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 Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0 
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I saw Diabolique fairly recently, but I thought it was really great. The reason this movie works so well is because it's slow and drawn out. It makes it feel like Christina is stuck in a never ending nightmare. I felt her distress throughout the picture, and this constant slow-burning tension is part of what makes the climax so terrifying. I initially wasn't sure what to make of the ending, because I thought the film went a bit overboard, but considering that the film feels like a never ending nightmare, I'll say that the ending is more than fitting as it seems like a microcosm of what made the film preceding it so great. As for the Vertigo connection, I think this film is different in the way that it used its pacing to create tension. Although, I consider both to be great films.

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Wed Oct 17, 2018 12:14 am
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One of the things I loved about Les Diaboliques is how it juxtaposed the two characters of Christina and Nicole...

Two women in love with the same man, the first one as a woman who thinks she's smarter than what she is and ends up getting way over her head, and the second one who pretends to be less than what she is and ends up getting the upper hand, at least for a while.

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Wed Oct 17, 2018 12:53 am
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Reviews of The Workshop, Derren Brown's Sacrifice, and Dark Money are forthcoming.

For November, I plan on tackling a few films starting with Oscar winner The Shape of Water. Also will take out stragglers Coraline and The Vault.

Thanks to Thief's November challenge, other titles will present itself.

Moonlight: Movie written by African American, No CGI/Special Effects
Chennai Express: Road Trip film, Bollywood film
Hector and the Search for Happiness: British film
I Love You (2016): Swedish film
Blue is the Warmest Color (2013): Palm D'or winner
Desierto (2015): Spanish Language Film
Ghostbusters (2016): Film with SNL alum, past or present
Monster Trucks (2016): Box office bomb
The Philadelphia Story (1940): Film that lost Best Picture in the 1940s
Barbecue (2017): Film about Food
Eight Men Out (1988): Period Drama
The Apology (2016): Film directed by woman
Black River (1957): Kobayashi Masaki film
An American in Paris (2018): Film based on play (it's based on the Broadway show)

No idea what I'll do for films/miniseries over 4 hours and/or 1950s Best Picture winner.

And also, if you have suggestions, feel free to chime in. Keep in mind that I have Netflix and Amazon Prime currently.


Fri Nov 02, 2018 11:35 am
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The Workshop (2018):

Basically it's about this guy named Antoine (Matthieu Lucci) who joins several other diverse youths in this writing workshop run by thriller author Olivia (Marina Fois) where they attempt to collaborate on a thriller novel that may well get published. He may also be influenced by his cousin who is part of a right wing movement. Antoine's behavior intrigues Olivia who realizes that maybe her writing for teens could use some color, some life. But at the same time, she's also disturbed by his words, his language.

I was wrongly sold on this as being a thriller, which outside of one sequence towards the end, it's not. It's more of a character study as Antoine isn't really so far different from typical teens (he takes chances, he worries about his body, he sometimes acts out to provocate). It helps that both Lucci and Fois are both magnetic personalities that draw you into the film. And director Laurent Canet doesn't shy away from the hurt caused by his words (often aimed at several Muslim characters), nor does his forget to give depth to the other characters of the workshop.

But if anything, I think there was a bit of hand waving going on with Antoine as well. He never seems to fully suffer the consequences of his actions, particularly in that one sequence towards the end. The finale doesn't quite seem earned.

On the plus side, I think my 2018 films have a new current leader. But will it last?

Spoiler alert: No, it doesn't.

NEXT: Oh, look. It's that psychological magician that talks too much again!


Sat Nov 03, 2018 8:25 am
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Derren Brown: Sacrifice

Basically, British illusionist/mentalist decides to create a hero out of Phil, a Florida construction worker who believes immigrants are creating problems for our country. In other words, he's practically a Trump voter in the flesh right down to the tattoos.

But by making this a TV show about a medical experiment for British TV, Brown convinces Phil to implant him with a chip in the back of his neck and gives him an app with a distinctive sound. After a while passes, he decides to test Phil on various things. Ultimately, this thing is about taking a bullet for a Mexican immigrant who is part of a giant version of Joe Schmoe with Phil in the lead role.

With some others, I do question some of the ethics of this psychological experiment. It's not so much a horrible thing to affect change, but some of the methods he uses are questionable such as the whole thing with the biker bar. It does feel like he's more interested in taking charge than in having Phil improve.

But unlike The Devil and Father Amorth: There's Fakery Afoot!, he takes pains to reveal that everything is happening as it happened. A powerful moment comes when he finds out what his DNA consists of. And it's followed by another one where he sits face to face with someone he's admitted having problems with. The feeling he has comes across as genuine.

But how can we become immersed in Brown's scenario when he feels like he has to explain everything to death? It's a bit less problematic than his previous special The Push which played more like The Game which kept getting interrupted every few minutes by Brown who feels like explaining something else. Oh, and the final points he makes feel like he's lecturing us. I don't think you've earned that right, considering you're playing around with psychology enough to make Dr. Zimbardo nervous.

Passable fare, but could have been more.

NEXT: The truth about politics and money, revealed. Or why I should wish to live in Montana instead of Kentucky?


Mon Nov 05, 2018 10:26 am
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Dark Money:

One hundred years after the rural state of Montana dealt with corruption in their state, the threat of dark money from outside interests threaten to do that again. Even though their toughest in the nation against campaign funding corruption was sank alongside Citizens United, the citizens in this state refuse to give up. A reporter named John Adams starts investigating one of these groups known as the American Tradition Partnership which ultimately leads to him catching a politician who is willing to do and say what these special interests will tell him what to do. Meanwhile the newly elected Montana Attorney General wants to come up with a new law with teeth to shine a light on who's behind the dark money.

Fascinating tale of how politics have been corrupted by corporations and what it might take in order to stop this from happening. This documentary argues that it's going to have to be states that step up; one allegation made is that Congressmen are already under their control. One frightening thing is the frustration felt by a member of the Federal Election Commission as she sees the three Republicans form a voting bloc which keeps it from doing anything.

It also works as a case study of how far a reporter will go to get to the truth, even as it costs him. One scene towards the end has him in tears as he thanks other reporters for being there during a trial.

It may have left PBS's website, but see this film please whether it's Kanopy or other sources. It's clear, pulls no punches, and manages to be somewhat uplifting and somewhat depressing at the same time.

NEXT: A 1951 movie musical becomes a 2010s Broadway musical.


Sun Nov 11, 2018 11:08 am
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Coming up this week are reviews of:

An American in Paris: The Musical (2018)
The Shape of Water (2017)
Coraline (2009)
The Vault (2017)
Take Me to the River (2016)
Wildland (2018)


Tue Nov 13, 2018 5:33 am
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Apex Predator wrote:
Coming up this week are reviews of:

An American in Paris: The Musical (2018)
The Shape of Water (2017)
Coraline (2009)
The Vault (2017)
Take Me to the River (2016)
Wildland (2018)


Ooh, Coraline is a treat, not only visually, but story-wise.

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Tue Nov 13, 2018 5:57 am
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Thief wrote:

Ooh, Coraline is a treat, not only visually, but story-wise.


Coraline and The Vault are both leftovers from last month that I started in October and didn't get finished until November.

Really wanted to see Take Me to the River before it expired and it appears that won't be the only Netflix film seen this month for that reason (Girlhood).

I got two films battling for the best of November and one that easily has the worst sewn up (if I don't get to a certain film by the end of the month).


Tue Nov 13, 2018 8:53 am
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An American in Paris: The Musical (2018)

Basically, it's a story of an American soldier named Jerry who chooses to stay in France following the second World War. He befriends a young composer and fellow American expatriate named Adam while falling for a young ballerina dancer named Lise who is currently seeing a rich guy named Henri who is too shy to tell her how he feels...or his dreams of being a showman. Complications ensue when the soldier's artwork gathers the attention of a rich American heiress named Milo who becomes interested in more than his art.

The most impressive thing here is the set design. Amazed how they were able to move so quickly and how they're able to turn a cafe into a lake into a clothing store so fast. Dancing is fine, and yes, they do keep the George Gershwin score which is sung efficiently.

But even though they tried to avoid comparisons to the Gene Kelly/Leslie Caron 1951 film on which this is based, the stage performances doesn't always translate well to the small screen. The majority of funny lines falls a bit flat as does the composer's New Yawk accent. And I could have done without the dialogue implying the would-be showman was interested beyond the fairer sex. Oh, and the play just kind of ends less with a bow on top and more with a hmm, okay.

Overall, it's less S'Wonderful and more S'Decent.

NEXT: A best picture winner!


Tue Nov 20, 2018 10:16 am
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Halfway through the 8th film and I feel like I made a colossal mistake. Maybe the worst film I've seen in about a year and a half. So much to talk about once I get time to do it.


Wed Nov 21, 2018 2:31 am
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Apex Predator wrote:
Halfway through the 8th film and I feel like I made a colossal mistake. Maybe the worst film I've seen in about a year and a half. So much to talk about once I get time to do it.

Ooooh, good teaser.


Fri Nov 23, 2018 7:33 am
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Apex Predator wrote:
Halfway through the 8th film and I feel like I made a colossal mistake. Maybe the worst film I've seen in about a year and a half. So much to talk about once I get time to do it.


Curiosity is killing me!!

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Fri Nov 23, 2018 7:51 am
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If only the Netflix would cooperate, I'd love to tell you all about it.


Sat Nov 24, 2018 1:11 am
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In the coming days, we'll get through the following titles:

The Shape of Water (2017)
Coraline (2009)
The Vault (2017)
Take Me to the River (2016)
Wildland (2018)
The Philadelphia Story (1940)
Baby Driver (2017)
Ghostbusters (2016)
Hector and the Search for Happiness (2014)
Loving Vincent (2017)

And here's a hint as to which title I was referring to:

Considering how similar her character was to that of Gone Girl, I spent time during the film theorizing that she ended up killing the lead character and moving in with NPH's character.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 10:02 am
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Wow, I've taken forever with this.

The Shape of Water (2017)

Last year's Oscar winner from director Guillermo Del Toro is essentially a remake of Creature from the Black Lagoon where a mute woman named Elisa (Sally Hawkins) teams up with her homosexual neighbor Giles (Richard Jenkins) to break out a creature (Doug Jones) from an aquarium which she cleans. This decision eventually involves her sympathetic co-worker Zelda (Octavia Spencer) and an elite government man with sinister designs for the creature (Michael Shannon).

There's a mix of love of old cinema (nifty sequence involving Elisa and Giles tap-dancing to an old musical) with modern craft (one sequence set in Elisa's bathroom involving copious amounts of running water). One also can appreciate the society outsiders trying to stick it to those favored by the federal government (such as his brand new car).

One sequence at a pie diner plays it a bit close on the nose and although I enjoyed Shannon's performance in general, I might could have done without some of his issues with his fingers. I get why some argue the romance itself is rushed, but I didn't find it so much that as more along the lines of two outsiders learning to appreciate and getting to know each other.

I give this a solid recommendation. As it turns out one of two picks of the month!

Next: Sullen pre-teen must decide between real life and fantasy.


Mon Dec 03, 2018 10:24 am
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I liked The Shape of Water quite a bit, but it had a couple idiotic scenes. For instance, when she flooded the bathroom to have sex with the monster. My reaction was "Can you seriously not see any of the ways this can backfire?" Or, how she'd masturbate in the bathtub, causing her to show up late to work. However, I agree that The Shape of Water is really good, and although it wouldn't be my choice for Best Picture, I'm glad a science fiction film finally won.

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Mon Dec 03, 2018 12:13 pm
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I liked it, thought it was ok, but not much more. I also had issues with some scenes and decisions, and overall consider it somewhat forgettable.

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Mon Dec 03, 2018 12:32 pm
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Apex Predator wrote:
Wow, I've taken forever with this.

The Shape of Water (2017)

Last year's Oscar winner from director Guillermo Del Toro is essentially a remake of Creature from the Black Lagoon where a mute woman named Elisa (Sally Hawkins) teams up with her homosexual neighbor Giles (Richard Jenkins) to break out a creature (Doug Jones) from an aquarium which she cleans. This decision eventually involves her sympathetic co-worker Zelda (Octavia Spencer) and an elite government man with sinister designs for the creature (Michael Shannon).

There's a mix of love of old cinema (nifty sequence involving Elisa and Giles tap-dancing to an old musical) with modern craft (one sequence set in Elisa's bathroom involving copious amounts of running water). One also can appreciate the society outsiders trying to stick it to those favored by the federal government (such as his brand new car).

One sequence at a pie diner plays it a bit close on the nose and although I enjoyed Shannon's performance in general, I might could have done without some of his issues with his fingers. I get why some argue the romance itself is rushed, but I didn't find it so much that as more along the lines of two outsiders learning to appreciate and getting to know each other.

I give this a solid recommendation. As it turns out one of two picks of the month!

Next: Sullen pre-teen must decide between real life and fantasy.

I really enjoyed your response to this. A lot of people seem to bust its balls for maybe not being exactly what they were hoping for or, probably more so, its mainstream success and Oscar win.
But it's a really good movie. Really great filmmaking. In my opinion, a return to form, the return to form that was needed, for Del Toro.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:27 am
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For me it's 2017's La La Land, an entertaining, heart warming homage to classic films that, allright, isn't some revolutionary masterpiece but at least warrants a nice time at the movie theater. It's not my favorite of the Oscar nominees, but I'm fine with it winning. Also, Del Toro seems like a really kind person who genuinely loves cinema, so that's a plus.
I'm glad Del Toro took this route instead of making another Pacific Rim.


Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:48 am
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Popcorn Reviews wrote:
I liked The Shape of Water quite a bit, but it had a couple idiotic scenes. For instance, when she flooded the bathroom to have sex with the monster. My reaction was "Can you seriously not see any of the ways this can backfire?" Or, how she'd masturbate in the bathtub, causing her to show up late to work. However, I agree that The Shape of Water is really good, and although it wouldn't be my choice for Best Picture, I'm glad a science fiction film finally won.


I think one of the key subplots in Shape of Water was Eliza's sexual awakening. From the beginning of the film with the egg timer, it appears that she is reaching out for human contact in a way that she can't explain. Although she mainly has a good friendship with Giles, it's clear that he won't work for her. Same thing for Zelda. And although Strickland seems willing, a combination of his rampant ego and her good taste keeps her strictly on the side of not interested. But as she starts to get to know the creature, her feelings for him start to multiply.

I just read this article the other day that implies that she's part human/part fish just like the creature. Thinking about it in that way does clear some things up, although I'm not sure why it didn't get hinted at in the film itself.


Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:12 am
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Coraline (2009)

Poor Coraline (Dakota Fanning). Her mother Mel (Teri Hatcher) is uptight and her father Charlie (John Hodgman) is too focused on his work to pay much attention. She has only annoying kid Wybie (Robert Bailey, Jr), circus rat trainer Mr. Bobinsky (Ian McShane) and former showgirls Miss Spink and Miss Forcible (Jennifer Saunders and Dawn French) that even notice her.

But one night when she opens a locked door, she finds a new set of parents who seem eager to dote on her and cater to her whims. But as Wybie's suspicious cat (Keith David) opines, things aren't necessarily all that's cracked up to be. Things Coraline learns on further visits.

I got a wonderfully dark Halloween animated tale that fits right in with The Nightmare Before Christmas (director Henry Selick also did that one) and Paranorman. I had kinda given up on animated films giving us nightmare fuel like in some 1980s and early 1990s animated fare (such as All Dogs Go to Heaven 2). But this one delivers in spades and is probably the best Teri Hatcher performance and one of Dakota's best performances. Also dug the fact that it displayed a fairly realistic depiction of a dysfunctional family.

If anything, I do have a few issues with the third act and how it led to the conclusion. Mainly, it felt a bit on the rushed side as things could have been explained a bit better.

But it's definitely rock solid and I'm off to a decent November.

NEXT: My strong start stalls out in a heist gone horribly wrong.


Wed Dec 05, 2018 9:02 am
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Apex Predator wrote:

I think one of the key subplots in Shape of Water was Eliza's sexual awakening. From the beginning of the film with the egg timer, it appears that she is reaching out for human contact in a way that she can't explain. Although she mainly has a good friendship with Giles, it's clear that he won't work for her. Same thing for Zelda. And although Strickland seems willing, a combination of his rampant ego and her good taste keeps her strictly on the side of not interested. But as she starts to get to know the creature, her feelings for him start to multiply.

I just read this article the other day that implies that she's part human/part fish just like the creature. Thinking about it in that way does clear some things up, although I'm not sure why it didn't get hinted at in the film itself.

I feel like the film could've pulled that off in ways which didn't seem wildly illogical.

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Wed Dec 05, 2018 9:19 am
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Apex Predator wrote:
Coraline (2009)

Poor Coraline (Dakota Fanning). Her mother Mel (Teri Hatcher) is uptight and her father Charlie (John Hodgman) is too focused on his work to pay much attention. She has only annoying kid Wybie (Robert Bailey, Jr), circus rat trainer Mr. Bobinsky (Ian McShane) and former showgirls Miss Spink and Miss Forcible (Jennifer Saunders and Dawn French) that even notice her.

But one night when she opens a locked door, she finds a new set of parents who seem eager to dote on her and cater to her whims. But as Wybie's suspicious cat (Keith David) opines, things aren't necessarily all that's cracked up to be. Things Coraline learns on further visits.

I got a wonderfully dark Halloween animated tale that fits right in with The Nightmare Before Christmas (director Henry Selick also did that one) and Paranorman. I had kinda given up on animated films giving us nightmare fuel like in some 1980s and early 1990s animated fare (such as All Dogs Go to Heaven 2). But this one delivers in spades and is probably the best Teri Hatcher performance and one of Dakota's best performances. Also dug the fact that it displayed a fairly realistic depiction of a dysfunctional family.

If anything, I do have a few issues with the third act and how it led to the conclusion. Mainly, it felt a bit on the rushed side as things could have been explained a bit better.

But it's definitely rock solid and I'm off to a decent November.

NEXT: My strong start stalls out in a heist gone horribly wrong.

I'm a pretty big fan of that one. Great blend of animation and horror.

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Wed Dec 05, 2018 9:20 am
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Love Coraline. Gorgeous animation and deeper than most animated films.

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Wed Dec 05, 2018 10:09 am
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Popcorn Reviews wrote:
I feel like the film could've pulled that off in ways which didn't seem wildly illogical.

It is a fantasy. :P


Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:58 pm
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Thief wrote:
Love Coraline. Gorgeous animation and deeper than most animated films.

Agreed. Excellent.


Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:58 pm
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Wooley wrote:
It is a fantasy. :P

Yeah, but the characters should still make rational decisions.

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Wed Dec 05, 2018 9:18 pm
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Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Yeah, but the characters should still make rational decisions.

What is a rational decision about interacting with a fish-man?
Also, I felt the movie made it pretty clear that she liked to transgress and desperately wanted to live a life more on the edge, which is why I think that scene in particular is the centerpiece of the film. It's the moment when she simply throws all caution and reason to the wind, once and for all.


Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:06 am
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Wooley wrote:
What is a rational decision about interacting with a fish-man?
Also, I felt the movie made it pretty clear that she liked to transgress and desperately wanted to live a life more on the edge, which is why I think that scene in particular is the centerpiece of the film. It's the moment when she simply throws all caution and reason to the wind, once and for all.

Okay, fair enough.

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Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:55 am
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The Vault (2017)

Three siblings (Taryn Manning, Francesca Eastwood, Scott Haze) decide to rob a bank to save his brother from some thugs. Things work, at first, as they're able to get some money and pretty much every employee is accounted for. After helping one sibling avoid tripping an alarm by inputting a code, the assistant manager (James Franco) informs them of a secret basement vault with millions locked inside. But he didn't tell them everything about it.

The family dynamic shifting is the best part of this film. We see that the brother doesn't quite have the heart to be ruthless (as he escorts the head teller to a bathroom, they start a revealing conversation) and the sisters are kind of at odds due to abandonment issues. But as the film goes about its plot, the dynamics change until the end.

Sadly, the horror element is a complete whiff. The only horrible thing that happens is that 80-90 minutes or so get wasted. Perhaps there were links to an earlier botched robbery in 1982. But its elements make zero sense especially when it tries to go all Saw with the reveals in the last 10 minutes or so.

If you do a shot every time a shot of James Franco looking concerned or vaguely sinister occurs onscreen, then you'll be gone well before the film runs out of plot and reels.

Keep this one in the discount vault.

NEXT: More family dynamics as an outsider teen finds himself in trouble thousands of miles away.


Sat Dec 08, 2018 3:58 am
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Plans for December:

Santa as a Character: The Christmas Chronicles (2018)
Film with Winter in the title/Film Set in the Snow: Dead of Winter (2014)
Film with Christmas/Holiday in Title: A Christmas Prince: The Royal Wedding (2018)
Foreign Holiday Film/Christmas or Holiday Horror: Grandmother's House (2001)
Film About the Nativity: The Star (2017)
Documentary about Christmas or Holidays: Santa Quest (2014)
Christmas or Holiday animated film/90% or higher RT score: Tokyo Godfathers (2003)
Minority led Christmas/Holiday film: Miss Me This Christmas (2017)
Christmas/Holiday film based on a book/play: Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn: The Broadway Musical (2017)
An adaption of the Christmas Carol: A Christmas Carol (2015)
Christmas/Holiday film nominated for an Oscar: It's a Wonderful Life (1946) re-watch
Christmas/Holiday film made before 1930: A Parish Priest's Christmas (1906)

Some catchup for November/Beating the Deadline Wire for December
Monster Trucks (2017)
Moonlight (2016)
Spotlight (2015)

I think that's enough but it's always possible that I see more/different ones. I'll see if I can knock out several during this winter storm taking place Saturday/Sunday.


Sat Dec 08, 2018 4:02 am
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Wooley wrote:
What is a rational decision about interacting with a fish-man?
Also, I felt the movie made it pretty clear that she liked to transgress and desperately wanted to live a life more on the edge, which is why I think that scene in particular is the centerpiece of the film. It's the moment when she simply throws all caution and reason to the wind, once and for all.


I had issues with two specific moments from the film, and although they are two relatively minor plotpoints, they rang with me in a not so good way.

1. The revelation that the waiter that Richard Jenkins' character was chatting with, was a racist. I don't think it was necessary, it was already established that the guy was a bit of an asshole, so throwing that in felt like an unnecessary shove towards that area. It felt forced narratively speaking.
2. Eliza's graphical explanation of how the fish-man's sexual organs work. Again, it was another unnecessary moment that added nothing to the plot or the overall theme, but rather lowered the film's own bar.


Overall, both moments felt like the script not giving enough credit to its audience. I still liked the film, thought it was ok/cute. I liked the heist aspect of the first half, I thought the romantic aspect of the second half was merely ok. There's a nice theme about outcasts and how they find their way to flourish, so to speak, but I never felt this was Best Picture material.

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Sat Dec 08, 2018 4:08 am
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Thief wrote:

I had issues with two specific moments from the film, and although they are two relatively minor plotpoints, they rang with me in a not so good way.

1. The revelation that the waiter that Richard Jenkins' character was chatting with, was a racist. I don't think it was necessary, it was already established that the guy was a bit of an asshole, so throwing that in felt like an unnecessary shove towards that area. It felt forced narratively speaking.
2. Eliza's graphical explanation of how the fish-man's sexual organs work. Again, it was another unnecessary moment that added nothing to the plot or the overall theme, but rather lowered the film's own bar.


Overall, both moments felt like the script not giving enough credit to its audience. I still liked the film, thought it was ok/cute. I liked the heist aspect of the first half, I thought the romantic aspect of the second half was merely ok. There's a nice theme about outcasts and how they find their way to flourish, so to speak, but I never felt this was Best Picture material.


I saw both moments a bit differently.

1. You could argue it was a bit of piling on and I would not disagree. But I think it also served as an additional point of disillusionment for Giles's character. He had held the pie diner with rose colored glasses. But between the reaction to the failed pass and the refusal to serve the woman in the diner, his idealism was replaced by a more realistic reality. I think you could also perhaps make a case that they were trying to refer to the turbulent times of when the film was set with both the civil rights era and the acceptance of homosexuality still to come, but not quite there yet.

2. Probably was unnecessary. I do think one of the subplots in Shape of Water was Eliza's sexual awakening and how she went from timing herself in the bathtub to having a "relationship" with the creature. Part of that, I suppose, is letting her good friend know why she was in a good mood. Maybe it's a bit more of a reach than number 1, but I don't think it cheapened anything. It might have also indicated that her friendship with Zelda was strong.


Among films from this decade that won best picture, I think The Shape of Water is behind Boyhood, The Artist and 12 Years a Slave. I'm not even sure it's better than Dunkirk. But on the whole, I did think it was pretty good.


Sat Dec 08, 2018 9:37 am
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Apex Predator wrote:

Among films from this decade that won best picture, I think The Shape of Water is behind Boyhood, The Artist and 12 Years a Slave. I'm not even sure it's better than Dunkirk.
I would hope not, since Dunkirk was my favorite movie from last year :D Seriously though, while I didn't like Shape quite as much (as I sympathize with a lot of the complaints other people make about it), and it isn't my favorite del Toro movie either (that would be Pan's Labyrinth, one of my all-time favorites), I still liked it a lot; it had this sort quirky, enchanting, one-of-a-kind magic about it that very few other films can compare to, and while I respect that its sometimes rather over the top, go-for-broke style and sensibilities would turn off a number of viewers, it's that very lack of restraint on the part of GDT when he made it that made it so unique and enjoyable for me personally. At the very least, it's better that it won Best Picture than just another real-life "prestige" pic like Darkest Hour, am I right?

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Mon Dec 10, 2018 7:46 am
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Stu wrote:
I would hope not, since Dunkirk was my favorite movie from last year :D Seriously though, while I didn't like Shape quite as much (as I sympathize with a lot of the complaints other people make about it), and it isn't my favorite del Toro movie either (that would be Pan's Labyrinth, one of my all-time favorites), I still liked it a lot; it had this sort quirky, enchanting, one-of-a-kind magic about it that very few other films can compare to, and while I respect that its sometimes rather over the top, go-for-broke style and sensibilities would turn off a number of viewers, it's that very lack of restraint on the part of GDT when he made it that made it so unique and enjoyable for me personally. At the very least, it's better that it won Best Picture than just another real-life "prestige" pic like Darkest Hour, am I right?


Kinda torn between the old school meeting the new school feel of Dunkirk and the magical, quirky fairy tale of Shape of Water.

Pan's Labyrinth is the best Del Toro film.

Agreed that it was better to see TSOW win out over a more typical "prestige" pic like Darkest Hour or The Post.


Mon Dec 10, 2018 9:02 am
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While I knew beforehand that I'm not a huge buff in terms of the Oscars, I was still surprised to learn that I've only seen 3 Best Picture winners of the 2010's when I went to check (in my defense, I don't care as much about the Oscars as opposed to other best of the year lists such as AFI and Sight & Sound). Out of the ones I've seen though, Moonlight is my favorite by a long stretch. I'll have to watch Birdman again to decide whether I like it more or less than TSOW.

I'll likely see 12 Years a Slave and The Artist, but are any other ones worth checking out.

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Mon Dec 10, 2018 10:41 am
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Popcorn Reviews wrote:
I'll likely see 12 Years a Slave and The Artist, but are any other ones worth checking out.

Spotlight


Mon Dec 10, 2018 10:46 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
Spotlight

Okay.

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Mon Dec 10, 2018 10:49 am
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Popcorn Reviews wrote:
While I knew beforehand that I'm not a huge buff in terms of the Oscars, I was still surprised to learn that I've only seen 3 Best Picture winners of the 2010's when I went to check (in my defense, I don't care as much about the Oscars as opposed to other best of the year lists such as AFI and Sight & Sound). Out of the ones I've seen though, Moonlight is my favorite by a long stretch. I'll have to watch Birdman again to decide whether I like it more or less than TSOW.

I'll likely see 12 Years a Slave and The Artist, but are any other ones worth checking out.


Spotlight is the only one I haven't seen from the 2010s winners, but I would consider all of the other ones to be enjoyable/watchable at the very least. I would agree that Moonlight is the best of the bunch by a long stretch. The Artist would be the one I need to rewatch.

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Mon Dec 10, 2018 11:10 am
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Apex Predator wrote:


Pan's Labyrinth is the best Del Toro film.


Probably my second or third favorite. It's definitely behind The Devil's Backbone for me, which is one of my 5 or 10 favorite films of that decade, and may be just behind or even with Cronos.


Tue Dec 11, 2018 10:59 am
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