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 Obituaries 
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Australian disability advocate and actor Quentin Kenihan has died at the age of 43.


He was born with osteogenesis imperfecta, a bone disease.


Kenihan was the focus of a documentary by Australian journalist Mike Willesee. He later hosted a Ten Network television show, Quentin Crashes.


Kenihan appeared in a few films, including Thunderstruck, Dr. Plonk, and arguably his most well known role as Corpus Colossus in Mad Max: Fury Road. He had also published a book in 2016.


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By the time we got to Woodstock we were half a million strong
And everywhere was a song and a celebration
And I dreamed I saw the bomber death planes riding shotgun in the sky
Turning into butterflies above our nation


Sun Oct 07, 2018 10:23 pm
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Veteran actor Scott Wilson has died at the age of 76.

Born in Thomasville, Georgia, Wilson began his career as a murder suspect in In the Heat of the Night in 1967. In the same year he appeared as another murder suspect, Richard Hickock, in the adaptation of Truman Capote's In Cold Blood.

Wilson would go on to appear in over 70 films and television shows, often gravitating to westerns or military roles. Some of Wilson's other film roles included The Great Gatsby (1974), The Ninth Configuration, The Right Stuff, Judge Dredd, Dead Man Walking, G.I. Jane, The Way of the Gun, Monster (2003), The Host (2006), and Hostiles.

Wilson's television roles included The X-Files, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (as Sam Braun, casino owner and father of Catherine Willows), Law & Order, The OA, and The Walking Dead as Hershel Greene.

Wilson had been married since 1977 but had no children. He died on October 6, 2018, from Leukemia.

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By the time we got to Woodstock we were half a million strong
And everywhere was a song and a celebration
And I dreamed I saw the bomber death planes riding shotgun in the sky
Turning into butterflies above our nation


Sun Oct 07, 2018 10:34 pm
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Death Proof wrote:
Veteran actor Scott Wilson has died at the age of 76.

Born in Thomasville, Georgia, Wilson began his career as a murder suspect in In the Heat of the Night in 1967. In the same year he appeared as another murder suspect, Richard Hickock, in the adaptation of Truman Capote's In Cold Blood.

Wilson would go on to appear in over 70 films and television shows, often gravitating to westerns or military roles. Some of Wilson's other film roles included The Great Gatsby (1974), The Ninth Configuration, The Right Stuff, Judge Dredd, Dead Man Walking, G.I. Jane, The Way of the Gun, Monster (2003), The Host (2006), and Hostiles.

Wilson's television roles included The X-Files, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (as Sam Braun, casino owner and father of Catherine Willows), Law & Order, The OA, and The Walking Dead as Hershel Greene.

Wilson had been married since 1977 but had no children. He died on October 6, 2018, from Leukemia.


Didn't even know he had leukemia :( I obviously know of him from The Walking Dead, but I'm looking at his filmography and I'm seeing he was in a lot of films I've seen. I'm glad he had a chance to had such a showcase role near the end of his career. He had a brief role on Season 1 of Bosch, and it was very pleasant seeing him. Seemed like a real affable, down-to-earth guy.

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Sun Oct 07, 2018 10:42 pm
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Thief wrote:

Didn't even know he had leukemia :( I obviously know of him from The Walking Dead, but I'm looking at his filmography and I'm seeing he was in a lot of films I've seen. I'm glad he had a chance to had such a showcase role near the end of his career. He had a brief role on Season 1 of Bosch, and it was very pleasant seeing him. Seemed like a real affable, down-to-earth guy.



I knew him mostly from CSI. I never watched the other spin-offs, but I watched pretty much every episode of the main series.

I didn't even realize that was him in The Host. I'll have to go back and watch that for Halloween.

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By the time we got to Woodstock we were half a million strong
And everywhere was a song and a celebration
And I dreamed I saw the bomber death planes riding shotgun in the sky
Turning into butterflies above our nation


Sun Oct 07, 2018 10:49 pm
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Death Proof wrote:


I knew him mostly from CSI. I never watched the other spin-offs, but I watched pretty much every episode of the main series.

I didn't even realize that was him in The Host. I'll have to go back and watch that for Halloween.


I never got into any of the CSI's other than scattered episodes here and there, but I saw The Host recently and I think I got back to the scene thinking "is that him?".

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Sun Oct 07, 2018 10:54 pm
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Death Proof wrote:
Wilson began his career as a murder suspect in In the Heat of the Night in 1967. In the same year he appeared as another murder suspect, Richard Hickock, in the adaptation of Truman Capote's In Cold Blood.

Huh. Never made that connection.


Sun Oct 07, 2018 11:38 pm
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Jinnistan wrote:
Huh. Never made that connection.



Originally the producers wanted to get Paul Neuman and Steve McQueen to play the accused killers but Neuman decided to star in Cool Hand Luke and Hombre while McQueen made Bullitt and The Thomas Crown Affair. Sidney Poitier personally recommended Wilson for his role after working with him in In the Heat of the Night. Wilson didn't find out about that until after the production.

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By the time we got to Woodstock we were half a million strong
And everywhere was a song and a celebration
And I dreamed I saw the bomber death planes riding shotgun in the sky
Turning into butterflies above our nation


Mon Oct 08, 2018 12:54 am
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Damn. RIP Mr. Wilson. The first thing I remembered seeing him in was Macon County Line with another great character actor, Jesse Vint. I remember Max Baer Jr.(Jethro from The Beverly Hillbillies) played a deputy sheriff. Wilson and Vint played brothers who ended up getting on his bad side. Plus he was Hershel. He's gonna be missed.


Mon Oct 08, 2018 4:43 am
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https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/microsoft-co-founder-paul-allen-dies-at-65/ar-BBOqYFg?OCID=ansmsnnews11

Cancer wins again. RIP, Paul.


Tue Oct 16, 2018 6:34 pm
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He had announced the cancer was back about two weeks ago. Didn't even give him a break. :(

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Tue Oct 16, 2018 10:15 pm
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Former pro wrestler 'Dirty' Dick Slater dead at 67. I don't remember this guy but I'm not passing up the chance to post a dirty dick reference.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/ny-news-former-wwe-wrestler-dick-slater-passes-away-20181018-story.html


Fri Oct 19, 2018 5:22 am
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Sat Oct 20, 2018 10:00 pm
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Thu Oct 25, 2018 5:53 am
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Captain Oats wrote:


Oh, man. Loved him on that film :(

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Thu Oct 25, 2018 5:53 am
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Captain Oats wrote:



He was great in Poltergeist.

Also in an episode of The Jeffersons as a white supremacist. He has a heart attack and George ends up using CPR to save him. "Should have let me die." - cold blooded, man. Powerful episode.

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By the time we got to Woodstock we were half a million strong
And everywhere was a song and a celebration
And I dreamed I saw the bomber death planes riding shotgun in the sky
Turning into butterflies above our nation


Thu Oct 25, 2018 6:06 am
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R.I.P. I saw Poltergeist for the first time a few days ago, coincidentally. He was a welcome sight even though his character is a grade-A sleazoid.

He was so good at playing authority figures. I also really like him in Wall Street and Mulholland Drive.

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Thu Oct 25, 2018 7:22 am
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Whitey Bulger dies in prison. Fittingly of course.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/whitey-bulger-dead-hazelton-prison-cause-of-death-unknown-live-updates-today-2018-10-30/


Wed Oct 31, 2018 3:20 am
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To his credit, he was great playing Jack Nicholson.


Wed Oct 31, 2018 3:36 am
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R.I.P. Douglas Rain, the actor who voiced HAL-9000 in 2001. He was 90.
https://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-46178930

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Tue Nov 13, 2018 1:57 am
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Torgo wrote:
R.I.P. Douglas Rain, the actor who voiced HAL-9000 in 2001. He was 90.
https://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-46178930



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Tue Nov 13, 2018 2:35 am
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Tue Nov 13, 2018 3:52 am
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Captain Oats wrote:



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"I guess one man CAN make a difference."

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By the time we got to Woodstock we were half a million strong
And everywhere was a song and a celebration
And I dreamed I saw the bomber death planes riding shotgun in the sky
Turning into butterflies above our nation


Tue Nov 13, 2018 4:18 am
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"He seems really hung up on superhero sex organs, but he'll outgrow it"

RIP

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Wed Nov 14, 2018 2:15 pm
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Country music singer and musician Roy Clark has died at the age of 85.

Best known for hosting Hee Haw for nearly 30 years, Clark was an influential figure in country music as a performer and in popularizing it.

Born in Virginia, Clark began playing banjo, guitar and mandolin at age 14. At the age of 15 he won two national banjo championships. He simultaneously pursued athletic careers in baseball and boxing before dedicating himself soley to music. His first appearance at the Gran Ole Opry was at the age of 17.

At the age of 23 Clark earned a pilot's license. He owned several planes over his lifetime.

Clark appeared on The Beverly Hillbillies as recurring characters and in the 70's he guest-hosted for Johnny Carson on the Tonight Show. Some of his other television appearances included The Muppet Show, The Odd Couple, and The Drew Carey Show. Clark won numerous Country Music Awards for entertainer of the year and instrumentalist of the year. Clark won a Grammy Award for Best Country Instrumental Performance in 1982.

Clark had been married since 1957 and had four children. He died at his home in Tulsa, OK due to complications from pneumonia.

_________________
By the time we got to Woodstock we were half a million strong
And everywhere was a song and a celebration
And I dreamed I saw the bomber death planes riding shotgun in the sky
Turning into butterflies above our nation


Fri Nov 16, 2018 2:56 am
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Fri Nov 16, 2018 11:08 pm
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bummer. he was a cool dude.


Fri Nov 16, 2018 11:14 pm
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Captain Oats wrote:


He wrote The Princess Bride, too.

Good man.

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By the time we got to Woodstock we were half a million strong
And everywhere was a song and a celebration
And I dreamed I saw the bomber death planes riding shotgun in the sky
Turning into butterflies above our nation


Sat Nov 17, 2018 1:33 am
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Sat Nov 17, 2018 2:35 am
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NYT wrote:
Nicolas Roeg, a British director acclaimed for a string of films in the 1970s that included the rite-of-passage tale “Walkabout,” the psychological thriller “Don’t Look Now” and the David Bowie vehicle “The Man Who Fell to Earth,” died on Friday. He was 90.

A son, Nicholas Jr., confirmed the death to Britain’s Press Association. The cause and location were not given.

Mr. Roeg came up through the filmmaking ranks, spending 20 years as a camera operator and cinematographer before serving as one of two directors (along with Donald Cammell) of “Performance,” a 1970 drama about the London rock world.

It starred Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones, and Mr. Roeg would go on to feature other singers in acting roles — Mr. Bowie in “The Man Who Fell to Earth” in 1976 and Art Garfunkel in “Bad Timing” in 1980. Mr. Roeg maintained that the seeming challenge wasn’t all that formidable.

“The fact is that Jagger, Bowie and Garfunkel are all extremely bright, intelligent and well educated,” he told The New York Times in 1980. “A long way from the public stereotype.”

“It’s really very simple,” he added of his directing philosophy. “I just mind my own business and stay as far away from the actors as possible.”

Mr. Garfunkel, though, was not so dismissive. He said by email that Mr. Roeg “brought me to the edge of madness and violence in ‘Bad Timing,’” and called him “a handsome man — beautiful, as were his pictures.”

If Mr. Roeg was known for casting rock stars, he also made an impression with one particular sex scene, in the 1973 film “Don’t Look Now,” about a grieving couple played by Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie. The scene, which featured lots of crosscutting, was graphic for the time — so much so that as recently as this year Mr. Sutherland still felt compelled to deny persistent rumors that the sex in it was not simulated.

“The takes were 15 seconds long, maximum,” he told The Daily News.

Nicolas Jack Roeg was born on Aug. 15, 1928, in London to Jack and Mabel (Silk) Roeg. He did not attend film school, instead entering the business at the bottom in 1947, making tea and operating the clapperboard at Marylebone Studios in London.

He worked his way up to camera operator and then cinematographer, receiving the director of photography credit on films like François Truffaut’s “Fahrenheit 451” and Richard Lester’s “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum,” both in 1966. He also shot Mr. Lester’s “Petulia” (1968), which featured the jump cuts and leaps in time that would be among Mr. Roeg’s signatures.

“Performance,” his first directing credit, was completed in the late 1960s but shelved because Warner Brothers had misgivings about it. Some critics savaged it when it was finally released, but its reputation grew over time. In 1999 it made the British Film Institute’s list of the 100 best British movies ever made, as did “Don’t Look Now.”

“Walkabout,” Mr. Roeg’s first solo directing credit, released in 1971, told the story of a teenage girl and her brother who were abandoned in the Australian desert and are befriended by a young Aborigine. Mr. Roeg was his own cinematographer on the film.

“Roeg uses the camera — wide shots, close-ups, colors and textures — to create a sense of unmediated perception,” A. O. Scott of The Times said of the film in a 2010 reassessment, “as if we were seeing the world for the very first time.”

“The Man Who Fell to Earth” further enhanced Mr. Roeg’s reputation for making challenging, visually adventurous films.

“You could call Roeg a pretentious director, but he is a gifted one, and many of his pretensions pay off in beauty, tension and a mysterious, unsettling power,” Jack Kroll wrote in reviewing the movie in Newsweek. “ ‘The Man Who Fell to Earth’ has enough of these qualities to offset a sometimes maddeningly oblique style.”

Mr. Roeg, whose first marriage, to Susan Stephen in 1957, ended in divorce, married his lead actress from “Bad Timing,” Theresa Russell, in 1982. She also appeared in several of his other films, including “Eureka” (1983), “Insignificance” (1985) and “Track 29” (1988).

Also among his later films was “The Witches” (1990).

“This tale about a witches’ plot to turn every child in England into a mouse is based on the novel by Roald Dahl, who does not write sugarcoated books,” Caryn James wrote in her review in The Times. “It was directed by Nicolas Roeg, best known for the wonderfully terrifying ‘Don’t Look Now’ and the deeply strange ‘The Man Who Fell to Earth,’ with David Bowie as an alien. As it turns out, Mr. Roeg is just the right match for this macabre and funny idea.”

Mr. Roeg’s marriage to Ms. Russell ended in divorce. In 2005 he married Harriet Harper, who survives him. In addition to Nicolas Jr., other survivors include three other sons from his first marriage, Waldo, Luc and Sholto, and two sons from his second marriage, Max and Statten.

In 1988, Jay Carr, film critic for The Boston Globe, summarized Mr. Roeg’s style.

“The characters in Nicolas Roeg’s films live in their fantasies, and so does Roeg’s camera,” he wrote. “He delights in juxtaposing their imaginings with so-called real life, sharing the confusion, making it universal.”

Among the directors Mr. Roeg influenced was Edgar Wright (“Baby Driver”).

“His films hypnotized me for years and still continue to intrigue,” Mr. Wright wrote on Twitter. “Along with classics like ‘Performance’ and ‘Walkabout,’ I could watch ‘Don’t Look Now’ on a loop and never tire of its intricacies.’”


Sat Nov 24, 2018 11:09 pm
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Guess I should take the opportunity to finally watch Walkabout soon; RIP!

:(

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Sun Nov 25, 2018 8:30 am
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Sun Nov 25, 2018 10:39 am
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Captain Oats wrote:




Just saw this. Amazing guy - had the Guinness world record for throwing cards (190 feet at 90 mph) and appeared in a bunch of movies and TV shows, plus he was the go-to expert for productions regarding magic and misdirection.

_________________
By the time we got to Woodstock we were half a million strong
And everywhere was a song and a celebration
And I dreamed I saw the bomber death planes riding shotgun in the sky
Turning into butterflies above our nation


Sun Nov 25, 2018 1:18 pm
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"South Street Seaport, he says. He can't stand the heat. He can't stand it." :(


Sun Nov 25, 2018 4:56 pm
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NYT wrote:
Bernardo Bertolucci, the Italian filmmaker whose sensual and visually stylistic movies ranged from intense chamber dramas to panoramic historical epics, died on Monday at his home in Rome. He was 77.

His death was confirmed by his wife, Clare Peploe, in a statement that did not specify the cause.

Mr. Bertolucci’s early work reflected the revolutionary spirit of the 1960s and ’70s, in particular the shifting social and sexual mores of the times. While several of his films delved into the traumas of his country’s recent past, he fashioned himself as a global auteur.

Coming of age as the Italian neorealist movement was on the wane, he drew inspiration from the French New Wave and routinely worked across borders and with international casts.

Many of Mr. Bertolucci’s films were warmly embraced by Hollywood. “The Last Emperor” (1987), a lavish biopic of Pu Yi, who became the emperor of China at the age of 3, won all nine Academy Awards for which it was nominated, including best picture and best director.

But Mr. Bertolucci’s best-known — and most controversial — film came earlier in his career: “Last Tango in Paris” (1972), an explicit depiction of the intense sexual relationship between a middle-aged American widower and a young Frenchwoman (played by Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider). A worldwide sensation and instant lightning rod, the film was lauded by some for pushing the boundaries of sexual representation, and denounced by others as misogynistic or pornographic.

“Last Tango” received an X rating, landed on the covers of Time and Newsweek, and earned $36 million at the United States box office alone. In Italy, the film was the subject of a protracted obscenity trial. In 1976, the Italian Supreme Court ordered all copies destroyed and handed Mr. Bertolucci a four-month suspended sentence.

Bernardo Bertolucci was born on March 16, 1941, in Parma, Italy, into an affluent, artistically inclined family. His father, Attilio, was a renowned poet and occasional film critic; his mother, Ninetta, taught literature. As a teenager, after the family had moved to Rome, he started making short films with a borrowed 16-millimeter camera.

At age 20, Mr. Bertolucci dropped out of the University of Rome when the opportunity arose to assist a neighbor and family friend, Pier Paolo Pasolini, on the set of Mr. Pasolini’s first feature, “Accattone” (1961).

Despite early success as a poet — a collection of his poetry won the prestigious Viareggio Prize in 1962 — Mr. Bertolucci chose to devote himself to cinema. Expanded from a story treatment by Mr. Pasolini, his directing debut, “The Grim Reaper,” about the murder of a prostitute in a Roman park, premiered at the Venice Film Festival in 1962.

If his first feature carried inevitable shades of Pasolini, Mr. Bertolucci came into his own with his second, “Before the Revolution” (1964). Loosely based on the Stendhal novel “The Charterhouse of Parma,” it describes the struggle of a young man torn between his bourgeois background and his radical aspirations.

For Mr. Bertolucci, the character’s conflict mirrored his own. “I was a Marxist with all the love, all the passion, and all the despair one can expect from a bourgeois who chooses Marxism,” he said in a 1965 interview with the magazine Cahiers du Cinéma.

“Before the Revolution” anticipated Mr. Bertolucci’s interest in exploring the intersections of the personal and the political, while also establishing his knack for inscribing autobiographical references in films adapted from literary sources. While the Italian reviews were mostly negative, the film was championed by French critics, who identified Mr. Bertolucci as a fellow traveler of the French New Wave.

The love was mutual. Mr. Bertolucci, who spent a month in Paris attending screenings at the Cinémathèque Française as a high school graduation gift, insisted on doing early interviews in French, which he called “the language of cinema.”

Learning from Godard

Even more than Mr. Pasolini, Jean-Luc Godard was an important early influence. Mr. Godard looms large over Mr. Bertolucci’s third, and most experimental, feature, “Partner” (1968), a reworking of Dostoevsky’s “Double,” in which a young man encounters his revolutionary doppelgänger.

In what he described as a pivotal moment in his creative life, Mr. Bertolucci began Freudian analysis in 1969. He spoke often and openly about the process, describing himself in a 1977 interview with The Washington Post as “a repressed person” who “can express my energy, my libido, my aggression, only in my work.”

Many of Mr. Bertolucci’s films — which abound with father figures, Oedipal conflicts, identity confusion and dream logic — are ripe for psychoanalytic readings. The two films that he made in quick succession after entering analysis, both tackling Italy’s Fascist history, were breakthrough works that are often ranked among his most enduring achievements.

In “The Spider’s Stratagem” (1970), adapted from a Borges story, a young man investigates the death of his father, a resistance leader. Through formal devices — the same actors appear in both past and present-day sequences — the film creates a disorientingly fluid sense of time and underscores the persistence of history.

Using an even more intricate flashback structure, “The Conformist” (1970), set during the Mussolini era and based on a novel by Alberto Moravia, connects the Fascist mind-set with repressed sexuality. The protagonist (Jean-Louis Trintignant) is a closeted man who, in his desperate bid for normalcy, marries, joins the Fascist Party, and agrees to assassinate a former professor.

“The Spider’s Stratagem” and “The Conformist” marked the beginning of a long collaboration with the cinematographer Vittorio Storaro, whose work was notable for its expressive lighting and sinuous camera movement, and who contributed to Mr. Bertolucci’s reputation as a visual stylist.

A lifelong leftist and a member of the Italian Communist Party in his 20s and 30s, Mr. Bertolucci began to question the viability of political filmmaking as his work grew more popular. “You cannot make political films in a commercial situation,” he said in an interview with The New York Times in 1973. “The more revolutionary the film, the less the public would accept it.”

With “Last Tango in Paris,” he moved away from the questions of political idealism and guilt that had preoccupied him and toward the sexual revolution then unfolding. In interviews at the time, he referred to sex as “the only thing that still seems true” and “a new kind of language.”

“Last Tango in Paris” premiered at the New York Film Festival in October 1972, and immediately rose to the status of a cultural event. The critic Pauline Kael proclaimed it “the most powerfully erotic movie ever made” and likened its premiere to the first performance of Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring.”

Other reviewers were more skeptical. Citing the abundance of female nudity, Judith Crist, writing in New York magazine, placed it in “the male-chauvinist tradition.” Grace Glueck, in The New York Times, dismissed it as “the perfect macho soap opera.”

For Mr. Bertolucci, the film was less about liberation than regression. “At the end he’s a fetus,” he said of the Brando character in an interview with Rolling Stone magazine.

Although its shock value has faded with time, “Last Tango in Paris” retained its capacity for controversy long after its release. Ms. Schneider, who was 19 during the shoot, later described the filming of the notorious rape scene — in which Mr. Brando’s character sodomizes her character — as a traumatic experience.

Mr. Bertolucci came under fire for comments in a 2013 interview in which he revealed that Ms. Schneider, who died in 2011, was not told that Mr. Brando would use butter as a lubricant in that scene of simulated sex, saying he “wanted Maria to feel, not to act, the rage and the humiliation.”

1900 in 5 1/2 hours

The success of “The Conformist” and “Last Tango” allowed Mr. Bertolucci to embark on his most ambitious film, “1900,” a multigenerational family saga about the class struggle with a large international cast including Robert De Niro, Gérard Depardieu, Burt Lancaster, Donald Sutherland and Dominique Sanda.

Tracing the entwined destinies of two men born on the same day at the dawn of the 20th century — one a peasant, the other an aristocrat — the film follows its characters through several decades of Italian political and social upheavals.

Mr. Bertolucci unveiled a five-and-a-half-hour cut at the Cannes Film Festival in 1976 to mixed reviews. After a public dispute with the distributor, Paramount, and his producer, Alberto Grimaldi, over the running time, Mr. Bertolucci relented and produced a four-hour version for American release the following year.

In 1978, Mr. Bertolucci married Clare Peploe, who had worked with him as an assistant director on “1900.” He wrote his next film, “Luna” (1979) — about an opera singer (Jill Clayburgh) and her teenage son — with Ms. Peploe and his brother, Giuseppe. “The Tragedy of a Ridiculous Man” (1981), about a wealthy man forced to renounce his worldly possessions to recover his kidnapped son, won Ugo Tognazzi the best actor prize at Cannes.

Capitalizing on the vogue for historical prestige pictures, Mr. Bertolucci shifted back into epic mode with “The Last Emperor,” the first Western feature granted permission to film within the Forbidden City in Beijing.

While the film plays out against China’s tumultuous passage from feudalism to communism, Mr. Bertolucci conceded that his primary interest was less in historical events than in the psyche of his passive protagonist, who was re-educated during the Cultural Revolution and died a humble gardener.

Mr. Bertolucci’s next two films came to be bracketed with “The Last Emperor” as his “Eastern trilogy.” (All three were co-written with the screenwriter Mark Peploe, his brother in law.) “The Sheltering Sky” (1990) was based on a Paul Bowles novel about Americans adrift in North Africa. “Little Buddha” (1993) told the dual stories of the life of Siddhartha and of an American boy who may be the reincarnation of a Buddhist lama.

Most of Mr. Bertolucci’s later films concerned characters who have shut out the world around them, as foreshadowed by the lost souls of “Last Tango in Paris.”

“Stealing Beauty” (1996), about the sexual awakening of an American teenager, was set among the artistic habitués of a Tuscan villa. The action in “Besieged” (1998) was confined mainly to the Roman home where a refugee from an unnamed African country works as a maid for a reclusive pianist.

In “The Dreamers” (2003), based on a novel by Gilbert Adair, Mr. Bertolucci returned to the revolutionary politics and Paris cinephilia of his youth. But the story unfolded from the point of view of characters who have sealed themselves off in an erotic idyll, oblivious to the student riots in the streets outside.

Slowed by poor health and back problems, Mr. Bertolucci directed his final film, “Me and You” (2012), from a wheelchair. Another intimate drama, it revolved around a troubled adolescent hiding out in a basement with his half sister.

For Mr. Bertolucci the growing insularity of his work was less a result of a narrowing worldview than a reflection of the world he saw around him.

“Politics was part of our life,” he told The Hollywood Reporter in 2014. “People don’t seem involved or passionate anymore; politics is something distant.”


Mon Nov 26, 2018 10:14 pm
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Oxnard Montalvo wrote:
Bernardo Bertolucci

In all due respect to the late RT poster pluckylump, I hope that some of the outrage surrounding Last Tango in Paris has quieted down enough for people to appreciate what a terrific film it is. Probably Brando's greatest performance, anyone who thinks that the film is pro-rape, well, simply has not bothered to actually see the film. I hope that calls on Twitter to destroy all of the existing copies of the movie, and perhaps prosecute the apologists who insist on enjoying it, have dampened down, like all Twitter outrages tend to, and people can recognize the context of this harrowing self-destructive journey.

Along with his preceding classics, Before the Revolution, The Conformist and The Spider's Stratagem, Bertolucci wouldn't quite reach these heights again, although 1900 and Last Emperor come very close, but he's a significant filmmaker of the post-Fellini/Antonioni generation.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 1:26 am
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I remember reading about the filming of that scene a while ago and shrugged it off probably 'cause I was so enured to stories of directors abusing their actors (especially during the 70's when "everything must be real!"). maybe some actors are willing to give themselves over to that sort of abuse in the hopes it will make their performance better but my sympathy for Schneider has since grown. would I have felt different if Schneider was fine with it? I dunno. it still wouldn't have been as if Bertolucci and Schneider were conspiring to humiliate Brando.

I know it is possible to separate the movie from the conditions it was made under (as you say, it is far from pro-rape) but I wouldn't blame anyone if they didn't want to see it for those reasons either.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 1:55 am
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I just rented The Conformist at my library last weekend. Guess I'll watch it one of these days.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 2:03 am
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Oxnard Montalvo wrote:
I remember reading about the filming of that scene a while ago and shrugged it off probably 'cause I was so enured to stories of directors abusing their actors (especially during the 70's when "everything must be real!"). maybe some actors are willing to give themselves over to that sort of abuse in the hopes it will make their performance better but my sympathy for Schneider has since grown. would I have felt different if Schneider was fine with it? I dunno. it still wouldn't have been as if Bertolucci and Schneider were conspiring to humiliate Brando.

A very good example could be found in The Exorcist, a film I unapologetically enjoy, which involved a great deal of abuse from director William Friedkin towards his cast, including but not limited to injuries to both Burstyn and Blair for irresponsible FX stunts, traumatizing the crew on a daily basis with psychopathic tantrums, and slapping the (real life) priest before he gave Merrin the last rites. He consistently created and maintained a terrorized atmosphere throughout the shoot. And we could throw in his legendary "stolen" shooting of the French Connection car chase, which threatened (but thankfully avoided injury to) a number of unwitting NYC drivers. Simply put, Friedkin is a pig. But those are still great films. The notion (which seems to have evolved quite recently) that enjoying one's work allows a tacit pass on all of the artist's personal crimes is something I can't abide. I can think that Polanski is objectively a great filmmaker and still believe that he should have served time for his act. A primary problem with these kinds of outrages are the moral absolutes they insist on adhering to. Either with us or against us.

My problem with plucky was his insistence that the film contained an actual act of rape, which is not what Schneider herself ever actually claimed. We can say that she was manipulated, coerced, taken advantage of as a 19 year old woman into doing a scene she did not want to do and was unaware of her options to refuse doing it. What happened was clearly unethical, and shines very poorly on the allegedly more mature and powerful men involved. The issue becomes irritating to me when it goes to the extreme of claiming rape, condoning rape, and that the film should be destroyed and everyone who watched it should be shamed as rape apologists. This is the rinse/repeat pathology of impulsive Twitter indignation.

Oxnard Montalvo wrote:
I wouldn't blame anyone if they didn't want to see it for those reasons either.

I would certainly blame anyone who would deliberately choose to ignore the context of what it is that they're denouncing, which is to say those who feel that the film endorses its depiction of rape.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 2:44 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
In all due respect to the late RT poster pluckylump, I hope that some of the outrage surrounding Last Tango in Paris has quieted down enough for people to appreciate what a terrific film it is. Probably Brando's greatest performance, anyone who thinks that the film is pro-rape, well, simply has not bothered to actually see the film. I hope that calls on Twitter to destroy all of the existing copies of the movie, and perhaps prosecute the apologists who insist on enjoying it, have dampened down, like all Twitter outrages tend to, and people can recognize the context of this harrowing self-destructive journey.

Along with his preceding classics, Before the Revolution, The Conformist and The Spider's Stratagem, Bertolucci wouldn't quite reach these heights again, although 1900 and Last Emperor come very close, but he's a significant filmmaker of the post-Fellini/Antonioni generation.


My hesitation towards watching it again has nothing to do with a pro-rape message in the film, which would be nonsense, or that it is somehow wrong or immoral to watch the film now knowing what is on screen. Whatever one wants to call what happened to Schneider during the filming of the movie, being aware of her own great discomfort with that scene, makes it seem like it would be too invasive for me to watch in the future. My own feelings on this hardly detract from the movie though, since it is likely Bertolucci and Brando's best, and that alone says all one needs to know about the quality of the film. I would in fact say that not only is it Brando's best performance, it might be the best performance I've ever seen from an actor. I just can do without seeing that particular scene again. And it's not like I haven't watched the movie enough already as it is.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 2:46 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
A very good example could be found in Th Exorcist,


Friedkin is an interesting example because not only was he a nasty piece of work, but the result of that nastiness regularly manifests itself on screen. He is pushing the camera into Ellen Burstyn's face as it expresses actual pain that he is responsible for, and we are witnessing the immediate aftermath of him physically assaulting one of his actors. I think if Burstyn or that particular priest had ever come out to claim their feelings of embarassment or humiliation in those scenes, while I doubt that it would be enough for me to turn my back on the movies, I would have difficulty watching these particular moments. But because he mostly seems to have been absolved by them, and seemingly has retained a close friendship with Burstyn all of these years, it softens the blow of his obviously terrible behavior.

Other movies I have less of a reason to give a pass to, and make me feel somewhat hypocritical in ever putting up some kind of moral buffer between me and a film. Portrait of Jason, I think is one of the most fascinating things I've watched in the last few years, and it is obviously built around the notion of a complete assassintion of someone's personality. Maybe Jason was a total wretch and deserved this to some degree, maybe he was at peace with how he was depicted. But I don't know these things with any kind of certainty, and the voyeurism of watching a man become slowly broken to pieces, is grossly voyeuristic. But irrefutably spectacular. And I have every intention of watching that one again.

Of course these sort of inconsistencies of outrage are fairly common. Even Ebert, while unable to deal with the supposed humiliation of Rosselini in Blue Velvet and Jennifer Jason Leigh in Fast Times (humiliations which I believe Ebert was only assuming, since I've never heard either of these actors claim any sort of exploitation on these films), yet giving a pass to the unknown actress in Last House forced at knife point to piss herself...well, sometimes where one persons particular outrage begins doesn't make a whole lot of consistent sense.

Of course I am also not saying that people shouldn't be outraged at certain elements in films. It's only natural that we all have our own personal tipping point. But what I never have had much time for is those who tell me I am supposed to be equally as outraged as them, and outraged at the same things. Most people understand this, but unfortunately, the internet has exposed a whole cabal of people who aren't particularly reasonable about these things.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 2:59 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
I just can do without seeing that particular scene again.

I don't think that the final scene after that would be as perfectly pathetic without it.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 3:04 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
I don't think that the final scene after that would be as perfectly pathetic without it.


I'm not saying the scene doesn't have a function. It's just I'm wary of it now.

I imagine if I ever came across the movie on television, I would probably not be able to help myself and watch it. And I doubt I would skip past the offending moment because I just passively will watch a movie till its end no matter my problems with its quality or abhorence.. But it would likely linger in my memory in a pretty distasteful way. And who needs that?


Tue Nov 27, 2018 3:08 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
seemingly has retained a close friendship with Burstyn all of these years, it softens the blow of his obviously terrible behavior.

It's worth noting that Schneider also maintained a close relationship with Brando throughout the rest of her life, despite Brando being a "co-conspirator" (in fact, the butter was his idea). That shouldn't absolve Brando of his responsibility, but it should maybe put some perspective on it.

And Brando, lest we forget, was also a pig in so many ways, but should we decide to remove him and his performances from the cinematic record for his very questionable treatment and subtle but sustained abuse of the various women in his life?


Tue Nov 27, 2018 3:13 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
It's worth noting that Schneider also maintained a close relationship with Brando throughout the rest of her life, despite Brando being a "co-conspirator" (in fact, the butter was his idea). That shouldn't absolve Brando of his responsibility, but it should maybe put some perspective on it.

And Brando, lest we forget, was also a pig in so many ways, but should we decide to remove him and his performances from the cinematic record for his very questionable treatment and subtle but sustained abuse of the various women in his life?


You don't need to convince me. You'll never have me on the side of prohibiting any artist, or philosopher, or provocateur from circulation.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 3:18 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
You don't need to convince me. You'll never have me on the side of prohibiting any artist, or philosopher, or provocateur from circulation.

I woud defend Birth of a Nation as long as I reserve the right to never have to sit through it again.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 3:27 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
I woud defend Birth of a Nation as long as I reserve the right to never have to sit through it again.


All that being said, is 1900 worth the time? I've heard mixed things and it is really one of the only landmark works of his that I've yet to see.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 4:09 am
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crumbsroom wrote:

All that being said, is 1900 worth the time? I've heard mixed things and it is really one of the only landmark works of his that I've yet to see.

The best of it is very good, but it's a little bloated. I would take advantage of watching the two-part version for breathing room.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 4:16 am
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Alright, I'm gonna watch Last Tango in Paris (which I nearly typed as Last House in Paris) this week, so we can settle the controversy once and for all.

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Tue Nov 27, 2018 1:37 pm
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And I probably should see 1900 soon, as it seems right up my alley. Maybe I'll do a double feature of overlong, unwieldy epics loaded with objectionable content and finally get around to Caligula at the same time.

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Tue Nov 27, 2018 1:43 pm
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Rock wrote:
and finally get around to Caligula at the same time.


Ha!

I'm honestly not sure if you should or you shouldn't.

Probably should.


Tue Nov 27, 2018 2:07 pm
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