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 Ain't Nuttin' Like The Old School 
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A Word from Trevor

I found myself enjoying hip hop in secret throughout my childhood to preteen years. I credit my decade-plus long fascination in the genre to my older brother, whose adoration for the music was too present too ignore; his bedroom walls covered in posters of 2Pac, his speakers always pounding to the beats of Pac, Eminem, and countless others. I remember watching the documentary Tupac: Resurrection with my brother nine years ago and it sparking a fondness in the artist that has only grown exponentially over the last decade.

My parents were not particularly amused with my brother's passion in hip hop; or at least my mother was indifferent whereas my father was vocal in his contempt. I never admitted to myself in those years that I was a fan, for a few reasons. Partly because of my parents, partly because I didn't want my brother to know he was having as large an influence on me as he was (he undoubtedly sparked my interest in many things, from hip hop to various movies and television shows to comics) as I wanted to form my own identity and interests, and partly because I knew that what I was hearing was 'too adult' for my preadolescence ears.

For many years following I largely ignored hip hop, during what were my 'classic rock' teenage years. But as my music tastes began to broaden more and more, I found myself discovering and exploring genres that were previously never on my radar, and I rediscovered what I once had to listen to in private. It was the Beastie Boys and my reexamination of Eminem that got me interested again. I admired the anarchic antics of the rock-rappers, and my fondness of Marshall which went back to childhood blossomed into a great respect when I went through his albums in full, and I remembered just how personal and powerful this music could be. For some it's a spoken word confessional set to music, with the same directness and harsh truths about living conditions and social imbalance sometimes explored from the finest stand-up comedians and spoken word performers (minus the music). But of course hip hop would be one note if that was all it was; many of its finest pioneers and innovators put great effort into making the music as memorable – and sometimes as important – as the lyrics. And for others, it's all about the beats.

According to my RateYourMusic profile, I've listened to 45 hip hop albums. And yet I still don't feel that I know the music too well. I'm still not at a point where I can successfully articulate my feelings on what I listen to in this genre. Perhaps this experiment will help in that. I gave DJ Jazzy Kurz the task of compiling a list of albums for us both to listen to. I asked for a list that he thought did justice to the essential canon of the genre, that also incorporated some of his lesser known personal favourites, and some stuff that not even he has heard. This will be a chronological exploration, as we listen to and discuss 90 hip hop albums spanning 1982 to 2006.

A Word from Kurz

In the first year of high school (13-14y old) I started listening to contemporary pop music like the other kids were doing. Then, sometime during 1998, 2pac's “Changes” was released as a single and in a way you could say it changed the rest of my adolescent years, or at least until sometime when I was 17. 2pac was already dead, but from the grave he spoke to me in a way no other artist had before at that time. He spoke of a world completely alien to me, yet so compelling. Later I found out that 2pac may never have intended the song to sound like it does, but I didn't know that then. It sounded soulful and even somewhat melodic, yet was dominated by the rhythm and not just instrumentally. His voice, rapping and rhyming were very much a part of the rhythmic seduction.

And this was not the lovey dovey stuff or the simple dance stuff that I heard in most music at the time. In 3 verses 2pac paints a complex picture of urban malaise, black male identity, harsh ghetto life, suicidal thoughts, racism, institutionalized violence, police brutality, both the destruction and economical power of the drug business and much more. In a way, it's almost a state of the union address.

In other words, this was relevant, topical, powerful and engaged me in a way I wasn't aware pop music could do. Soon I started to drift more and more towards hip hop music until it was all I listened to. And not just the more conscious, more political/socially engaged stuff that first drew me in. To this insecure white youth, gangster rap had a great appeal too. Around 2002-2003, however, I started expanding my taste in music and rapidly started to turn my back to rap – by selling my by then sizable collection of hip hop CD's at flea markets.

After entering university, this attitude dissipated and I slowly started to listen to hip hop again. When Trevor recently said he wanted to explore the genre in full I thought it would be fun and interesting to accompany him on this journey, revisiting old favorites from my youth, discussing the essentials and discovering some 'new' stuff along the way. So I made a list of 90 albums for us to go through and discuss, taking us from 1982 to 2006. Which albums? You'll just have to follow and see.

-----

Album #1

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Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five - The Message (1982)

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 12:19 am
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:heart:

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 12:26 am
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My knowledge of hip-hop is appalling, but I'll follow along. At least I've heard #1. I guess I'll wait for your reviews before commenting.


Tue Apr 03, 2012 12:33 am
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Preparation: it's what I like to see.

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 12:35 am
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I love me some Two Pack!

Really looking forward to this thread.

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 1:35 am
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eminem<3

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 1:42 am
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yesyesyesyesyesyesyesyesyesyes


Tue Apr 03, 2012 1:56 am
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I won't deny it, I'm also a straight "ridah".

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 1:58 am
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Very cool idea for a thread.


Tue Apr 03, 2012 2:19 am
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"It's Hammer Time"


Tue Apr 03, 2012 2:25 am
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Great OP. Love hearing stories like that from the people here, and I can identify with both of you. For me, Trev, it was a good friend that got me into hip-hop, and it was around the same age Kurz began obsessing over the music. I've had my ups-and-downs with rap and hip-hop over the years; lately I'm more interested in the production side of things, focusing less and less on the MCs, but I'll be diligently following this thread. I haven't actually listened to much of the genre at all lately, so I just put The Message back on my iPod for easy listening today.


Tue Apr 03, 2012 2:26 am
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Colonel Kurz wrote:
Then, sometime during 1998, 2pac's “Changes” was released as a single and in a way you could say it changed the rest of my adolescent years, or at least until sometime when I was 17. 2pac was already dead, but from the grave he spoke to me in a way no other artist had before at that time. He spoke of a world completely alien to me, yet so compelling. Later I found out that 2pac may never have intended the song to sound like it does, but I didn't know that then. It sounded soulful and even somewhat melodic, yet was dominated by the rhythm and not just instrumentally. His voice, rapping and rhyming were very much a part of the rhythmic seduction.

Now I'm wondering how many teenagers were ushered into the genre by that particular song, given how powerful it was. That said, and to be infinitely pedantic, I'd still consider the likes of Tupac and Eminem as prime examples of rap music - commercial rap music, at that - rather than hip hop. Hip hop, as a genre, maintains a certain connection to its origins - its "cultural pillars", as Wikipedia rather awkwardly puts it. A list of ten hip hop artists/groups, in no particular order, that I'd like to see mentioned:

A Tribe Called Quest
De La Soul
Jurassic 5
Mos Def
The Roots
Brand Nubian
Gang Starr
The Pharcyde
KMD
Pete Rock & CL Smooth

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 3:53 am
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The song that 'did it' for me was LL Cool J's first single 'Radio'. My cousin put it on a cassette with tracks from Biz Markie, Run DMC and others and LL stood out the most for me. Braggadocio came before LL but he perfected the art of boasting. He went on to career defining hits with 'Goin' Back to Cali', 'Mama Said Knock You Out' and even starred in Barry Levinson's crapterpiece Toys.

Very limited radio stations had rap shows then and only station K-Day played rap 24 hours a day. It has since resurrected in several formats and exists today as an oldies rap/r&b station. When I want old school, I turn K-Day on.

I'm sure a whole generation of people were turned on to rap through 'Yo! MTV Raps', one of the few seminal shows on the station besides 'Alternative Nation' and their popular heavy metal show.
They were the first to play videos from De La Soul and the Native Tongues crew. They played real old school videos and up to date stuff. It was the visual bible for hip-hop and the videos were still fresh eyed and in a way innocent. Not all that guns n Cristal n $20,000 Rolex stuff that passes for gangsta today.

Also, hoping to see one of my personal heroes on this thread and one of the great inspirations for East Coast hip-hop. Big L. Long live Big L.


Tue Apr 03, 2012 4:07 am
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I've never cared much for that distinction between rap and hip hop as one being the commercial side and being more "true". Whenever that came up in conversation, I'd always point to what The Blastmaster, The Teacha, KRS-One defined it: Hip hop is the culture/movement as a whole, and rap is just the vocal, rapping part of that. One of the five elements, or if you want, 'cultural pillars'.

That said I'll probably just be using the two words as synonyms.

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 4:08 am
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
A Tribe Called Quest
De La Soul
Jurassic 5
Mos Def
The Roots
Brand Nubian
Gang Starr
The Pharcyde
KMD
Pete Rock & CL Smooth

Based on the half of this list that I do know, I need to check out the other half.

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 4:10 am
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Colonel Kurz wrote:
I've never cared much for that distinction between rap and hip hop as one being the commercial side and being more "true". Whenever that came up in conversation, I'd always point to what The Blastmaster, The Teacha, KRS-One defined it: Hip hop is the culture/movement as a whole, and rap is just the vocal, rapping part of that. One of the five elements, or if you want, 'cultural pillars'.

That said I'll probably just be using the two words as synonyms.


I agree. KRS-One has his own defined set of rules as set out by the Temple of Hip-Hop and talks about the 5 elements.

It's the same as drum n bass for me. Goldie, Grooverider, Roni Size and Fabio still get labeled as both drum n bass/jungle. Makes no different to me. It only differs when you start adding sub-genres like drill n bass (Aphex Twin, Plug, Squarepusher).


Tue Apr 03, 2012 4:25 am
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I always thought of them as synonyms. I realized I was probably wrong, but it didn't concern me.

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 4:51 am
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Are you doing one album per artist? Basically I'm asking if I'll get to relish in more than one Gang Starr album in this thread or not.


Tue Apr 03, 2012 5:26 am
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Derninan wrote:
Are you doing one album per artist? Basically I'm asking if I'll get to relish in more than one Gang Starr album in this thread or not.


Some artists will be featured with a couple albums; I think one artist will get four album appearances.

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 5:29 am
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Trevor wrote:

Some artists will be featured with a couple albums; I think one artist will get four album appearances.
Three artists actually.

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 5:47 am
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Just started the album. It makes me want to go roller skating. FRESHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!


Tue Apr 03, 2012 6:32 am
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I had not listened to this before, beyond the title track of course, which I think I first got to know by coming across the video clip on TV. As it turns out this is the perfect way to start this thread. Not because the album is perfect by any means, but because in a way, it contains the history, present and future status of the genre at that time. The first track, She's Fresh, is almost more of a funk track, showing rap's roots in the funk, with not that much rapping but more of a hype men quality to it that shows how rapping started in the first place: guys rapping over records at parties to get the crowd hyped. The second track takes that funk and turns it into hip hop. Then, Scorpio, is some Afrika Bambaataa type house/electronica/rap crossover that shows how in the early '80s these genres were still intertwined. It's A Shame returns to the funky hip hop of the second track but also introduces the consciousness that's part of what made the title track a classic, and has some turntablism to boot. The next two songs are unfortunate examples of the direction R&B took in the 80s. Thankfully then there's the title track, maturing the genre and elevating it beyond party music just to make people dance, though not sacrificing any funk at the same time. It's slower tempo places a focus on the lyrics more than anything going on in hip hop at the time, detailing inner city problems, both the practical issues and the emotional response to these. It also marks the rise of the MC over the DJ in the hierarchy of hip hop, as Grandmaster Flash was not even involved in this song. Instead, rapper Melle Mel, then just one of the Furious Five, takes the spotlight and runs with it. A landmark album, even with the two weak songs.

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 6:33 am
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You go through this song by song and you don't mention how groundbreaking Adventures is?
EDIT: I guess you could not count it as part of the album, which would also explain why I am familiar with a different album cover.


Tue Apr 03, 2012 6:49 am
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Yeah, it isn't on the album. But please, do elaborate about how it's groundbreaking.

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 6:59 am
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mm, I remember getting into hip-hop in the early 00's, it was Tribe and some of Dilla's Busta Rhyme remixes on a friend's stereo that really got me interested, my parents never really gave a shit about it, which I guess is fortunate for me.

Hope to see people who don't really get their due in this thread, Stetasonic for example, first real hip-hop band, but I so rarely see them get their due.


Tue Apr 03, 2012 4:45 pm
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Colonel Kurz wrote:
I've never cared much for that distinction between rap and hip hop as one being the commercial side and being more "true". Whenever that came up in conversation, I'd always point to what The Blastmaster, The Teacha, KRS-One defined it: Hip hop is the culture/movement as a whole, and rap is just the vocal, rapping part of that. One of the five elements, or if you want, 'cultural pillars'.

That said I'll probably just be using the two words as synonyms.

I wouldn't say that one is the commercial side and the other is more "true". Both have their commercial side, but rap has more power commercially. Hip hop is generally more conscious of its roots, and probably more socially conscious in general. MCing is a part of both.

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 5:09 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
Now I'm wondering how many teenagers were ushered into the genre by that particular song, given how powerful it was. That said, and to be infinitely pedantic, I'd still consider the likes of Tupac and Eminem as prime examples of rap music - commercial rap music, at that - rather than hip hop. Hip hop, as a genre, maintains a certain connection to its origins - its "cultural pillars", as Wikipedia rather awkwardly puts it. A list of ten hip hop artists/groups, in no particular order, that I'd like to see mentioned:

A Tribe Called Quest
De La Soul
Jurassic 5
Mos Def
The Roots

Brand Nubian
Gang Starr
The Pharcyde
KMD
Pete Rock & CL Smooth

:heart: :heart: :heart:
Pete Rock and CL Smooth made 2 of the greatest hip hop albums that no one ever listened to.
"He's a SWEET Soul Brother....Soul Brother #1, here I come on the new tip.."

I remember when I heard T.R.O.Y that completely changed my view of hip hop. Once I got my hands on both albums I could never stop listening to them. And just in my opinions some of the instrumentals Pete Rock chose to preface/end songs with are sometimes better than the actual song instrumental.


Tue Apr 03, 2012 5:25 pm
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Ace wrote:
Pete Rock and CL Smooth made 2 of the greatest hip hop albums that no one ever listened to.
"He's a SWEET Soul Brother....Soul Brother #1, here I come on the new tip.."


I can concur with this statement.

The same could be said of Big L's Lifestylez ov da Poor & Dangerous but he died before he could achieve fame.


Tue Apr 03, 2012 5:33 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
I wouldn't say that one is the commercial side and the other is more "true". Both have their commercial side, but rap has more power commercially. Hip hop is generally more conscious of its roots, and probably more socially conscious in general. MCing is a part of both.

I still find this incredibly vague. And yes, infinitely pedantic. Looking up if there's any agreement on this pedantic issue I came across so many different definitions, ranging from something similar to what you're saying to 'hip hop is upbeat dance music vs. rap is the kind where the lyrics matter more', so I'll just stick to my original inclination and use the two indiscriminately. Sorry if that's gonna drive the pedantic in you crazy. :P

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 7:52 pm
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Colonel Kurz wrote:
Sorry if that's gonna drive the pedantic in you crazy. :P

Ha, of course not. Go ahead! :D

It's important to consider both terms - too many people I speak to insist on using one or the other.

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Tue Apr 03, 2012 9:32 pm
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Listened to the album twice yesterday. Man, it brought me back.

Favorite track is still "She's Fresh," heh, which almost feels like cheating. Funk speaks to my soul. "It's Nasty" and "The Message" aren't far behind, though.

And holy shit, I remember "Dreamin'" being a weird song, but good lord, that song is WEIRD. Almost creepy.

Good first choice.


Wed Apr 04, 2012 2:12 am
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She's Fresh is also my favorite on the album. Super fun track

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Wed Apr 04, 2012 4:35 am
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Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five – The Message (1982)

With the arguable exception of The Sugarhill Gang's Rapper's Delight – an album apparently only noteworthy for its title track and for possibly being the genre's first LP release – The Message is the first classic hip hop album. It doesn't sound much like one would expect out of hip hop in this day and age, but at the same time it's impressive just how solid and distinct the genre was even in its first years of popularity. Rapping is frequently present across the seven tracks, which sound like a conglomerate of pop, funk, R&B, and sometimes even disco and electronia. With its first two songs, the delightfully fun “She's Fresh” and “It's Nasty”, The Message presents itself as party music, a record meant to be enjoyed with the company of friends blaring through boombox speakers. The Pitchfork review of this album declares “Scorpio” the strongest track, even saying “The Message” “pale[s] next to [it]”. After a few listens, I don't see it. I guess that's just Pitchfork being Pitchfork. Compared to what follows, though, it's still one of the more memorable tracks; it does the robotic voice very nicely, I'll admit. “It's A Shame” is a competent hip hop number but musically weak and unmemorable. The album falls even more with a rather dreadful ten minutes of ballads; “Dreamin'” and “You Are”, slow and preachy and a mood killer for the otherwise musically upbeat record. The album closer and title track is every bit as great as its opener; at seven minutes it's the longest track, and also the most addictive. It's not the party song that the opening tracks are, however; it moves slower and has a steady beat without much variation so as to not distract from the lyrics which are at the forefront, and it's probably the most politically conscious hip hop track recorded up to that point, not holding back in its depiction of living in poverty.

I can't finish this review without acknowledging the great bonus track/re-addition, “The Adventures of Grandmaster Flash on the Wheels of Steel”, an early and influential example of turntablism/record mixing.

3.5/5*

*I count “The Adventures of” track in with the album. If I didn't, I might have to have went with 3/5, as there are three of the seven original tracks that I don't care for.

Yeah, I realize how just arbitrary rating is, but as I actively update my RateYourMusic profile, I do find it helpful for future reflections.

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Wed Apr 04, 2012 7:32 am
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I thought about doing ratings just for this thread, since I could tell myself it would be just in context of this thread, and then I decided not to as I had tremendous trouble figuring out what rating would make sense for The Message...

Anyway, the next album will be:

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Wed Apr 04, 2012 7:36 am
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Great write-ups. I was never too fond of that Run DMC, but I'll spin it again and see if anything has changed over the years.


Wed Apr 04, 2012 10:59 am
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Colonel Kurz wrote:
For many years following I largely ignored hip hop, during what were my 'classic rock' teenage years. But as my music tastes began to broaden more and more, I found myself discovering and exploring genres that were previously never on my radar, and I rediscovered what I once had to listen to in private.

I had a very similar experience. After loving hip-hop in middle school, I more or less ignored it until I got to college, but now it has become such a large part of my life (to the extent that I spent a good amount of my junior year on music video shoots for people in the Boston hip-hop scene) that I cannot, for the life of me, see why I ever left it behind. I'm very excited to read the rest of this thread.
JediMoonShyne wrote:
A Tribe Called Quest
De La Soul
Jurassic 5
Mos Def
The Roots
Brand Nubian
Gang Starr
The Pharcyde
KMD
Pete Rock & CL Smooth

Especially if all these acts are all included

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Wed Apr 04, 2012 11:12 am
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Great thread.

A lot of the old school groups were pretty weak lyrically(as far as complexity goes), but the groovy beats and sounds more than made up for it. A Tribe Call Quest, for me, was so listenable because of their smooth sounds, both in terms of instrumentals and voice work. Lyrically, they were fairly average.


Wed Apr 04, 2012 1:04 pm
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Speaking of...

this is pretty sick beat. or so i think.



Wed Apr 04, 2012 1:07 pm
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intherealmofsense wrote:
A Tribe Call Quest, for me, was so listenable because of their smooth sounds, both in terms of instrumentals and voice work. Lyrically, they were fairly average.

The first verse of Excursions is often named as a favorite, though.

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Wed Apr 04, 2012 6:54 pm
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In honour of this thread, I've decided to listen to hip hop (almost) exclusively this week.

And fuck, I forgot how incredible this album is:


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Wed Apr 04, 2012 7:11 pm
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Post Re: Ain't Nuttin' Like The Old School

Tribe's excellent flow and ability to really control the pace of a verse really set them apart, but so did their lyrics, they might not seem like the most original listening to it today, but you got to remember, Tribe explored a lot of stuff that was relatively untouched by their contemporaries lyrically, feminism, delusion with money, even date-rape. They weren't ever really average, and I don't think you can reasonably say that if you actually consider their impact and the culture at the time they were most active.


Wed Apr 04, 2012 7:13 pm
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Post Re: Ain't Nuttin' Like The Old School

Canibus! I forgot all about him... :oops:

And Das is right.

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Wed Apr 04, 2012 7:20 pm
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There's quite a few nods to Native Tongues and even Tribe on the new De La Soul presents Plug 1 & Plug 2 album. I haven't given extensive listens but they make nods to Microphone Mathematics, Can I Kick It and a few others. Even on the new Slum Village mixtape they rework a Tribe track w/ De La. Later this year will present the Black Star reunion album and the first track I heard is fantastic.

These write-ups are good, but right now I'm mainly focusing on current hip-hop, SPACEGHOSTPURPP, Clams Casino and likes that are definitely influenced by that whole movement, but equally immersed in smoked-out boards of canada like electronics (check A$AP ROCKY's 'Pesos' produced by Clams Casino). Will be reading on.

As far as pot rap, don't forget Devin tha Dude. Way, way before Wiz, Khalifa and the others. And of course one of my favorite not mentioned a lot rappers, Jeru the Damaja. Hope to see a mention here.


Wed Apr 04, 2012 9:38 pm
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Mya daughter apparently loves to dance to Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five. She only took a small break to sit and take a drink of milk during our initial run through of the album. I joined her dancing for several songs. Great way to start this thread. We'll be following along, I'm sure. :D

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Wed Apr 04, 2012 10:47 pm
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Run-D.M.C. - Raising Hell

The album to launch hip hop into the mainstream? Not really, but it is the first real step into that direction, thanks to producers Russell Simmons and Rick Rubin, who came up with the idea to combine Run DMC's hard hitting rhyming and boasting with Aerosmith's rock sound, resulting in a remake of Walk This Way - and that's what really launched Run into the mainstream, as well as the rap-rock sound and revitalizing Aerosmith's career. 26 years later, it's lost nothing of it's vitality and power. Nor has most of this album, despite the by modern standards simple lyrics - the interplay between Run and D.M.C., their flow and forceful delivery more than makes up for that, not to mention the hard, funky, rocking beats that they do the delivering over - not sure how much of the credit should go to the aforementioned producers and how much to Jam Master Jay - despite years of listening to hip hop including a few years of obsession and recording a song myself I've never been completely clear on how that works on a professional level. In 1986, Run DMC had no equals, but soon they would be eclipsed by new acts and early in the following decade be all but obsolete. Nevertheless, their impact and importance cannot be understated. And not just on the musical front - they also made the B-Boy stance famous.

Highlights: Walk This Way, Peter Piper, It's Tricky, You Be Illin'


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Mon Apr 09, 2012 12:58 am
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Run-D.M.C. - Raising Hell (1986)

Run-D.M.C. were the most commercially successful hip hop group at their peak in the mid 1980s, pushing the genre closer to mainstream than it had ever been. They had been building in momentum since their '84 debut album, and two years later released their third album, Raising Hell, which is the first classic album in the genre's history; and many would probably tell you the first truly great album in rap history.

Raising Hell gets off to a wonderful start with "Peter Piper", "It's Tricky" and "My Adidas", the funnest tracks on the entire album, with "It's Tricky" probably being the best song the group ever recorded.

"Walk This Way" follows, the famous Aerosmith cover recorded alongside Aerosmith. The rock-rap fusion and association with a classic rock band helped make this the song responsible for bringing rap into mainstream pop music. Unfortunately, it's a really weak cover and inferior to the Aerosmith original, with its incorporated rap feeling awkward and out of place. The rock/rap fusion on Raising Hell is highly influential but I can't help but feel slightly underwhelmed. In the same year this album was released Beastie Boys debuted with Licensed to Ill, which I feel is a slightly stronger early rap/rock effort. And while Run-D.M.C. apparently peaked with Raising Hell, Beastie Boys got significantly better with their second album and into the '90s. I'm getting off topic, now, of course. The Boys will get their turn soon enough.

"Is It Live" is a brief return to the goodness preceding "Walk This Way", but it makes way to "Perfection", a slow uneventful number. The opening seconds of "Hit It Run" show a promising step up, but it falls apart with an embarrassing chorus beat of immaturity with beat-box spitting and panting - at least that's what it sounds like.

"Raising Hell" and "You Be Illin'" are the highlights of the second half of the album and unfortunately the last tracks that I care for. "Dumb Girl" is offensive and musically empty. The last two songs, they just sort of exist.

It's not a good sign when I find myself frequently checking how much time is left to a 40-minute album. Raising Hell's truly inspired moments are not frequent enough to make it the great album its reputation and influence would have you believe.

3.5/5

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Mon Apr 09, 2012 2:12 am
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Ha, I never even heard the original prior to the Run DMC version, and when I try it now I miss them. :P To me, the latter version rocks more.

Oh, and next up:

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Mon Apr 09, 2012 5:47 am
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Well, neither version of "Walk This Way" is particularly great. I'd just stick with the rock one.

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Mon Apr 09, 2012 5:54 am
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Yeah the first half of Raising Hell is pretty great and really fun. The rest of the album is pretty much a comedown from there. I hadn't listened to it in a while but I think the album is definitely extremely important to the history of rap more than it's essential listening. And I also agree that the Beastie Boys would do more in the long run to influence the blending of the genres for fans of the music. But you can still put "It's Tricky" on any mix and whenever it comes on it's bound to make everyone smile.

I haven't heard Criminal Minded yet, so I'll listen to that now and report back!


Mon Apr 09, 2012 6:11 am
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