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 ISOLATION | Cinemas of Solitude 

ISOLATION | What should we watch next?
Ijaazat | Gulzar, 1987 33%  33%  [ 3 ]
Wolf's Chalet | Chytilová, 1987 11%  11%  [ 1 ]
The Deadly Affair | Lumet, 1966 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Waiting for Happiness | Sissako, 2002 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
A Whole Night | Akerman, 1982 56%  56%  [ 5 ]
Total votes : 9

 ISOLATION | Cinemas of Solitude 
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
Page, someone? Help?

Too soon.

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Wed Oct 14, 2015 10:35 pm
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MrCarmady wrote:
i guess gravity is a good shout

I await your essay with great relish, 'Carmady.

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Thu Oct 15, 2015 2:25 am
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Through films like Estate Violenta and Cronaca Familiare, Valerio Zurlini carved out something of a niche as an Italian director concerned chiefly with the suppressed emotions of his characters; though, it should be noted that most of these characters exist in fairly domestic realms and situations. With Il Deserto dei Tartari, Zurlini applies this same level of internal scrutiny to figures that exist far beyond the domestic sphere: specifically, an over-decorated regiment of soldiers based in an isolated fortress on the border of some unspecified country. Here, these suppressed feelings are condensed into a single fear: that of the unknown, as symbolised in the seemingly endless expanse of desert that surrounds the fortress - itself representing the psychological imprisonment that must be experienced by anyone that is removed from civilisation to such an extreme. Jacques Perrin's protagonist is a fresh-faced newcomer to this cloistered environment, himself arriving as a violent reminder to the existing "inmates" of their lost years; years that seem to hang in such a place, largely spent gazing fearfully at the horizon in apprehension of some impending ambush that may never even materialise. The appearance of a solitary white horse upon said horizon one day, rather than representing freedom or some kind of respite, is instead viewed with nothing but misgiving. It's all very Kafkaesque; all shadows and suspicion, and by all accounts a very literal adaptation of Dino Buzzati's source novel.

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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Thu Oct 15, 2015 2:47 am
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
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I'm wondering what your take on the "disembodied voice" may be. Isolation is one thing, but a voice without a body--within isolation--is something interesting and confounding. The voice and noise are so prevalent in this film, and together with isolation, really says something about the precarious nature of being alone with nothing but a voice or voices to deal with. Can humans be alone with themselves and face their own voice? Can we face the voice of others in our isolation? Why do these voices have such a strong pull on our own conscious awareness? And why is it that consequent behavioral patterns arise from this awareness (in this case, perhaps murder or suicide!)?


Thu Oct 15, 2015 4:17 am
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Oh, yes!

I remember this as a distinctive feature of the Kurosawa - does it appear as a recurring theme in his work? Disembodied voices can be an effective tool when attempting to capture isolation and loneliness, but non-diegetic noises in general are perhaps even more important. It's so easy to overdo the voice thing and lose credibility or authenticity in the process. What do you think are the best examples of this - the voice thing, I mean? And as for the behavioral patterns, it's another thing that is very rarely done well at all. The most recent film I can think of off the top of my head is Sparrows Dance, though I suppose that should fall under a psychological condition rather than merely the product of being antisocial....

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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Thu Oct 15, 2015 5:26 am
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
Oh, yes!

I remember this as a distinctive feature of the Kurosawa - does it appear as a recurring theme in his work? Disembodied voices can be an effective tool when attempting to capture isolation and loneliness, but non-diegetic noises in general are perhaps even more important. It's so easy to overdo the voice thing and lose credibility or authenticity in the process. What do you think are the best examples of this - the voice thing, I mean? And as for the behavioral patterns, it's another thing that is very rarely done well at all. The most recent film I can think of off the top of my head is Sparrows Dance, though I suppose that should fall under a psychological condition rather than merely the product of being antisocial....

This is the only film I've seen from him, actually. The best example in the film is probably this sequence in the hospital basement. It may be the most useful example for both diegetic and nondiegetic sound--specifically, the industrial hum that pervades the non diegetic soundtrack, and the diegetic, disembodied voice that seems to haunt him.


Thu Oct 15, 2015 8:30 am
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Yes, excellent sound design in this one.

Another good example in this thread (voices, sounds) is Yaadein: viewtopic.php?p=1154534#p1154534

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Fri Oct 16, 2015 1:46 am
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A nice passage from Tartari, plus some screenshots:

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Fri Oct 16, 2015 1:47 am
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I'm not seeing any Tartari.

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Fri Oct 16, 2015 3:30 am
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Neither are they, clearly.

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Fri Oct 16, 2015 2:38 pm
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A few words on Jean-Daniel Pollet's Le Horla, which SNAPZ has been telling me to watch since the beginning of time as we know it. I actually decided to read Guy de Maupassant's short story (below) before heading into this one and feel it was the right decision, since many of the more striking passages and inner monologues are repeated here meaning that you can focus on the images rather than digesting words. The idea that this short puts forward of an invisible being - a new kind of being - feeding on the lifeforce of humans is something I've come across before in both literature and film, but here the protagonist is a solitary one and as such you are constantly questioning his fears as irrational and perhaps the product of prolonged isolation.



http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stori ... Horl.shtml

Let's read/watch/discuss, guys?

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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Fri Oct 16, 2015 7:11 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
Let's read/watch/discuss, guys?
Doing this now!

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Fri Oct 16, 2015 10:31 pm
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Slow work day. Might as well read that short story.


Fri Oct 16, 2015 10:34 pm
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:heart: :heart: Guys.

This one did remind me a lot of Morel, actually...

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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Sat Oct 17, 2015 4:27 am
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
:heart: :heart: Guys.

This one did remind me a lot of Morel, actually...


Read it. Cool story, bro.

Slow work day still slow. I might as well watch the damn movie, too.


Sat Oct 17, 2015 5:04 am
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What did you make of it, Beau?

From the "Dialectics" chapter of Noel Burch's Theory of Film Practice, which goes on to mention Rope and Alphaville in the same breath:

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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Sat Oct 17, 2015 5:19 pm
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Along with The Manchurian Candidate and the aforementioned Seconds, John Frankenheimer's Seven Days in May comprises what is sometimes known as his "Paranoia Trilogy", which should give some sense as to what to expect here. It is a film shrouded in suspicion; silhouetted figures, the owners of long shadows, meet only where the trashcans can overhear their shared confidences and political decisions are given added weight by the mahogany context in which they are cast. For a film that very much sees things from the perspective of Kirk Douglas' protagonist, Frankenheimer makes the odd decision to capture not only his mistrust and misgivings but also those of the characters he orbits. More than once we inhabit the head of his warmongering opponent, played by Burt Lancaster; we live out this man's paranoia, his unquenchable thirst for military action and blind goal of seizing power for himself. And Fredric March's tired president represents yet another viewpoint in the film, driven into a corner by the yells of military industrialists who see nothing but weakness in his quest for peace. Frequently, these different positions are made to share the screen and Frankenheimer is typically precise in the way they are composed: desks become symbols that denote authority, well-positioned flags lend even further patriotic weight. Long corridors and clinical, white architecture emphasise the isolated nature of these political men and their decisions, while the windows that dot each room represent a continued theme of self-surveillance.

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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Sat Oct 17, 2015 5:48 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
What did you make of it, Beau?
Not Beau, but...

The film surprised me. The way he’s still narrating after the fact (into a tape recorder this time) eliminates tension. In fact, if I hadn’t read it first, I think I would have spent at least half the film assuming he was only writing a story or something. Until he started to break things, he didn’t seem upset at all. The ending's really well done, though, and makes the tape recorder pay off.

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The Iron Giant ▪ Lisbon Story ▪ Jealousy Is My Middle Name ▪ On the Beach at Night Alone ▪ Paju ▪ A Girl at My Door ▪ A Brand New Life ▪ Moana ▪ Ant-Man and the Wasp ▪ Night Must Fall ▪ Colo

Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Sono | my bookshelf


Sun Oct 18, 2015 2:50 am
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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Fri Nov 13, 2015 10:52 pm
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For some reason (several, actually) this one reminded me quite strongly of Nobuhiko Ôbayashi's House: a bunch of gossipy teenagers, clearly identified under Breakfast Club-like personalities, are relocated under flimsy pretenses to an isolated cabin in the woods whereupon strange happenings begin to manifest. There's something aesthetically similar about the two films, too, and not just in the questionable fashion choices of shell suits and ski pants. Both are notably jarring when it comes to camera work, with the kind of oblique close-ups and rushed zooms that are perhaps more synonymous with the western horror films of the period. To its credit, Vera Chytilová's film is perhaps the more subtle, unfolding initially as a teenage vacation-drama before things go so terribly awry - perhaps the reason it has apparently become such an after-school fixture on Czech television. Besides its cult status today, Wolf's Chalet also exists as something of a commentary on the idea of documenting human interaction and reaction in a controlled environment (here, aliens are the manipulators and kids are the manipulated) that could be compared to the phenomenon of reality television - only, some years before the buds of this phenomenon took root around Europe. Indeed, it is the combining of such horror elements with the concept of reality TV that places Wolf's Chalet as a distant cousin (even a forerunner) to much of the voyeuristic horror cinema we've seen since.

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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Sat Nov 14, 2015 10:02 pm
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Juraj Herz's Morgiana is another I've been meaning to watch for some time - ever since first seeing The Cremator, probably. Peter Strickland recently mentioned it as a chief inspiration behind The Duke of Burgundy in his piece for the BFI, and on reflection there is a lot of this one in his film: specifically, the setting, its atmosphere and tone. I'd question his assertions that Morgiana is an example of camp Gothic, but there is certainly a measured decadence in both films that comes through; the crumbling surroundings in which sisters Klara and Victoria (same actress) dwell and seethe recall those seen in other Czech surrealist entry Valerie and Her Week of Wonders, but also The Hourglass Sanatorium with endless overgrown grounds and the fetid, hanging stench of overripe food. Perhaps the most striking element of Morgiana is its use of perspective: the employing of a fish-eye lens that was used to such great effect in Herz's earlier film, here coming to represent the point of view of the family cat as it skulks in and out of rooms - a passive onlooker as murder rings through the decorative hallways and gaudy, over-indulgent rooms. One sister's jealousy towards the other seems lifted straight from Cinderella; the surroundings are that of a Hans Christian Andersen fable, capable of stirring up fantastic images to which we apply a realistic context, but are perhaps better left to exist in the realm of make-believe.

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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Fri Dec 11, 2015 5:04 am
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Jedi

I just stole your 'measured decadence' line for my mistress america 'declarative statement'

I'm giving you no credit


Fri Dec 11, 2015 5:12 am
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Expect a letter from my attorney, Traz.

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Fri Dec 11, 2015 6:14 pm
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Other than Jacques Deray's La Piscine (featured previously) of which this is almost a snappy reimagining, there are also shades of both Rossellini and Bergman to be found here. Some have mentioned Journey to Italy for its central relationship but I'd even go one further and add Stromboli (also featured previously) to the mix, for its volcanic island surroundings. Likewise, you could look towards the island-bound studies in human behaviour conceived by Bergman, where self-imposed isolation only serves to highlight cracks; to emphasise frailties and inadequacies. One might also nominate Pasolini's Teorema as a prevailing influence here, for its introducing of a rogue variable into a contained environment that is already tenuous. The variable here arrives in the form of Ralph Fiennes, whose character seeks to upset ex-flame and disheveled pop star Tilda Swinton's new relationship. With his obnoxious daughter (Dakota Johnson) in tow, whose role as a disinterested observer is perhaps closest to our own; she watches, questions and occasionally incites, but ultimately hers is a mind comparatively unblemished when placed alongside that of her older cohabitants. Much time is also spent by Guadagnino creating some kind of juxtaposition between the contemporary lifestyle of the idle rich and the old world values that define the surrounding countryside. There is cheese making and town square festivities, perhaps symbolising the newfound serenity of Tilda Swinton's character when compared to a glimpsed previous life of hard parties and harder drugs.

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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Tue Dec 22, 2015 10:10 pm
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The idea of interstellar maroonment, or being lost in space, is one that has dominated science fiction since its inception. One of the more popular recent examples, at least of those films that could be placed in a similar context to this one, would be Duncan Jones' Moon. In both cases, any drama or horror elements are removed, leaving something more grounded - a battle to survive, to a certain extent, but also to maintain one's sanity. The adversary instead becomes oneself; something that is quite literally represented in Moon through Sam Rockwell's disinterested doppelganger, but here is a position reserved for us. We become the privileged addressee of internal thoughts; the screen to which Matt Damon's stranded astronaut directs all his practical theories, but also his whispered hopes and fears. While communication becomes key to The Martian, social isolation does seem to be less important here; at least, it has less of a negative effect on the sanity of the protagonist who - plagued by hard luck, plans disrupted once and again - is more focused on the idea of survival, without the time to consider whether the universe is truly against him. One imagines that the life of an astronaut, especially when cut off from his peers, is one of resourcefulness and forward planning. This is something that I can't recall seeing in many films, but is central here. Experienced, charismatic and cool under pressure, the various disasters that befall him are simply another formula to be methodically solved.

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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Tue Dec 22, 2015 11:46 pm
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You've passed the 200 mark. Congratulations, Jedi! :heart:

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Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Sono | my bookshelf


Thu Dec 24, 2015 2:55 pm
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Finally!

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Tue Dec 29, 2015 7:00 pm
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201 is a very lonely number. :P

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The Iron Giant ▪ Lisbon Story ▪ Jealousy Is My Middle Name ▪ On the Beach at Night Alone ▪ Paju ▪ A Girl at My Door ▪ A Brand New Life ▪ Moana ▪ Ant-Man and the Wasp ▪ Night Must Fall ▪ Colo

Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Sono | my bookshelf


Wed Dec 30, 2015 4:59 am
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Love you, Maiden.

Pick more things for us to watch?

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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Wed Dec 30, 2015 10:01 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
Pick more things for us to watch?
Any of these strike your fancy?

Viy
Housekeeping
Angel
Winter Light

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The Iron Giant ▪ Lisbon Story ▪ Jealousy Is My Middle Name ▪ On the Beach at Night Alone ▪ Paju ▪ A Girl at My Door ▪ A Brand New Life ▪ Moana ▪ Ant-Man and the Wasp ▪ Night Must Fall ▪ Colo

Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Sono | my bookshelf


Thu Dec 31, 2015 7:06 am
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How about all of them?

Could do the Bergman one, like, right now. Want to join?

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Thu Dec 31, 2015 8:16 am
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So, what did you think? Does it count as cinema of solitude if he's only isolated by his own horrible personality? :P

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Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Sono | my bookshelf


Sat Jan 02, 2016 12:55 am
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I liked it, though not quite as much as other Bergmans.

How would you rank it?

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Thu Jan 07, 2016 5:53 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
How would you rank it?
Definitely at the bottom of the Faith Trilogy...

My top Bergmans are still

Sawdust and Tinsel
Through a Glass Darkly
The Silence

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The Iron Giant ▪ Lisbon Story ▪ Jealousy Is My Middle Name ▪ On the Beach at Night Alone ▪ Paju ▪ A Girl at My Door ▪ A Brand New Life ▪ Moana ▪ Ant-Man and the Wasp ▪ Night Must Fall ▪ Colo

Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Sono | my bookshelf


Sat Jan 09, 2016 3:38 am
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Unfriended

The cluttered frame of this movie-on-a-laptop-screen can't quite hide the fact that our Skyping and Facebooking protagonists, persecuted on the Internet by a vengeful spirit, will die alone. Most horror films, in one way or the other, are about loneliness. Even those about groups of youngsters, like many slashers, are really about the whittling down of their numbers. Near the end of such movies, only one or two usually remain. The real horror is being left alone. But in this case, our heroes are alone from the outset, each inside his or her own room, and all it takes is a bad connection to sever what binds them together. They can't come to each other's aid, since they're too far away. In fact, they can't even move: if they leave their rooms, says the spirit, they die, so they have to remain seated while yet another Skype window winds down.

Nevertheless, this is not (only) another technophobic dystopia about how, in the era of interconnectedness, we're less connected than we've ever been. It is cautious and pessimistic, sure, but it expresses that caution through uninhibited immersion into what it's cautious about. That is, through deep familiarity with the subject. The filmmakers don't wish to turn back the clock and do away with our technological toys. If that were to happen, there would be no movie and, more importantly, no audience to watch it.

The online environment of social media might be banal and commonplace to us, but it becomes alien and strange in this film, which uses the language of this environment, the loading screens and message alerts, the stuttering videos and pixelated cam feeds, to fulfil the requirements of the genre, for suspense and dread. Actions we perform every day are appropriated by the plot and milked for dramatic effect. Suddenly, these actions no longer seem purely utilitarian but hide more sinister possibilities. The movie-on-a-laptop-screen isn't new: earlier examples include critical, experimental shorts like Transformers: The Premake. What's more novel is how the online environment is resignified through horror genre tropes and expanded as a surface of expressive possibility.

Significantly, the vengeful spirit roams the online wilds because that is where she was shamed and bullied in the public forum of social media, which led her to commit suicide. What the film says, then, is not that we're disconnected in the era of interconnectedness, but that, maybe, we're too connected, not just to each other but to everything all of us ever do, to our pasts, accumulating in the endless, stupid, unfiltered archive of the Internet. As the bodies pile up and friendships are nipped in the bud, the real bogeyman becomes not the vengeful spirit but the endless exposure of our virtual selves, the collection of videos and photos and text messages that roam undeleted from one browser window to another, waiting for another Google search. Our protagonists become not just strangers to their friends, but to themselves: they can hardly control their unruly online reflections, which outlive them in the form of a digital afterlife. Phrases like "In Real Life" no longer make any sense. What happens online doesn't stay online and is very much real life. It's so important, even, that it must be filmed, somehow. It cannot be ignored by cinema, because this new environment is, also, a new home for cinema itself and for the traffic of images.


Sat Jan 09, 2016 4:50 am
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great movie


Sat Jan 09, 2016 5:01 am
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I love you, Beau. <3

Also, that film still gives me nightmares.

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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Sat Jan 09, 2016 8:32 am
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Will admit to not being quite as immediately drawn to Winter Light as others in Bergman's loose trilogy, and was distracted while viewing this by Maiden's endless chatter about woolen hats and such. But yes, this one is a lot more austere and sparse, somehow; spiritually bleak and visually stark, as it has been described in the past. One scene that does stand out though, and perhaps merely as a notable point of rupture in all this grey austerity, is Ingrid Thulin's fourth wall-breaking monologue: her recital of Marta's letter to Tomas. It is an extraordinary scene; a lingering take, well over six minutes in all, that says much more in its capturing of Marta's wide-eyed emphasis upon certain words than it does in those words themselves. It is a scene that exists in stark contrast given the other modes of address in the film, which are stiff and starched and often take place in the third person, as is the way it is done and has always been done in such environments. It also prefigures other radical forms of communication seen in later Bergman films, Persona to pick just one, that all seem designed to strip away artifice and social codes; to unmask these figures and allow them to truly bear their souls, and what more effective way to bear one's soul than to address the camera directly?

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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Mon Jan 11, 2016 9:37 pm
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Beau wrote:
The real horror is being left alone. But in this case, our heroes are alone from the outset, each inside his or her own room, and all it takes is a bad connection to sever what binds them together.

This is just a contemporary reimagining of many Bergman films then, is it not? Vaguely associated figures come together in one place so as to fulfill some kind of social responsibility, dragging behind them years of baggage: broken promises, whispered lies, poisoned relationships, deep-seated worries, stewed grudges, etc. Then, within the suffocating confines of this chosen setting, poke one another until the veneer splits and all this bilge flows to the surface in the form of crippling truths.

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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Mon Jan 11, 2016 10:13 pm
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Desplechin later paid homage to that monologue in Kings and Queen, in the scene where the dead father addresses his daughter through a letter.

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Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:02 am
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Wow, had no idea about that. Grabbing now!

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Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:06 am
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The film is a whole is good if unwieldy (as Desplechin's films tend to be), but that particular scene I found riveting.

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Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:19 am
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My least favorite of the faith trilogy, Winter Light suffers from hideous protagonists. Doesn't Bergman normally write complicated characters, men and women with plenty to chew over, good and bad? Through a Glass Darkly was especially good at this. But, here, the dreary Marta clings stubbornly to her unrequited love and, despite taking her case directly to us, fails to stir any sympathy in my hard heart. Then there's Thomas, whose cold, cruel narcissism makes even Marta seem warm! The best (most human) moments are with Max von Sydow's depressed Jonas, who barely gets screen time, and the cynical organist, likewise. Bleak, bleak, bleak!

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Wed Jan 13, 2016 5:17 am
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
My least favorite of the faith trilogy, Winter Light suffers from hideous protagonists. Doesn't Bergman normally write complicated characters, men and women with plenty to chew over, good and bad? Through a Glass Darkly was especially good at this.

I'd say most of his characters are pretty hideous, no?

Bloated with their own worries, their own self-conceit...

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Wed Jan 13, 2016 9:15 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
I'd say most of his characters are pretty hideous, no?

Bloated with their own worries, their own self-conceit...
Not as hideous as Thomas! Seriously, most of his characters seem... human to me, just with their ugly sides more exposed than usual. But all his sides were ugly! :P

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Wed Jan 13, 2016 10:21 pm
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Found the best short(ish) film on ISOLATION recently:

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Tue Feb 02, 2016 7:02 pm
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While Akio Jissôji's Mandara doesn't really apply here in the traditional sense, there are some compositions used and images formed towards the beginning of the film that positively define the idea of isolation. The opening sees an unnamed student couple lounging among the confines of a beach-side villa; the bedroom, to be precise, with its dazzling white interiors and odd, clinical air of a Mediterranean hospital ward. The process of love making is clearly an intimate one, but once climax is attained and paradise fleetingly reached (neatly juxtaposed with the crashing of the waves outside), the two figures break away and are instead framed in an isolated context. In a brief moment of calm that comes before the ensuing storm, Jissôji makes exquisite use of negative space, engulfing his characters in this clean, expressionistic architecture as they idle on the bed or else stare into the mirror. This can be related to the scenes of rape that develop on the beach later, with the female body often portrayed as part of the sand; an extension of the dunes, the curves of and bony protrusions giving way to piled sand. Contrarily, large parts of this sequence are shot with a fisheye lens that dispels much of the serenity built up in the preceding scenes, cultivating a general feeling of disorientation and stifling malaise.

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“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Tue Feb 09, 2016 10:38 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
While Akio Jissôji's Mandara doesn't really apply here in the traditional sense, there are some compositions used and images formed towards the beginning of the film that positively define the idea of isolation.
Ah, yes, the rape cult movie. Think that's the definition of not enough solitude, haha. It's unforgettable, though, for sure.

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The Iron Giant ▪ Lisbon Story ▪ Jealousy Is My Middle Name ▪ On the Beach at Night Alone ▪ Paju ▪ A Girl at My Door ▪ A Brand New Life ▪ Moana ▪ Ant-Man and the Wasp ▪ Night Must Fall ▪ Colo

Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Sono | my bookshelf


Wed Feb 10, 2016 2:33 am
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Ha, that's the one, yes!

The opening is great, but it becomes difficult to watch by the end. More shots:

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Wed Feb 10, 2016 5:49 pm
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FFfffuck that's one of those movies I need to see so much that I'm personally waiting until I'm in the right state of mind because I know it'll impress me so much.

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