It is currently Wed May 23, 2018 6:10 am



Reply to topic  [ 90 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
 Obituaries 
Author Message
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Torgo wrote:
Harry Anderson.
Loved him on Cheers and Night Court. The man was born to perform.

Urgh, this sucks. There's very little detail in the article, but it doesn't look like a natural cause if they felt a need to rule out "foul Play" immediately.

His stand-up stuff was really strong. He made some SNL and HBO Young Comedian spots in the early 80s that were great.


Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:34 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Death Proof wrote:
I still need to see that. Somehow I've never gotten around to seeing it.

Meh, it's not as good as Frighteners :P


Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:35 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Jinnistan wrote:
Urgh, this sucks. There's very little detail in the article, but it doesn't look like a natural cause if they felt a need to rule out "foul Play" immediately.

His stand-up stuff was really strong. He made some SNL and HBO Young Comedian spots in the early 80s that were great.


Yeah, I was a fan. He also just seemed more naturally likable than your average TV personality.


Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:40 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Torgo wrote:
Harry Anderson.
Loved him on Cheers and Night Court. The man was born to perform.



Also as adult Richie Tozier in the original IT.

I never missed Night Court when I was a kid. My favorite episode was when Harry was (temporarily) debenched and he was planning on executing the world's greatest prank, until he got reinstated as a judge.


He was going to put a giant funny nose glasses/mustache on the Statue of Liberty.

_________________
She's been dying and I've been drinking and I am the Rain King


Tue Apr 17, 2018 10:41 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Good for Judd Apatow for squeezing in a book plug in his Twitter eulogy for Harry.


Tue Apr 17, 2018 10:42 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Jinnistan wrote:
Urgh, this sucks. There's very little detail in the article, but it doesn't look like a natural cause if they felt a need to rule out "foul Play" immediately.

His stand-up stuff was really strong. He made some SNL and HBO Young Comedian spots in the early 80s that were great.



He actually started out doing comedy and magic on SNL back when they would actually have comedians on like Joel Hodgeson and Sam Kinison. That got him onto Cheers as conman "Harry the Hat" which in turn got him on Night Court. I loved that John "Gomez Addams" Astin was his dad on the show, too.

_________________
She's been dying and I've been drinking and I am the Rain King


Tue Apr 17, 2018 10:42 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Jinnistan wrote:
Meh, it's not as good as Frighteners :P



I love The Frighteners. :)


"There ain't nothing worse than a bunch of pissed-off brothas that's already dead!"

_________________
She's been dying and I've been drinking and I am the Rain King


Tue Apr 17, 2018 10:43 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Torgo wrote:
Harry Anderson.
Loved him on Cheers and Night Court. The man was born to perform.


Sad to hear of his passing. Yeah, I'm a bit concerned about the cause of death as well.

I liked how he was able to throw magic into everything. Even his role in A Matter of Faith, which would prove to be his last.

Yes, I liked him in Night Court. But he was also pretty good in Dave's World.


Tue Apr 17, 2018 11:01 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Captain Oats wrote:


I feel bad with anybody with the last name Pyle coming next year at the Oscars.

I'll add he was the one decent reason to watch the Texas Chainsaw Massacre prequels. Those films had a lot of problems, but he wasn't one.


Tue Apr 17, 2018 11:04 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Torgo wrote:
Harry Anderson.
Loved him on Cheers and Night Court. The man was born to perform.


Loved "Night Court", but don't remember him in "Cheers". Side note - as a blooming teen, Markie Post had it all.

Image


Tue Apr 17, 2018 7:06 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

John Dumbear wrote:
Loved "Night Court", but don't remember him in "Cheers". Side note - as a blooming teen, Markie Post had it all.

He played "Harry the Hat" in the first two seasons. He was a con man you loved to hate.

John Dumbear wrote:
Image

I won't be needing coffee this morning.

_________________
Last Great Movie Seen
Paddington (King, 2014)


Tue Apr 17, 2018 10:28 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Also, rest in peace Barbara Bush:

Image

_________________
Recently Reviewed: Inception | Tully | There Will Be Blood


Wed Apr 18, 2018 11:20 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Stu wrote:
Also, rest in peace Barbara Bush:


Not trying to be morbid here. But after 70+ years of marriage, I feel George will be gone soon also.


Wed Apr 18, 2018 6:46 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

RIP Carl Kasell of NPR fame. Pure class and will be missed by many, like myself. Gave me a few decades of listening pleasure. Absolutely adored his show "Wait...Wait, Don't tell me".


Wed Apr 18, 2018 9:03 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Pro wrestler Bruno Sammartino has died at the age of 82.

Arguably one of the most popular wrestlers of the 60's and 70's, Sammartino was born in Italy just prior to World War 2. In 1950 he moved to Pittsburgh, PA where he lived for the rest of his life. Sickly from surviving the years of the war, Sammartino devoted himself to weight training to build himself up, resulting in nearly making the 1956 Olympic team. He set a world record bench press with a lift of 565 pounds in 1959 and also competed in bodybuilding.

Sammartino's pro wrestling debut was in December, 1959. In 1966 he purchased Spectator Sports which was a major stopping point for some of the most famous wrestlers of the day. Sammartino would go on to wrestle for the WWWF and WWF, winning three tag team titles and two world titles over his career. He would go on to have a major feud with protege Larry Zybyszko, considered one of the greatest feuds in pro wrestling. He later feuded with Rowdy Roddy Piper, Macho Man Randy Savage and Paul Orndorff. His final WWF match was in a tag team with Hulk Hogan against King Kong Bundy and the One Man Gang. Sammartino continued to do commentary on one of the WWF's programs until 1988.

Sammartino had been married since 1959 and has three sons.

_________________
She's been dying and I've been drinking and I am the Rain King


Wed Apr 18, 2018 11:52 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Actor Verne Troyer has died at the age of 49.

Troyer was an actor, stuntman, and comedian. He was born with achondroplasia dwarfism, making him one of the shortest men in the world at 2ft 8in.

Troyer was most well known for his portrayal of "Mini Me", Dr. Evil's tiny clone in the Austin Powers films. He had also appeared in Men in Black, Bubble Boy, Harry Potter and the Sorceror's Stone, The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus, and over four dozen other films and television shows.

Troyer had been married briefly and had recently been living with his partner, actress Brittney Powell.

_________________
She's been dying and I've been drinking and I am the Rain King


Sun Apr 22, 2018 5:42 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

I think this got missed yesterday, but Avicii died in Oman yesterday. He was 28.

The Swedish DJ was best known for his worldwide smash Wake Me Up and the moderate hit followup Hey Brother in 2013-4. He was also immortalized in song by Mike Posner's comeback smash I Took a Pill in Ibiza (to show Avicii I was cool...).


Sun Apr 22, 2018 7:34 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Death Proof wrote:
Actor Verne Troyer has died at the age of 49.
Aw, that sucks; too young, and I grew up watching the Austin Powers trilogy, so I enjoyed him a lot as Mini-Me. My favorite moment of his is probably that hilarious face he made when he saw The Mole's mole in Goldmember:



Rest in peace, Verne...

_________________
Recently Reviewed: Inception | Tully | There Will Be Blood


Mon Apr 23, 2018 5:33 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

R.I.P. Bob Dorough, composer of "Conjunction Junction" and other Schoolhouse Rock! favorites

_________________
Recently Reviewed: Inception | Tully | There Will Be Blood


Wed Apr 25, 2018 1:43 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Apex Predator wrote:
I think this got missed yesterday, but Avicii died in Oman yesterday. He was 28.

The Swedish DJ was best known for his worldwide smash Wake Me Up and the moderate hit followup Hey Brother in 2013-4. He was also immortalized in song by Mike Posner's comeback smash I Took a Pill in Ibiza (to show Avicii I was cool...).


I read that on Pitchfork. Sad. So young. RIP.


Wed Apr 25, 2018 3:31 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

The cause of death in the case of Harry Anderson has been attributed to a flu-related stroke, for anyone interested.


Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:09 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Italian director Gianfranco Parolini has died.

I never heard of the guy, but:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/If_You_Meet_Sartana_Pray_for_Your_Death

A Spaghetti Western with Klaus Kinski in it? I'm watching the hell out of this tonight. Great title, too.

_________________
She's been dying and I've been drinking and I am the Rain King


Sat Apr 28, 2018 4:16 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Death Proof wrote:
A Spaghetti Western with Klaus Kinski in it? I'm watching the hell out of this tonight. Great title, too.

I've seen a couple recently, Black Killer and The Beast. The Sartana one is better. Check out The Great Silence though, which is the best.


Sat Apr 28, 2018 9:06 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

NYT wrote:
Nelson Pereira dos Santos, a Brazilian director who was instrumental in elevating the cinema of his country, often despite government repression and lack of financial support, died on April 21 in Rio de Janeiro. He was 89.

His death was announced by the Brazilian Academy of Letters, to which he was elected in 2006, the first filmmaker so honored. The academy said the cause was pneumonia.

Mr. dos Santos, who began making feature films in the 1950s, was among the founders of the Cinema Novo movement, which sought to transform Brazil’s filmmaking from low comedies and Hollywood imitations to something that reflected the realities of Brazilian life.

His first major film, “Rio 40 Graus” (“Rio 40 Degrees,” also sometimes translated as “Rio 100 Degrees”), released in 1955, told the story of three boys who sell peanuts to survive, and emphasized the problem of poverty.

“It was a big moral and political success,” Mr. dos Santos told The Los Angeles Times in 1985. “For four months it was banned by the police on the grounds that it was subversive and could make a revolution.”

By the 1960s, Mr. dos Santos and other Brazilian directors were showing at international festivals, including Cannes. In 1984, he won the international critics’ prize there for “Memórias do Cárcere” (“Memoirs of Prison”), about the imprisonment of the Brazilian writer Graciliano Ramos.

“Nelson Pereira dos Santos brought to the screen a powerfully socially committed moviemaking about Brazil’s poor and dispossessed,” Darlene J. Sadlier, a professor emerita at Indiana University-Bloomington who wrote a 2003 biography of him, said by email. “Throughout his career, he worked toward the creation of a national film industry in the face of a marketplace long dominated by Hollywood movies.”

Mr. dos Santos was born on Oct. 22, 1928, in São Paulo, Brazil. His parents, especially his father, were film lovers and would take him and his siblings to the movies often. A brother, Saturnino, once described a Sunday ritual at a São Paulo movie house.

“Four hours of movies, from 1 to 5,” he said, “and this went on for years. We saw all the films considered today to be the great classics of the time.”

Those were mostly Hollywood films — Laurel and Hardy, Charlie Chaplin — and infected young Nelson with the movie bug. In high school he also became sensitized to Brazil’s economic troubles, and in 1945 he joined the Brazilian Communist Party. He also began reading Brazilian writers like Jorge Amado and Mr. Ramos, whose novel “Vidas Secas” (“Barren Lives”), about a family in Brazil’s poverty-stricken northeast, he would adapt into a movie in 1963.

Mr. dos Santos was headed for a career in law but instead went to Paris to study film. His parents, he said, never got over the switch.

“Even when I had decided to be a filmmaker my father would ask me when I was going to get a real job,” he recalled in a 1996 interview with The Globe and Mail in Canada.

He worked as an assistant director on several films before making “Rio 40 Graus” on a slim budget.

He and other Cinema Novo directors were influenced by Italian neorealism and the French New Wave. Their films emphasized folklore and gritty, naturalistic stories — “Rio 40 Graus” was shot in a documentary style — and eschewed elaborate sets in favor of hand-held cameras, natural lighting and real landscapes. Another Cinema Novo director, Glauber Rocha, called it a “cinema of hunger” for its focus on poverty and hardship.

The military coup in Brazil in 1964 proved crippling for Cinema Novo, with its populist and Marxist leanings.

“My films were prohibited by the military because they showed the reality of Brazil,” Mr. dos Santos said. But he kept making movies by changing his style.

“My films were constantly subjected to censorship,” he said, “so I had to concentrate more on metaphorical works to show the realities of life under a military regime.”

He certainly waxed metaphorical in one of his best-known movies, “Como Era Gostoso o Meu Frances,” or “How Tasty Was My Little Frenchman,” released in 1971. It’s a dark comedy in which Portuguese sailors dump a Frenchman overboard and he winds up on an island off Brazil populated by cannibals. A commentary on what Europeans did to native South Americans, it did not amuse a certain film festival in France.

“When the film was first released,” The New York Times wrote in 1992 when the movie resurfaced in a festival called Meals on Reels, “judges at the Cannes Film Festival withdrew it from competition because of its nudity and cannibalism, according to the program notes. It didn’t help that the main item on the menu was French.”

For much of his career, Mr. dos Santos lamented the lack of financial resources available to Brazilian filmmakers, as well as theater owners’ continued preference for Hollywood films over local ones.

“Movie theaters in Brazil are completely dominated by North American cinema,” he said in a 2000 interview quoted in Dr. Sadlier’s book. “It’s impossible for Brazilian cinema to become self-sufficient in this context.”

The complaint also reflected his longstanding concern for the impoverished segments of the country’s population.

“When the large mass of Brazilians without shoes, and who are without the resources to enter a movie theater, becomes part of the consumer market,” he said in the same interview, “then our cinema will explode and will be preferred by the people because it is ours, because it speaks our language and reflects our innermost beings and reality.”

Mr. dos Santos is survived by his wife, Ivelise; four children, Nelson, Ney, Márcia and Diogo; and five grandchildren.

Dr. Sadlier noted that Mr. dos Santos was an advocate for Brazilian culture to the end of his career: His final two films were “A Música Segundo Antonio Carlos Jobim” (“The Music According to Antônio Carlos Jobim,” 2012) and “A Luz do Tom” (“In Light of Tom,” 2013). Both were documentaries about Jobim, the famed Brazilian songwriter.

“His last films,” Dr. Sadlier said, “pay tribute to the bossa nova composer whose music is, like Pereira dos Santos’s many films, an integral part of Brazil’s history and culture.”


Sat Apr 28, 2018 10:56 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Nelson Pereira dos Santos. I only got to see a few of his films because they're hard to find but they were certainly impactful. RIP. He was known as the grandfather of cinema novo.


Sun Apr 29, 2018 2:45 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries


_________________
Read Write Hand


Mon May 07, 2018 11:01 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Guess I'm finally watching my copy of Tree of Wooden Clogs this week.

Il Posto and I Fidanzati are also quiet masterpieces.

_________________
Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.


Tue May 08, 2018 2:57 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

I saw Olmi's 2011 film The Cardboard Village and it was really good. RIP.


Tue May 08, 2018 7:42 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries



One of the giants of editing. Out of Sight and The Elephant Man also among her biggest credits.

_________________
Read Write Hand


Wed May 09, 2018 11:02 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

R.I.P. I especially like her work in Soderbergh's Out of Sight.

_________________
Last Great Movie Seen
Paddington (King, 2014)


Thu May 10, 2018 1:54 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

She received a special award from the Academy on 2017's broadcast. RIP.


Thu May 10, 2018 3:23 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries


_________________
Read Write Hand


Tue May 15, 2018 2:24 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Captain Oats wrote:



She was great in Black Christmas.

_________________
She's been dying and I've been drinking and I am the Rain King


Tue May 15, 2018 3:12 am
Profile
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Death Proof wrote:


She was great in Black Christmas.


And Sisters.


Tue May 15, 2018 3:38 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

R.I.P. Tom Wolfe

Quote:
Wolfe, a chronicler of the ‘60s counterculture who helped change the face of nonfiction writing as a leader in the New Journalism movement before turning to writing novels with the bestselling The Bonfire Of The Vanities, has died. As astute observer of social trends in his prime, Wolfe is credited with introducing the phrases “Radical Chic” and the “‘Me’ Decade” to the American lexicon. His agent confirmed the news to The New York Times, saying Wolfe died yesterday in a Manhattan hospital. He was 87.


:(

_________________
Recently Reviewed: Inception | Tully | There Will Be Blood


Wed May 16, 2018 2:11 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Tom Wolfe was one of the greats of his generation. As in the last great generation of American writers.


Wed May 16, 2018 2:44 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Jinnistan wrote:
Tom Wolfe was one of the greats of his generation. As in the last great generation of American writers.
Speaking of...

March 3, 1971
Woody Creek, CO

Dear Tom…

You worthless scumsucking bastard. I just got your letter of Feb 25 from Le Grande Hotel in Roma, you swine! Here you are running around fucking Italy in that filthy white suit at a thousand bucks a day laying all kinds of stone gibberish & honky bullshit on those poor wops who can’t tell the difference ... while I’m out here in the middle of these goddamn frozen mountains in a death-battle with the taxman & nursing cheap wine while my dogs go hungry & my cars explode and a legion of nazi lawyers makes my life a goddamn Wobbly nightmare....

You decadent pig. Where the fuck do you get the nerve to go around telling those wops that I’m crazy? You worthless cocksucker. My Italian tour is already arranged for next spring & I’m going to do the whole goddamn trip wearing a bright red field marshal’s uniform & accompanied by six speed-freak bodyguards bristling with Mace bombs & when I start talking about American writers & the name Tom Wolfe comes up, by god, you’re going to wish you were born a fucking iguana!

OK for that, you thieving pile of albino warts. You better settle your goddamn affairs because your deal is about to go down. “Unprofessorial,” indeed! You scurvy wop! I’ll have your goddamn femurs ground into bone splinters if you ever mention my name again in connection with that horrible “new journalism” shuck you’re promoting.

Ah, this greed, this malignancy! Where will it end? What filthy weight in your soul has made you sink so low? Doctor Bloor was right! Hyenas are taking over the world! Oh Jesus!!! What else can I say? Except to warn you, once again, that the hammer of justice looms, and that your filthy white suit will become a flaming shroud!

Sincerely,
Hunter

_________________
"It's OK to have beliefs, just don't believe in them." — Guy Ritchie


Wed May 16, 2018 3:22 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

As I said....one of the greats of his generation.


Wed May 16, 2018 7:53 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Bill Gold died today at the age of 97. The artist and graphic designer created hundreds of movie poster designs throughout his career. His first poster was Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942) and his most recent was J. Edgar (2011).

Some of his most well known posters included Casablanca, Dial M for Murder, Giant, The Music Man, Cool Hand Luke, Bullitt, A Clockwork Orange, The Exorcist, The Sting, Smokey and the Bandit, Clash of the Titans and many more. He collaborated with numerous directors including multiple titles for George Roy Hill, Clint Eastwood, Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick, Elia Kazan, and Robert Altman.

Of the many films for which Gold made posters, six were Academy Award Best Picture winners: Casablanca, My Fair Lady, The Sting, Ordinary People, Platoon and Unforgiven.

Gold was married and had two children. He died at home in Old Greenwich, Connecticut.

_________________
She's been dying and I've been drinking and I am the Rain King


Mon May 21, 2018 8:36 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Obituaries

Death Proof wrote:
Bill Gold died today at the age of 97. The artist and graphic designer created hundreds of movie poster designs throughout his career. His first poster was Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942) and his most recent was J. Edgar (2011).

Some of his most well known posters included Casablanca, Dial M for Murder, Giant, The Music Man, Cool Hand Luke, Bullitt, A Clockwork Orange, The Exorcist, The Sting, Smokey and the Bandit, Clash of the Titans and many more. He collaborated with numerous directors including multiple titles for George Roy Hill, Clint Eastwood, Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick, Elia Kazan, and Robert Altman.

Of the many films for which Gold made posters, six were Academy Award Best Picture winners: Casablanca, My Fair Lady, The Sting, Ordinary People, Platoon and Unforgiven.

Gold was married and had two children. He died at home in Old Greenwich, Connecticut.

http://billgold.net/iconic-posters/

As a non-famous artist, I'm astounded at the sheer number of eyeballs that guys like this have reached. Any one of these posters would make for a noteworthy career.

_________________
Captain's Log


Mon May 21, 2018 8:53 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 90 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: ThatDarnMKS and 21 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware.