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 The Berlin School and Beyond 
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B-Side wrote:
Not really a German film, though. Isn't part of the Berlin School framework mean the films are German and not just directed by a German, or does it not really matter? I mean, I wouldn't call Dave Matthews' music African, even though he's from South Africa.

It's really more about the approach than the setting or the language. At least, that's the impression I get. Marseille was shot in France and is mostly in French, for example, but it's still considered a German film and an integral entry to the Berlin School. Granted, its director is something of a founding figure, but still, I don't think such variables should really matter. That said, I am yet to see Sleeping Sickness.

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Tue Apr 16, 2013 2:10 am
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One might be forgiven for deducing from the mere title of Thomas Durchschlag's Allein (Alone) that the film slides neatly among others of the Berlin School, displaying similar aspects of isolation or reduced aesthetics. Unfortunately, this isn't quite the case. The solitudinous title refers primarily to the the syndrome held by the film's protagonist, Maria, a student living in Essen who suffers from borderline personality disorder. While one of the more prominent features of the Berlin School is that its films concern predominantly normal people living out normal existences in a normal setting who then have that all torn suddenly and sometimes irreparably apart, here Durchschlag is more concerned with Maria's "abnormality": her prevailing self-loathing, and how this affects the relationships she attempts to build or maintain. To its credit, Allein doesn't attempt to define nor to offer any explanation for said disorder; "I'm a little different from the others", is all Maria manages to utter in her suppressed attempt at some kind of confession, before finishing, rather sheepishly: "I'm much, much prettier." There are highs and there are lows in her life, perhaps more of the latter than the former, and the self-destruction is presented in many different forms, yet nothing is really concluded here. Ultimately, however, the film cannot seem to help but wander into clichéd territory: scenes of self-harm, violent sexual escapades, occasional poorly-acted emotional outbursts, and all with the same heavy, bumbling piano track that one supposes is employed to represent the melancholy aspects of Maria's inner anguish.
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Tue Apr 16, 2013 3:03 am
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
But all the stories are shadowed by past loves, lost opportunities, illness, absence, death—and then the empty hallways, suddenly bereft of their bustling crowds, a glancing allusion to a sad new world story.

Beautifully put.

I watched this last night. Just gathering my thoughts before replying in detail!

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Tue Apr 16, 2013 3:19 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
Quick, someone write something Berlin-related so I can reply to Maiden without posting for a fourth successive time.

Bloody Germans.

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Wed Apr 17, 2013 11:48 pm
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I watched Jerichow, and really enjoyed it. Once again, it feels really different from the rest of the Berlin School films I've watched.

JediMoonShyne wrote:
The sparseness, isolation; the loss of identity and belonging experienced by each of the characters - not just the foreigner, but also the natives - recalls the classical western, with its drifters and nomads and its overwhelming sense of suspicion.
Perfect! That’s exactly how it feels. I don’t really think he removed the lust, though. You’re probably right that their longing for escape and financial security is the stronger motivation, but there’s heat there, too. That scene in the dark hallway?! I found the whole film to be extraordinarily vivid and intense, though I’m not sure why. Is it the performances (which are excellent) or the faces (even better)? Or is it just unusually effective filmmaking? Maybe it has more to do with the focus charu mentions, the way the rest of the world is stripped away, leaving these characters exposed.

charulata wrote:
Also astounding is the way Petzold is able to allow us to occupy these characters' inner worlds and create emotional resonance while still maintaining this rigorous austere style.
This, too. I loved the way even the husband is given understanding and a surprising measure of dignity, at the end.


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Thu Apr 18, 2013 12:49 am
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
Orly is a small, oddly charming film involving several intertwining stories, ambitiously shot in an actual, crowded airport. The narrative elements are piecemeal, some vivid, some barely there, echoed in the half-lovely, half-mundane photography of real spaces and challenging lighting. For me, its strength is in the idea of storytelling itself, as the varied tales begin to coalesce into something more. There's the self-conscious history told to a new acquaintance, spiteful recollections used as weapon on a loved one, strange musings in a letter, comic moments from a novel, and one story told with no words at all; all loosely structured like a song-cycle, with recurring characters and the final scenes echoing the first. Of course, I loved the air of melancholy that prevails. My favorite story is the most incomplete and mournful of all, the wordless passage when the young man recognizes Sabine and is unexpectedly overwhelmed by memories. But all the stories are shadowed by past loves, lost opportunities, illness, absence, death—and then the empty hallways, suddenly bereft of their bustling crowds, a glancing allusion to a sad new world story.

Yes, "bookends" would be too strong a description, but I also liked how the final scenes echoed the earlier ones. Though, I do feel that in this case, unlike in Schanelec's others, the film could have benefited from a slightly more rigorous structure. I can appreciate your use of the term "song-cycle", but I'd have preferred some kind of strict poem-like structure rather than something so loose, and perhaps even with less of this tangential cutting to and from the airport.

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 1:12 am
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
Yes, "bookends" would be too strong a description, but I also liked how the final scenes echoed the earlier ones. Though, I do feel that in this case, unlike in Schanelec's others, the film could have benefited from a slightly more rigorous structure. I can appreciate your use of the term "song-cycle", but I'd have preferred some kind of strict poem-like structure rather than something so loose, and perhaps even with less of this tangential cutting to and from the airport.
Yeah, I was slightly confused/taken aback by the scenes outside the airport (not involving cab rides to and from). Why wasn't the Theo/Sabine phone call shown from Sabine's end? Obviously it makes Theo more prominent... But, yeah, I agree about the structure.

Where's elixir? He had something to say about this one.

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 1:34 am
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
I watched Jerichow, and really enjoyed it. Once again, it felt so different from the rest of the Berlin School films I've watched.

:) :fresh:

Shieldmaiden wrote:
I don’t really think he removed the lust, though. You’re probably right that their longing for escape and financial security is the stronger motivation, but there’s heat there, too. That scene in the dark hallway?!

I agree.. it's secondary perhaps but it's there. It's been a while since I watched it but isn't there also a scene where he's outside the house and they have a little quick tryst among the bushes or something? I recall something like that and in my memories, it's an incredibly tense and intense scene.

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This, too. I loved the way even the husband is given understanding and a surprising measure of dignity, at the end.

This.

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 1:48 am
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More danger than sex perhaps but it's still so intense.

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 2:00 am
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I watched Sleeping Sickness. It's quite fascinating, mostly for its content rather than its form, which is clean and efficient and nothing more.

Thankful for the switch in protagonist and all the fish-out-of-water interest it produces. Surreal ending with the hippo transformation...metaphor! The meaning is somewhat lost on me.

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 2:09 am
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Oh good! I'm writing something on that one now.

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 2:15 am
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Trip wrote:
Surreal ending with the hippo transformation...metaphor! The meaning is somewhat lost on me.

Spoilerer?

I did read something about the hippo part, though. How people have been likening it to Boonmee, but that it actually refers to a memory from the director's childhood:

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Animistic tales in my childhood in Africa played a major role: it was often said of particular village elders that they could turn into hippos. My father once took us children out in a canoe to watch hippos, completely underestimating the danger posed by these animals, even though the villagers had warned him. A few years after we left Vanga, an American medical student was killed in the river by the village by a hippopotamus and there were rumors that the head of the hospital had turned into a hippopotamus out of jealousy to kill this woman.

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 3:19 am
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
Spoilerer?

Nah.

Yeah, a hippo transformation myth is mentioned earlier in the film, setting it up. I didn't know Köhler comes from Africa. Gotta see his other films.

The doctor who transforms is at a bit of a crisis point, obviously, with this French doctor who, not unlike in the tale you just quoted, comes to Africa and poses a threat as per the doctor's position there. There's no murder, however! (At least not prior to the end) Yet his transformation has the weight of his inability to leave Africa for the roots he has established (new family, mainly) and his resentment of his German family and of European life. I suppose these characters act as symbols of nations (the old colonial France, the learned but anxious young Africa born of France) ultimately, but I have not read much into it. They are all doctors, after all, but their patient is the continent itself.

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 3:39 am
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Trip wrote:
The doctor who transforms is at a bit of a crisis point, obviously, with this French doctor who, not unlike in the tale you just quoted, comes to Africa and poses a threat as per the doctor's position there. There's no murder, however! (At least not prior to the end) Yet his transformation has the weight of his inability to leave Africa for the roots he has established (new family, mainly) and his resentment of his German family and of European life.

I think the point is someone else transformed into a hippo and killed Velten. His African wife or brother-in-law maybe? He wanted to leave Africa but didn't have the will power to do it on his own. It was said that he'd requested the evaluation himself, right?

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 3:59 am
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
I think the point is someone else transformed into a hippo and killed Velten. His African wife or brother-in-law maybe? He wanted to leave Africa but didn't have the will power to do it on his own. It was said that he'd requested the evaluation himself, right?

Oh, I didn't even think of this. It's true, we don't see him in the morning at all, and the hippo creeps out of the bush and into the water. I had assumed because of Velten's sudden craziness the previous night that it was him. Or the idea of becoming a local animal matched his being ingrained with the culture, you know? The two you mention are both sound suspects, not that there has to be one or that it has to be figured out lol. I've already forgotten the beef with the brother-in-law though. Anyway he was paying the family with the French funds I believe. He necessarily requested the evalution so he could continue paying for everything there (we gather mostly for luxuries since they have so few patients), not so much because he wanted another to act for him, though I agree he procrastinates out of not wanting his German family to know, and not wanting to let go of Africa. Did he want to go back to Europe as you say? I don't recall this. Anyway, having it be a suicide by way of requesting the evalution would make more sense had it been suggested the hippo was the black doctor, no? Wow, read that sentence I just typed, it is very silly.

I now want to watch it again.

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 4:23 am
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Ha, it does sound crazy. He knows he'll never get more funds if they evaluate him. He wasn't attempting bribery or anything. Someone (his sleazy French friend maybe?) definitely said he wanted the French government to pull him out because he couldn't do it himself. I think he was going to be miserable either way, but that the whole African situation had become unbearable to him.

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 4:33 am
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Ah, fair enough. I just keep thinking of a scene where he and the black doctor talk about what his report could mean and he seemed at least somewhat hopeful, not to me fully knowing and having orchestrated it to go the other way. Though you are correct about his not attempting to bribe. What matters is as you say, he'd be miserable either way.

Also, Claire Denis called, she wants her opening credits back.

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 4:40 am
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Trip wrote:
Also, Claire Denis called, she wants her opening credits back.
Yes, I saw that! The whole film is much more Denis than Joe. I can see his enthusiasm for the latter in the extremely white, sterile city French hospital, made to contrast with the jungle hospitals in Cameroon, but that's as far as it goes. There's no atmospheric magic using sound or light.

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 4:41 am
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Angela Schanelec's second feature set outside Germany, Orly, takes place in the bustling Parisian airport of the same name, and further develops this aforementioned and integral Berlin School trait of spiritual solitude and isolation by applying them, rather ambitiously, to a crowded environment. In doing so, Schanelec quite consciously refuses to drown out said environment so as to dwell on the oddly intimate dialogues shared between strangers, but instead makes us even more aware of it. Each frame and prolonged static take is a veritable hive of activity, with figures criss-crossing the foreground and background, yet this never seems to distract from the conversations, expressions and body language that we are invited to follow. Neither does the strong and pervading ambient noise, which one would almost expect to overwhelm in such a situation, but the snatched, disembodied sentences that occur off-screen only seem to allow us to concentrate more fully upon the words we are supposed to hear - similar to how the aural buzz of a classroom encourages application and realisation. And it is only with the ultimate emptying of the environment that we are able to appreciate this. With Orly, then, Schanelec proves that a given setting, be it the urban inner-city or its rural outskirts, matters very little in the context of the Berlin School. It is not where these things occur as much as it is how they occur; how people react to one another and their surroundings, particularly the space around them. Especially here, in such a cluttered and animated environment, where space comes at a premium.
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Thu Apr 18, 2013 4:59 am
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
Yes, I saw that! The whole film is much more Denis than Joe. I can see his enthusiasm for the latter in the extremely white, sterile city French hospital, made to contrast with the jungle hospitals in Cameroon, but that's as far as it goes.

There's only a hint of such a contrast.
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There's no atmospheric magic using sound or light.

Agreed. Too German for all that. :shifty:

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 5:02 am
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By the way, this thread has proven to be a terrific idea, Jedi. A home for all this stuff, it's helpful.

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 5:07 am
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Sleeping Sickness is an intriguing story of two French doctors in Africa, the first of whom gets pulled deeper and deeper into Africa almost against his will (like contracting a disease), while the second serves as a clear-eyed witness to the other's crisis of conscience. Velten starts out fighting the endemic corruption alongside the disease he specializes in, but, as soon as his family is out of the way, finds himself unable to resist various temptations. Nzila, the doctor sent three years later to find out what has happened to Velten, is of African descent, which opens up new layers of cultural contrasts. After facing some cartoonish racism from his white colleagues in France, he arrives in Africa as an almost comical fish-out-of-water, thoroughly confusing the Cameroon natives. Pierre Bokma is outstanding as the conflicted Velten, who seems miserable, but trapped, unable to take any kind of decisive action himself. I also loved the night scenes, where the darkness is so complete Nzila sleeps with his head-band flashlight on, and the mysterious jungle wraps around the night-hunters like an embrace.

I've run into this idea of language/cultural barriers in so many of these Berlin School films now: Sleeping Sickness, Jerichow, Marseille, The Days Between. And it's at least touched on in Passing Summer, Everyone Else, Madonnen, and Orly. It’s obviously a very common issue in Europe (and the world) right now, so I don't know how big a deal to make of it here. But, it seems to fit neatly into the overarching themes of identity and belonging I've seen in these films. In a global economy where people can slip in and out of place and language so easily, do they lose their connections to their origins? And what difference does it make if they want to or not?


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Thu Apr 18, 2013 5:53 am
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Some catching up...
charulata wrote:
I agree.. it's secondary perhaps but it's there. It's been a while since I watched it but isn't there also a scene where he's outside the house and they have a little quick tryst among the bushes or something? I recall something like that and in my memories, it's an incredibly tense and intense scene.
Yeah, that was a great tense scene. Not as steamy as the hallway one though. Jedi must have slept through that one.

Trip wrote:
There's only a hint of such a contrast.
Oh, definitely. But, based on that interview Jedi quoted, it's obviously deliberate.

Trip wrote:
By the way, this thread has proven to be a terrific idea, Jedi. A home for all this stuff, it's helpful.
So, so seconded! Helpful and fun. :)

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 9:06 am
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This thread has had the unintended side-effect of making me want to hunt down Sandie Shaw records.

oh, and I liked Something to Remind Me a ton. Warm film, even at its cruelest.


Thu Apr 18, 2013 3:52 pm
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
Perfect! That’s exactly how it feels. I don’t really think he removed the lust, though. You’re probably right that their longing for escape and financial security is the stronger motivation, but there’s heat there, too. That scene in the dark hallway?!

There's certainly moments of shared lust, I think, but it's typically diffused fairly quickly. That scene in the hallway, where the husband is passed out on the bed mere feet away, is the perfect example: it should be sexual and dangerous and exciting, yet instead it seems almost anti-climactic. I often found myself, where a good thing or not, comparing Jerichow to not only Garnett's Postman but also Double Indemnity while watching it. If you think of the constant flirting, the risque exposure of skin, that kind of thing. There's a lot of heat in these films, meaning that while money is a huge influence upon the decisions made by these characters, so is sex. In Jerichow, I just don't think that's the case.

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 5:30 pm
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Trip wrote:
By the way, this thread has proven to be a terrific idea, Jedi. A home for all this stuff, it's helpful.

Only thanks to the contributions of all involved!

It is nice to have it all in one place, though. :heart:

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 5:31 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
There's a lot of heat in these films, meaning that while money is a huge influence upon the decisions made by these characters, so is sex. In Jerichow, I just don't think that's the case.
Aw. I think I like sex scenes to be like real life, not "the movies." And my real life is nothing like Double Indemnity. :P

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Thu Apr 18, 2013 9:30 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
It is not where these things occur as much as it is how they occur; how people react to one another and their surroundings, particularly the space around them. Especially here, in such a cluttered and animated environment, where space comes at a premium.

Schanelec on Spaces -

http://www.cine-fils.com/interviews/ang ... nelec.html

Also, Köhler's picks for the 2012 Sight & Sound poll -

Quote:
Blissfully Yours | 2002 | Apichatpong Weerasethakul
Close-Up | 1989 | Abbas Kiarostami
D'est | 1993 | Chantal Akerman
In a Year of 13 Moons | 1978 | Rainer Werner Fassbinder
Last Movie, The | 1971 | Dennis Hopper
Opening Night | 1977 | John Cassavetes
Passenger, The | 1974 | Michelangelo Antonioni
Sunrise | 1927 | F. W. Murnau
Two or Three Things I Know About Her… | 1967 | Jean-Luc Godard
When a Woman Ascends the Stairs | 1960 | Naruse Mikio

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Fri Apr 19, 2013 6:05 pm
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naru naru

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Fri Apr 19, 2013 6:39 pm
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Despite its local references, I have more often seen Christian Petzold, Domink Graf and Christoph Hochhäusler's Dreileben trilogy compared to the British Red Riding series commissioned by Channel 4 in 2009, and, to be honest, it's a logical reference point to start from. Both sets of films were initially made for television, with an overlapping narrative centering on a manhunt, though diverge in their respective time frames, with Red Riding unfolding over the course of a decade and Dreileben re-telling much of the same small period from three very different perspectives. The one consistent here is of course the location: Thuringia, its dense forests and damp caves, and all the mythological folklore that the setting evokes - the tale of Ondine, for example, about the water nymph who bears a mortal man's child. It is a setting perhaps more consciously and successfully integrated into the trilogy's bookends, with Petzold's watery elements and Hochhäusler's oppressive woodland, but Graf's connecting piece remains for me the standout. One should recall here that it was Graf whose initial criticism of his Berlin School colleagues of cold-blooded formalism actually sparked the email debate (later published in Revolver magazine; very much the official publication of the Berliner Schule) which ultimately led to the production of Dreileben. Here, the older Graf is clearly the more formally playful of the three, pushing aside the main narrative in favour of a quiet, at times even Rohmerian drama that flat-out refuses the genre ideas that appear to have inspired much of the rest of the trilogy. All of which he shoots on grainy 16mm, unlike the digital used by his counterparts, employing occasional aesthetic eccentricities such as violent sideways pans and sporadic but welcome moments of wordy humour so as to stave off both the morbid and the maudlin.
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Sat Apr 20, 2013 7:00 pm
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Graf's is also the most inexplicable and baffling.

Weigh in on Sleeping Sickness already.

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Sat Apr 20, 2013 11:18 pm
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Trip wrote:
Graf's is also the most inexplicable and baffling.

Weigh in on Sleeping Sickness already.

Isn't that the same thing? :P

It's really grown on me, Graf's segment. Petzold's is probably a better representative of the Berlin School, but Graf's is more layered, and works just as well as a chamber piece. Neither really need nor rely on the manhunt arc, to be honest. You mentioned before that Graf's is murky, and I agree: a lot of stuff is left unanswered. The whole rediscovering of one's past that the two women go through upon stirring old memories, for example, and the coincidence that they both come to realise, is a confusing little tangent. Though, I do love how Graf almost distractedly unravels this story about the photo and mysterious ex-boyfriend, only to take it nowhere in particular.

And sooooon. I liked it, if you're looking for a preview!

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 3:01 am
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
Also, Köhler's picks for the 2012 Sight & Sound poll
Mmm. I like him.

JediMoonShyne wrote:
Here, the older Graf is clearly the more formally playful of the three, pushing aside the main narrative in favour of a quiet, at times even Rohmerian drama that flat-out refuses the genre ideas that appear to have inspired much of the rest of the trilogy. All of which he shoots on grainy 16mm, unlike the digital used by his counterparts, employing occasional aesthetic eccentricities such as violent sideways pans and sporadic but welcome moments of wordy humour so as to stave off both the morbid and the maudlin.
Intriguing. We haven't even talked about Graf yet in this thread, have we? Has anyone seen A Map of the Heart?

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 3:21 am
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
We haven't even talked about Graf yet in this thread, have we? Has anyone seen A Map of the Heart?

No and no.. but Graf represents the antecedent to this movement, I think? No value judgment here, mind.. just that his approach is apparently more classical?

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 3:24 am
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
Intriguing. We haven't even talked about Graf yet in this thread, have we? Has anyone seen A Map of the Heart?

Not yet, but I have it downloaded! Is he considered part of the Berlin School, though? From what I've read, he's mostly done TV stuff, so I've no idea.

Either way, I'm now very much looking forward to Arslan's In the Shadows and Heisenberg's The Robber, which seem to relate in their reworking of genre.

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 3:26 am
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I really want to see Graf's In the Face of the Crime.


Sun Apr 21, 2013 3:36 am
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It is perhaps to be expected, given all the former and part-time critics and academics in its midst, that the evolution of the Berlin School—and it has evolved, in more tangible and interesting ways than most so-called movements—rests on an interplay between theory and practice, a compulsion among its affiliates both to discuss and to demonstrate what it means to make films in and about Germany today. If the Berlin School’s house style—cool, precise, observational—was positioned as a reaction to mainstream storytelling conventions, the recent move toward genre experimentation, with an embrace of more robust narratives and more expansive emotions, seems partly a reaction to the marginalization of the early films.

Hmm.

Also, this poster is so Joe, but what was with that music over the end credits?

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 3:43 am
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
Also, this poster is so Joe, but what was with that music over the end credits?
It was Art of Noise, right? Why? Köhler is old enough to remember them!

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 3:52 am
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
It was Art of Noise, right? Why? Köhler is old enough to remember them!

It was?

Seemed so out of place, no?

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 4:10 am
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I remember Sleeping Sickness being ok. Solid but nothing really struck me... some of it seemed too derivative (of Weerasethakul, of Denis etc).

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 5:36 am
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
Mmm. I like him.

I know, right? :D

To compare, picks from other Berlin School figures:

Quote:
Valeska Grisebach

Au Hasard Balthazar | 1966 | Robert Bresson
Beau Travail | 1998 | Claire Denis
eclisse, L' | 1962 | Michelangelo Antonioni
Last Picture Show, The | 1971 | Peter Bogdanovich
Melancolia | 2008 | Lav Díaz
Enfance nue, L' | 1969 | Maurice Pialat
People on Sunday | 1930 | Curt Siodmak/Robert Siodmak/Edgar G. Ulmer/Fred Zinnemann
Real Young Lady, A | 2000 | Catherine Breillat
Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives | 2010 | Apichatpong Weerasethakul
Woman of the Dunes | 1964 | Teshigahara Hiroshi
Quote:
Christoph Hochhäusler

Andrei Rublev | 1966 | Andrei Tarkovsky
eclisse, L' | 1962 | Michelangelo Antonioni
Godfather: Part I, The | 1972 | Francis Ford Coppola
Grapes of Wrath, The | 1940 | John Ford
M | 1931 | Fritz Lang
Ossessione | 1943 | Luchino Visconti
Règle du jeu, La | 1939 | Jean Renoir
Tropical Malady | 2004 | Apichatpong Weerasethakul
Trouble in Paradise | 1932 | Ernst Lubitsch
Wild at Heart | 1990 | David Lynch
Quote:
Pia Marais

Battle of Algiers, The | 1966 | Gillo Pontecorvo
Bigger Splash, A | 1974 | Jack Hazan
Dr. Strangelove | 1963 | Stanley Kubrick
Germany Year Zero | 1948 | Roberto Rossellini
Love Streams | 1984 | John Cassavetes
Marnie | 1964 | Alfred Hitchcock
River, The | 1951 | Jean Renoir
Samouraï, Le | 1967 | Jean-Pierre Melville
Solaris | 1972 | Andrei Tarkovsky
Z | 1968 | Costa-Gavras

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 5:44 am
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I went to a Q&A with Marais and I remember her bringing up Love Streams.

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 5:46 am
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Antonioni and Weerasethakul are common denominators

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 5:47 am
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snapper wrote:
Antonioni and Weerasethakul are common denominators

Unsurprisingly. Nice to see Pialat, Breillat and Denis mentioned, too.

Grisebach has the most interesting taste, but I need to see People on Sunday.

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 5:56 am
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
Seemed so out of place, no?
I was sort of surprised at its lightheartedness. It was a cue not to take the hippo thing too seriously, maybe. Though I can't say I was in any danger of that. :P

snapper wrote:
I remember Sleeping Sickness being ok. Solid but nothing really struck me... some of it seemed too derivative (of Weerasethakul, of Denis etc).
I'd love to know what you found derivative of Weerasthakul.

Quote:
Real Young Lady, A | 2000 | Catherine Breillat
Haha, what?

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 5:57 am
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
I'd love to know what you found derivative of Weerasthakul.


Long take juxtapositions of hyper-urban and primordially natural locations, wildlife as greek chorus to the action, existential journey of identity/emotional understanding interpreted as physical journey into the unknown/into a lost heritage, foregrounding of natural sounds everywhere etc

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 6:07 am
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snapper wrote:
Long take juxtapositions of hyper-urban and primordially natural locations, wildlife as greek chorus to the action, existential journey of identity/emotional understanding interpreted as physical journey into the unknown/into a lost heritage, foregrounding of natural sounds everywhere etc
I forgot you and I see Weerasethakul through different lenses. I don't really see the Köhler in most of that either.


Jedi, I loved Ghosts! Easily the best thing I've seen for this thread. I'll write something up tomorrow.

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 12:48 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
I need to see People on Sunday.


I don't know if "need" would be the right word. It's decent, though.

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 4:21 pm
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
Haha, what?

http://explore.bfi.org.uk/sightandsound ... 2b835c0c46

Odd.

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Jedi, I loved Ghosts! Easily the best thing I've seen for this thread. I'll write something up tomorrow.

Glad to hear it!

I was planning to re-watch and write about that one, too.

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Sun Apr 21, 2013 5:24 pm
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
I forgot you and I see Weerasethakul through different lenses. I don't really see the Köhler in most of that either.


Jedi, I loved Ghosts! Easily the best thing I've seen for this thread. I'll write something up tomorrow.


How do you define Weerasethakul's style then? His thesis statement?

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Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston
The Love Witch / Biller
Edward Hopper / Peck
Les signes / Green
Time and Tide / Hutton
* Ordinary Matter / Frampton
Vertical Features Remake / Greenaway
* Chickens / Amiralay


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Sun Apr 21, 2013 8:45 pm
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