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 We Didn't Start The 80s 
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Jinnistan wrote:
I'm trying to remember which poster at RT was the one who gave me shit for recommending Visiting Hours when it played on TCM.

I mean, classic, folks. It's right there.


I know when I saw it as a kid, that I wasn't much impressed. The killer was just some regular guy hanging out in coffee shops without any real mythology about him, and there was long stretches between action scenes. Some of the violence even dared to happen off screen. Which is all strangely exactly what many of the adult critics seem to be saying about it as they talk out of the other side of their mouth about it being misogynist. Because quickening up the pace, giving less time to flesh out those pesky female characters or the dreary monotony of the killers life and adding more juice to the action would clearly correct that problem.


Tue Jul 31, 2018 9:45 am
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I don't think I ever saw it, but this Visiting Hours trailer always creeped me out when I was a kid.


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Tue Jul 31, 2018 10:23 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
For me, the most important place to look when diagnosing the level of misogyny in these sorts of film, is how the film views its female characters. All three of the women in Visiting Hours are fully fleshed out, nuanced women who are unwilling to be played as anyone's victim.

He's a man who is so fragile he feels himself to be less of a man simply because he is employed as the guy who vaccuums the set of a show that gives voice to the feminist character that Lee Grant plays. As tough and mean as he wants to be seen, he is a total zero. And the film knows this.


Exactly. And one of the points that the film makes so well is that the violence is all about him, not about the women. An outspoken feminist, a hard-working single mother, a bar-fly party girl----all of them manage to be enraging to him by any degree of suggesting that they might be above him. He is physically dominant, and this one point of leverage becomes the only way he can feel better about himself. I also think it's worth mentioning the way that his
rape/assault on Lisa is shot. Even when she's still sort of into it, there's the part where she bends over to take off her pants and the camera instead chooses to watch Ironside as he watches her. Later when he has the knife and uses it to cut off her shirt, the camera pans up to her face (and the place on her cheek where he already cut her) and never actually shows her topless. Such a contrast to the numerous films in which a woman's top is pulled or ripped off and the camera lovingly zooms in on the nudity
.

I think that the presence of the father in the story is such an insightful element--I literally can't think of another story with a male killer (even one with an abusive father backstory) where there is a father-son relationship as part of the current story.

I also love the fact that the women are allowed to interact with each other instead of being presented as isolated victims, and that their interactions prove to be key to understanding what is happening. In most slashers, female characters are presented more as "episodes", mostly unconnected to each other.


Tue Jul 31, 2018 11:07 am
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crumbsroom wrote:

It's an old complaint, but the reality is that most critics are grossly lazy, and this laziness comes out even more when they are dealing with genre films.

The truth... you speak it.


Tue Jul 31, 2018 12:39 pm
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I have placed a star next to Visiting Hours on my October list.

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Tue Jul 31, 2018 12:46 pm
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STAND BY ME (1986)

Time for me to be Mr Contrarian again. I'm gonna file this one with Shawshank Redemption. It's competently made and I acknowledge that everyone else loves it but it just isn't for me. I don't enjoy pooping on the parties of others so I'll just leave it at that. There were plenty of reasons to predict that I wouldn't like this one (example: the constant nostalgia-wallow of Baby Boomers was an aspect of the 80s I found particularly annoying) but after enjoying When Harry Met Sally so much, I went into this one ready to be won over. Oh well.

(and just for the record, I bear no malice towards Corey Feldman the tween-aged actor but why was he always given the role of the insufferable foul-mouthed little prick that I would've hated when I was a kid?)

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Tue Jul 31, 2018 1:48 pm
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Captain Terror wrote:
STAND BY ME (1986)

Time for me to be Mr Contrarian again. I'm gonna file this one with Shawshank Redemption. It's competently made and I acknowledge that everyone else loves it but it just isn't for me. I don't enjoy pooping on the parties of others so I'll just leave it at that. There were plenty of reasons to predict that I wouldn't like this one (example: the constant nostalgia-wallow of Baby Boomers was an aspect of the 80s I found particularly annoying) but after enjoying When Harry Met Sally so much, I went into this one ready to be won over. Oh well.

(and just for the record, I bear no malice towards Corey Feldman the tween-aged actor but why was he always given the role of the insufferable foul-mouthed little prick that I would've hated when I was a kid?)

Funny, I totally agree with you about Stand By Me (including your Feldman assessment). But you're outta yer fuckin' gourd on Shawshank.


Wed Aug 01, 2018 1:03 pm
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Wooley wrote:
But you're outta yer fuckin' gourd on Shawshank.

So I've been told. :) I dunno, I mean I didn't dislike it but I hardly remember what it was about and have no desire to revisit it.
As for Stand By Me, after thinking it over all day I think I pinpointed my main problem. I have no issue with any of the performances and in fact they were all pretty great. But I never felt any connection to any of the characters because everything they said sounded like it was from a screenplay, if you know what I mean. I was never convinced that these were real kids. Have you ever known middle-schoolers to give each other career advice and then hug it out?

And then just on a personal level the cursing-like-sailors, smoking cigarettes and toting guns was SOOO far removed from my middle school experience that there was just nothing for me to latch on to. That's more my problem than the movie's I guess but it is what it is. And yeah, having your ear burned by your father would no doubt result in some behavioral problems, but again there was no moment when I was made to sympathize with Feldman's character, so I was just left thinking what a d-bag he was. (In fairness I'm pretty sure there were a couple of attempts to humanize him but again, none of it felt authentic to me so I was unmoved I guess). I got some Ron Howard vibes from this one. Well-made in terms of craft, but kind of bland and just barely over my sappiness threshold.

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Wed Aug 01, 2018 1:47 pm
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Captain Terror wrote:
As for Stand By Me, after thinking it over all day I think I pinpointed my main problem. I have no issue with any of the performances and in fact they were all pretty great. But I never felt any connection to any of the characters because everything they said sounded like it was from a screenplay, if you know what I mean. I was never convinced that these were real kids. Have you ever known middle-schoolers to give each other career advice and then hug it out?

And then just on a personal level the cursing-like-sailors, smoking cigarettes and toting guns was SOOO far removed from my middle school experience that there was just nothing for me to latch on to. That's more my problem than the movie's I guess but it is what it is. And yeah, having your ear burned by your father would no doubt result in some behavioral problems, but again there was no moment when I was made to sympathize with Feldman's character, so I was just left thinking what a d-bag he was. (In fairness I'm pretty sure there were a couple of attempts to humanize him but again, none of it felt authentic to me so I was unmoved I guess). I got some Ron Howard vibes from this one. Well-made in terms of craft, but kind of bland and just barely over my sappiness threshold.

Yeah, it's just a soft-focus Boomer-nostalgia movie to me. Can do without.


Thu Aug 02, 2018 12:31 am
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Wooley wrote:
Yeah, it's just a soft-focus Boomer-nostalgia movie to me. Can do without.

I can't verify this but I'm pretty sure that "Lollipop" by the Chordettes appears in roughly 60% of all movies released in the 80s.

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Thu Aug 02, 2018 12:36 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
I got five bucks that says Captain doesn't make it past North.
I actually saw North in theaters back when I was 6 years old, and remember laughing really hard at some gag where the title character quickly bugs out in his plane away from some lame family that was looking to adopt him. True story, bro, and true shame on me :oops:

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Thu Aug 02, 2018 2:30 am
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Captain Terror wrote:
And then just on a personal level the cursing-like-sailors, smoking cigarettes and toting guns was SOOO far removed from my middle school experience that there was just nothing for me to latch on to. That's more my problem than the movie's I guess but it is what it is. And yeah, having your ear burned by your father would no doubt result in some behavioral problems, but again there was no moment when I was made to sympathize with Feldman's character, so I was just left thinking what a d-bag he was


Ha! I was totally Corey Feldman's character at 13 years old, so it was pretty easy for me to relate (and to wince in reflection)

Stand By Me is far from a realistic movie. It is certainly filtered through not only boomer nostalgia, but just nostalgia for teenage years in general (and, yeah, probably more the kinds of teens who smoke cigarettes and look for dead bodies, again, something I could relate to with my group of friends). I don't think it's a necessarily a great movie, but I have maintained a fondness for it all these years later.

Also, I don't really have the same backlash towards Boomers making films that revel in their teenage years. There are no shortage of films that do this for the 70's, 80's, 90's and undoubtedly, will soon to do for the oughts. No reason to parse between them. They are all essentially the same thing, regardless of the decade.

I'm totally with you on Shawshank though. A big whatever to that one.


Thu Aug 02, 2018 2:41 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
Ha! I was totally Corey Feldman's character at 13 years old

Be advised that 13 y.o. Capt. Terror is secretly judging you right now.
crumbsroom wrote:
Also, I don't really have the same backlash towards Boomers making films that revel in their teenage years. There are no shortage of films that do this for the 70's, 80's, 90's and undoubtedly, will soon to do for the oughts. No reason to parse between them. They are all essentially the same thing, regardless of the decade.

I mildly disagree here because the Boomers always seemed to be way more smug and self-congratulatory about it. While something like That 70s Show celebrated the good stuff but also mocked the cheesy stuff, the Boomers rarely seemed willing to acknowledge their own foibles. Sure, you gave us the Beatles but somebody was buying Archies records. So yeah, every generation has done it but the Boomers really Steve Bannon-ed it in the 80s. (Did I do that right, Rock?) It could just be that I was a teenager at the time so listening to old folks reminisce (including my parents which is probably significant) was extra annoying as a result.
crumbsroom wrote:
I'm totally with you on Shawshank though. A big whatever to that one.

Thanks for the backup.

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Thu Aug 02, 2018 3:36 am
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Captain Terror wrote:
Be advised that 13 y.o. Capt. Terror is secretly judging you right now.


That's okay. 13 year old crumb was judging the whole world.

As for the boomer issue, I guess that's fair enough. But I take that general attitude of theirs to justify me not liking Baby Boomers themselves that much. Ultimately, a rancid generation. I tend to give their nostalgia boner movies a pass though. I accept the blindspots of a generation when it comes to art.


Thu Aug 02, 2018 5:52 am
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Captain Terror wrote:
Thanks for the backup.


Anytime. Shawshank is The Conjuring of Greatest Films of All Time. Blech.


Thu Aug 02, 2018 5:54 am
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crumbsroom wrote:

Anytime. Shawshank is The Conjuring of Greatest Films of All Time. Blech.


Accurate.

The first time I watched it I was like, "This is it?!".


Thu Aug 02, 2018 6:04 am
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Image

Image

That's my message to you, as a longtime Shawshank fan :D

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Thu Aug 02, 2018 6:13 am
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I just feel like it's a solid 7/10 film. What is great about it? I see plenty of "fine" or "good" elements to it, but nothing that makes me think that it belongs on any kind of best of all time list. Seeing it at the top of the IMDb 250 just baffles me. Better than Brief Encounter? Better than Seven Samurai?


Thu Aug 02, 2018 6:26 am
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Takoma1 wrote:
I just feel like it's a solid 7/10 film. What is great about it? I see plenty of "fine" or "good" elements to it, but nothing that makes me think that it belongs on any kind of best of all time list. Seeing it at the top of the IMDb 250 just baffles me. Better than Brief Encounter? Better than Seven Samurai?

My thoughts exactly. Forget Seven Samurai, I didn't even think it was significantly better than The Green Mile.

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Thu Aug 02, 2018 9:29 am
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Thief wrote:
Image

Image

That's my message to you, as a longtime Shawshank fan :D



I got your back, bro. I never got the hate for it.

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Thu Aug 02, 2018 9:41 am
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Death Proof wrote:


I got your back, bro. I never got the hate for it.
Is anyone here really saying they hate it? What I'm reading is that people find it kind of middling for a movie with such a stellar reputation. Which I understand. It's a movie that telegraphs exactly what you're supposed to think and feel at every moment, whether it's through the blunt narration or the cloying score. It's undeniably well-crafted, but it's craft in the purpose of beating the audience into submission to just mindlessly accept its Hallmark aphorism philosophy. Again, it's well-made but just kind of facile.

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Thu Aug 02, 2018 9:47 am
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BL wrote:
Is anyone here really saying they hate it? What I'm reading is that people find it kind of middling for a movie with such a stellar reputation. Which I understand. It's a movie that telegraphs exactly what you're supposed to think and feel at every moment, whether it's through the blunt narration or the cloying score. It's undeniably well-crafted, but it's craft in the purpose of beating the audience into submission to just mindlessly accept its Hallmark aphorism philosophy. Again, it's well-made but just kind of facile.


Exactly


Thu Aug 02, 2018 10:02 am
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Takoma1 wrote:
I just feel like it's a solid 7/10 film. What is great about it? I see plenty of "fine" or "good" elements to it, but nothing that makes me think that it belongs on any kind of best of all time list. Seeing it at the top of the IMDb 250 just baffles me. Better than Brief Encounter? Better than Seven Samurai?


I think that all of the technical aspects of the film are top-notch: direction, cinematography, the performances... I saw it for the first time back in 1995, give or take, and I was totally immersed in the story. Plus, the twist caught me completely off guard back then. I loved it. Still love it. It helps if you see the film more as a fable, rather than a realistic portrayal of prison life, etc. and I'm pretty sure that's the way King, and then Darabont, intended it.

But more importantly, the theme of hope against adversity resonated with me then. This is a more personal reason than the above, but - as cliché as it might sound - that message really got to me in a moment where I needed it. It has been my personal #1 film ever since.

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Thu Aug 02, 2018 10:14 am
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Thief wrote:
It helps if you see the film more as a fable, rather than a realistic portrayal of prison life, etc. and I'm pretty sure that's the way King, and then Darabont, intended it.

But more importantly, the theme of hope against adversity resonated with me then. This is a more personal reason than the above, but - as cliché as it might sound - that message really got to me in a moment where I needed it. It has been my personal #1 film ever since.


I can't argue when people have personal connections with films, because I have some really weird ones myself.

To me, even seeing the movie without a literal reading, it just didn't click for me. I'm basically a champion of films that promote optimism and I tend to have a negative reaction to films that skew the opposite direction (artificially cynical/pessimistic), but there was something about the way that the plot progressed that didn't work.

I think it comes down to the fact that I am very resistant to films where I feel manipulated. I know, intellectually, that all films are manipulative. But in a good film you aren't overly aware of that fact. I constantly felt in Shawshank Redemption that emotions were being pushed at me. That created a vibe of artificiality that kept me from connecting with the film on a genuine level.


Thu Aug 02, 2018 10:54 am
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Can we all just agree that if Red opened the box to find Andy's murder weapon, it would have been a far more satisfying ending to The Shawshank Redemption? That ending would actually confirm that human beings are far more complicated and contradictory than they appear as compared with what the finished film would have us believe, which is that good people are good and will always appear good at all times, even if they're framed as bad.

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Thu Aug 02, 2018 11:01 am
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BL wrote:
Can we all just agree that if Red opened the box to find Andy's murder weapon, it would have been a far more satisfying ending to The Shawshank Redemption? That ending would actually confirm that human beings are far more complicated and contradictory than they appear as compared with what the finished film would have us believe, which is that good people are good and will always appear good at all times, even if they're framed as bad.


I actually thought that was how it was going to end and one person I was watching with said "Oh, my God, is his gun going to be in there?!" It would also raise more questions about what it means to be "redeemed" or even what it means when we say that we want justice. Andy, falsely accused, clearly does not deserve to be beaten or assaulted. Would we feel differently about that if he were guilty of his crime? We know that Red is guilty, so are we okay with
him also ending up on the paradise-like beach
?

Again, it's not bad. Just a bit too easy.


Thu Aug 02, 2018 11:46 am
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crumbsroom wrote:

Ha! I was totally Corey Feldman's character at 13 years old, so it was pretty easy for me to relate (and to wince in reflection)

Stand By Me is far from a realistic movie. It is certainly filtered through not only boomer nostalgia, but just nostalgia for teenage years in general (and, yeah, probably more the kinds of teens who smoke cigarettes and look for dead bodies, again, something I could relate to with my group of friends). I don't think it's a necessarily a great movie, but I have maintained a fondness for it all these years later.

Also, I don't really have the same backlash towards Boomers making films that revel in their teenage years. There are no shortage of films that do this for the 70's, 80's, 90's and undoubtedly, will soon to do for the oughts. No reason to parse between them. They are all essentially the same thing, regardless of the decade.

I'm totally with you on Shawshank though. A big whatever to that one.

I cannot fathom how someone can like the former and not think much of the latter. Stand By Me is such soft-focus, nostalgic bullshit I just wanna punch the whole generation in their fucking selfish, world-ruining face.
And then Shawshank's a good movie.


Thu Aug 02, 2018 1:35 pm
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Captain Terror wrote:
Be advised that 13 y.o. Capt. Terror is secretly judging you right now.

I mildly disagree here because the Boomers always seemed to be way more smug and self-congratulatory about it. While something like That 70s Show celebrated the good stuff but also mocked the cheesy stuff, the Boomers rarely seemed willing to acknowledge their own foibles. Sure, you gave us the Beatles but somebody was buying Archies records. So yeah, every generation has done it but the Boomers really Steve Bannon-ed it in the 80s. (Did I do that right, Rock?) It could just be that I was a teenager at the time so listening to old folks reminisce (including my parents which is probably significant) was extra annoying as a result.

Oh my god, you did it SO right.


Thu Aug 02, 2018 1:37 pm
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Takoma1 wrote:
I just feel like it's a solid 7/10 film. What is great about it? I see plenty of "fine" or "good" elements to it, but nothing that makes me think that it belongs on any kind of best of all time list. Seeing it at the top of the IMDb 250 just baffles me. Better than Brief Encounter? Better than Seven Samurai?

Yeah, but the IMDB list is total fucking bullshit and we all know it.
Does it belong in the same conversation with Kurosawa? Of course not, who's even fucking saying that?
But was it better than Forrest Gump, I'm not even gonna wait, of fucking course it was, so Gump shoulda come in 3rd AT BEST.
Y'all gotta realize that there's hype about Shawshank now, but when it came out NOBODY SAW IT. I wandered into it after stepping out of some other movie in the the theater that didn't satisfy me, bought a fucking ticket cause I'm not a goddamn reprobate, and sat down to watch a movie I had never even seen a trailer for.
And I got Shawshank.
So yeah, it's a pretty damn good movie. You compare it, and I ain't talking to you, specifically here, Tak, just in general, you compare it to other movies of that tone and it totally holds up.
Would I tell anyone it was one of the 100 best movies ever. Of course not. That would be insane. But people shouldn't let latter-day hype determine how they feel about a film. It's at least an 8 as a film any day of the week and twice on Sunday and I might even argue that it's not a Great Film but is right on the border.


Thu Aug 02, 2018 1:44 pm
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Captain Terror wrote:
My thoughts exactly. Forget Seven Samurai, I didn't even think it was significantly better than The Green Mile.

Dude, The Green Mile was shit. Don't even. :P


Thu Aug 02, 2018 1:44 pm
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Takoma1 wrote:

I actually thought that was how it was going to end and one person I was watching with said "Oh, my God, is his gun going to be in there?!" It would also raise more questions about what it means to be "redeemed" or even what it means when we say that we want justice. Andy, falsely accused, clearly does not deserve to be beaten or assaulted. Would we feel differently about that if he were guilty of his crime? We know that Red is guilty, so are we okay with
him also ending up on the paradise-like beach
?

Again, it's not bad. Just a bit too easy.

After 40 years in prison? When he was just a stupid kid when the crime happened? Yes, I am totally the guy who is ok with that, and I think our country should be moving that way, despite what our current government may feel.


Thu Aug 02, 2018 1:48 pm
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Wooley wrote:
It's at least an 8 as a film any day of the week and twice on Sunday


For me it's a 6.5/10

Definitely 13/20 on Sundays though.


Thu Aug 02, 2018 1:51 pm
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Wooley wrote:
After 40 years in prison? When he was just a stupid kid when the crime happened? Yes, I am totally the guy who is ok with that, and I think our country should be moving that way, despite what our current government may feel.


What I'm asking is
what it means to be "redeemed". Because with the two main characters the film doesn't give us any choices other than "was innocent the whole time, actually" or "spent 40 years in prison." This is why I think it would be more powerful if it turned out that Andy was guilty, because then the film would actually question what it means to rehabilitate someone. The idea that sitting in a cage for 10 or 20 or 40 years makes someone rehabilitated is totally wrong-headed, to my mind. I mean, the Red we meet at the beginning of their story isn't that much different from who he is 20 years later--was he "redeemed" at that point?


Thu Aug 02, 2018 10:41 pm
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crumbsroom wrote:

For me it's a 6.5/10

Definitely 13/20 on Sundays though.

Ha!


Fri Aug 03, 2018 12:18 am
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Takoma1 wrote:

What I'm asking is
what it means to be "redeemed". Because with the two main characters the film doesn't give us any choices other than "was innocent the whole time, actually" or "spent 40 years in prison." This is why I think it would be more powerful if it turned out that Andy was guilty, because then the film would actually question what it means to rehabilitate someone. The idea that sitting in a cage for 10 or 20 or 40 years makes someone rehabilitated is totally wrong-headed, to my mind. I mean, the Red we meet at the beginning of their story isn't that much different from who he is 20 years later--was he "redeemed" at that point?

I hear what you're saying, but that isn't the story. It is the story of an innocent man imprisoned for 20 years or whatever. That is the main point of the entire story.


Fri Aug 03, 2018 12:19 am
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Takoma1 wrote:
What I'm asking is
what it means to be "redeemed". Because with the two main characters the film doesn't give us any choices other than "was innocent the whole time, actually" or "spent 40 years in prison." This is why I think it would be more powerful if it turned out that Andy was guilty, because then the film would actually question what it means to rehabilitate someone. The idea that sitting in a cage for 10 or 20 or 40 years makes someone rehabilitated is totally wrong-headed, to my mind. I mean, the Red we meet at the beginning of their story isn't that much different from who he is 20 years later--was he "redeemed" at that point?


I disagree about Red. I mean, sure, he isn't a bad person per se, but the Red from the beginning of the film is quite different from the Red from the end of the film. It's not the traditional transition of a "hardened" criminal into a good person, but rather something more psychological and emotional. From a man that had lost all hope and was en route to become a shell, to a man that craves another chance at life. Red's redemption comes by the way of realizing that he can't change his past and the mistake he made, but he can do something about his future instead of just letting himself rot in prison. And with this, I don't mean necessarily getting out of prison, but that ends up being a result of his change.

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Fri Aug 03, 2018 12:48 am
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Wooley wrote:
I hear what you're saying, but that isn't the story. It is the story of an innocent man imprisoned for 20 years or whatever. That is the main point of the entire story.


I would say the main point of the story is about never losing hope, despite the adversity. If you see the film from the perspective of Red, and see him as the real protagonist of the story, that's what they're getting at. The prison and the 20+ years are just the circumstances that can prevent these men from losing hope. Red was en route to that, but Andy never did. Andy's imprisonment is the catalyst for Red's story, and it is through this attitude and friendship that his vision of life changes. He is the one with the story arc, not Andy.

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Fri Aug 03, 2018 12:56 am
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Takoma1 wrote:

What I'm asking is
what it means to be "redeemed". Because with the two main characters the film doesn't give us any choices other than "was innocent the whole time, actually" or "spent 40 years in prison." This is why I think it would be more powerful if it turned out that Andy was guilty, because then the film would actually question what it means to rehabilitate someone. The idea that sitting in a cage for 10 or 20 or 40 years makes someone rehabilitated is totally wrong-headed, to my mind. I mean, the Red we meet at the beginning of their story isn't that much different from who he is 20 years later--was he "redeemed" at that point?



But he is different. When he sees Brooks' message carved into the joist at the halfway house, and he realizes Andy was right about having hope. In the beginning Red was just going through the motions, but had no hope for the future. Andy gave him hope that things could get better. After he's released he realizes he doesn't want to end up at the end of a rope like Brooks because he can't handle the outside world, but he also realizes hope DOES exist.

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Fri Aug 03, 2018 4:01 am
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Post Re: We Didn't Start The 80s

Thief wrote:

I would say the main point of the story is about never losing hope, despite the adversity. If you see the film from the perspective of Red, and see him as the real protagonist of the story, that's what they're getting at. The prison and the 20+ years are just the circumstances that can prevent these men from losing hope. Red was en route to that, but Andy never did. Andy's imprisonment is the catalyst for Red's story, and it is through this attitude and friendship that his vision of life changes. He is the one with the story arc, not Andy.

I meant narratively, not thematically.


Fri Aug 03, 2018 5:02 am
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Wooley wrote:
I hear what you're saying, but that isn't the story. It is the story of an innocent man imprisoned for 20 years or whatever. That is the main point of the entire story.


I get that. I'm just saying that I think the story lacks a bit of complexity from where I stand. When I think about justice and hope and redemption, there's such depth that can be explored and I think the film takes a simpler route.

And that's not to knock simple stories. I think the movie probably told exactly the story it wanted to tell. But I never felt anything profound watching it, anything to push it from decent/good to great.


Fri Aug 03, 2018 5:24 am
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Post Re: We Didn't Start The 80s

Pretty sure Shawshank wasn't made in the 80s.


Fri Aug 03, 2018 11:01 am
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Post Re: We Didn't Start The 80s

MISERY (1990)

I liked this one but I kind of feel like it would've been better as a 45-minute episode of a TV show like Tales From the Crypt or something. It's a simple story and I felt like a couple of scenes were redundant in getting their point across. Still, Caan and Bates were both good and the story is fun. Funny how relevant this film/story is now, given the hundreds of Annie Wilkeses that can be found online. Rian Johnson is just one car accident away from being "hobbled".

And I'm gonna end my Rob Reiner project here unless someone can convince me that A Few Good Men is essential viewing. I'm eager to move on to the next thing.

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Sat Aug 04, 2018 11:34 am
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Captain Terror wrote:
MISERY (1990)

I liked this one but I kind of feel like it would've been better as a 45-minute episode of a TV show like Tales From the Crypt or something. It's a simple story and I felt like a couple of scenes were redundant in getting their point across. Still, Caan and Bates were both good and the story is fun. Funny how relevant this film/story is now, given the hundreds of Annie Wilkeses that can be found online. Rian Johnson is just one car accident away from being "hobbled".

And I'm gonna end my Rob Reiner project here unless someone can convince me that A Few Good Men is essential viewing. I'm eager to move on to the next thing.


You don't need to watch A Few Good Men.


Sat Aug 04, 2018 11:44 am
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You can't handle A Few Good Men!

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Sat Aug 04, 2018 11:45 am
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Captain Terror wrote:
MISERY (1990)

I liked this one but I kind of feel like it would've been better as a 45-minute episode of a TV show like Tales From the Crypt or something.

I've always felt this way about the book, in that it would have been a fantastic short story or novella, but in book-length, for me, it gets very repetitive, especially in the back-half. In that way, I thought the film did an admirable job in pacing out a lot of that repetition.


Sat Aug 04, 2018 11:53 am
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Captain Terror wrote:
MISERY (1990)

I liked this one but I kind of feel like it would've been better as a 45-minute episode of a TV show like Tales From the Crypt or something. It's a simple story and I felt like a couple of scenes were redundant in getting their point across. Still, Caan and Bates were both good and the story is fun. Funny how relevant this film/story is now, given the hundreds of Annie Wilkeses that can be found online. Rian Johnson is just one car accident away from being "hobbled".

And I'm gonna end my Rob Reiner project here unless someone can convince me that A Few Good Men is essential viewing. I'm eager to move on to the next thing.

I've always felt A Few Good Men was totally competent mainstream pop-filmmaking, and as good as most Cruise movies.


Sat Aug 04, 2018 12:11 pm
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Captain Terror wrote:
MISERY (1990)

I liked this one but I kind of feel like it would've been better as a 45-minute episode of a TV show like Tales From the Crypt or something. It's a simple story and I felt like a couple of scenes were redundant in getting their point across. Still, Caan and Bates were both good and the story is fun. Funny how relevant this film/story is now, given the hundreds of Annie Wilkeses that can be found online. Rian Johnson is just one car accident away from being "hobbled".

But he didn't get outta the cock-a-doody CAR!


Sat Aug 04, 2018 12:11 pm
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Wooley wrote:
I've always felt A Few Good Men was totally competent mainstream pop-filmmaking, and as good as most Cruise movies.


Exactly. You took the words out of my mouth.


Sat Aug 04, 2018 12:13 pm
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As somebody who has spent a considerable amount of time observing courtroom proceedings, I can't accept Nicholson's testimony in A Few Good Men as anything but the laziest screenwriting imaginable. That level of self-incrimination would've been embarrassing in an episode of Perry Mason. It's an interesting movie that just shits the bed in the third act.

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Sat Aug 04, 2018 12:20 pm
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Post Re: We Didn't Start The 80s

Jinnistan wrote:
Pretty sure Shawshank wasn't made in the 80s.


Nobody said it was.

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Sat Aug 04, 2018 12:36 pm
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