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 Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom 
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The only Tarr film I've seen is The Turin Horse, which I loved. I plan to watch Werckmeister Harmonies and Satantango someday.

Also, I'll be watching Zulu this weekend. I'll be sure to post my thoughts on it in this thread afterwards.

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Wed Dec 20, 2017 12:18 pm
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Popcorn Reviews wrote:
The only Tarr film I've seen is The Turin Horse, which I loved. I plan to watch Werckmeister Harmonies and Satantango someday.

Also, I'll be watching Zulu this weekend. I'll be sure to post my thoughts on it in this thread afterwards.


Did you know it's also called Werckmeister Harmoniak? I find that interesting. That's the original title.


Wed Dec 20, 2017 12:25 pm
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For Tarr fans, I cannot more highly recommend that you read László Krasznahorkai's fiction, which has only recently started to get proper English translations into print. Reading Sátántangó and The Melancholy of Resistance (from which Werckmeister Harmonies was adapted) is a fascinating study in seeing how both novelist and filmmaker can work from the same basic story structure but play to the strengths of their respective media. And Krasznahorkai's War and War contains possibly the funniest meta joke I've ever encountered in a book, which is saying something since I rarely find that anything "meta" works as a real joke.

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Wed Dec 20, 2017 12:29 pm
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ski petrol wrote:

Did you know it's also called Werckmeister Harmoniak? I find that interesting. That's the original title.

I also discovered that. While looking the film up on Amazon, I saw both titles for different versions of the DVD on sale. I'm assuming the word "Harmoniak" means Harmonies in Hungarian.

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Wed Dec 20, 2017 12:31 pm
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BL wrote:
Krasznahorkai's War and War contains possibly the funniest meta joke I've ever encountered in a book, which is saying something since I rarely find that anything "meta" works as a real joke.
Out of curiosity, what was the joke?

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Wed Dec 20, 2017 2:59 pm
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Stu wrote:
Out of curiosity, what was the joke?

The whole book basically builds to a punchline in the form of an anticlimax:
It's about a Hungarian archivist who has discovered a manuscript that he thinks is of such overwhelming beauty that he makes it his final mission in life to travel to New York to type it up and post it on the internet for others to have a similar epiphany. However, it's pretty clear that the guy is losing his mind during the course of the book and that he doesn't really understand how the internet works. And the snippets we get of the manuscript seem like a pretty unremarkable series of adventures in the life of a few characters. So the question is whether the full manuscript leads to the great revelation the main character keeps promising or whether his fixation on it is just a product of his psychosis. With the whole story hinging on this mystery, we reach the point in the story after more than 200 pages where the guy finally posts the manuscript to the internet and we're provided with a URL...which, if you plug it into a browser, leads to a message from a fictional web hosting service saying the page is unavailable due to lack of payment. The whole mystery leads nowhere because of how computer illiterate the main character is. My explaining it probably doesn't work to convey the humor, but the actual moment of plugging in that URL only to get what amounts to a broken link after such an elaborate setup gave me a good laugh.

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Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:00 am
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While I think I may be a bit more partial to his follow-up, Taking Off, I think that both of these films show a somewhat untapped potential for Milos Forman as a comic director. It's a shame that after his recognition following Cuckoo' Nest, he would avoid comedies for prestigious fare, only showing his talents for comedic tone in small bursts within Amadeus and Ragtime (and, no, Man on the Moon was not funny).

The biggest joke, in hindsight, seems to be just how controversial this modestly charming film turned out to be, being banned following the Prague Spring by the kinds of brittle, self-important authorities that he's mocking here as clueless, vain and banal - but never really malicious or tyrannical. Similar to Daisies (but nowhere near as surreal), that such a light-hearted farce could be considered so existentially subversive says a lot more about Soviet cultural oppression than a more pointed, accurate satire could. The reality is that Formon's caricature of empty-headed tradition is just as relevant to any community, no less to a PTA or VFW meeting in America than to any other stuffy social organization.


Thu Dec 21, 2017 10:53 am
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BL wrote:
For Tarr fans, I cannot more highly recommend that you read László Krasznahorkai's fiction, which has only recently started to get proper English translations into print. Reading Sátántangó and The Melancholy of Resistance (from which Werckmeister Harmonies was adapted) is a fascinating study in seeing how both novelist and filmmaker can work from the same basic story structure but play to the strengths of their respective media. And Krasznahorkai's War and War contains possibly the funniest meta joke I've ever encountered in a book, which is saying something since I rarely find that anything "meta" works as a real joke.


I'm always looking for authors who released novels post 1980 that prove me wrong that novels post 1980 suck, so I will keep this in mind. Of course, I'm aware I simply must be looking in the wrong places, but with the exception of Wallace and (maaaaybe) Chabon, I pretty much fucking hate nearly everything I've read from the past 40 years.


Thu Dec 21, 2017 10:58 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
While I think I may be a bit more partial to his follow-up, Taking Off, I think that both of these films show a somewhat untapped potential for Milos Forman as a comic director. It's a shame that after his recognition following Cuckoo' Nest, he would avoid comedies for prestigious fare, only showing his talents for comedic tone in small bursts within Amadeus and Ragtime (and, no, Man on the Moon was not funny).

The biggest joke, in hindsight, seems to be just how controversial this modestly charming film turned out to be, being banned following the Prague Spring by the kinds of brittle, self-important authorities that he's mocking here as clueless, vain and banal - but never really malicious or tyrannical. Similar to Daisies (but nowhere near as surreal), that such a light-hearted farce could be considered so existentially subversive says a lot more about Soviet cultural oppression than a more pointed, accurate satire could. The reality is that Formon's caricature of empty-headed tradition is just as relevant to any community, no less to a PTA or VFW meeting in America than to any other stuffy social organization.


I'm in love with this movie. The scene where they keep turning out the light so the thief can return what he stole unseen always cracks me up. It is unfortunate that he didn't make smaller pictures like this as he continued on (even though Amadeus is a really good example of a great 'big' picture)

I had also meant to comment about your Carey/Kaufman post on the previous page. I basically completely agree. I remember finding his performance to be nothing more than an average impersonation with nothing beneath. Of course, some may say there never was anything beneath Kaufman, so this is just keeping in line with the characters reality. But those who don't think there was anything beneath Kaufman's act, and that there wasn't a man in there somewhere, however ill defined that man may have been, seriously probably don't understand the charms of his act to begin with. Andy Kaufman wasn't an empty smile and a promise for milk and cookies. Unfortunately, Foreman didn't seem to understand this either, and so the whole movie plays as a reenactment of Kaufman's greatest hits and, as a result, is an awful movie.


Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:04 am
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Popcorn Reviews wrote:
The only Tarr film I've seen is The Turin Horse, which I loved. I plan to watch Werckmeister Harmonies and Satantango someday.

Also, I'll be watching Zulu this weekend. I'll be sure to post my thoughts on it in this thread afterwards.


Don't let the average critical response to Man From London keep you away from that one. I makes very good company with these other three movies that made up the last leg of his career.


Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:06 am
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Mason & Dixon, White Noise, Satanic Verses, Bonfire of the Vanities (the book is really good), Hocus Pocus, American Psycho, Good Omens, and I'm sure I could think of some more.

Since the 21st Century? OK, mostly crap.


Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:06 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
Of course, some may say there never was anything beneath Kaufman, so this is just keeping in line with the characters reality. But those who don't think there was anything beneath Kaufman's act, and that there wasn't a man in there somewhere, however ill defined that man may have been, seriously probably don't understand the charms of his act to begin with. Andy Kaufman wasn't an empty smile and a promise for milk and cookies. Unfortunately, Foreman didn't seem to understand this either, and so the whole movie plays as a reenactment of Kaufman's greatest hits and, as a result, is an awful movie.

I agree with all of this. This notion of "nobody behind the wheel" is such an absurdity, and seems to be perpetuated by those who can't get a grip on the very paradigm that he's shifting. They're tired of being wrong about which cup Andy's hiding the ball, so they assume there's no ball involved. I don't see how anyone acquainted with his work could fail to see the sincerity in his work.

Newsweek screened the Jim & Andy doc with Kaufman's brother and sister, and they both go some lengths to try to correct this notion of Andy as being some Zelig-like savant, and their criticisms of both Man On The Moon and the more recent documentary focus in on how they tended to sidestep an understanding of the man in favor of furthering this more dehumanizing myth.


Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:16 am
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crumbsroom wrote:

Don't let the average critical response to Man From London keep you away from that one. I makes very good company with these other three movies that made up the last leg of his career.

I'll consider seeing that one as well.

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Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:16 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
Mason & Dixon, White Noise, Satanic Verses, Bonfire of the Vanities (the book is really good), Hocus Pocus, American Psycho, Good Omens, and I'm sure I could think of some more.

Since the 21st Century? OK, mostly crap.


I should have probably clarified I mostly mean authors that really came into their own beginning in the 80's. Even though I haven't read either of the books, I'm an established fan of both Pynchon and Wolfe, and should eventually get to both of those (I will say that I wasn't a big fan of Inherent Vice, even though I loved the movie). I did forget about DeLillo though. I'll admit, while not a big fan of White Noise, Underworld and, in particular, Libra are really fantastic.


Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:23 am
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Popcorn Reviews wrote:
I'll consider seeing that one as well.


Yes it's good. Possibly the most subdued noir film I've ever witnessed.

On a similar title note there is another movie called The Man From Earth which you should witness as well. It's basically 10 or so people in a room having a conversation (yeah, low budget) but it's such a fascinating conversation with interesting twists. I really liked it but it's only a movie you can see once.


Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:26 am
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crumbsroom wrote:

I should have probably clarified I mostly mean authors that really came into their own beginning in the 80's. Even though I haven't read either of the books, I'm an established fan of both Pynchon and Wolfe, and should eventually get to both of those (I will say that I wasn't a big fan of Inherent Vice, even though I loved the movie). I did forget about DeLillo though. I'll admit, while not a big fan of White Noise, Underworld and, in particular, Libra are really fantastic.


I'm reading Libra right now. About half way through. I love DeLillo.


Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:37 am
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ski petrol wrote:

Yes it's good. Possibly the most subdued noir film I've ever witnessed.

On a similar title note there is another movie called The Man From Earth which you should witness as well. It's basically 10 or so people in a room having a conversation (yeah, low budget) but it's such a fascinating conversation with interesting twists. I really liked it but it's only a movie you can see once.

Sounds interesting.

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Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:39 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
I wasn't a big fan of Inherent Vice

not a big fan of White Noise

What in the hell?


Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:49 am
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It's nice to see Janson posting on these boards even though he can't seem to understand that not everyone is gonna like the same books that he does. Silly guy.


Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:18 pm
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Tonight's double header

Image

Vs.

Image

Which movie will reign victorious? Or will I fall asleep before the fatal blow makes contact?


Thu Dec 21, 2017 1:38 pm
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BL wrote:
The whole book basically builds to a punchline in the form of an anticlimax:
It's about a Hungarian archivist who has discovered a manuscript that he thinks is of such overwhelming beauty that he makes it his final mission in life to travel to New York to type it up and post it on the internet for others to have a similar epiphany. However, it's pretty clear that the guy is losing his mind during the course of the book and that he doesn't really understand how the internet works. And the snippets we get of the manuscript seem like a pretty unremarkable series of adventures in the life of a few characters. So the question is whether the full manuscript leads to the great revelation the main character keeps promising or whether his fixation on it is just a product of his psychosis. With the whole story hinging on this mystery, we reach the point in the story after more than 200 pages where the guy finally posts the manuscript to the internet and we're provided with a URL...which, if you plug it into a browser, leads to a message from a fictional web hosting service saying the page is unavailable due to lack of payment. The whole mystery leads nowhere because of how computer illiterate the main character is. My explaining it probably doesn't work to convey the humor, but the actual moment of plugging in that URL only to get what amounts to a broken link after such an elaborate setup gave me a good laugh.
Ha, that's great.

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Thu Dec 21, 2017 1:47 pm
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crumbsroom wrote:
Tonight's double header

Image

Vs.

Image

Which movie will reign victorious? Or will I fall asleep before the fatal blow makes contact?

To complicate matters, the angry red planet also had its own music room.

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Thu Dec 21, 2017 1:50 pm
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crumbsroom wrote:
Tonight's double header

Image

Vs.

Image

Which movie will reign victorious? Or will I fall asleep before the fatal blow makes contact?


Tie


Thu Dec 21, 2017 2:32 pm
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crumbsroom wrote:

I should have probably clarified I mostly mean authors that really came into their own beginning in the 80's. Even though I haven't read either of the books, I'm an established fan of both Pynchon and Wolfe, and should eventually get to both of those (I will say that I wasn't a big fan of Inherent Vice, even though I loved the movie). I did forget about DeLillo though. I'll admit, while not a big fan of White Noise, Underworld and, in particular, Libra are really fantastic.


Blood Meridian


Thu Dec 21, 2017 3:54 pm
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crumbsroom wrote:
Tonight's double header

Image

Vs.

Image

Which movie will reign victorious? Or will I fall asleep before the fatal blow makes contact?

I dig ARP.


Thu Dec 21, 2017 9:00 pm
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crumbsroom wrote:
I should have probably clarified I mostly mean authors that really came into their own beginning in the 80's.

I think that Brett Easton Ellis and Neil Gaiman would still qualify then. Also, Jay McInerney, although, like Ellis, his talent may have been squandered in his youth. And I can't help but include people like Clive Barker and William Gibson. Why not?

For me, I would set the bar at 2000. Not that it's all been crap since then, but I'm not sure how many great books have yet been produced this century. My favorite recent writers fall into the more personal-voice non-fiction genre of Jon Ronson, Sarah Vowell, Michael Lewis. And since George Saunders just published his first novel last year, I guess I have to put him in that category as well.


Fri Dec 22, 2017 11:50 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
For me, I would set the bar at 2000. Not that it's all been crap since then, but I'm not sure how many great books have yet been produced this century.
I'd count Roberto Bolano's 2666, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Half of a Yellow Sun, Edward P. Jones' The Known World, Joseph O'Neill's Netherland, Ian McEwan's Atonement, John McGahern's That They May Face the Rising Sun, Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go, Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, and Paul Harding's Tinkers.

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Sat Dec 23, 2017 1:55 am
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BL wrote:
I'd count Roberto Bolano's 2666, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Half of a Yellow Sun, Edward P. Jones' The Known World, Joseph O'Neill's Netherland, Ian McEwan's Atonement, John McGahern's That They May Face the Rising Sun, Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go, Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, and Paul Harding's Tinkers.

Thanks. I'm familiar with a couple of those (rather the films, natch), and I suspected that my view was a product of being out of touch with more modern publishing. I blame the rise of memoirs :[


Sat Dec 23, 2017 9:54 am
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Stu wrote:
I like SPR a lot too, Pops, to the point where it's one of my favorite movies, even; I've always felt that it's a surprisingly effective combination of traditional Hollywood sentimentality and emotion with some of the rawest, most intense recreated battle scenes in movie history, and possibly did more to popularize the use of handheld cameras in action scenes than any other film. It's one of those movies that I'm dying to revisit and write a glowing review of, no doubt.

8-)

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Sat Dec 23, 2017 12:20 pm
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I watched this earlier today, and I enjoyed it quite a bit. Instead of providing scenes of character development (which can often weigh films down if handled poorly), the film spent the first hour simply depicting the soldiers socializing and preparing for the Zulu warriors. In those scenes, we got to see how those soldiers interacted with each other and what their strengths and flaws were as characters. Due to this, I cared for them a lot. I'm also going to second what Rock said about the battle scene in the 2nd half. It was really well-done. Instead of giving the audience time to catch their breath after the British were to kill off a wave of Zulu warriors, another wave would follow soon after. Because of this, the action was slightly reminiscent of the style of Black Hawk Down. As suspenseful as the action was, however, there were a few things which bugged me about the battle sequences. For instance, sometimes when a character got shot up close, the film wouldn't show a bullet hole or any blood. Also, many characters died from stab wounds much quicker than they would've in real life (some characters died the very second after they were stabbed). Despite this, however, I found this to be an enjoyable experience. Thanks for recommending it, crumbs.

7/10

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Sat Dec 23, 2017 1:16 pm
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Jinnistan wrote:
What in the hell?


Inherent Vice is full of great characters, but as for its writing, it rang flat for me. I think PT Anderson brought the work to life better than the author. Like Sportello, Pynchon himself seems like a man running on the fumes of a bad trip, and not taking anything into the stratosphere as stuff like Gravity's Rainbow proved he can do. Should I be comparing this book to that one. No, but I can't help it since IV almost seems completely lost in the shadow that GR casts over it.

I knew nothing about White Heat going into it other than it was sitting on my grandmothers shelf and it was by the same guy who had written Underworld and Libra. It's absurd almost surreal approach and dark humor seemed strained to me. Unlike Inherent Vice, which I did somewhat like, I didn't really like White Heat much at all. I'm always surprised when I realize it is probably the book he is most known for.


Mon Dec 25, 2017 6:43 am
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I thought White Heat was that Jamaican women's prison film starring Udo Kier as blonde Lou Reed and James Cagney as the Ghost of Brando Future.


Mon Dec 25, 2017 6:49 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
I think that Brett Easton Ellis and Neil Gaiman would still qualify then. Also, Jay McInerney, although, like Ellis, his talent may have been squandered in his youth. And I can't help but include people like Clive Barker and William Gibson. Why not?


I've only read American Psycho by Ellis, and even that I couldn't bring myself to finish. This mainly had to do with the ugliness of so much of it. Apparently, when something is ugly in a film, I have hardened myself to it, but when in print it bothers me more. And while I liked his approach of weighing all of his prose down with the minute details of every brand he's surrounded by, I liked it more in theory. After awhile it's deliberately repetitive nature wore me down. I don't really say these things as criticisms as much as just taste. As for Gaiman, I haven't read anything by him but a single short story that was quite good. I'm always kind of suspicious of grown ups who still give off a teenage goth vibe, so I have never treated him as seriously as maybe I should, but I wouldn't be surprised if he's better than I've given him credit for.

I like Barker, and he's considerably better than King, but I'm really more a fan of his imagination that his actual writing (which is decent). Abarat (I think that's what it is called) is a really good fantasy novel and his books of blood should be canon for the genre.

Also, as Looka mentioned, I don't know how I overlooked Blood Meridian, probably my favourite book of the last forty years. That shit just hollowed me out (and, yes, I am surprised that I made my way all through it considering that it is a considerably more cruel book than American Psycho)


Mon Dec 25, 2017 6:49 am
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Based on Gore Vidal's novel, of course.


Mon Dec 25, 2017 6:50 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
I thought White Heat was that Jamaican women's prison film starring Udo Kier as blonde Lou Reed and James Cagney as the Ghost of Brando Future.


It says something when I can't even be bothered to remember the title correctly. I knew something about it sounded wrong, but I figured I was close enough to not bother checking.


Mon Dec 25, 2017 6:51 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
As for Gaiman, I haven't read anything by him but a single short story that was quite good. I'm always kind of suspicious of grown ups who still give off a teenage goth vibe, so I have never treated him as seriously as maybe I should, but I wouldn't be surprised if he's better than I've given him credit for.

He's better known for his comic bo....I, ha, mean 'graphic novels'. But Good Omens is recommended. One of the better books that Douglas Adams didn't write.


Mon Dec 25, 2017 6:56 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
He's better known for his comic bo....I, ha, mean 'graphic novels'. But Good Omens is recommended. One of the better books that Douglas Adams didn't write.


Is that the Sandman Series? I saw that at the place I worked at and fucking hated the art work (I generally hate most comic art) so I never even considered reading it.

Well, I really like Hitchhiker's Guide, so that's a strong selling point. I remember seeing it laying around at my ex's place so I'll probably borrow it next time I'm visiting.


Mon Dec 25, 2017 7:01 am
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BL wrote:
I'd count Roberto Bolano's 2666, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Half of a Yellow Sun, Edward P. Jones' The Known World, Joseph O'Neill's Netherland, Ian McEwan's Atonement, John McGahern's That They May Face the Rising Sun, Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go, Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, and Paul Harding's Tinkers.


I never read Never Let Me Go, because I didn't like the movie, but I've always had my eye on it since I'm such a big fan of his Remains of the Day.


Mon Dec 25, 2017 7:04 am
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Wooley wrote:
I dig ARP.


A good deal of it is pretty bad, but when it cooks it really cooks. And even the bad parts are generally amusing and charming in that 50's crap sci fi movie kinda way. I could definitely have done without all of the red tinting on the Mars scenes though.


Mon Dec 25, 2017 7:05 am
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For those who feel that the perils of binge drinking wasn’t as deeply explored as it should have been in Party of Five, and that the emotional complexities of Bailey ruining that kids birthday party were not nearly dire enough, Accident on Hill Road is Bollywood’s proper answer to this. Conducting itself with the style of a Movie of the Week melodrama, we will be introduced to how body shots, sexy dancing and a drug dealing boyfriend who just wants everyone to relax already and take some ecstasy, can turn a seemingly goodhearted nurse, into a hit and run mama of the grandest proportions.

Based on the true life story of Chante Mallard, the woman who drove home with the man she ran over lodged in her windshield, ultimately leaving him to die on the hood of her car in her garage, Accident seems to feel that the moral implications of this story are inadequate. Unwilling to simply condemn the emotional bankruptcy of the nurse herself, who will consistently become enraged whenever her victim dares to honk the horn of the car he’s impaled upon for help, and hit him with a cricket bat, we will also be introduced to a myriad of Three’s Company like interlopers who come upon the crime scene by peeking through windows and making astonished expressions, but who are all too selfish to call the authorities. In good time the declining mental state of the nurse, and her compulsion to not muck her impending visa application by getting indicted for vehicular manslaughter, will lead her to ask her hood life boyfriend Sid to take care of the situation for her, even though he’d seemingly prefer to just feed her some more ecstasy, sway his hips with sexual intent and then rub his face against her in a soft focus montage of icky love making.

Without Sid this movie would probably be unbearable. But from the moment he is introduced, strutting into the bar with his leather jacket and handing out ecstasy tablets to groveling drugged out women on their knees, to the scene where after being enlisted for murder he retrieves his gun from inside a microwave (which he then uses to make a pizza pop), Sid makes a play for being the least cool thug I’ve seen in a film for some time. I’d imagine Claudia from Party of Five would make a more menacing villain, her fingers hooked into her oversized overalls, plotting from inside of her indoor tent how best to dispose of unwanted bodies.


Thu Dec 28, 2017 6:48 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
For those who feel that the perils of binge drinking wasn’t as deeply explored as it should have been in Party of Five, and that the emotional complexities of Bailey ruining that kids birthday party were not nearly dire enough, Accident on Hill Road is Bollywood’s proper answer to this. Conducting itself with the style of a Movie of the Week melodrama, we will be introduced to how body shots, sexy dancing and a drug dealing boyfriend who just wants everyone to relax already and take some ecstasy, can turn a seemingly goodhearted nurse, into a hit and run mama of the grandest proportions.

Based on the true life story of Chante Mallard, the woman who drove home with the man she ran over lodged in her windshield, ultimately leaving him to die on the hood of her car in her garage, Accident seems to feel that the moral implications of this story are inadequate. Unwilling to simply condemn the emotional bankruptcy of the nurse herself, who will consistently become enraged whenever her victim dares to honk the horn of the car he’s impaled upon for help, and hit him with a cricket bat, we will also be introduced to a myriad of Three’s Company like interlopers who come upon the crime scene by peeking through windows and making astonished expressions, but who are all too selfish to call the authorities. In good time the declining mental state of the nurse, and her compulsion to not muck her impending visa application by getting indicted for vehicular manslaughter, will lead her to ask her hood life boyfriend Sid to take care of the situation for her, even though he’d seemingly prefer to just feed her some more ecstasy, sway his hips with sexual intent and then rub his face against her in a soft focus montage of icky love making.

Without Sid this movie would probably be unbearable. But from the moment he is introduced, strutting into the bar with his leather jacket and handing out ecstasy tablets to groveling drugged out women on their knees, to the scene where after being enlisted for murder he retrieves his gun from inside a microwave (which he then uses to make a pizza pop), Sid makes a play for being the least cool thug I’ve seen in a film for some time. I’d imagine Claudia from Party of Five would make a more menacing villain, her fingers hooked into her oversized overalls, plotting from inside of her indoor tent how best to dispose of unwanted bodies.
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Thu Dec 28, 2017 7:59 am
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Post Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

I just wasted a few minutes trying to Wiki what the fuck a Party of Five is.

No, I never watched Melrose Place either, but I do remember that Seinfeld episode with the lie detector.


Thu Dec 28, 2017 8:21 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
I just wasted a few minutes trying to Wiki what the fuck a Party of Five is.


Did you think that Scott Wolf just appeared out of nowhere before landing that starring role in White Squall? For fuck, Janson.


Thu Dec 28, 2017 9:11 am
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crumbsroom wrote:

Did you think that Scott Wolf just appeared out of nowhere before landing that starring role in White Squall? For fuck, Janson.

Here's what I thought. I thought Scott Wolf was on one of those Christian sitcoms like Kirk Cameron. Actually, I thought the same thing about Jennifer Love Hewitt, but it seems she's also Party of Five.

Full disclosure, I never saw Dawson's Creek either. After The Gift, I didn't think I'd have to.


Thu Dec 28, 2017 10:10 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
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For those who feel that the perils of binge drinking wasn’t as deeply explored as it should have been in Party of Five, and that the emotional complexities of Bailey ruining that kids birthday party were not nearly dire enough, Accident on Hill Road is Bollywood’s proper answer to this. Conducting itself with the style of a Movie of the Week melodrama, we will be introduced to how body shots, sexy dancing and a drug dealing boyfriend who just wants everyone to relax already and take some ecstasy, can turn a seemingly goodhearted nurse, into a hit and run mama of the grandest proportions.

Based on the true life story of Chante Mallard, the woman who drove home with the man she ran over lodged in her windshield, ultimately leaving him to die on the hood of her car in her garage, Accident seems to feel that the moral implications of this story are inadequate. Unwilling to simply condemn the emotional bankruptcy of the nurse herself, who will consistently become enraged whenever her victim dares to honk the horn of the car he’s impaled upon for help, and hit him with a cricket bat, we will also be introduced to a myriad of Three’s Company like interlopers who come upon the crime scene by peeking through windows and making astonished expressions, but who are all too selfish to call the authorities. In good time the declining mental state of the nurse, and her compulsion to not muck her impending visa application by getting indicted for vehicular manslaughter, will lead her to ask her hood life boyfriend Sid to take care of the situation for her, even though he’d seemingly prefer to just feed her some more ecstasy, sway his hips with sexual intent and then rub his face against her in a soft focus montage of icky love making.

Without Sid this movie would probably be unbearable. But from the moment he is introduced, strutting into the bar with his leather jacket and handing out ecstasy tablets to groveling drugged out women on their knees, to the scene where after being enlisted for murder he retrieves his gun from inside a microwave (which he then uses to make a pizza pop), Sid makes a play for being the least cool thug I’ve seen in a film for some time. I’d imagine Claudia from Party of Five would make a more menacing villain, her fingers hooked into her oversized overalls, plotting from inside of her indoor tent how best to dispose of unwanted bodies.

I fail to see how Sid is the villain here.

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Thu Dec 28, 2017 11:47 am
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*sways hips with sexual intent*

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Thu Dec 28, 2017 11:48 am
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Watch in horror as old men dribble soup from their beards


Sat Dec 30, 2017 12:27 pm
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I have seen this Feast. Could have used a dollop more of porridge. And a solid cultured ounce of sexual intent in those kneading hips.


Sat Dec 30, 2017 12:35 pm
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Don't sway your hips for at least an hour after you eat porridge or you'll get cramps.

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Sat Dec 30, 2017 12:38 pm
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Sat Dec 30, 2017 12:42 pm
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