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 Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom 
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crumbsroom wrote:

If moping around a diner in homoerotic leather is your idea of 'fun', you may be right.


Okay, now I'm fully aroused.


Tue Jan 09, 2018 9:19 pm
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crumbsroom wrote:
I'm not assuming either of these have DVD releases though, right. I've never even heard ghostly whispers of either of them.

I watched both on Prime, and I'm under the assumption that this correlates with their being available on physical media through their site. Looking now, it shows that new DVD copies of Tracks are available, indicating that it's currently in print from Paramount Home Entertainment. This copy looks good, widescreen and HD, much better than the dub I watched several years back. Prime also has a couple of other Jaglom films, more recent, and for such an obscure figure, he's been unbelievably prolific.

Bloodbath seems to be a release from FilmRise, a label specializing in the obscure, but their quality is erratic. They've got several titles on Prime, some look great and fully restored, others look like cheap dupes. This falls more into that latter category - cropped format, blurry and smothered mono mix, not necessarily any better than what you can find on Youtube. A lot of these kinds of titles fall into a nebulous quasi-legal category, and I wonder if the streaming service allows for some loopholes around various international copyright disputes. As it is, I can safely say that this release, even if you find a physical copy, is pratically a bootleg. But FilmRise is the label if you want to check on its availability.

crumbsroom wrote:
You've seen The Last Movie, right.

Only chunks. This is something that would be an ideal priority for Criterion. I can't think of too many American titles from 2014's Story of Cinema series that continue to remain unreleased and unrestored.


Wed Jan 10, 2018 5:28 pm
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Terrible title, even worse poster, disguises this almost-was film from the director of Reflecting Skin. When it focuses on the British squalor that the characters live in, only worsened by the hoodied demons in the street, it seems promising. The isolation of Jim Sturgess' character becomes manifest not only in his increasingly erratic behavior, but the social structures that begin to decompose around him. But as it moves clunkily into magic realism territory, than some kind of half baked morality tale, it loses all steam. Too many painfully maudlin moments and unearned moral dillema's. That said, even as the movie begins to flounder, it has great set pieces built into it right up to the last half hour or so, from saran wrapped male prostitutes to the Faustian dealmaker who lives in a tenement building. Even the comedic touches of a character called "The Weapons Man", while not entirely working very well into the fabric of the movie it surrounds, are still pleasant eccentricities not lost on me. Plus, what could be more British than a pulpy monstrosity drinking a cuppa.

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Clearly Philip Ridley still has some of the poetic touches he so beautifully showcased in Reflecting Skin, just don't know if he settled on the best script.


Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:03 am
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That horrible poster and title (this edge!!!) has made me skip it so many times that I never bothered to check who directed it. Cover calling the book black.


Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:15 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
Image

Terrible title, even worse poster, disguises this almost-was film from the director of Reflecting Skin. When it focuses on the British squalor that the characters live in, only worsened by the hoodied demons in the street, it seems promising. The isolation of Jim Sturgess' character becomes manifest not only in his increasingly erratic behavior, but the social structures that begin to decompose around him. But as it moves clunkily into magic realism territory, than some kind of half baked morality tale, it loses all steam. Too many painfully maudlin moments and unearned moral dillema's. That said, even as the movie begins to flounder, it has great set pieces built into it right up to the last half hour or so, from saran wrapped male prostitutes to the Faustian dealmaker who lives in a tenement building. Even the comedic touches of a character called "The Weapons Man", while not entirely working very well into the fabric of the movie it surrounds, are still pleasant eccentricities not lost on me. Plus, what could be more British than a pulpy monstrosity drinking a cuppa.

Image

Clearly Philip Ridley still has some of the poetic touches he so beautifully showcased in Reflecting Skin, just don't know if he settled on the best script.


I enjoyed Heartless, but it definitely loses its way and the imagery can't quite carry it home.


Wed Jan 17, 2018 12:02 pm
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Highway to Hell plays as a Chad Lowe fever dream—fuelled by the anger that the his Emmy winning performance in Life Goes On made everyone think he really had AIDS, the disappointment of being overlooked on his wife’s Oscar Thank You list as he wept forgotten in that immense crowd of somebodies, and the jealousy that he will never be as good looking or as ageless as his sex addict older brother—Chad Lowe will have nothing to lose as he bursts into Hell, looking for the girl that the Devil stole from him, determined to bring her back, even if she might kinda be alright staying there after all.

Of course, because it’s Chad Lowe, he might seem like the most lacksidasical element of his own fever dream. Unlike the poster promises, he won’t even don a single wifebeater to aid his quest, look buff or have Kristy Swanson chain herself to his ankle. He’ll more likely just button a checkered shirt from the Gap half way, and put on a pair of beige slacks. You know. For comfort. And so when mad ice cream scoopers threaten to scoop out his brain or plastercine three headed dogs pounce, he can just kind of raise his eye brows in emotion, recite a half assed action hero one liner off a cue card somewhere, and give the camera a look that says confessing to Becca that his dick was contagious was a walk in the park compared to this. His range wasn’t quite cut out for the netherworld.

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But it’s probably not best to rate the quality of Highway to Hell on his performance. Or even the story which amounts to little more than a Hell Cop who steals virgins for Satan (this is really the entirety of the plot, placed over a boilerplate Orpheus arc). This is a movie about how a low budget filmmaker transformed a stretch of Arizona desert into a place that looks like few versions of Hell I’ve come across on film. Creaking donut shops with customers covered in dust, a laid back Beelzebub mechanic, biker gangs composed of what looks like dentists, weird looking kids, demon temptresses with low swinging boobs and devil minions that look like Andy Warhol paving a road to Hell with sinners who claims their sins were well intentioned. It even has a Hitler played by Gilbert Gottfried, because who else could ever be loud enough to rant like Hitler in Hell.

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This is a just generally likeable and imaginative movie, that is one of the rare campy horror comedies that somehow doesn't completely put me off. Yes, it has Chad Lowe in it. But don’t hold that against him like Hilary Swank did.


Thu Jan 18, 2018 11:02 am
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Heh. I went to high school with Kristy Swanson. Never saw any of her movies though.


Thu Jan 18, 2018 11:10 am
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In a sunset dappled montage of bone mobiles, a drunken sheepherder sleeping amongst his sheep friends, many moaned baa’s, and maybe allusions to a forgotten moment of bestiality, a bloody and mutant sheep embryo will appear in the dirt in the morning. Hardly the kind of hangover one expects to wake from after a night of slot machine victories, prostitute robberies, bar fights, banjo bands playing “Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf” and some a bunch of pseudo science from a scienctist who suddenly appear out of nowhere to drive pickled sheepherders home. And we are only six minutes into Godmonster of Indian Flats.

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Exactly the kind of band one would hope accompanies the kind of sheep fucking soon alluded to

Now this might imply that this film is a fast moving and quirkily demented B Movie full of spectacle, which might be misleading. Godmonster is a strangely leisurely paced film more concerned with the internal and incomprehensible dramas playing out between the leader of a historical society who holds antebellum balls every weeked, a black land developer who is partial to pie fights, and the importance of elaborately staged dog funerals to keep the peace. And all the while these Peyton Place small town controversies are unfolding, a pair of scientists and the shepherd they have taken under their wing, nurture their sheep monster to adulthood. But anything really resembling a horror film will be kept well under wraps until the final twenty minutes. And even then, horror might not be the word. Watching the hilariously ponderous appearance of the Godmonster appear in the town to distract from their petty squabbles is clearly not meant to be as much horrifying as confounding. And hilarious.

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Not sure if these children are unaware of their impending guest, or if they are just too embarrassed for it to make firm eye contact.

I recently wondered to myself what truly low budget, so bad it’s good film would deserve a Criterion treatment. Films that create their own world and cinematic language, all the while being baffling and equally wonderful to laugh at and appreciate. Doris Wishman’s “A Night To Dismember”, was on the list, no matter how impossibly headache inducing it is to watch with its unsynced sound and non sequiter editing. “Boardinghouse” deserves a mention, but is likely too ponderous and pointless and deep down the rabbit hole to really be appreciated by many. So maybe the gauntlet should fall to this. There is a voice to be heard in the weird pacing and disorienting editing of Godmonster which seems to cut out swathes of drama in place of whatever the hell it is they decided to keep in the frame. It is also a testament to zero budget filmmakers that what you do, no matter how bad, or defiant against norms, or easy to poke fun of, can also be admirable. It can also verge on being art.


Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:59 am
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After rising tensions between the U.S. and the Soviet Union leads to nuclear war, the survivors have to survive against looters, starvation, and radiation sickness. What I liked about this movie was how realistic it was. It had a depiction of corruption and malice on a worldwide scale. Many of the death scenes were long and drawn out and its plot was also eerily plausible. Also, its documentary style camerawork was pretty interesting. You don't get to know the characters all that well, but I think that may have been intentional, because if something like this were to ever happen, you'd just be another face in the crowd. Overall, I'd say this movie has aged really well, and I highly recommend it.

8/10

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Mon Jan 22, 2018 3:37 am
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Threads is a terrifying movie. How nice for it to be more pertinent than ever these days.


Mon Jan 22, 2018 3:39 am
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Went out to dinner for my brother's birthday tonight and in the middle of the meal my dad says, "I found some movie on Amazon about a mutant sheep!" So there's a 100% chance that my father will be watching The Godmonster in the coming week.

I cheated and looked up the picnic scene on Youtube, and I'm wondering if the creature is supposed to be frightening. Rather than run from it, I think I'd be more inclined to run toward it, with a pistol, to put the wretched thing out of its misery. Of course by skipping the rest of the film I missed out on a lot of the nuance of the scene, I realize.

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Mon Jan 22, 2018 10:34 am
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Captain Terror wrote:
Went out to dinner for my brother's birthday tonight and in the middle of the meal my dad says, "I found some movie on Amazon about a mutant sheep!" So there's a 100% chance that my father will be watching The Godmonster in the coming week.

It is on Amazon Prime at the moment.

As for Highway to Hell, I watched that one late night in high school on cable. I remember being amused by it, but also having forgot all about it. It was a comedy, right?


Mon Jan 22, 2018 12:04 pm
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crumbsroom wrote:
I recently wondered to myself what truly low budget, so bad it’s good film would deserve a Criterion treatment. Films that create their own world and cinematic language, all the while being baffling and equally wonderful to laugh at and appreciate.

I'm going to go with Timothy Carey's The World's Greatest Sinner because I'm not at all convinced that he was in on the joke.

Also, since it's my personal favorite Ed Wood film, Bride of the Monster has weeks of unpackable analysis embedded in its madness.


Mon Jan 22, 2018 12:10 pm
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Captain Terror wrote:
I cheated and looked up the picnic scene on Youtube, and I'm wondering if the creature is supposed to be frightening. Rather than run from it, I think I'd be more inclined to run toward it, with a pistol, to put the wretched thing out of its misery. Of course by skipping the rest of the film I missed out on a lot of the nuance of the scene, I realize.


I think sympathy is the fair response. The movie at no point really takes the horror angle on any of its scenes. The monster, during the bulk of the movie, is more of a curious afterthought in the background. It is really more of a muted melodrama, or a surreal comedy (I do believe much of the humor in the film is intentional, "I said I'm sorry about the dog and I meant it. I even went to its funeral", is just too much of a self aware stupid line both in its construction and eventual utterance not meant to be laughed at).

It is the ultimate charming magic of the movie that it plays by no expected rules. Even if much of the confusion the audience feels in how they are supposed to react to the movie from scene to scene is partly a result of incompetence, that's fine. But I personally feel there is enough intent in the feeling the movie evokes, and moments of genuinely calculated mise en scene and sound design, that as crappy as most of it ends up looking, and as confoundingly silly as all of it is, this was somewhat of a labor of love by the director. And those are always the best 'bad' movies.


Mon Jan 22, 2018 12:23 pm
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Jinnistan wrote:


Definitely. In the way that Evil Dead II is a comedy. Just not nearly as good as that one.


Mon Jan 22, 2018 12:24 pm
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Jinnistan wrote:
I'm going to go with Timothy Carey's The World's Greatest Sinner because I'm not at all convinced that he was in on the joke.

Also, since it's my personal favorite Ed Wood film, Bride of the Monster has weeks of unpackable analysis embedded in its madness.


I really need to see that Carey movie. When I saw him briefly pop up in One Eyed Jacks, acting like a typical farting maniac dancing on tables, I remembered that you mentioned that one awhile back.

Ed Wood is undoubtedly a guy whose whole filmography is worthy of Criterion treatment. Bride of the Monster is great, as is most of his better known works. And Glen or Glenda, as horrible and boring as most of it is, is just about one of the most special movies ever made. Has a junk movie artist ever put more on the line or more of himself in his shitty shoestring work?I think not. Of all his movies, only Jailbait is a bit of a chore to sit through, but if anyone out there is a fan of watching the world's worst blackface routine, they should seek this one out. Hoo boy.


Mon Jan 22, 2018 12:29 pm
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crumbsroom wrote:
It is the ultimate charming magic of the movie that it plays by no expected rules. Even if much of the confusion the audience feels in how they are supposed to react to the movie from scene to scene is partly a result of incompetence, that's fine. But I personally feel there is enough intent in the feeling the movie evokes, and moments of genuinely calculated mise en scene and sound design, that as crappy as most of it ends up looking, and as confoundingly silly as all of it is, this was somewhat of a labor of love by the director. And those are always the best 'bad' movies.


what's a good starter guide to these kinds of movies? I fear that by hewing to much of the respected canon, I am missing out on a whole lot of great schlock.


Mon Jan 22, 2018 12:48 pm
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Oxnard Montalvo wrote:

what's a good starter guide to these kinds of movies? I fear that by hewing to much of the respected canon, I am missing out on a whole lot of great schlock.


It's a good question that I'd have to think over. I'm pretty far through the looking glass with a lot of this stuff and my tolerance for movies fucking around is really high, so I might be a little dangerous to take advice from. I get particularly excited about a lot of movies that don't have any real traditional sense of rhythm, so they can come off as either sluggishly paced or completely fragmented and borderline incomprehensible. It is a very fine line between what I can find fascinating or beautiful in these kinds of films, and what is actually legitimately unwatchable.

I'll give it some thought, since something like Godmonster might be a little bit bracing in its levels of wrongness for someone wanting to just dip their toe in the pool to test the temperature.


Mon Jan 22, 2018 1:01 pm
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crumbsroom wrote:

It's a good question that I'd have to think over. I'm pretty far through the looking glass with a lot of this stuff and my tolerance for movies fucking around is really high, so I might be a little dangerous to take advice from. I get particularly excited about a lot of movies that don't have any real traditional sense of rhythm, so they can come off as either sluggishly paced or completely fragmented and borderline incomprehensible. It is a very fine line between what I can find fascinating or beautiful in these kinds of films, and what is actually legitimately unwatchable.

I'll give it some thought, since something like Godmonster might be a little bit bracing in its levels of wrongness for someone wanting to just dip their toe in the pool to test the temperature.


as long as I have something to recommend to my friends next time they ask me to watch Sharknado (or other similar works).

I am assuming that Ed Wood and Tommy Wiseau, both with critically-acclaimed biopics, would make the top of a Earnestly Bad Movies canon.


Mon Jan 22, 2018 1:13 pm
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crumbsroom wrote:
Of all his movies, only Jailbait is a bit of a chore to sit through

Have you seen Orgy of the Dead? Unless you skip to Fawn Silver's dance, it's excruciatingly tedious nightclub stripping in a graveyard. And even Fawn Silver (the only really sexy dancer among them) is frequently looking annoyed off-camera, because Ed is no doubt giving her typically skeevy instructions on how to shake her breasts. It's really not even worth making fun of.


Mon Jan 22, 2018 1:26 pm
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Oxnard Montalvo wrote:
as long as I have something to recommend to my friends next time they ask me to watch Sharknado (or other similar works).

I am assuming that Ed Wood and Tommy Wiseau, both with critically-acclaimed biopics, would make the top of a Earnestly Bad Movies canon.


Some of these are more canon than others, but these are my favourite bad movies, if you're looking for recommendations:
Rock'n'Roll Nightmare
Miami Connection
Lady Terminator
Disco Dancer
Troll 2

I've shamefully seen nothing by Ed Wood, so I should probably fix that. The Room is also a must-see, but I have trouble putting it among my favourites. The egotism running through it that makes it so fascinating to watch also puts me off from it just a little, especially compared to the likability of something like Rock'n'Roll Nightmare and Miami Connection, which are nice enough to give all their characters time to shine.

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Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:09 pm
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thanks.

also I'll probably stay away from The Disaster Artist movie if possible in lieu of reading the book. I too had a bit of a lack of affection for The Room for similar reasons so I dunno if I'm the mood to see Wiseau's ego sentimentalized at the moment. like I dunno if I'd want to watch a hypothetical Ed Wood-style biopic of Neil Breen.


Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:17 pm
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Jinnistan wrote:
Have you seen Orgy of the Dead? Unless you skip to Fawn Silver's dance, it's excruciatingly tedious nightclub stripping in a graveyard. And even Fawn Silver (the only really sexy dancer among them) is frequently looking annoyed off-camera, because Ed is no doubt giving her typically skeevy instructions on how to shake her breasts. It's really not even worth making fun of.


No. I was only speaking of those I've seen: Jail Bait, Glen or Glenda, Plan 9, Night of the Ghouls, Bride of the Monster. I know virtually nothing about the other handful of his films, but I'd still be willing to watch all of them.


Tue Jan 23, 2018 8:26 am
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Rock wrote:

Some of these are more canon than others, but these are my favourite bad movies, if you're looking for recommendations:
Rock'n'Roll Nightmare
Miami Connection
Lady Terminator
Disco Dancer
Troll 2

I've shamefully seen nothing by Ed Wood, so I should probably fix that. The Room is also a must-see, but I have trouble putting it among my favourites. The egotism running through it that makes it so fascinating to watch also puts me off from it just a little, especially compared to the likability of something like Rock'n'Roll Nightmare and Miami Connection, which are nice enough to give all their characters time to shine.


These are as good a starting place as any. All are as about as enjoyable as any b movie can get, and they are all really unique films on their own. Yeti: Giant of the 20th Century is also one that should be lumped in with those. And for a classic example, The Brain that Woudn't Die is another favourite.


Tue Jan 23, 2018 8:31 am
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crumbsroom wrote:

These are as good a starting place as any. All are as about as enjoyable as any b movie can get, and they are all really unique films on their own. Yeti: Giant of the 20th Century is also one that should be lumped in with those. And for a classic example, The Brain that Woudn't Die is another favourite.


Also:

Soul Vengeance
Dolemite
Hundra
Doom Asylum
Star Crash
Primal Rage
Shriek of the Mutilated
Slime City


Tue Jan 23, 2018 8:59 am
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many thanks crumbs!


Tue Jan 23, 2018 9:02 am
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Ever since I found out that Blood Rage is the same film as Nightmare at Shadow Woods, I always imagine Trey Parker playing the lead role. That could be a really great remake.


Tue Jan 23, 2018 9:20 am
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Popcorn Reviews wrote:
After rising tensions between the U.S. and the Soviet Union leads to nuclear war, the survivors have to survive against looters, starvation, and radiation sickness. What I liked about this movie was how realistic it was. It had a depiction of corruption and malice on a worldwide scale. Many of the death scenes were long and drawn out and its plot was also eerily plausible. Also, its documentary style camerawork was pretty interesting. You don't get to know the characters all that well, but I think that may have been intentional, because if something like this were to ever happen, you'd just be another face in the crowd. Overall, I'd say this movie has aged really well, and I highly recommend it.

8/10
Funny you should mention Threads now, as I just recently noticed an article about it in The AV Club's recurring series on post-apocalyptic films, Apocalypse Then; check it out!
crumbsroom wrote:
Ed Wood is undoubtedly a guy whose whole filmography is worthy of Criterion treatment. Bride of the Monster is great, as is most of his better known works. And Glen or Glenda, as horrible and boring as most of it is, is just about one of the most special movies ever made. Has a junk movie artist ever put more on the line or more of himself in his shitty shoestring work?I think not. Of all his movies, only Jailbait is a bit of a chore to sit through, but if anyone out there is a fan of watching the world's worst blackface routine, they should seek this one out. Hoo boy.
And, even though he didn't direct it himself (obviously), Ed still made one of Tim Burton's best films possible, so that probably counts in his favor as well.

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Tue Jan 23, 2018 11:17 am
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oooh, bad movie suggestions? I used to be quite the connoisseur at one time although I don't seek them out as much anymore. From memory, my favorites used to be

The Oldies:
The Ape Man (Lugosi)
Plan 9 From Outer Space (Wood)
From Hell It Came (walking tree)
Robot Monster (gorilla in a diving helmet)

The Not-Quite-As-Oldies:
Yeti: Giant of the 20th Century (a special one. There was a time when I liked no movie more.)
Infra-Man (aka Super-Inframan)
Time of the Apes
The Curse of Bigfoot
Mighty Peking Man

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Those can all be considered "fun" to watch. I was never big on the sleazier side of schlock, although I recognize its place in the world. Adding blood and boobs introduces a more depressing element that's less fun for me. I mean, I'll watch those too, but probably only once.

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Tue Jan 23, 2018 11:25 am
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I like Deathstalker myself.
(Given that I actually consider Beastmaster to be a good movie.)


Wed Jan 24, 2018 12:52 am
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Wooley wrote:
(Given that I actually consider Beastmaster to be a good movie.)

I wouldn't call it a "bad" movie.

I recently scoured through some of Amazon Prime's titles of similar 80s-cheese fare, usually some kind of mix of Conan-fantasy and Mad Max-post-apocalypse - and that sweet spot where the two are wed in unholy mediocrity. Trust me, Beastmaster is a fine film compared to the worst of its cousins from the era.


Wed Jan 24, 2018 1:00 am
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Wooley wrote:
(Given that I actually consider Beastmaster to be a good movie.)


haha yeah, when I said I no longer seek out bad movies I could hear my friends and family saying "Oh, really?" This is the guy that just told everyone how great The Creeping Flesh is.

ps--Deathstalker is a special film because it taught the tween-aged Capt Terror what boobs look like.

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Wed Jan 24, 2018 1:59 am
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Captain Terror wrote:

haha yeah, when I said I no longer seek out bad movies I could hear my friends and family saying "Oh, really?" This is the guy that just told everyone how great The Creeping Flesh is.

ps--Deathstalker is a special film because it taught the tween-aged Capt Terror what boobs look like.

Yes. One will definitely learn.


Wed Jan 24, 2018 4:36 am
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Stu wrote:
Funny you should mention Threads now, as I just recently noticed an article about it in The AV Club's recurring series on post-apocalyptic films, Apocalypse Then; check it out!

Thanks for posting the article. I might watch some of the films which were brought up in it someday. Anyways, what did you think of this film?

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Wed Jan 24, 2018 11:56 am
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Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Thanks for posting the article. I might watch some of the films which were brought up in it someday. Anyways, what did you think of this film?
I've never seen it...

:oops:

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Thu Jan 25, 2018 5:10 am
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LINDA MANZ AS A COWBOY BOOT

Watching Out of the Blue reminded me of an old pair of cowboy boots I used to wear to highschool. They didn’t fit and I would clomp down the hallways in them towards my classes. Everyone told me they were horrible. Even I knew they were horrible, but I wore them every day for two years, the heels eventually wearing down until they were lopsided, making walking difficult. At any point my father could have asked for them back. They were after all his. He had bought them from a van on the side of the road one night when he was stumble drunk. But even he soon realized they weren’t worth wearing. He would never again find the right concoction of beer and spirits and amphetamines to ever make them sparkle quite like they did that night he brought them home, and so left them in his closet for me to come across one day when I was angry and hating everything and looking for something real special to wear to school. And there they were when I needed them. They sat there amongst the clutter of his other drunk fashion miseries: fringe suede jacket, karate outfits, Satan’s Choice T-Shirts moccassins, and all of the other looks he had briefly adopted until sobriety made him opt instead for a week in nothing but pajamas. But when I saw them there, these boots called to me. They were exactly what I was looking for. The kind of fashion accessory that would defy the odds of anyone continuing to remain my friend.

There were other faux-pas’ of course. Who doesn’t have them in highschool? But it was these boots that called the most attention to themselves. They were noisy, unpleasant, desperate for attention and completely at odds with my Canadian middle class, suburban surroundings. They were also an obvious posture. Defiance for defiance sake. Horribly embarrassing, but noble in their own stupid, shallow, brash as well as frighteningly insecure way. The qualities of any typical mixed up adolescence.

All of which will be elements quickly made apparent in the performance of Linda Manz in Dennis Hoppers “Out of the Blue”. The manner in which she under smokes and over puffs her cigarettes, or walks with an off balance swagger that seems born from legs too short for the quick determination of her steps, or repeats songs lyrics like talismans whenever she runs out of anything interesting to say. She plays teenagehood with such an fearless commitment to how it really feels that she constantly risks becoming completely unnatural with every movement she makes. And frequently does. But Manz should be proud of this. There is such an admirably unconscious quality to the all consuming self consciousness of her very being in this film that it creates a performance that is so perfectly encapsulates adolescence that it becomes just as hard to look at as an old teenage photograph of a bad haircut. But in this instance, twenty four bad haircuts a second. It is remarkable how succinctly she can bring back these bad memories.

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Fri Jan 26, 2018 12:28 pm
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Stu wrote:
I've never seen it...

:oops:

I feel like I say this sentence a lot on this site, but I highly recommend watching it once you're able to find free time.

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Fri Jan 26, 2018 12:32 pm
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Linda Manz in that movie is one of the best child performances I've ever seen.

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Fri Jan 26, 2018 2:11 pm
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Rock wrote:
Linda Manz in that movie is one of the best child performances I've ever seen.


And virtually never did anything again until Harmony Korrine pulled her for little more than a cameo in Gummo. It seems the real life Manz may have been just as troubled as Cebe, and the performance may have run pretty close to the truth of her life, so maybe there shouldn't be great surprise that she eventually vanished. Still, it's unfortunate.


Sat Jan 27, 2018 2:43 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
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LINDA MANZ AS A COWBOY BOOT

Watching Out of the Blue reminded me of an old pair of cowboy boots I used to wear to highschool. They didn’t fit and I would clomp down the hallways in them towards my classes. Everyone told me they were horrible. Even I knew they were horrible, but I wore them every day for two years, the heels eventually wearing down until they were lopsided, making walking difficult. At any point my father could have asked for them back. They were after all his. He had bought them from a van on the side of the road one night when he was stumble drunk. But even he soon realized they weren’t worth wearing. He would never again find the right concoction of beer and spirits and amphetamines to ever make them sparkle quite like they did that night he brought them home, and so left them in his closet for me to come across one day when I was angry and hating everything and looking for something real special to wear to school. And there they were when I needed them. They sat there amongst the clutter of his other drunk fashion miseries: fringe suede jacket, karate outfits, Satan’s Choice T-Shirts moccassins, and all of the other looks he had briefly adopted until sobriety made him opt instead for a week in nothing but pajamas. But when I saw them there, these boots called to me. They were exactly what I was looking for. The kind of fashion accessory that would defy the odds of anyone continuing to remain my friend.

There were other faux-pas’ of course. Who doesn’t have them in highschool? But it was these boots that called the most attention to themselves. They were noisy, unpleasant, desperate for attention and completely at odds with my Canadian middle class, suburban surroundings. They were also an obvious posture. Defiance for defiance sake. Horribly embarrassing, but noble in their own stupid, shallow, brash as well as frighteningly insecure way. The qualities of any typical mixed up adolescence.

All of which will be elements quickly made apparent in the performance of Linda Manz in Dennis Hoppers “Out of the Blue”. The manner in which she under smokes and over puffs her cigarettes, or walks with an off balance swagger that seems born from legs too short for the quick determination of her steps, or repeats songs lyrics like talismans whenever she runs out of anything interesting to say. She plays teenagehood with such an fearless commitment to how it really feels that she constantly risks becoming completely unnatural with every movement she makes. And frequently does. But Manz should be proud of this. There is such an admirably unconscious quality to the all consuming self consciousness of her very being in this film that it creates a performance that is so perfectly encapsulates adolescence that it becomes just as hard to look at as an old teenage photograph of a bad haircut. But in this instance, twenty four bad haircuts a second. It is remarkable how succinctly she can bring back these bad memories.

Image

Image


I prefer the remake :shifty:

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Sat Jan 27, 2018 4:25 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
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Please tell me these are the actual boots from your story.

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Sat Jan 27, 2018 4:37 am
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Captain Terror wrote:
Please tell me these are the actual boots from your story.


My father would never have good enough taste to buy boots like these from a highway blackmarket van.


Sat Jan 27, 2018 2:18 pm
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crumbsroom wrote:

And virtually never did anything again until Harmony Korrine pulled her for little more than a cameo in Gummo. It seems the real life Manz may have been just as troubled as Cebe, and the performance may have run pretty close to the truth of her life, so maybe there shouldn't be great surprise that she eventually vanished. Still, it's unfortunate.

You're post got me googling, and while unfortunate that she had such a small body of work, she seems to be doing alright based on this 2011 Village Voice profile, which includes a recipe for clam bread.

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Sat Jan 27, 2018 2:45 pm
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Jinnistan wrote:
I wouldn't call it a "bad" movie.

I recently scoured through some of Amazon Prime's titles of similar 80s-cheese fare, usually some kind of mix of Conan-fantasy and Mad Max-post-apocalypse - and that sweet spot where the two are wed in unholy mediocrity. Trust me, Beastmaster is a fine film compared to the worst of its cousins from the era.

Well, Beastmaster has a number of things going for it that elevate it above most of its kin. It obviously never reaches the Conan level, but then it didn't have the budget Conan had, it didn't have John Milius, it didn't have James Earl Jones, and it didn't have one of the great fantasy franchises of the 20th Century to rely on.
But Beastmaster has a good story, it REALLY maximizes its budget, it has Don Coscarelli, it has Rip Torn, and most of all, it has heart.
I used to love it, I thought, mostly for the many great fantasy elements and characters that are actually a little different from most others. I mean, it has a hero who can share thoughts with animals is know slouch with a sword, and has a fucking folding-shuriken. I love the terrifying bat-wing people. I love the mindless leather-slaves that create sparks as they run their spiked fists along the stone walls. And I particularly love that the enemy is the faceless "Jun Horde" to off-set Torn's "another moustache-twirling villain".
And of course, John Amos brings the heart to the whole production.
But, finally, as an older adult, I find that I love the movie for all the things Coscarelli did on the budget he had to make this movie seem so much more real and so much more fantasy than its kin. Yar and Ator and Deathstalker and the like still ultimately feel like they were filmed in a forest in California that might actually be right behind some new subdivision. Beastmaster really feels like another time and another world, much closer to Conan. There's one shot I remember (it's been a long time so I can't tell you when it occurs), when Coscarelli uses forced perspective to make it look like the city and the temple are much bigger than they actually are. You can catch it, but if you let it slide a little or you're a little younger it actually works and to me it just showed such great craft and such dedication to making this film work.
All in all, I think The Beastmaster stands apart from everything else in its genre. To me it is the epitome of what can be accomplished on a small budget if enough care and craft are put into it.
(I have not seen The Sword And The Sorcerer in ages so I can't quite say how it compares. And Krull is the tits and I'll fight anyone who says otherwise.)


Sun Jan 28, 2018 2:26 am
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Wooley wrote:
And Krull is the tits and I'll fight anyone who says otherwise.)

I guess I could blame that poster, and that awesome weapon, combined with a wild child's imagination, but I believe the bar was set way too high for me to have been satisfied.

And I've always liked Sword and the Sorcerer, Rifftrax be damned.


Mon Jan 29, 2018 3:53 am
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Out of the Blue would be the logical conclusion to my attempted Dennis Hopper psychotic-era tour, but alas, I couldn't find it.

Although very different films, I do have a soft spot for his later neo-noirs. And, holy fuck, did Hopper direct Chasers? That's somehow the most psychotic twist of them all.


Mon Jan 29, 2018 3:57 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
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Terrible title, even worse poster, disguises this almost-was film from the director of Reflecting Skin. When it focuses on the British squalor that the characters live in, only worsened by the hoodied demons in the street, it seems promising. The isolation of Jim Sturgess' character becomes manifest not only in his increasingly erratic behavior, but the social structures that begin to decompose around him. But as it moves clunkily into magic realism territory, than some kind of half baked morality tale, it loses all steam. Too many painfully maudlin moments and unearned moral dillema's. That said, even as the movie begins to flounder, it has great set pieces built into it right up to the last half hour or so, from saran wrapped male prostitutes to the Faustian dealmaker who lives in a tenement building. Even the comedic touches of a character called "The Weapons Man", while not entirely working very well into the fabric of the movie it surrounds, are still pleasant eccentricities not lost on me. Plus, what could be more British than a pulpy monstrosity drinking a cuppa.

Image

Clearly Philip Ridley still has some of the poetic touches he so beautifully showcased in Reflecting Skin, just don't know if he settled on the best script.


The fact it's the guy who directed Reflecting Skin is a bitter twist indeed.

The film had some momentum at the beginning, but lost its way as it turned into

a hackneyed love story. It was clearly built for some revenge, but the writers decided to swerve us.


Even though the film had the courage of its convictions towards the end, I found it to be rather underwhelming.


Mon Jan 29, 2018 9:10 am
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As far as '80s sword-and-sandal fantasy movies go, Lucio Fulci's Conquest is worth a watch. It's not terribly exciting, but has a pretty unique atmosphere.

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Mon Jan 29, 2018 12:13 pm
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Here's one I saw last week, very 80s, and the "lost universe" is basically the same kind of fantasy landscape we're talking about.

Not good, by the way.


Mon Jan 29, 2018 12:48 pm
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I have several films that I could mention from my Prime bottom feeding.


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I saw this one under the name Manhunt, and it's genuinely a lot of fun. Henry Silva and Willy Strode play a great pair of mafia hitmen sent to seek out an Italian pimp that looks like a swarthier Alfred Molina. The film is never really campy, but there's a lot of knowing humor in it, and the soundtrack is balls in the best sense of the term. I only wish that the print was in better shape.


Image

I added several spagetti westerns to my watchlist, mostly going by directors I know, but I couldn't resist the rare starring role for Kinski. This one is pretty cheap, but Kinski is Kinski, a black-clad lawyer with a saddle full of very deadly legal tomes. I don't know what to say, if you like Kinski, this one has Kinski. The only slight problem is that it is dubbed with a particularly un-Kinski actor, adding the unfitting air of sanity and sensibility to his character.


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Yeah, I know what you're thinking. I assure you that my intentions are pure. It occurred to me when I found this that I have never seen a German film between the end of WWII and Schlondorff's Young Torless twenty years later, so I felt I needed to see what German cinema looked like in 1958, and if I had to suffer through the lovely Eva Bartok and Sabina Sesslmann in order to do it, then by god I'm a trooper. The film (orig. Madeline Tel. 13 62 11), which was marketed in America as a sultry skin-flick about the perils of prostitution, is a lot better than that seedy destination, but probably not the best example of what Germany was offering at the time.


Mon Jan 29, 2018 1:09 pm
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