I'd probably suggest some more weight training if definition is your goal, as adding a bit more muscle will both increase your baseline metabolism and also spread your existing bodyfat over a larger surface area, stretching it and giving you the appearance of being more toned.
Mod Hip wrote:
The main thing that threw me in your previous post was the 'macronutrient' thing.

Macronutrient breakdown is merely the distribution of fats/carbs/proteins within meals and throughout the day. In reality, most don't need to pay attention to this, provided their diet is pretty balanced though discrepancies in certain areas can lead to some physique (and health) issues. I will maintain that paying attention to this distribution is fairly important in and around the time of an exercise bout though.
Mod Hip wrote:
Also, I've actually never heard about carbs AFTER a workout - I learned about carb-loading when I was wrestling in high school but never really knew what it did for your body exactly... just did what the other, more experienced wrestlers were doing. With my girlfriend being the main source of knowledge about this sorta thing right now, I'm doing things that are really suggested for a woman's makeup... but I'm going for it simply because it seems more beneficial than not and I figure something dietary is better than just working out and doing everything else normally. I have tried doing some of my own research but I quickly get search engine overload syndrome.

Yeah, I understand that there's a lot of information out there and it can be hard to filter/process it all. Below I've attached the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) position stand on appropriate physical activity intervention strategies for weight loss and prevention of weight regain for adults, which I hope helps. Also, in regard to ingesting carbs after a workout, it's because they're important for recovery following bouts of exercise, though you needn't go overboard, especially if your goal is fat loss; this intervention is of higher necessity for weight trainers looking to replenish their glycogen scores after a workout.
Vivacious J wrote:
That's what I had read, but what about stretching after? I don't know about what the studies say but I find it very important. Being flexible is underrated.

Stretching after is important, with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching being the most effective according to recent literature. Still, these can be difficult to perform and can lead to unintentional stress on joints and other tissue if done improperly, so I'd only recommend doing these with caution and an experienced trainer. Static stretching can still produce good results following exercise interventions though it's important to avoid certain popular tendencies that can lead to injury: placing hands (and pulling) directly on joint capsules, doing things like hurdler stretches, bouncing (ballistic stretching), doing stretches that distort a joint's normal range of motion due to a postural misalignment, etc...
LEAVES wrote:
If you warm up before you stretch it does help, though, right? If you don't think so, I don't trust your sources. Also, I don't know what DROM means. Sounds like an acronym to convince people that you know what you're talking about without having to tell anyone what you're talking about.

I still wouldn't recommend doing static stretching (stretch and hold) before lifting or training but, if warmed up properly, one can get away with this though the benefits are pretty minimal. Reason being, this kind of stretching can produce micro tears in the muscle tissue, not dissimilar to those caused by resistance training but sans the productivity, which can impede strength output and, in turn, performance. Stretching afterward is now considered to be the best way to implement a stretching protocol into your program.

As for dynamic range of motion stretches (DROM), it's exactly what it sounds like. You're moving your joints through a progressively larger range of motion in order to, among other things, increase blood flow to skeletal muscle and supportive tissue and induce joint lubrication. Generally, these are sport or exercise specific. More information and examples can be found here.
derninan wrote:
From what I've heard/read, stretching after exercise is much more important than stretching before exercise. I need to stretch more, I feel like it's the part of my routine I neglect the most.

Correct. I've been stretching more than I used to in hopes of increasing my shoulder ROM to help my golf game, but this is reserved for after my resistance training.
Mod Hip wrote:
Interesting, I suppose...

Too much muscle wasting. At the very least, a light protein snack or some properly proportioned BCAAs should be consumed to prevent this, unless cardiovascular fitness is the be-all end-all of one's training goals.
LEAVES wrote:
There are two surefire ways to burn fat: don't eat at all and don't eat and then exercise. Oh, also liposuction. I don't think any of them belong in a 'fitness' thread, though.

A smallish reduction in overall calories accompanied with exercise can help burn fat. Knowing that a pound of fat is ~3,500 calories, one can plan accordingly by reducing their overall calories by as little as 250 calories a day and increasing their exercise plan to burn an additional 250 calories a day. This should result in approximate loss of 1 pound per week, which is a healthy rate of weight loss. Obviously, the difficult part is sticking to this, and paying closer attention to your overall energy intake.


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

_________________
Viewed
Girlhood (Sciamma, 2015)
Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation (McQuarrie, 2015)
House of Tolerance (Bonello, 2011)
Tangerine (Baker, 2015)
Snake Eyes (De Palma, 1998)


Reviewed

L'avventuraLa Dolce VitaMy Darling ClementineMaster of the HouseBreaking the WavesPersona

Prereviewed
...


Tue Jun 08, 2010 12:19 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Very helpful, Immaculate - thank you. I downloaded the PDF and bookmarked the DROM link.

_________________
we told you what to dream
twitter
letterboxd
last.fm


Tue Jun 08, 2010 12:29 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Mod Hip wrote:
Very helpful, Immaculate - thank you. I downloaded the PDF and bookmarked the DROM link.

No problem. Also, if bored, I'd recommend browsing the rest of that site (brianmac.co), as some solid information on many aspects of fitness can be found there. Let me know if you have any questions about the PDF -- sometimes they aren't written with the utmost clarity.

_________________
Viewed
Girlhood (Sciamma, 2015)
Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation (McQuarrie, 2015)
House of Tolerance (Bonello, 2011)
Tangerine (Baker, 2015)
Snake Eyes (De Palma, 1998)


Reviewed

L'avventuraLa Dolce VitaMy Darling ClementineMaster of the HouseBreaking the WavesPersona

Prereviewed
...


Tue Jun 08, 2010 12:39 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Phew, I think I sweat more than I ever have ever today. I'm definitely getting better at pushing myself. I chomped down an extra-protein-loaded Powerbar after 4 hours of cardio/freeweights/chest-presses (I was actually counting reps this time... did 3 sets of 20 then lightened the load and did one set of 30) and my girlfriend got on my case because she thinks Powerbars are trash. I'm still doing bananas and cottage cheese (don't know when, if ever, my whey is gonna show up...) but I'm kind of inclined to believe her. Don't want to be counter-acting any hard work.

_________________
we told you what to dream
twitter
letterboxd
last.fm


Wed Jun 09, 2010 6:05 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Immaculate wrote:
I still wouldn't recommend doing static stretching (stretch and hold) before lifting or training but, if warmed up properly, one can get away with this though the benefits are pretty minimal. Reason being, this kind of stretching can produce micro tears in the muscle tissue, not dissimilar to those caused by resistance training but sans the productivity, which can impede strength output and, in turn, performance. Stretching afterward is now considered to be the best way to implement a stretching protocol into your program.

As for dynamic range of motion stretches (DROM), it's exactly what it sounds like. You're moving your joints through a progressively larger range of motion in order to, among other things, increase blood flow to skeletal muscle and supportive tissue and induce joint lubrication. Generally, these are sport or exercise specific. More information and examples can be found here.
I've read the whole thing about the controlled experiment where they have some people who stretch and others who don't and then they lift and then they judge performance and those who stretch perform worse... but who stretches for immediate performance? If long term increases in strength are the same or better, then it's irrelevant about immediate strength unless it's a competition. The other aspect is to reduce injury which, if we're talking about the same study, did not test athletes before competitive sports, only highly controlled weightlifting. I'll trust my body to not be stretched before I go out as soon as those people whose bodies are getting paid tens of millions of dollars per year are entrusted to do it without stretching. Until then, I trust no single study or 'new way of thinking'.

If this thinking is so trusted, why don't professional athletes around the world and their trainers subscribe to it? They seem to do DROM exercises, I see those all the time, but they always, always, always stretch before competition.

_________________
LEAVES come from TREES
Retired


Wed Jun 09, 2010 7:08 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

My whey powder finally showed up today - $36 w/free shipping for 5lbs (69 servings, so 34 or 35 shakes since I'll be doubling up for my body weight)... this article from IntenseWorkout was helpful: http://www.intense-workout.com/post_workout.html

I also looked up some info about that Powerbar I noshed yesterday - this chick liked it in spite of typically being adverse to Powerbars... and her reasoning helped me justify my having partaken in the 30g of protein (and tons of sugar and unnatural crap): http://www.epinions.com/review/Powerbar ... 0318715524

_________________
we told you what to dream
twitter
letterboxd
last.fm


Thu Jun 10, 2010 4:46 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Mod Hip wrote:

My fingers are stronger for having typed them all.

Seriously, I didn't initially intend to unload so much text on y'all... just kinda happened that way :P

See, people don't stop to think that Abe Lincoln was telling the truth when he wrote, "sorry this letter is so long, I didn't have time to write a shorter one."

Leaving out words, thoughts, ideas, sentences...takes a lot of thought, therefore time, and is therefore work.

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Thu Jun 10, 2010 5:22 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Gort wrote:
See, people don't stop to think that Abe Lincoln was telling the truth when he wrote, "sorry this letter is so long, I didn't have time to write a shorter one."

Leaving out words, thoughts, ideas, sentences...takes a lot of thought, therefore time, and is therefore work.


So true. I just started typing that first post after making the banner (which I've since realized has two design-related oversights but oh well) and didn't look back. It's why short stories and short films are tougher to write than novels and features. You have to weigh every word.

_________________
we told you what to dream
twitter
letterboxd
last.fm


Thu Jun 10, 2010 5:25 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

LEAVES wrote:
I've read the whole thing about the controlled experiment where they have some people who stretch and others who don't and then they lift and then they judge performance and those who stretch perform worse... but who stretches for immediate performance? If long term increases in strength are the same or better, then it's irrelevant about immediate strength unless it's a competition.

This depends on what program one's using, as many are dependent on day-to-day improvement in the areas of major lifts. Nonetheless, my point, as stated, wasn't to at all costs avoid static stretching prior to working out, just that it's not very beneficial, possibly even detrimental.
LEAVES wrote:
The other aspect is to reduce injury which, if we're talking about the same study, did not test athletes before competitive sports, only highly controlled weightlifting. I'll trust my body to not be stretched before I go out as soon as those people whose bodies are getting paid tens of millions of dollars per year are entrusted to do it without stretching. Until then, I trust no single study or 'new way of thinking'.

So why does stretching before a bout of exercise or competition ward off injury? Stretching can acutely improve joint mobility but this effect is transient and disappears quickly following cessation, which is why the ACSM and the like recommend a stretching protocol of 3-5x per week in order to increase flexibility. Other than that, the supposed purpose of stretching is to increase blood flow to the muscle, which is better achieved through more dynamic means. When working out, for example, ~70-80% of the body's blood is transported to and through skeletal muscle -- a far greater percentage than what can be achieved through stretching. Furthermore, sport specific warm ups better lubricate the body's joints and, if done through a progressive range of motion, can "loosen" the body up, so to speak, just as well as static stretching can in addition to being relevant to the task at hand. So, again, I don't really see the need if you're taking a comprehensive enough DROM approach.
LEAVES wrote:
If this thinking is so trusted, why don't professional athletes around the world and their trainers subscribe to it? They seem to do DROM exercises, I see those all the time, but they always, always, always stretch before competition.

The thinking is new and people are wary of what's new, especially in an industry with no real regulation or professional standardization -- dogmatic practices still rule. That said, I can think of no major physiological advantage to doing this particular type of stretching before an exercise bout or competition, which is all I'm trying to convey. Still, I wouldn't cite top level professionals as the best examples, as they're still prone to poor posture and dangerous techniques. Hell, I could watch any football team stretching together before a game and point out a handful of guys whose form should be monitored more closely and corrected accordingly. It seems that, of late, stretching is more beneficial to a team's sense of unity and collective spirit than it is to their actual performance. Again, you can stretch till your heart's content, but I'll be waiting until I finish my session.
Mod Hip wrote:
My whey powder finally showed up today - $36 w/free shipping for 5lbs (69 servings, so 34 or 35 shakes since I'll be doubling up for my body weight)... this article from IntenseWorkout was helpful: http://www.intense-workout.com/post_workout.html

I also looked up some info about that Powerbar I noshed yesterday - this chick liked it in spite of typically being adverse to Powerbars... and her reasoning helped me justify my having partaken in the 30g of protein (and tons of sugar and unnatural crap): http://www.epinions.com/review/Powerbar ... 0318715524

I wouldn't double up the servings, as, if taken with milk, a normal shake will provide you with ~30g protein, which is about what your body can digest. You'd be better off either spreading out your servings or obtaining more protein via wholefood sources. As a rule, I'm not much a fan of bars either, but they're okay from time to time. I just wouldn't make them a staple of your diet.

_________________
Viewed
Girlhood (Sciamma, 2015)
Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation (McQuarrie, 2015)
House of Tolerance (Bonello, 2011)
Tangerine (Baker, 2015)
Snake Eyes (De Palma, 1998)


Reviewed

L'avventuraLa Dolce VitaMy Darling ClementineMaster of the HouseBreaking the WavesPersona

Prereviewed
...


Thu Jun 10, 2010 6:57 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Cool, thanks, Immaculate. That's a good point about the powder - the stuff i read was talking about mixing with water and I'll be mixing with milk and banana. I do consume much more protein at other times in the day, too, so I should be all set and feeling better in the pocket for it, what with the halving the rate by which I go through the whey. And yeah, the main thing my girlfriend was freaking out about was the idea she concocted that I was eating Powerbars breakfast, lunch and dinner. Just happens there was a sale on 'em so I picked a few up and I've only used 'em when I feel the time is right... I certainly haven't used them as replacement for anything.

_________________
we told you what to dream
twitter
letterboxd
last.fm


Thu Jun 10, 2010 7:17 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

No problem. Milk makes shakes more palpable and, moreover, provides a different type of protein (casein) than whey. Casein digests at a slower rate than whey, providing you with a prolonged state of nutrient release. Still, animal protein is considered top tier.

_________________
Viewed
Girlhood (Sciamma, 2015)
Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation (McQuarrie, 2015)
House of Tolerance (Bonello, 2011)
Tangerine (Baker, 2015)
Snake Eyes (De Palma, 1998)


Reviewed

L'avventuraLa Dolce VitaMy Darling ClementineMaster of the HouseBreaking the WavesPersona

Prereviewed
...


Thu Jun 10, 2010 7:23 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Immaculate wrote:
No problem. Milk makes shakes more palpable and, moreover, provides a different type of protein (casein) than whey. Casein digests at a slower rate than whey, providing you with a prolonged state of nutrient release. Still, animal protein is considered top tier.


I had read up on the casein thing a few days ago - almost considered getting a drink mix that has both whey and casein but it was too pricey... and of course I'm taking in casein anyway so... yeah, I'll definitely feel good after a workout knowing that stuff's coursing through my body, especially now that I'm pushing myself harder. I have started to see some upper body definition, particularly in my triceps. As for weight... I'm not sure how accurate my scale is (it's a cheapy from Wal-Mart, I think) but where I was 198 a few days ago, I'm now fluctuating between 202.5 and 204.5. I'm not too worried about it for a handful of reasons and variables to be considered but y'know. As for today, since I worked myself pretty hard yesterday I took it easy... did some easy rounds on that hoverboarding game (enough to work up a sweat) and did some laps/inflatable-assisted ab stuff in the pool and called it good. Hoping to nail the gym tomorrow, get home and "shake" it up.

_________________
we told you what to dream
twitter
letterboxd
last.fm


Thu Jun 10, 2010 7:49 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Immaculate wrote:
This depends on what program one's using, as many are dependent on day-to-day improvement in the areas of major lifts. Nonetheless, my point, as stated, wasn't to at all costs avoid static stretching prior to working out, just that it's not very beneficial, possibly even detrimental.
I would think, like any other load bearing cord, the question of whether or not it gets injured is one of tension. I know that stretching the calves can reduce the pressure on the plantar fascia by up to 300% due to a more balanced distribution of the load. This may translate to the muscles in the foot, as well, I don't know. If these exercises that increase lubrication and blood flow do nothing about the tension in a muscle, then they seem for the untrained mind to be irrelevant. Now, if they do the same relaxing of tension as stretching, that's the important answer, or if the relaxing of tension is illusory or irrelevant, that's another answer. I'd think there would be something about that aspect, since neither joint lubrication nor blood flow seem to have much to do with muscle injuries. You say 'loosening' offhand, as if that isn't issue at hand.

In digging around, it seems that stretching is absolutely mandatory and does have a mechanical relaxation of tension:

'Controversy remains about the extent to which dynamic warm-ups prevent injury. But studies have been increasingly clear that static stretching alone before exercise does little or nothing to help.'

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/02/sport ... .html?_r=1

Stretching is essential, but it must come with a warmup, and the stretching itself is better if done dynamically, says this article. It says that the physical stretching of the muscle is important, for those same mechanical reasons that are obvious, but the preferred method has to do with the brain, not the muscle. Blood flow and joint lubrication are elements of power that are largely irrelevant to and not sufficient for preventing injury. That makes sense. Thus, stretching is good and highly necessary, but static stretching is bad. Is this basically what you were trying to say, but using acronyms which are meaningless to me? It doesn't seem so, and this article seems to disagree with you. Or, at least, it seems to explain explicitly that these DROM things you speak of are stretching, and probably induce the same 'microtears' that you speak about. The decrease in performance they say is mental, not physical.
Immaculate wrote:
The thinking is new and people are wary of what's new, especially in an industry with no real regulation or professional standardization -- dogmatic practices still rule. That said, I can think of no major physiological advantage to doing this particular type of stretching before an exercise bout or competition, which is all I'm trying to convey. Still, I wouldn't cite top level professionals as the best examples, as they're still prone to poor posture and dangerous techniques. Hell, I could watch any football team stretching together before a game and point out a handful of guys whose form should be monitored more closely and corrected accordingly. It seems that, of late, stretching is more beneficial to a team's sense of unity and collective spirit than it is to their actual performance. Again, you can stretch till your heart's content, but I'll be waiting until I finish my session.
It's easy for a student to say 'it's new and you're all afraid of what's new'... it's easier for a seasoned professional to say, 'It's new and we're afraid of it because it's wrong.'

_________________
LEAVES come from TREES
Retired


Thu Jun 10, 2010 9:25 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

LEAVES wrote:
I would think, like any other load bearing cord, the question of whether or not it gets injured is one of tension. I know that stretching the calves can reduce the pressure on the plantar fascia by up to 300% due to a more balanced distribution of the load. This may translate to the muscles in the foot, as well, I don't know. If these exercises that increase lubrication and blood flow do nothing about the tension in a muscle, then they seem for the untrained mind to be irrelevant.

Flexibility is more than a muscle's ability to be stretched and generally refers to the potential range of motion around a joint capsule. Two important aspects of this are blood flow - as to increase oxygen and nutrient availability - and joint lubrication. The article you've posted below, which I'll address in more detail in a bit, supports this, citing that muscles from a rabbit could be stretched more before ripping after warming up. Ergo, these two factors are of importance, as they allow the muscle tissue to tolerate greater loads through greater ranges of motion. They are not irrelevant and even your article - which I was quickly going to poo poo, as it's a news article and not a peer reviewed study - states this.
LEAVES wrote:
Now, if they do the same relaxing of tension as stretching, that's the important answer, or if the relaxing of tension is illusory or irrelevant, that's another answer. I'd think there would be something about that aspect, since neither joint lubrication nor blood flow seem to have much to do with muscle injuries. You say 'loosening' offhand, as if that isn't issue at hand.

To an extent, it isn't the issue at hand, nor is "loosening" the technical term, so I make a habit of not using it with much frequency. From the article:
NYT wrote:
A well-designed warm-up starts by increasing body heat and blood flow. Warm muscles and dilated blood vessels pull oxygen from the bloodstream more efficiently and use stored muscle fuel more effectively. They also withstand loads better.

Isn't this, to a tee, what I've been saying? Dynamic range of motion stretches do all of this, which I've already said on at least one occasion here, hence what I said about blood being shuttled to the skeletal muscle system in my last post.
LEAVES wrote:
In digging around, it seems that stretching is absolutely mandatory and does have a mechanical relaxation of tension:

'Controversy remains about the extent to which dynamic warm-ups prevent injury. But studies have been increasingly clear that static stretching alone before exercise does little or nothing to help.'

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/02/sport ... .html?_r=1

Stretching is essential, but it must come with a warmup, and the stretching itself is better if done dynamically, says this article. It says that the physical stretching of the muscle is important, for those same mechanical reasons that are obvious, but the preferred method has to do with the brain, not the muscle.

It's saying that dynamic stretching is essential and static stretching is a waste, which is exactly what I've been saying. I'm not sure how you've misinterpreted so. The quotes below state that one's mental tolerance to pain is higher after performing a static stretch, an inhibitory response is released, and the muscle is weaker.
NYT wrote:
The straining muscle becomes less responsive and stays weakened for up to 30 minutes after stretching.

...

While static stretching is still almost universally practiced among amateur athletes...it doesn’t improve the muscles’ ability to perform with more power, physiologists now agree. “You may feel as if you’re able to stretch farther after holding a stretch for 30 seconds,” McHugh says, “so you think you’ve increased that muscle’s readiness.” But typically you’ve increased only your mental tolerance for the discomfort of the stretch. The muscle is actually weaker.

Which is what I've been saying, sans that the result being partly mental and not wholly physical. I've already stated that dynamic warm-ups should be done through a progressive range of motion. What do you think this means exactly and how does this differ from what the article states?
LEAVES wrote:
Blood flow and joint lubrication are elements of power that are largely irrelevant to and not sufficient for preventing injury. That makes sense.

No it doesn't. The article you posted maintains that muscular activity - provided via electric stimulus - allows for increased range of motion and load tolerance. Another quote, not related to the study but to the matter at hand:
NYT wrote:
When you’re at rest, there’s less blood flow to muscles and tendons, and they stiffen.

LEAVES wrote:
Thus, stretching is good and highly necessary, but static stretching is bad. Is this basically what you were trying to say, but using acronyms which are meaningless to me?

Yes, and what acronyms did I use that I didn't clarify or aren't Googleable?
LEAVES wrote:
It doesn't seem so, and this article seems to disagree with you. Or, at least, it seems to explain explicitly that these DROM things you speak of are stretching, and probably induce the same 'microtears' that you speak about. The decrease in performance they say is mental, not physical.

Funny, as I've acknowledged them as "stretches" from the get go. The difference is the lack of a hold and a static, oftentimes increasing, amount of force put on muscles and tendons as opposed to, in the case of DROM stretches, a progressively expanding range of motion reached through sport-specific movement. So, they may or may not produce the same "microtears," but that ignores the physiological differences between the two methodologies (and the article acknowledges both a mental and physical impediment anyway). Regardless, this isn't the real issue and neither is the neuromuscular decrease in performance, which I was not aware of (learning is power!). I've been saying since we've begun that static stretching is bad and DROM stretches and warm up protocols are good. The article you posted supports this. So I'm not sure what the real issue even is anymore.
LEAVES wrote:
It's easy for a student to say 'it's new and you're all afraid of what's new'... it's easier for a seasoned professional to say, 'It's new and we're afraid of it because it's wrong.'

And it's even easier for a layperson to make this allegation whilst ignoring points about the current state of the industry. And so it goes.

_________________
Viewed
Girlhood (Sciamma, 2015)
Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation (McQuarrie, 2015)
House of Tolerance (Bonello, 2011)
Tangerine (Baker, 2015)
Snake Eyes (De Palma, 1998)


Reviewed

L'avventuraLa Dolce VitaMy Darling ClementineMaster of the HouseBreaking the WavesPersona

Prereviewed
...


Fri Jun 11, 2010 12:16 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

You're right, you've been saying the same things, reading back (although this sentence: 'Stretching afterward is now considered to be the best way to implement a stretching protocol into your program' is awfully misleading, seeing as you are emphasizing the importance of dynamic stretching, right?), but your emphasis on immediate performance and sort of ignoring injury and relegating 'looseness' to a throw-away element, which is the only possible thing I could care about, made me scratch my head. There was definitely some mixed signals.

Also, when you first referenced the notorious 'DROM' it was as 'exercises' rather than stretching, and you then contrasted it entirely with static stretching, which made it sound like these 'exercises' are good and 'stretching' is bad, which I thought was fishy. Turns out 'stretching' is good, still. All is well. I know you're offended that I 'misunderstood' your words, but your words haven't been so clear.

I think the article highlights the differences between dynamic stretching and static stretching without really referencing the actual science of stretching independent of . What about these 'microtears'? Do these not occur in dynamic stretching?

_________________
LEAVES come from TREES
Retired


Fri Jun 11, 2010 12:37 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Google search:

DROM -- fragrances international.
Dromnyc -- restaurant and lounge located in the East Village area.
Drom -- is a commune in the Ain department in Eastern France, according to Wikipedia.

There's also this. It's an introduction to a video we don't see.

Google Scholar has this study, which Immaculate will hate. From 1998. Might be outdated. Another article, more in favor of DROM. There's this, but it's not quite what we're talking about. This one, however, is by far the most useful:

Quote:
There are two main types of stretching, static (holding a stretching exercise in one position without movement) and dynamic stretching, which means moving while stretching (arm swings, knee rotations, neck circles).

Researchers show that athletes should not perform prolonged static stretching before the big game or a key practice session because this slows muscle activation for around an hour afterwards, (Reduced strength after passive stretch of the human plantar flexors, 2000, Fowles). Using dynamic stretching is a wise pre-competition strategy.

Static stretching builds flexibility and should be performed regularly, just not immediately before a big game or a key practice session.

Warming up prior to a high-intensity, ballistic, athletic event is an absolute rule - never to be broken, and stretching can be combined (multi-tasked) as part of the warm-up. The goal of the warm-up is to get the blood flowing and raise body temperature (one degree) prior to athletic competitions and high-intensity training. It's desirable to have the athlete's muscle, ligaments, and joints experience the functional range of motion required of the sport during the warm-up.


So, okay. That's at the bottom of the second page of Google search for Dynamic Range of Motion. DROM by itself gave me very little. Combining Dynamic Range of Motion AND Stretching, I get more useful stuff, this time on the first page of Google Search. There's this, with some dynamic stretching techniques. And this, comparing static and dynamic stretching. Immaculate-friendly material here:

Quote:
Research has shown that static stretching can be detrimental to performance and doesn’t necessarily lead to decreases in injury.

Quote:
New research has shown that static stretching decreases eccentric strength for up to an hour after the stretch. Static stretching has been shown to decrease muscle strength by up to 9% for 60 minutes following the stretch and decrease eccentric strength by 7% followed by a specific hamstring stretch. (4)

Quote:
Many of the best strength coaches support the use of dynamic stretching. Dynamic stretching consists of functional based exercises which use sport specific movements to prepare the body for movement.

Quote:
There are few sports where achieving static flexibility is advantageous to success in the sport. Therefore according to the principle of specificity it would seem to be more advantageous to perform a dynamic warm-up which more resembles the activity of the sport.(12)


This is what I got through Google. Conclusions for the following Immaculate-LEAVES debate: fewer acronyms equals more understanding; DROM equals fragrances.


Fri Jun 11, 2010 1:06 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

You also have to figure that unreliability of sources is ever-present on random google searches and ever-shifting terminology can mislead.

Also, none of that seems to say what the dynamic stretching actually does as far as 'stretching' is concerned, it just says, "It's better, even though it's the same, but that other stuff sucks."

Also when they cite these numbers, is that 'static non-warmup of any type' or is it the same regardless of warmup or not and does it change if you do the DROM stretches in conjunction with static stretches as the bottom of that NY Times article referred to where it showed marked reduction in injury rates? Not clear, not clear at all.

_________________
LEAVES come from TREES
Retired


Fri Jun 11, 2010 1:08 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

LEAVES wrote:
You also have to figure that unreliability of sources is ever-present on random google searches and ever-shifting terminology can mislead.

Also, none of that seems to say what the dynamic stretching actually does as far as 'stretching' is concerned, it just says, "It's better, even though it's the same, but that other stuff sucks."


They do, though. Repeatedly.


Fri Jun 11, 2010 1:11 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Beau wrote:
They do, though. Repeatedly.
They give you the difference between the two, not the common, and since the element that is called 'stretching' is essential, you'd think that would be the backbone of the topic, not just 'this is better than that'.

_________________
LEAVES come from TREES
Retired


Fri Jun 11, 2010 1:12 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

LEAVES wrote:
They give you the difference between the two, not the common, and since the element that is called 'stretching' is essential, you'd think that would be the backbone of the topic, not just 'this is better than that'.


Immaculate said we should Google. I did and got some stuff. I have absolutely no stock in this debate at all. I don't know why stretching should be the topic of discussion when you're discussing two stretching techniques. I would like to think you're already referring to stretching when the discussion is about two ways of stretching. How much more stretching do you want? None of the articles are arguing against stretching. They're just comparing the results of two ways of stretching, one of which, since it prepares you for movement, is more conductive to activities in which you move.


Fri Jun 11, 2010 1:20 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Beau wrote:
Immaculate said we should Google. I did and got some stuff. I have absolutely no stock in this debate at all. I don't know why stretching should be the topic of discussion when you're discussing two stretching techniques. I would like to think you're already referring to stretching when the discussion is about two ways of stretching. How much more stretching do you want? None of the articles are arguing against stretching. They're just comparing the results of two ways of stretching, one of which, since it prepares you for movement, is more conductive to activities in which you move.
Because of the prevalence of anti-stretching rhetoric which stressed the importance of 'exercises' over 'stretching'. Immaculate is certainly arguing against static stretching, which not all sources do.

In fact, static stretching is prescribed for a lot of therapeutic instances and the static flexibility is important - in preventing injury, for me. A physical therapist prescribed stretching after years of trouble, it worked, good news. Almost all of these articles on stretching are simply in regards to results in strength, and that's IE's apparent main concern, but certainly not mine. I stretch to prevent a specific injury as prescribed by a licensed physical therapist. Stretching is good.

_________________
LEAVES come from TREES
Retired


Fri Jun 11, 2010 1:23 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

LEAVES wrote:
[Because of the prevalence of anti-stretching rhetoric which stressed the importance of 'exercises' over 'stretching'. Immaculate is certainly arguing against static stretching, which not all sources do.


Whatever. That's in one of the articles I posted. Or that I thought I posted. I now see the link is wrong. My apologies. Anyhow, the whole beginning of that article refutes anti-stretching rhetoric, then moves on to the comparison of two ways of stretching. Immaculate is arguing against static stretching. That's one kind of stretching. He prefers another sort of stretching, dynamic stretching, which emphasizes movement instead of maintaining a stretched position for thirty seconds, which is static stretching and which doesn't prepare the body for movement. You've gotten all hung up on the no-stretching argument, maybe due to Immaculate's phrasing. I certainly don't care, though. Not rooting for him either, since that long post was a slight jab at his "hey, this is easily Googleably, yo!" stance.


Fri Jun 11, 2010 1:30 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Beau wrote:
Whatever. That's in one of the articles I posted. Or that I thought I posted. I now see the link is wrong. My apologies. Anyhow, the whole beginning of that article refutes anti-stretching rhetoric, then moves on to the comparison of two ways of stretching. Immaculate is arguing against static stretching. That's one kind of stretching. He prefers another sort of stretching, dynamic stretching, which emphasizes movement instead of maintaining a stretched position for thirty seconds, which is static stretching and which doesn't prepare the body for movement. You've gotten all hung up on the no-stretching argument, maybe due to Immaculate's phrasing. I certainly don't care, though. Not rooting for him either, since that long post was a slight jab at his "hey, this is easily Googleably, yo!" stance.
Internet is unreliable, IE's writing is unreliable, hence why the debate and the debate over all sides of the issue. Seems clear and justified to me.

_________________
LEAVES come from TREES
Retired


Fri Jun 11, 2010 1:32 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

LEAVES wrote:
Almost all of these articles on stretching are simply in regards to results in strength, and that's IE's apparent main concern, but certainly not mine. I stretch to prevent a specific injury as prescribed by a licensed physical therapist. Stretching is good.


Who cares about your concerns? Immaculate's main business here is telling others how to grow muscles. If you have another business, then it is to be expected that his advise will not apply to you. I don't see why our keyboards had to suffer our fingers so much as a result.


Fri Jun 11, 2010 1:36 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Beau wrote:
Who cares about your concerns? Immaculate's main business here is telling others how to grow muscles. If you have another business, then it is to be expected that his advise will not apply to you. I don't see why our keyboards had to suffer our fingers so much as a result.
We're all friends here, even you and me. Don't lie to yourself. Give me a hug.

_________________
LEAVES come from TREES
Retired


Fri Jun 11, 2010 1:37 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

LEAVES wrote:
Internet is unreliable, IE's writing is unreliable, hence why the debate and the debate over all sides of the issue. Seems clear and justified to me.


Maybe. You were doing the same thing he and I were doing, though. "I heard." "I read." We can't do much else. None of us are trustworthy. We can have a debate every day like that. Wait.


Fri Jun 11, 2010 1:39 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

LEAVES wrote:
We're all friends here, even you and me. Don't lie to yourself. Give me a hug.


I hug you every day, LEAVES. Every day.


Fri Jun 11, 2010 1:41 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

LEAVES wrote:
You're right, you've been saying the same things, reading back (although this sentence: 'Stretching afterward is now considered to be the best way to implement a stretching protocol into your program' is awfully misleading, seeing as you are emphasizing the importance of dynamic stretching, right?), but your emphasis on immediate performance and sort of ignoring injury and relegating 'looseness' to a throw-away element, which is the only possible thing I could care about, made me scratch my head. There was definitely some mixed signals.

Also, when you first referenced the notorious 'DROM' it was as 'exercises' rather than stretching, and you then contrasted it entirely with static stretching, which made it sound like these 'exercises' are good and 'stretching' is bad, which I thought was fishy. Turns out 'stretching' is good, still. All is well. I know you're offended that I 'misunderstood' your words, but your words haven't been so clear.

I think the article highlights the differences between dynamic stretching and static stretching without really referencing the actual science of stretching independent of . What about these 'microtears'? Do these not occur in dynamic stretching?

I made the mistake of being a little too ambiguous with my language, which is my mistake. Early in the conversation I casually referred to static stretching as merely stretching, for that's the traditional mindset of what stretching is, but I should have done more to clarify the difference between it and other types of stretching. I also realized, and hoped you wouldn't, that I referred to DROM as exercise instead of stretching, though I suppose I get away on the technicality that DROM exercises are stretching exercises. Anyway, I'm not offended at all by the confusion. Sure, I was a little perturbed, but I understand where the mix ups came from. I'll browse some databases this afternoon to see what I can churn up in the way of full text articles on the advantages/disadvantages of static stretching on cellular and applied levels.

As for Beau, yes, that article I'd "hate" is outdated, but that's not really the issue. It's measuring the effects of different stretching protocols on hamstring flexibility, not performance or injury prevention. Earlier, I mentioned that the ACSM (that's the American College of Sports Medicine, so you don't have to Google) recommends static or PNF (proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation) stretching 3-5x a week to improve flexibility. The argument isn't that static stretching doesn't improve flexibility, but that there are better times to implement it than before a workout or performance. That's all. Kudos to you for going the PubMed route though.

Also, I only mentioned it was "Googleably, yo!" because I had already written out the full names for all the acronyms I used, which I then followed with the abbreviations. That was mere frustration on my part.

In other news: Hill Sprints suck.

_________________
Viewed
Girlhood (Sciamma, 2015)
Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation (McQuarrie, 2015)
House of Tolerance (Bonello, 2011)
Tangerine (Baker, 2015)
Snake Eyes (De Palma, 1998)


Reviewed

L'avventuraLa Dolce VitaMy Darling ClementineMaster of the HouseBreaking the WavesPersona

Prereviewed
...


Fri Jun 11, 2010 2:15 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

I run a fairly tough uphill trail at least twice a week and than do crunches, obliques with weights and push-ups and that's it.


Fri Jun 11, 2010 3:30 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

I have Rheumatoid arthritis, so lately exercise has been pretty difficult since at this point I have near-constant pain in my left ankle, both knees and my right hip. I've improved my diet, which has helped, but I need to lose more weight just to take pressure off my lower body. IE or whoever else would know, what would you say is the best possible low-impact workout outside of swimming, which I can't do too much because of my shoulder (which I somehow tore while swimming).

_________________
Recent
Stranger By The Lake (Guiraudie '13)
Like Father, Like Son (Koreeda '13)
When Evening Falls On Bucharest Or Metabolism (Porumboiu '13)
Our Sunhi (Hong '13)
Computer Chess (Bujalski '13)

Blog
Twitter


Fri Jun 11, 2010 5:45 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

bubba, the only thing coming to my relatively uninformed mind is an elliptical, which I use as opposed to a treadmill to avoid joint pain.

I was wiped out by the time I got to the gym today... I still managed 20+ minutes on the elliptical and a few rounds of (counted!) reps on the chest-press. I'm sore and pooped... but y'know, eez good. Will hit the gym again Saturday afternoon. I made my first post-workout shake today with 6oz of milk, a banana and a scoop of whey powder... tasty, tasty stuff! By the by... my bicep curls and military presses have been hurting the back of my neck... my girlfriend says the same thing. I think our form is fine... wazzup widdat?

Also! What tunes do you guys jam during workouts? Here's an off-the-toppa-my-head list o'faves...

Chaiyya Chaiyya Bollywood Joint - Sapna Awasthi & Sukwinder Singh
Misrepresented People - Stevie Wonder
Rapper's Delight - Sugarhill Gang
Robot Rock - Daft Punk
Sensation - Bryan Ferry
Seventeen - Winger
This Blood - Black Lab
Through the Fire & the Flames - Dragonforce
Almost anything by Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich
Almost anything by the Dropkick Murphys
Anything by the Damn Yankees
Almost anything from the Collateral soundtrack
Anything from the Bill & Ted soundtrack
Anything from the Rocky soundtracks

And... of course... Working for the Weekend by LOVERBOY!!!

Image

*air guitar* da-da daa dundododododada, da-da daa dundododododada...

_________________
we told you what to dream
twitter
letterboxd
last.fm


Fri Jun 11, 2010 8:18 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

I should also add almost anything by Poison or Night Ranger to my tunes list :D

Anyway... another question... should I be waiting longer between workouts than 1 day? I try to get in at LEAST a little bit of cardio every day but this past week I've only been going full-force in the gym every OTHER day... and I've noticed that I'm able to do slightly less and less every time. In counting my reps, I'm not really aiming for any specific number... just counting to see how many I do and then trying to hit or surpass that number next round... and I'm not limiting myself to three sets... just doing as many as I can until I can't do n'more. I was able to do about 5 sets of 30 early this week, then two days ago I was only able to do sets of 20-25... then today I struggled to reach 20, typically doing between 14 and 17. I did spend a few hours on my hoverboarding video game working up a good sweat but I worked even harder on it early in the week and it didn't hurt my in-gym performance so I'm wondering if I need to give myself another day of rest between. I noticed Blevo works on different parts of his body for a few days in a row then takes two days off... but my physical goals seem to be different.

_________________
we told you what to dream
twitter
letterboxd
last.fm


Sun Jun 13, 2010 7:04 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Putting these in spoilers so not to disturb any hapless wanderers...

Carrot Top has buffed up! o_O;;

Image

Image

_________________
we told you what to dream
twitter
letterboxd
last.fm


Mon Jun 14, 2010 4:13 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Mod Hip wrote:
Putting these in spoilers so not to disturb any hapless wanderers...

Carrot Top has buffed up! o_O;;

Steroids dude. We don't need a congressional board of review for this one.

_________________
The Director's Cut + Light & Sound Are Ample Food
last.fmdvdsbooksicheck
It's a Wednesday night baby, and I'm alive


Mon Jun 14, 2010 4:21 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Flak wrote:
Steroids dude. We don't need a congressional board of review for this one.


I kinda figured but still o_O;;

_________________
we told you what to dream
twitter
letterboxd
last.fm


Mon Jun 14, 2010 4:23 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Ha, I just learned that Carrot Top goes to the LA Fitness my girlfriend used to frequent in the greater Orlando area. I used to live across the street from it. Apparently he does spinning classes about every day.

_________________
we told you what to dream
twitter
letterboxd
last.fm


Mon Jun 14, 2010 6:42 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Mod Hip wrote:
Apparently he does spinning classes about every day.

More power to him. I took one 20 minute spinning class and nearly died, though, to be fair, I wasn't in the best shape at the time. Anyway, I'll be sure to post something relevant in here tomorrow.

_________________
Viewed
Girlhood (Sciamma, 2015)
Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation (McQuarrie, 2015)
House of Tolerance (Bonello, 2011)
Tangerine (Baker, 2015)
Snake Eyes (De Palma, 1998)


Reviewed

L'avventuraLa Dolce VitaMy Darling ClementineMaster of the HouseBreaking the WavesPersona

Prereviewed
...


Mon Jun 14, 2010 9:26 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Spinning class is not as awesome as I imagined.

_________________
The Director's Cut + Light & Sound Are Ample Food
last.fmdvdsbooksicheck
It's a Wednesday night baby, and I'm alive


Mon Jun 14, 2010 9:36 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

I did two spinning classes in a row once. Tiring.


Mon Jun 14, 2010 9:46 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

spinning is one of the mots difficult fitness classes you can do.

_________________
Everything around me is evaporating. My whole life, my memories, my imagination and its contents, my personality - it's all evaporating. I continuously feel that I was someone else, that I felt something else, that I thought something else. What I'm attending here is a show with another set. And the show I'm attending is myself. Fernando Pessoa

Live. Laugh. Love. - Freddy Krueger


Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:34 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Philosophe rouge wrote:
spinning is one of the mots difficult fitness classes you can do.


I really like it, better than riding a real bike for some reason...it's so expensive here to join a spin gym or just a nice gym here...boo.


Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:43 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Vivacious J wrote:

I really like it, better than riding a real bike for some reason...it's so expensive here to join a spin gym or just a nice gym here...boo.

YMCA!

_________________
Everything around me is evaporating. My whole life, my memories, my imagination and its contents, my personality - it's all evaporating. I continuously feel that I was someone else, that I felt something else, that I thought something else. What I'm attending here is a show with another set. And the show I'm attending is myself. Fernando Pessoa

Live. Laugh. Love. - Freddy Krueger


Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:44 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Immaculate wrote:
More power to him. I took one 20 minute spinning class and nearly died, though, to be fair, I wasn't in the best shape at the time.


Word. I had a similar experience. I don't remember exactly how long the class was but the bubbly instructor with her too-loud club music was riding my ass and I was dying on that damn bike. I never went back :P

Quote:
Anyway, I'll be sure to post something relevant in here tomorrow.


Looking forward to it :D

_________________
we told you what to dream
twitter
letterboxd
last.fm


Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:50 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Fitness

Philosophe rouge wrote:
YMCA!


It's pretty far from my apartment. Crunch is the closest, very close, but expensive. Then there's this amazing spinning only gym that Id love to join but it's ridiculously pricey. I guess Lucille Roberts and NY Sports Club are cheap but I am not a fan of cheap gyms. I like to feel like I'm in a sanctuary, use the sauna, have spinning classes, etc. I also like to make excuses about exercise - ha!


Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:52 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 1436 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ... 29  Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 33 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware.