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 Stu Presents: A History Of New Hollywood! 
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Oxnard Montalvo wrote:
for real though, I hope you at least find time for official Corrierino zeitgeist film Nashville. though I don't know if I would pick it as The Film of 1975 when we are more living in a post-Jaws Hollywood than a post-Nashville one.

I do love that film, as I do with all Altman movies. I badly need to watch it again.


Tue Sep 11, 2018 6:26 pm
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I'm pretty sure MASH is where he invents the overlapping dialogue, Im not the biggest Altman fan but some of his stuff is masterpiece level, he's fun to dig through, you should prioritize his stuff whenever you can

Im glad you went with this over Patton which really shouldnt be considered New Hollywood at all, it was very very establishment and bigbudget studio war movie ala Longest Day and in development before any New Hollywoods were hits (and Coppola was trying to be establishment at the time, eg Finian's Rainbow)

Oscars might be a bad way to choose New Hollywood ones, theres def crossover later as studios follow the hits and certain directors and producers and stars form a new establishment, but I think you'll find more interesting movies and a better sense of the history if you dont take Oscars into consideration

echoing others: great thread and glad to raed another entry, can't wait for next one!


Thu Sep 13, 2018 1:19 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
I'd recommend it, but it may be a bit more off-putting. In its way, it's even more anarchic than MASH (although a bit more forgiving on Sally Kellerman), and the humor veers from very silly to disturbingly weird. It's also outdated in may ways, but I think it's a special film. (And a great double feature with Harold & Maude if you're still considering a 1971 entry.)


It's really much more than that though. It's been said that Easy Rider proved that Jack Nicholson was a star, but Five Easy Pieces proved he was a great actor. Pretty much everything Jack did between 1970-1975 is worthwhile, but 5EP is on the shortlist of his personal best.


Growing up with MASH being a staple of the TV week, to the point where the theme music is immediately relatable (like Taxi, Barney Miller, Kotter, Rockford Files), it was quite a revelation once we found out what the lyrics were about.
I made my choice for '71 some time ago, and I'm afraid it's not Harold And Maude, but I'll keep that double feature idea in mind! I'll also see about going back and finishing 5EP some time, since I really am interested in checking out some more early Nicholson performances. And regarding "Suicide Is Painless", I was very amused to discover this little tidbit in my research on M*A*S*H: "According to Johnny Mandel and Robert Altman, the film's famous theme song was intended to be the "stupidest song ever written". After attempting to write the lyrics himself, Altman said he found it too difficult to write "dumb enough", and instead gave to the task to his fourteen-year-old son, Mike, who allegedly wrote the lyrics in five minutes. Because of its inclusion in the subsequent television series, he continued to get residuals throughout its run and syndication. Robert was paid seventy-five thousand dollars for directing, but his son eventually made about two million dollars in song royalties."

:D
Oxnard Montalvo wrote:
as a reward for being honest with your lack of exposure to Altman, I am now going to bully you mercilessly.

I do agree with M*A*S*H as the movie of 1970 though in tandem with Patton, the movie of choice for the other half of the country. remember a time when real men were allowed to fight the good fight without letting themselves be handcuffed by a bunch of bleeding hearts and moral relativists? (heck, it was apparently Nixon's favorite movie according to Woodward and Bernstein)
It's been a while since I last watched Patton, but I remember the infamous slapping-the-soldier scene being extremely drawn-out and uncomfortable to watch, which, along with the "Americans have never lost, and will never lose a war" line which might have been intended as some ironic commentary on the war we were losing at the time (a 1970's-era Coppola WAS one of the film's co-writers, after all) lead me to believe that the film isn't quite as pro-war as some think it is. But, like I said, it's been a while.
Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Another one I haven't seen. Dang it. However, just wanted to chime in that I'm really enjoying this thread so far.
Thanks 8-)
Joss Whedon wrote:
You better be talking about Skidoo, I won't tolerate your friendship if you don't
What the hell's Skidoo?
Oxnard Montalvo wrote:
for real though, I hope you at least find time for official Corrierino zeitgeist film Nashville. though I don't know if I would pick it as The Film of 1975 when we are more living in a post-Jaws Hollywood than a post-Nashville one.
Nashville's the Altman I want to watch the most next, along with McCabe And Mrs. Miller, when I can find the time.
wigwam wrote:
I'm pretty sure MASH is where he invents the overlapping dialogue, Im not the biggest Altman fan but some of his stuff is masterpiece level, he's fun to dig through, you should prioritize his stuff whenever you can

Im glad you went with this over Patton which really shouldnt be considered New Hollywood at all, it was very very establishment and bigbudget studio war movie ala Longest Day and in development before any New Hollywoods were hits (and Coppola was trying to be establishment at the time, eg Finian's Rainbow)

Oscars might be a bad way to choose New Hollywood ones, theres def crossover later as studios follow the hits and certain directors and producers and stars form a new establishment, but I think you'll find more interesting movies and a better sense of the history if you dont take Oscars into consideration

echoing others: great thread and glad to raed another entry, can't wait for next one!
Thanks!

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Sat Sep 15, 2018 12:22 pm
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Stu wrote:
What the hell's Skidoo?

The supper-club generation in Hollywood (Jackie Gleason, Groucho Marx, Mickey Rooney, Frankie Avalon, Peter Lawford, at least three Batman villains, etc) discover LSD and have a swinging old time at sea.


Sat Sep 15, 2018 12:29 pm
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Jinnistan wrote:
The supper-club generation in Hollywood (Jackie Gleason, Groucho Marx, Mickey Rooney, Frankie Avalon, Peter Lawford, at least three Batman villains, etc) discover LSD and have a swinging old time at sea.
Sounds amazing, really.

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Sat Sep 15, 2018 12:34 pm
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Stu wrote:
Sounds amazing, really.

Oh, it's groovy, man. And happening.


Sat Sep 15, 2018 12:35 pm
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Stu wrote:
It's been a while since I last watched Patton, but I remember the infamous slapping-the-soldier scene being extremely drawn-out and uncomfortable to watch, which, along with the "Americans have never lost, and will never lose a war" line which might have been intended as some ironic commentary on the war we were losing at the time (a 1970's-era Coppola WAS one of the film's co-writers, after all) lead me to believe that the film isn't quite as pro-war as some think it is. But, like I said, it's been a while.


like Truffaut says about anti-war movies.... (yadda yadda yadda you know what I'm going to say)

also, here is some more on Skidoo. it's one unique cultural artifact for sure.
http://www.reverseshot.org/symposiums/entry/969/skidoo


Sat Sep 15, 2018 12:51 pm
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Stu wrote:
Nashville's the Altman I want to watch the most next, along with McCabe And Mrs. Miller, when I can find the time.

I really liked McCabe and Mrs. Miller. A lot.


Sat Sep 15, 2018 1:10 pm
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Oxnard Montalvo wrote:
also, here is some more on Skidoo. it's one unique cultural artifact for sure.
http://www.reverseshot.org/symposiums/entry/969/skidoo

Why do people still shit on Popeye?


Sat Sep 15, 2018 1:13 pm
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Jinnistan wrote:
Why do people still shit on Popeye?

Yeah, I thought that movie had long ago been vindicated.


Sun Sep 16, 2018 12:50 pm
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