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As a way to familiarize myself with 70's American cinema (an area of film history that I've previously completely dismissed), I'm starting this thread. The following is a list of historically, critically or otherwise significant titles and my reactions to them (don't expect more than a blurb, if that). This will act as a sort of a watchlist. Let's see how many I can watch in 2015!

For reference, these are a few of my favorite American films of the 70's.

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Mon Feb 02, 2015 4:50 am
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It's kind of funny that when my older son was a teenager he didn't like films made before the 70s. But, except for a very few films, I've always considered the 70s a mire of pointless filmmaking.

So I'll be interested to see what I should not have avoided (for so long) as you go through your journey! Mebbe I can pick up recs, eh?

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Mon Feb 02, 2015 4:56 am
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Strick's Road Movie pls

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Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


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Mon Feb 02, 2015 4:57 am
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Real blind spot for me, too.

Is there any room in your bed, roujin?

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Mon Feb 02, 2015 5:00 am
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01. The Opening of Misty Beethoven (Radley Metzger, 1976)

Whereas other Metzger films elongate their pleasure by meting out sex judiciously, making the waiting part of the structure and also the appeal, this hardcore film, shot by Metzger under the name Henry Paris, literally opens with a couple engaged in cunnilingus before cycling through various other positions - the licking and insertion of genitals proudly displayed in frequent in closeups. Metzger's adaptation on Pygmalion is frequently witty in its dialogue and scenarios (the airline where stewardesses give head is pretty funny), but stylistically, it's just boring. The hardcore obligation forces Metzger to default to a lot of zoomed in shots of crotches, tongues and jizz. Which, you know, great, but it gets monotonous pretty fast.

★★

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02. Carnal Knowledge (Mike Nichols, 1971)

Twin portraits, framed by POV confessionals, of corroded male sexuality. Nicholson's wannabe lothario is blustering, broken; "tell me my thoughts" becomes focal point of his inability to be emotionally understood, thought of that way. Garfunkel is possibly the most odious character in the movie; sensitive, passive, willing to mold himself to the other, but needy and desperate in a way that's unctuous. The film is funny in a toxic sort of way, and then becomes personal in a way that's worse. Nichols stays out of the way mostly, electing to frame for psychological acuity, not pictorial pleasure, but he somehow finds meaningful compositions regardless (Ann-Margret's far-off stare framed with her head in the low-right corner, unknowable to us and to the other characters).

★★★

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03. Mean Streets (Martin Scorsese, 1973)

A string of anecdotes awkwardly forced to a breaking point. So many scenes here feel like something that has actually happened. Mean Streets is great because of how specific it is - the boredom of lounging around a bar where no one wants to play blackjack, the baby tiger, the endless parades of restaurants, bars, everyone and everything familiar. Pretty sure everyone in the film is a cousin of each other. Scorsese forces the modern saint aspect it, or rather overplays it, with his deep crimson lighting when Charlie submerges into the lifestyle or with the oven-top flames acting as an immediate source of penance. Cinema as confession, remembrance; "Be My Baby" tells it all. Sorta like a home movie that just happens to be stylistically bold and happens to have a narrative. So, yeah, it's pretty great.

★★★★

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04. Vigilante Force (George Armitage, 1976)

Armitage zips through his scenario with remarkable speed, letting the implications of his character's actions do all the heavy lifting. However, stylistically, he never asserts himself in anyway. Feels like the whole thing is passing by without comment, inflection; almost feels anonymous. It's as blank as Jan Michael Vincent's expression.

★★

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05. The Last Run (Richard Fleischer, 1971)

Very smart and nuanced direction at the service of a script that announces its own hackneyed intentions from the very start. The film just seems bored of its own character dynamics, its trajectory, everything. A better film would underplay the Scott/car dynamic, not highlight it with a sudden edit back to the car at film's end. At least we got Clint singing in Gran Torino. What do we get here?

★★


Mon Feb 02, 2015 5:13 am
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06. Gimme Shelter (Albert Maysles + David Maysles + Charlotte Zwerin, 1970)

Don't feel that great about it, but I could never get past my own ambivalence regarding the Stones. Tina Turner's powerhouse performance overwhelms the rest of the movie.

★★

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07. Up in Smoke (Lou Adler + Tommy Chong, 1978)

The humor this film is peddling was old hat in middle school, and there's simply nothing of interest now. Guess Jay and Silent Bob were these guys for me.



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08. Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Robert Wise, 1979)

Having little to no knowledge of the Star Trek universe, what registered most forcefully was the film's attention to its capturing its sets and special effects as best as possible (the long docking scene at the beginning is prime example of this). The rest is dramatically inert footage of people looking at screens, waiting for something to happen.



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09. Welcome to L.A. (Alan Rudolph, 1976)

"I don't know anybody on freeways. I always know somebody on the streets. That's what Los Angeles is all about." A series of lonely hookups, daytime drinking, new connections done with with sensitivity, poise and understanding. Its soundtrack is a series of piano-based ballads that outside of this context would be godawful, but here evoke a yearning for love that's palpable. Could also be a documentary about Keith Carradine laying pipe to a bunch of ladies over a couple of hours.

★★★

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10. Who'll Stop the Rain? (Karel Reisz, 1978)

Begins with theme music straight out of noir and then it continues pilfering from that playbook: disillusionment, anti heroes, etc. But Nolte is no Bogart, and there's zero charm or playfulness here. Hard to do with Nolte brutalizing everything around him (Tuesday Weld getting hooked on coke is collateral damage), and basically delivering seismic shocks to the film every time he does something. Truly some 70's shit.

★★★


Mon Feb 02, 2015 5:13 am
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11. Night Moves (Arthur Penn, 1975)

The mystery takes center stage, and yet it seems to exist outside the film, or at its edges, nipping away at the consciousness of Hackman's character. All the pieces are in place, and he thinks he's solved it, but he's looking at the wrong puzzle. A morose noir, brimming with sadness and disillusion, distracting us with a world we think we understand, while its true inner workings go unnoticed. "I didn't solve anything. I just fell in on top of it."

★★★

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12. Hustle (Robert Aldrich, 1975)

"Don't tell me nobody cares. Sometimes we don't have time to care." Reynolds and company operate in a world where everyone knows their place, and hustles to survive. Deneueve is his hooker girlfriend, phone sexing it up while Reynolds fixes drinks around her; their moments of intimacy a bastion for the complexity of adult relationships. A dead girl shows up and soon enough the rules and boundaries that Reynolds has set for himself begin to crumble. All throughout the movie, Reynolds sticks to the party line, protecting the people who are "somebody," keeping the "nobodies" at bay, protecting his own interests, never rocking the boat, gazing at a calendar of Rome and dreaming of his own getaway. When he does finally make a choice, he obviously pays for it.

★★★

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13. Lifeguard (Daniel Petrie, 1976)

Sensitively acted and directed, Lifeguard is almost completely unlike what its poster would suggest. Instead of "every girl's summer dream," the film sets out to show the various moral choices available to Sam Elliott's titular lifeguard. The film's humor and more 70's shit elements (little miniature stories like the flasher or the teen gropers) serve to balance the detours into moodier territory. That "territory" is ostensibly the film's actual subject, and here is where it excels. The film's ambivalent attitude towards its main character is there at every turn; instead of judging Elliott, it seems to be interested in what sort of decisions he'll make about the life he wants to lead. That's rare.

★★★

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14. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)

Really fascinated by the attention that Hooper gives to objects here. Always finds a moment to take in skulls, bugs, filth; effectively sketching out environment by parceling out closeups. His camera both registers material facts and exploits them for maximum effect. Then grooved on weird tension between the stillness of certain shots or scenes, and camera movement and editing in others. Gets weirder and funnier the more horrific it gets building to an editing clinic where the surreality of the scenario overwhelms the picture and becomes abstract. Bonus points for never suggesting that ending means a return to normalcy.

★★★

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15. Across 110th Street (Barry Shear, 1972)

Never quite lives up to its crackerjack explosive opening, getting stuck in a surprisingly talky affair that's more interested in highlighting its racial tensions than anything else. Quinn and Kotto are great together, but the film ends up spending way, way too much away from them.

★★


Mon Feb 02, 2015 5:14 am
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16. Open Season (Peter Collinson, 1974)

Thoroughly unpleasant, which fine, but also just boring. Its sleaze content kept close to the vest and never really exploited. I'm sure there's a pink film version of this that wouldn't cut away when the sex starts happening. After that, a Most Dangerous Game rehash that isn't suspenseful at all, with a ending that brings it back full circle in a pretty annoying and stupid way.



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17. Grease (Randal Kleiser, 1978)

Is there any great movie that starts out with an animated credits sequence? Enjoyed some of the in-between moments. Specially the stuff with the Pink Ladies (hell, I'd rather the whole movie be just about Frenchie and nothing but "Beauty School Dropout"-type numbers). Alas, the musical numbers are rather stodgy; camera simply follows performers around in perfunctory fashion and it's not like there's great dancing or choreography to rely on.

★★

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18. Richard Pryor: Live in Concert (Jeff Margolis, 1979)

I find it hard to judge stand-up films, but there's some brilliant, brilliant passages here. The blistering (auto)-critique of him shooting his car seguing into the ridiculousness of police brutality. This bit climaxes with a completely silly riff about dogs that extends and extends into him simply talking about his pets, impersonating anything and anyone involved, inventing the world one voice at a time.

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19. The Landlord (Hal Ashby, 1970)

A patchwork of scenes and observations that range from frank depictions of race relations in America to cartoony depictions of wealth and opulence, all somewhat held together by Ashby. The jarring switches in tone and mode of address seem to be the point, eschewing coherency in favor of something more eccentric. Still, some of it felt haphazard, arriving almost by accident at interesting moments and tensions.

★★

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20. Close Encounters of the Third Kind (Steven Spielberg, 1977)

Usually like Spielberg, but the last 30 or so minutes of this film are essentially meant to engineer a response which reduces the audience to the status of a child, filled with awe and wonder, jettisoning the complexity of Dreyfuss's earlier character moments and replacing them with a false sense of validation.

★★


Mon Feb 02, 2015 5:14 am
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also ganja & hess ae xx

let's scare jessica to death!

TTCSM made me appreciate horror

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Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


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Mon Feb 02, 2015 5:33 am
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i've already added pretty much movie to larger watchlist


Mon Feb 02, 2015 5:39 am
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wakarimasen

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Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


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Mon Feb 02, 2015 5:46 am
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roujin wrote:
i've already added pretty much movie to larger watchlist


let me know if you need help weeding out the bullshit to add in my pristine recs :up:


Mon Feb 02, 2015 5:54 am
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I always thought everyone loved the Yankee 70's?!?

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Mon Feb 02, 2015 6:00 am
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yeah im shocked any real cineaste could have this blindspot, but im excited for you! great era, great movies


Mon Feb 02, 2015 6:08 am
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I wonder what it would be like to watch Beyond the Valley of the Dolls for the first time again! Would Spengo still ruin it?

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Mon Feb 02, 2015 6:14 am
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before I was doing american 90s, I was going through american 80s but before that i was going through american 70s, i liked the 80s the most, sweet, ignorant 80s


Mon Feb 02, 2015 6:36 am
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the list above has pretty much every movie


Mon Feb 02, 2015 9:29 am
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roujin wrote:
the list above has pretty much every movie


oh i ddint see the other pages but also it randomizes them each time and you can't cntrl+f shitty little posters I HATE THAT SITE! :down:

(prioritize my recs) (skip all bogdonavich)


Mon Feb 02, 2015 10:45 am
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70s cinema foreverah

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Mon Feb 02, 2015 1:08 pm
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roujin wrote:
the list above has pretty much every movie


it doesn't have Looking for mr. goodbar, or Our winning season, doesn't have The manipulator either, and The todd killings isn't on it, can't find Born to win right away but now I have so that one's definitely on there already.
The Last of the Mobile Hotshots isn't though and neither is Short eyes, don't you want to see The man who loved cat dancing or Lipstick?
I recommend Mad bull and Jeremy, deadhead miles isn't too bad either but Inserts is definitely worth your while.
You might want to give The ski bum a chance or perhaps you'd prefer Shoot it black, shoot it blue,
Believe in me cause I Never Promised You a Rose Garden.....
I don't feel like going through these 5 pages anymore cause I'm not one of The losers like Frankenstein: the true story so I don't know if these are on it Savages , cry for me billy, where the lilies bloom, play it as it lays, buster and billie, all the kind strangers, smile, invasion of the bee girls, idaho transfer, little fauss and big halsy, poor pretty eddie, aloha, bobby and rose
:-|


Mon Feb 02, 2015 5:55 pm
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Kayden Kross wrote:
I wonder what it would be like to watch Beyond the Valley of the Dolls for the first time again! Would Spengo still ruin it?

I don't even remember the context for this. :-|


Mon Feb 02, 2015 8:38 pm
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i don't trust you pinhead. i love you, but i don't trust you


Mon Feb 02, 2015 11:15 pm
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I sometimes steal for no reason, still I think these two descriptions speak for themselves and cannot be ignored on the grounds of my vile, deceitful character

Quote:
A dedicated schoolteacher spends her nights cruising bars, looking for abusive men with whom she can engage in progressively violent sexual encounters.


Quote:
A young, once-great Hollywood film director refuses to accept changing times during the early 1930s, and confines himself to his decaying mansion to make silent porn flicks.


Mon Feb 02, 2015 11:55 pm
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i'll take a look through them. i can't watch everything. well, i can, but life is truly awful


Tue Feb 03, 2015 12:07 am
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watching american 80s flicks changed my life, first it cured my depression then it inspired me to sign up at a university to stalk young girls, it doesn't feel like i'm living in an 80s flick yet but I'm sure it will soon, very soon...
70s flicks were miserable times, nobody's going anywhere in 70s flicks, all stuck in their miserable lives


Tue Feb 03, 2015 12:22 am
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or as my dear friend perverted hermit would say "good vibes only"


Tue Feb 03, 2015 12:24 am
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The consistency of cinema in the 70s is slim to none. I realize I'm one of the very few (only?) to have this opinion but i almost find myself avoiding them... so I'm looking forward to reading more of this thread. Change my mind rourou.

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Tue Feb 03, 2015 2:17 am
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I'm going into this as a skeptic, hoping to be won over.


Tue Feb 03, 2015 2:29 am
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We so same

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Tue Feb 03, 2015 2:59 am
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Debating whether to include films I saw fairly recently (within the last two years) but before this project started. Should I rewatch those, too?


Tue Feb 03, 2015 3:25 am
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yeah any frank perry good also

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Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


TWEET1 | TWEET2 | FACE | BOXD | TUMBL1 | TUMBL2


Tue Feb 03, 2015 5:09 am
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roujin wrote:
Debating whether to include films I saw fairly recently (within the last two years) but before this project started. Should I rewatch those, too?

just the ones you didnt like and only after all the others


Tue Feb 03, 2015 8:42 am
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Pinhead wrote:
I sometimes steal for no reason, still I think these two descriptions speak for themselves and cannot be ignored on the grounds of my vile, deceitful character





You're pretty much gonna have to tell me what these are.

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Tue Feb 03, 2015 8:50 am
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1st is Goodbar and 2nd is probly Insterts


Tue Feb 03, 2015 8:59 am
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21. The Spook Who Sat by the Door (Ivan Dixon, 1973)

Thought this would be a some blaxpoitation thing, which I guess it still is, but it’s actually a truly radical piece of political cinema. The film’s main character is trained by the CIA after the organization is told to integrate, but after a while he debunks in order to teach his black brothers and sisters how to become militarized and overthrow their white oppressors. And it’s completely serious. 40 years later and we’re still waiting.

★★★

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22. The Lickerish Quartet (Radley Metzger, 1970)

A family of jaded continental Europeans spend all day lounging around in their huge castle. On the first night we join them, they sit around one of their living rooms, huddled around a projector, watching a b&w stag film. The dad provides running commentary (amused), the mom wonders how anyone could do this in front of a camera, while the son rages around them, disgusted at the whole notion. But soon the visions of the film begin to manifest themselves in real life. Doppelgangers pop up and, since this is a Radley Metzger film, start doing it with the family members. The film's best sequences are actually those hookups, as each one provides a window into how images/cinema can be used to satisfy our desires (the husband's episode counters his impotency, the son's is a blissful deflowering free of pain, confusion, consequences) Plus Metzger's editing patterns frequently suggest a discontinuity of events (we get glimpses of events, memories, during certain scenes), or rather a sense of being freeflowing, as if both everything and nothing happens all at once. Or maybe that our memories and desires are always with us, always waiting to be acknowledged or be fulfilled or something. Fascinating film.

★★★

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23. Score (Radley Metzger, 1974)

A couple of swingers have a little competition going on - the wife thinks she can bed a shy, new bride under a certain time period. The husband on the other hand has his eyes on the husband. What follows is a good-natured sex comedy, where the acting is pretty stilted and awkward, the zooms are a-plenty, and the editing (specially in the finale) turns rather Roeg-like. Did I also mention that this is porn? Cuz I should probably put that out there at some point. The film is actually rather light on the sex stuff for most of its duration; it mostly consists of the wife/husband's attempts to exploit their targets and get them weak at the knees with something that they didn't know they wanted (tho the husband pretty much turns out to have been a little curious the whole time - when he was young he wanted to be a cowboy!) It's only during the film's final 20-minute spell that the audience actually sees the "goods," as it were (your rewards are explicit gay blowjob scene, sapphic cunnilingus and other surprises). It's a groovy time, made all the much better for the presence of some random telephone repair man named "Mike," who exists solely to party.

★★★

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24. The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (Joseph Sargent, 1974)

A bunch of old-timers, ruff, practical men who are puzzled/exasperated by broads in the workplace, diversity, minorities in positions of power, and that there are no wars in Africa to mine for profit. They get to bounce off each other for a couple of hours as the film cycles through its brutally efficient and satisfying plot mechanics. Of course, Matthau is a pleasure, the wheels turning in his mind, punchlines and smiles beautiful character grace notes; Robert Shaw is delicious, too, honorable in his own weird way, aware that his time may be up, and still utterly annoyed at these new people that he has to associate with. Sargent keeps things nimble, quick-footed enough that there are no lulls and that the audience has no time to question the complexity of its characters or anything. We simply keep moving and moving and moving, "gesundheit" and credits.

★★★

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25. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (Sam Peckinpah, 1974)

Warren Oates hang out in mexican bars, playing the piano, being the token gringo. Then a way out is introduced, an opportunity to leave the drudgery of an ordinary life. Oates ignores his girlfriend's wishes and gets down in the muck of violence and death, alcohol-fueled and gripped by mania. Another cynical classic in the vein of Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Peckinpah delves into the psychosis and the bizarre tenderness of Oates' death pursuit with gusto, while also being acutely critical of the behaviors that got us to that place. A brutal, unflinching film; no weak bones, no weak moments. Get drunk, taste mud and blood, fuck life, for this is a masterpiece.

★★★★


Tue Feb 03, 2015 11:44 am
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26. Busting (Peter Hyams, 1974)

Elliot Gould and Robert Blake are two roguish vice cops who pretty much do whatever they want. However, they got bosses and stuff and apparently those bosses are in the pockets of this one guy named Rizzo. Gould and Blake have ridiculously awesome chemistry (Gould with his mustache and gum and Blake with his unlit cigarettes) and walk around the world of the film like badasses, even after getting chewed out by Rizzo himself or their bosses or just random people. They're also probably irresponsible pricks (they instigate a shootout in a crowded market and a hospital). The whole thing's wholly un-p.c., too. There's a great scene where they're tasked to bust some random gay bar and some black queen stereotype tries to feel up Blake's character, which results in a hilarious brawl (the punchline to this entire scene is so hilarious). But what I think really makes it shine is Hyams' constantly inventive camera movement (backward tracks, circling around characters and/or spaces, a general fidelity to the scene). That coupled with the film's general sense of disillusionment with authority (the film's final freeze frame and voice over feels like a damning indictment of the way that institutions can simply wear some one down) makes it definitely worth tracking down. Also: great soundtrack.

★★★

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27. Sisters (Brian De Palma, 1973)

This is one of the nuttier films I've seen in a while. One night stand turns nightmarish as the "sister" shows up, ready to play out your worst castration fantasies (not really) because of course the girl is horribly deranged (why wouldn't she be?). The film had me when it kept sliding further and further down into just bizarre shit. It's a hell of a lot less interesting when it's all about the girl across the way starts investigating all this. The film only really picks up again when we start getting into hypnosis and fake craziness and flashbacks embedded into fever dreams (it feels like you're going down the world's most fucked up rabbit hole). All of which is pretty fun and creepy and unsettling, all things I enjoy.

Editor's Note: the beginning of the film is so hilarious. De Palma is pretty good with these sort of little autonomous clever sequences (the opening of Blow Out, music video in Body Double, I'm sure there are more examples).

★★

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28. Cockfighter (Monte Hellman, 1974)

A series of crummy motel rooms, backroom deals, farms, still lives of country living, all inhabited by Warren Oates' silent hero, a man of wounded pride and of make-do ambition. It's a world populated by colorful characters: Harry Dean Stanton's friendly rival, Laurie Bird's scorned woman (who is ridiculous), slack-jawed yokels, hustlers, farmers, trainers, all out to make something of themselves. The cocks are avatars of their trainers, ready to fight out the economic struggles of their owners. Violent stuff, sure, but they're essential, for it highlights the disparity between lifestyles. Oates does what he does; he has no qualms about it, just work, money. But for outsiders, this is horrifying, brutal stuff, and the recoil is born of disappointment.

★★★

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29. The Deer Hunter (Michael Cimino, 1978)

I've seen complaints regarding the film's opening hour or so online, regarding it as overly long and "when it will get to the point" and "hey I thought this was a Vietnam movie" and such. That's all nonsense. The film's opening hour pretty much wipes the floor with most of the films of the 70's, just by itself. Those slow rhythms are just wonderful. Nothing but drinking, dancing, camaraderie, all those goddamn rituals that I'm so uncomfortable with, but secretly wish to uphold and cherish. Just get shitfaced, man! This entire sequence is honestly just perfect. Where the film treads more dangerous and icky terrain is the Vietnam stuff. Yeah, all that stuff is complete fabrication, but I liked the Russian Roulette stuff as a metaphor for the craziness of war (and how this major event affects each character). I bought it, but your mileage may vary. A completely emotionally draining experience.

★★★★

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30. Toys Are Not For Children (Stanley H. Brassloff, 1972)

Marcia Forbes' young, innocent girl keeps a couple of secrets from her fiancee. One, she has an obsessive relationship with the toys that her absentee father has gifted to her over the years. Another is that she masturbates using said dolls. On their wedding night, she suddenly goes all frigid and won't allow herself to be touched after the husband suggests that she put the toys away (she can't sleep without them). And this is just the start to the poor girl’s trials and tribulations. In a way, this is the ultimate Daddy Issues: The Movie. All of the main character’s anxieties and confusion get literalized in a series of extremely sleazy and uncomfortable sexytime scenarios, all of which are awesome and deeply fucked up. The depths of scuzzy brilliance that this reaches seriously cannot be expressed. It also features one of my favorite credit sequences ever – a strange, plaintive theme song accompanied by images of toys fading into the hazy memories of an idealized father/daughter relationship that probably never existed. The young daughter being put to bed by her father dissolves into the young beautiful bride-to-be; it doesn’t get clearer than that.

★★★


Tue Feb 03, 2015 11:58 am
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Two-Lane Blacktop GSM

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Tue Feb 03, 2015 1:08 pm
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roujin wrote:
all those goddamn rituals that I'm so uncomfortable with, but secretly wish to uphold and cherish. Just get shitfaced, man!

:lol:


Tue Feb 03, 2015 8:46 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
Real blind spot for me, too.

Is there any room in your bed, roujin?


you can watch if you want to


Wed Feb 04, 2015 12:49 am
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MMM I LIKE YOUR THIGHS

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Wed Feb 04, 2015 3:02 am
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perv


Wed Feb 04, 2015 4:16 am
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31. Rocky (John G. Avildsen, 1976)

Driven by Stallone's relentlessly odd characterization (it's in the way he talks, moves around, shifts his body, the whole cadence of Stallone) but anchored by Avildsen's modest, effective direction. Avildsen roots Rocky in a mostly believable environment, capturing the grimy atmosphere (paint peeling, deserted city streets), so when the underdog film cliches come through the most, the film has already earned some trust. Gets points an ending that's genuinely moving because the logical plot outcome ceases to matter, and all that comes through is Rocky's complete disregard for anything but what he cares about.

★★★

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32. Manhattan (Woody Allen, 1979)

I finally get the jokes. Hard for me to imagine how much I could've gotten out of this when I was 13 (the last time I watched this). I'm pretty ambivalent toward Woody, but it's hard to dismiss this film when it's so completely beautiful. Willis' cinematography is a complete triumph, romanticizing every frame, submerging the characters in his usual shadows. The characters here are all middlebrow bourgeois intellectuals, and Woody's set of references by this point are so familiar that I'm pretty sure he never moved past Fellini or Bergman. The film is affectionate toward them, mocking at points, but always interesting and engaging them, treating them fairly. Still, it's hard to not to feel a little icky when it comes to the Mariel Hemingway plot line, no matter how beautifully it's concluded.

★★★


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33. The Andromeda Strain (Robert Wise, 1971)

Actually pretty similar to Wise's later Star Trek film in that it's pretty much just people looking at screens, speaking jargon to each other. Andromeda differs in that it's a film that's pretty much solely interested in the scientific processes that its main characters employ, to the exclusion of much else. Still, Wise shoots his sets and characters with about the same level of interest, and can't quite ratchet up the tension when it counts.

★★

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34. The Godfather (Francis Ford Coppola, 1972)

Coppola's film is arguably the ground zero of today's Golden Age of TV anti-hero nonsense where our hero's morality is corroded by the end of its runtime. Its depiction of screen violence also seems prescient. Anyway, what makes the film of interest is how Coppola both mythologizes the Corleones, makes them emblematic of his thematic ideas, develops them metaphorically, while also sketching them as out more than just archetypes. It's also remarkably fleet-footed, running through its scenarios without becoming cumbersome in its relentless focus on plot, though a couple of detours (Michael's stay in Sicily) overstay their welcome. Also: Gordon Willis is the MVP.

★★★

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35. 10 (Blake Edwards, 1979)

Almost completely loved this, but felt it lost a little bit of its comic invention by film's end. Still, another Edwards comedy that's surprisingly full of pain and sadness, even if pratfalls and drunken buffoonery interrupt things every once in a while. The ending, however, is completely genius, as thematic strands regarding voyeurism, looking and perspective all come to fruition in the iris shot. But we've all read Dave Kehr on this movie, right?

★★★


Wed Feb 04, 2015 10:01 am
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This is probably the era of film that turned me into a film fan. Good thread m8.

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Wed Feb 04, 2015 10:25 am
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Love this thread. I'm going to pick up a ton of cool-looking stuff here. You have any plans to publish that grand master "list" here so we can see what you have to watch?

A quick and dirty top 20 (including dat experimental goodness):

1. Quick Billy (Bruce Baillie, 1971)
2. The Riddle of Lumen (Stan Brakhage, 1972)
3. Lucifer Rising (Kenneth Anger, 1972)
4. Juvenile Court (Frederick Wiseman, 1973)
5. Eye Lands (Myron Ort, 1970)
6. Assault on Precinct 13 (John Carpenter, 1976)
7. Husbands (John Cassavetes, 1970)
8. Valse Triste (Bruce Conner, 1976)
9. Last Chants for a Slow Dance (Jon Jost, 1977)
10. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (Sam Peckinpah, 1974)
11. Some Call It Loving (James B. Harris, 1973)
12. Epileptic Seizure Comparison (Paul Sharits, 1976)
13. The Scenic Route (Mark Rappaport, 1978)
14. Phase IV (Saul Bass, 1974)
15. God Told Me To (Larry Cohen, 1976)
16. China 9, Liberty 37 (Monte Hellman, 1978)
17. 11 x 14 (James Benning, 1977)
18. Rolling Thunder (John Flynn, 1977)
19. Race With the Devil (Jack Starrett, 1975)
20. Phantasm (Don Coscarelli, 1979)

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Wed Feb 04, 2015 2:16 pm
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Quick Billy and Last Chants are terrific

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Wed Feb 04, 2015 9:41 pm
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also, Forman's Taking Off pls

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Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


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Wed Feb 04, 2015 9:41 pm
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Fucking love that one.

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Wed Feb 04, 2015 9:53 pm
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Don't agree on Close Encounters, which I love, but this is a very fun thread.


Thu Feb 05, 2015 3:34 am
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Just wanted to acknowledge Snapper. Yes, all those movies are on the list.


Thu Feb 05, 2015 4:20 am
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Fun thread. Great write ups so far.

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Thu Feb 05, 2015 6:48 am
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