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 YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread 
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Hank will read it and butts will be kicked.

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"So, you see, he was condemned to walk in darkness a quadrillion kilometres (we've adopted the metric system, you know)..."
██████████████████████████████████████████The Devil, The Brothers Karamazov


Fri Feb 14, 2014 12:22 pm
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Right now I can't log into Photobucket in order to upload the closeout graphic for The Blob. Pg 32 needs it desperately!

I've run through everything they suggest except for changing my password. 'Cluding changing browsers. There were Win7 updates last night, though, and that could have screwed me.

Anyone else being told that their Photobucket username and password are incorrect, even though it worked this morning or yesterday just fine?

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Fri Feb 14, 2014 12:50 pm
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Shieldmaiden wrote:
My secret compartment is called "PM drafts."

Maiden, I finally started using this for Round Two and it works much, much better. Thanks for the tip.

(Until I started going back through the thread to save each page as PDF I didn't know where your original post with this gem was. Turns out it's on page 12, from 14 Jan 2012!)

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Sat Feb 15, 2014 9:26 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

The following post should give you up to a month to get these watched (if you want to) so that you can overwhelm the thread with erudite posts about these three films.

:!:

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:49 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Image

A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)
Where Can I Get It?


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Video Discs

The movies are available in DVD format. The 1976 film seems a bit more difficult to find. The 1933 and 2005 films are available in Blu-ray editions. There is hope in some quarters that the 1976 film will be issued somewhere other than France on Blu-ray, but right now we are safe from that.

1933 DVD: Amazon. -- DeepDiscount.
1933 Blu-ray: DeepDiscount. -- Amazon. -- Walmart.

1933/1976 DVD: Rakuten.com. -- DeepDiscount. -- CDUniverse.

1976 DVD: Rakuten. -- Amazon. -- DeepDiscount.

2005 DVD: DeepDiscount. -- Amazon.
2005 Blu-ray: DeepDiscount. -- Amazon.
2005 Blu-ray/DVD: Rakuten. -- Amazon.



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Soundtracks

The music from the 1933 film has been re-recorded at least twice. The most difficult soundtrack to find is the 1976. The 2005 soundtrack is easy to come by. There are soundtrack compilations available on Youtube for the time being for the 1933 and 1976 soundtracks.

1933 CD: Amazon. Moscow Symphony Orchestra re-recording Max Steiner's original score. -- CD Universe.
1933 mp3: Amazon. Moscow Symphony Orchestra re-recording Max Steiner's original score. Conductor William Stromberg.
-- iTunes. Actual audio clips from the film with dialog and sound effects along with the music.
-- iTunes. Re-recording of Max Steiner score by the National Philharmonic Orchestra.
1933 Youtube: Soundtrack compilation video. By Lordhelmchen76. Stereo, based on the Stromberg recording. 14:05

1976 CD: Amazon. -- Amazon Marketplace.
1976 mp3: not available commercially.
1976 Youtube: Soundtrack compilation video. By Lordhelmchen76. Stereo 14:51

2005 CD: Amazon. -- CD Universe.
2005 mp3: Amazon. -- iTunes.




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Other Sources

Netflix
-- 1933 DVD. -- 1976 DVD & streaming. -- 2005 DVD and Blu-ray.

iTunes -- 1933. -- 1976. -- 2005. -- 2005 extended.

Amazon Instant Watch -- 1933. -- 1976. -- 2005. -- 2005 extended.

Youtube -- Google search results: king kong 1976 youtube.



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Do You Like Posters?
Google search results: king kong 1933 poster. -- king kong 1976 poster. -- king kong 2005 poster.
Some of the modern, custom Kong posters you see in the teaser graphic are available to purchase. Wouldn't they look good on your wall?



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_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:50 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Doesn't this just make you chest-pounding excited!?

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:52 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Image

A Comparison of The Champ (1931) and The Champ (1979)
Okay, Hand Me My Crying Towel


ImageImageImage
Video Discs

The movies are available in DVD format. Neither is available in Blu-ray format.

1931 DVD: Amazon. -- DeepDiscount.
1931 Blu-ray: No Blu-ray yet, see: Amazon.

1979 DVD: DeepDiscount. -- Amazon. -- Currently unavailable from DeepDiscount. Very costly from Amazon.
1979 Blu-ray: No Blu-ray yet.



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Soundtracks

The 1931 music track is not available on CD or mp3. The 1979 track is available only from resellers, mostly on LP, or CD+R's made therefrom.

1979 LP: Ebay. -- Music Stack aggregator.

Google search result: the champ 1979 soundtrack youtube



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Other Sources
Netflix -- 1931 DVD. -- 1979 DVD.

iTunes -- 1931. -- 1979.

Amazon Instant Watch -- 1931. -- 1979.

Youtube -- Google search results: the champ 1931 youtube. -- the champ 1979 youtube.



ImageImageImage
Do You Like Posters?
Google search results: the champ 1931 poster. -- the champ 1979 poster.



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_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Fri Feb 21, 2014 12:53 pm
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

And now, the Find-it for...some blood and guts on the roadway.

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Sat Feb 22, 2014 6:21 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Image

A Comparison of Death Race 2000 (1975) and Death Race (2008)
Don't Stand in the Road


ImageImageImage
Video Discs

The movies are available in DVD format. Both are available in Blu-ray format.

1975 DVD: Amazon. -- DeepDiscount.
1975 Special Edition DVD: Amazon Roger Corman's early films collection.
1975 Blu-ray: DeepDiscount. -- Amazon. -- Walmart. -- CDUniverse.

2008 DVD: DeepDiscount. -- Amazon. -- Target.
2008 Blu-ray: DeepDiscount. -- CDUniverse.
2008 BRD-DVD combo: Amazon steelbook. -- DeepDiscount steelbook.




ImageImageImage
Soundtracks

The 1975 music track is not available on CD or mp3. The 2008 track is.

1975 CD: Can't find 'em, see: Soundtrack Collector.


2008 CD: Amazon.
2008 mp3: Amazon. -- iTunes.


ImageImageImage
Other Sources

Netflix
-- 1975 DVD & streaming. -- 2008 DVD and Blu-ray.

iTunes -- No 1975. -- 2008. -- 2008 unrated.

Amazon Instant Watch -- 1975. -- 2008.

Youtube -- Google search results: death race 2000 youtube. -- death race statham youtube.



ImageImageImage
Do You Like Posters?
Google search results: death race 2000 1975 poster. -- death race 2008 poster.



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Image
Death Race 2000 (1975, USA) Various posters and DVD boxes, at Wrong Side of the Art.com
Death Race 2000 1975 Wide Screen Covers images from covershut.com
death race 2000 dvd Google Search - Image results

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Sat Feb 22, 2014 6:21 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Image

A Comparison of The Thing from Another World (1951), The Thing (1982) and The Thing (2011)
Gimme Goosebumps!


ImageImageImage
The Novella That Got It Rolling
To read the novella that started this flurry of motion pictures, try Amazon -- Barnes & Noble



ImageImageImage
Video Discs

The movies are available in DVD format. Two are available in Blu-ray format.

1951 DVD: Amazon. -- DeepDiscount.
1951 Blu-ray: There is no Blu-ray release at this time. bluray.com.

1982 DVD: DeepDiscount. -- Amazon.
1982 Blu-ray: Amazon.-- DeepDiscount. -- Target.

2011 DVD: DeepDiscount.
2011 BRD-DVD combo: Amazon. -- Walmart. -- DeepDiscount.



ImageImageImage
Soundtracks

Availability varies by format and title. Most can be found at least in used form.

1951 CD: cd and lp.com. -- CD is out of print but used copies can be found.
1951 mp3: iTunes.
Youtube: Google search results the thing 1951 soundtrack youtube

1982 CD: Amazon.
1982 mp3: iTunes.
Youtube: Google search results the thing 1982 soundtrack youtube

2011 CD: Amazon.
2011 mp3: Amazon. -- iTunes.



ImageImageImage
Other Sources
Netflix -- 1951 DVD. -- 1982 DVD and Blu-ray. -- 2011 DVD and Blu-ray.

iTunes -- 1982. -- 1982 Europe. -- 2011. (No 1951 film at iTunes)

Amazon Instant Watch -- 1982. -- 2011. (No 1951 film on Instant)

Youtube -- Google search results: the thing from another world 1951 youtube. -- the thing 1982 youtube. -- the thing 2011 youtube.



ImageImageImage
Do You Like Posters?
Google search results: the thing from another world 1951 poster. -- the thing 1982 poster. -- the thing 2011 poster.



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Image
The Thing from Another World (1951, USA) from Wrong Side of the Art.com
The Thing (1982, USA) from Wrong Side of the Art.com
The Thing From Another World (1951) movieposterdb
The Thing (1982) movieposterdb

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Sun Feb 23, 2014 3:56 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Aight! That's 18 hours of work I don't have to do later.

I'll mount the initial posts for these four matches when I begin the Kong Multimatch in March.

Then I'll work through all four matches as fast as I can in order to free up my time for converting my novels to electronic books and reworking my trxbooks.com website, hoping to sell something with lower prices.

Dreams, ya know. :roll:

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Sun Feb 23, 2014 4:05 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

The autograbbing process has been done for all the rest of the films in Round Three!

I have a used book on the way that contains the short story and novella from which the Death Race and The Thing movies were made (along with 14 other stories that are the basis for sci-fi films). This book set me back 20 cents US, plus shipping.

As for the transformation of my own tomes, I bought a Kindle Paperwhite yesterday to be used to check out my conversions into Kindle format. The device handles the files differently from the PC readers, and I want to see what it really looks like.

Also, now I can read everything Sherlock Holmes after laying out a dollar for the compendium in Kindle format.

I'm sure y'all love all this background. Hee hee.

My used copy of Franco Zeffirelli's The Champ (1979) on DVD came from the Milwaukee public library. After I washed it with dish detergent it looks practically new, although when I first looked at it I doubted whether it would play. It did fine.

Working ahead on essays and tech posts for Kong, now.

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Tue Feb 25, 2014 8:14 pm
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Hurray! I've got the text built for all but the quotations technical posts in the Kong multimatch!

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Fri Feb 28, 2014 11:10 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Does that mean I get the rest of the night off?

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Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Fri Feb 28, 2014 11:10 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Sources in Print Image

I ordered a book called Reel Future, a 1994 publication edited by Forrest J. Ackerman & Jean Stine. I grew up reading Famous Monsters of Filmland, an Ackerman magazine publication. I added an asterisk before the title of each story and film I've read or seen. Other notes added in the body of text are from the author at SF Signal.

SF Signal wrote:
“The Empire of the Ants” by H. G. Wells (1905) – filmed as Empire of the Ants in 1977
“Herbert West—Reanimator” by H. P. Lovecraft (1922) – filmed as *Re-Animator in 1985
“Armageddon—2419 A.D.” by Philip Francis Nowlan (1928) – filmed for television and the movies as *Buck Rogers and other titles between 1933 and 1979
“Who Goes There?” by John W. Campbell, Jr. (1938) – filmed as *The Thing From Another World in 1951 and *The Thing in 1982
*“Farewell to the Master” by Harry Bates (1940) – filmed as *The Day the Earth Stood Still in 1951
“This Island Earth” by Raymond F. Jones (1952) – filmed as *This Island Earth in 1955
*“The Illustrated Man” by Ray Bradbury (1950) – filmed as *The Illustrated Man in 1969
*“The Sentinel” by Arthur C. Clarke (1951) – filmed as *2001: A Space Odyssey in 1968
“Seventh Victim” by Robert Sheckley (1953) – filmed as The Tenth Victim in 1965
*“The Racer” by Ib Melchior (1956) – filmed as *Death Race 2000 in 1975
*“The Fly” by George Langelaan (1957) – filmed as *The Fly in 1956 and 1986 (and apparently a new one is in production)
“Eight O’Clock in the Morning” by Ray Faraday Nelson (1963) – filmed as They Live in 1988
“We Can Remember It for You Wholesale” by Philip K. Dick (1966) – filmed as *Total Recall in 1990
“Damnation Alley” by Roger Zelazny (1967) – filmed as Damnation Alley in 1977
“Enemy Mine” by Barry B. Longyear (1979) – filmed as *Enemy Mine in 1985
“Air Raid” by John Varley (1977) – filmed as Millennium in 1989

A book that came out in 1994 naturally missed the 2011 remake of The Thing, and the 2012 remake of Total Recall as well as the 2008 Death Race and The Day the Earth Stood Still remakes. The so-called third remake of The Fly is still in limbo (and may have simply been planned as a sequel).

I wish I'd found the book a year ago. First off, it was only 20 cents (for a 538 pg hardcover used library book). Shipping was 4 dollars, though.

Second, it has the source short stories for four of the Remake Rematches I've worked up or will soon work up for this thread so far:
“Who Goes There?” by John W. Campbell, Jr. (1938) upcoming Multimatch The Thing
“Farewell to the Master” by Harry Bates (1940) completed Rematch The Day the Earth Stood Still
“The Racer” by Ib Melchior (1956) upcoming Rematch Death Race
“The Fly” by George Langelaan (1957) completed Rematch The Fly

Image
Reel Future from SF Signal, where I got the pretyped ToC.
the fly remake a Google search result

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Sat Mar 01, 2014 6:54 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Okay. I've watched all three Kong films. This was actually only my second viewing of the 2005. Reviews are written.

Once I have the essays finished, and get graphics designed, I can start posting. Might be ahead of the March 22 date.

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Tue Mar 04, 2014 11:28 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

This is the initial post for the Multimatch between King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)

This Rematch is complete as of 21 Mar 2014.
Suggested by Gort


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Essays for the Rematch of three King Kong films.


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_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:45 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

This is the initial post for the Quickmatch between Death Race 2000 (1975) and Death Race (2008)

This Rematch is complete as of 5 Apr 2014.
Suggested by ribbon


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Essays for the Rematch of two Death Race films.


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_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:47 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

This is the initial post for the Quickmatch between The Champ (1931) and The Champ (1979)

This Rematch is complete as of 25 April 2014
Suggested by dreiser


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Essays for the Rematch of The Champ films.


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_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:48 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

This is the initial post for the Multimatch between The Thing from Another World (1951), The Thing (1982), and The Thing (2011)

This Rematch is complete as of 25 May 2014.
Suggested by Ace


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Essays for the Rematch of three The Thing films.


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_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

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The Future Unreels


Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:49 am
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It looks like the King Kong Multimatch can begin this weekend. All the text is written and edited, except for essay #3 (sounds cryptic, doesn't it?).

Finding the quotations was fun this time. Often it's a drudge.

So expect this thang to go live before Monday. Unless I have an unexpected misfortune of some sort.

Those are the worst kind of misfortunes. The unexpected kind. And that's one possible theme you could find in the Kong movies.

See you again, soon! :D

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

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The Future Unreels


Sat Mar 08, 2014 10:46 am
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)

At the Helm

1933
Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack are the directors of the 1933 film, although neither gets a screen credit as director. The two had worked together on four documentary films before bringing their efforts to bear on the Kong story.

Cooper produced 67 films, often not credited on the screen. He has 6 director credits, beginning with the documentary Grass: A Nation's Battle for Life (1925), which he also produced along with Schoedsack. The Kong film was Cooper's 8th producer effort.

Schoedsack directed 16 titles from Grass in 1925 through This is Cinerama (1952), another joint producer/director effort with Cooper. Between 1915 and 1931 Schoedsack earned 15 cinematographer credits.

These two men were all over the various aspects of cinema creation, sometimes pushing the technical requirements ahead in the process.
In fact, Cooper was nominated for an Oscar for The Quiet Man (1952) along with John Ford. But in the same year, Cooper was given an honorary award "For his many innovations and contributions to the art of motion pictures."

1976
John Guillermin directed motion pictures from 1949 to 1988. He is still alive, but he is in his 90s. Guillerman was at the helm of several blockbuster films that I saw, but didn't care for. But he also directed Death on the Nile (1978) which I did like. Some awards people liked it, too. I saw Tarzan's Greatest Adventure (1959), and Tarzan Goes to India (1962), but I don't recall a lot about either film. I got to watch the 1962 film at a theater here in the hills of Arkansas as a 10-year old. I remember the advertising campaigns for several other films in his list, but I didn't see them. I have seen the very ending of his next-to-last directorial effort, a sequel to King Kong called King Kong Lives (1986). It didn't make me want to see the entire movie, not even for this Rematch.

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2005
Peter Jackson became wealthy and influential enough from Lord of the Rings that he could afford to produce his dream project, a remake of Merian Cooper's 1933 film, King Kong. Jackson has written and produced most of his blockbuster films, I'm using the term for the budget, not necessarily the box-office impact. From the standpoint of an American, King Kong (2005) is actually a "foreign film" whereas the two earlier films are not. Jackson is such a celebrity director that there is little need for me to embellish his mini-biography in this post. You can click to look at his IMDb filmography if you don't already know what he's best known for...and how would you not?




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Directing Duos posted at forces of geek Friday, March 9, 2012. "KING KONG (1933) may be the best example of two directors working in tandem who were perfectly in sync with what they both were trying to achieve. Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack had actually worked together a couple of times before embarking on the production of KING KONG. Their first collaboration had been the documentary GRASS (1925), shot in Persia, which followed a tribe herding their animals in search of food."
Peter Jackson Undergoes Emergency Surgery For Stomach Ulcer from celebrific.com

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

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The Future Unreels


Sat Mar 08, 2014 7:58 pm
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Well, we just got our toes into the granite work at 350 5th street, and we're no longer on the sidewalk. In fact, we're nearly 6 stories above the ground. Or, if you'd prefer to walk the inside stairwell, we've gotten to step number 103 of 1,860.


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Empire State Building Trivia and Cool Facts from about.com

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Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

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The Future Unreels


Sat Mar 08, 2014 8:10 pm
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)

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The Eighth Wonder Climbs to the Top


We believe that apes climb things, so it's only natural that the King Kong story should end with the giant animal seeking refuge high above the ground. In two of the films this perch is the Empire State Building. In one it is a tower of the World Trade Center. Kong even leaps between the twin towers in the 1976 film. Oh, yeah, in that film the twin towers also resemble a natural formation found on Skull Island where Kong is from.

Although there are other set pieces in the films, one being Kong's grooming of Ann or Dwan on the home island, the climb to the top of New York City's highest structure is the major sequence of all three films. In the initial treatment of the story (or so I've read) Kong would have climbed the Chrysler Building, but the new, taller New York City building was completed while the film was in the planning stages, and the shift had to be made. It had to be. It won't take a major mental effort to imagine that the three films might have had Kong mount the Chrysler Building, then the World Trade Center tower, and then the Empire State Building, if there had been much delay in finishing the Empire State Building in the 1930s.

Ultimately, in this tale, Kong breaks free of his shackles. It is vanity for any human to think that they can contain a force of Nature. Kong is just such a force. He looks like an ape, but he is much larger, more powerful than he appears. Carl Denham's intended reassurance with the boastful, "Don't worry, ladies and gentlemen. Those chains are chrome steel," sounds like all is well. But when Kong wants the chains shredded, shred them he does!

Kong is an interesting symbol in these films. At the same time he is the symbol of something that humanity cannot control (Nature), he is also the symbol of human arrogance and hubris. Carl Denham doesn't only win, he also loses big time. Imagine the liability lawsuits following his line "It was beauty killed the beast." As the symbol of controllable Nature, Kong is chained or caged by Denham's stage crew. But because Kong is a force of Nature he gets free. Once he is free he transforms in the story, into the symbol of humanity's arrogant striving to rise higher and higher.

But, there is a limit to his ascent. He can go only so far, just as human practical action can do. Once he is at the pinnacle of the tallest building around, he feels safe and secure. He feels in command of his life. But air machines are dispatched, and they also rise. They meet him where he thinks he is safe, and they wound him. It is not the bullets that kill Kong, they only weaken him so that he can no longer cling to his perch. The fall damages his body so that his giant heart pounds its last.

It is not beauty that kills the beast. Carl Denham is delusional; still acting like a carnival barker. It was Carl Denham's arrogant greed that killed the beast, by wrenching him from his home island and bringing him into the world of humans...where Kong does not belong. That is what makes Kong the symbol of the man's errant choice. Denham could have left Kong on his home island and sailed back to New York. His decision to bring Kong back with him simply postpones Denham's ultimate downfall.

Not only are these scenes the central set pieces of the films, they are the most fun in the 1933 and 2005 films. Because everything is mishandled in the 1976 opus the ascent scene is just as tedious as anything that comes before it. Fred Wilson's greed is evident before the film really gets going. He's simply in character for a 1970s corporate villain. Denham at least seems to hatch the idea of exploitation in light of his devastation, and only at the last minute, once it occurs to him that he could take Kong off the island with him. Wilson plots his capture halfway through the movie.

And it all ends in tragedy for Kong and Denham, but there is a bittersweet victory for Darrow and Driscoll in the bookend films. The 1976 plot leaves Jack and Dwan separated by social considerations and the crowd surrounding Kong's corpse.




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Kong climbs The Empire State Building ( King Kong 1933 ) from Youtube
Kong climbs the World Trade Centre from Youtube
King Kong (8/10) Movie CLIP - Climbing the Empire State Building from Youtube. A clip from the 2005 film.
Why did King Kong climb the Empire State Building? from convinceme (start a debate), posted by frankiej4189 on Jun 03, 2009

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

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The Future Unreels


Sun Mar 09, 2014 2:46 am
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)

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A Lost Scene


It's usually an entire film that gets lost. But in the case of King Kong (1933) a scene was excised, allegedly at the request of censors, and it likely was destroyed. On the commentary track for the 1933 film one of the commenters suggests that Merian Cooper was known for completely destroying any scenes that he cut out, so that they couldn't be put back in. Some people figure that's what he did with the spider pit scene from the 1933 film.

Peter Jackson spent some of his boatloads of bucks to recreate the spider pit scene. Yes, an equivalent scene is included in the script for the 2005 remake, and it's a frenetic, frantic scene in the film. But on the digi-book Blu-ray for the 1933 film, Weta Digital has recreated what might have been the spider pit scene excised from the Cooper-Schoedsack King Kong movie. It's pretty much based on the script, some production stills, and Cooper's storyboard drawings for the scene. These, apparently, still exist, and exist in Peter Jackson's personal collection to boot.

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Fortunately, no one's gone so far as to put it into the film. It's presented as an extra on the DVD and Blu-ray release. The reconstruction is much less kinetic than the 2005 remake version. And it is presented with a lead-in from the film as it exists today. A triceratops blocks the crewmen's escape from Kong, trapping them on the large log that Kong twists until they all fall into a chasm that it bridges. Then, the reconstruction ends as soon as John Driscoll severs a vine, causing a two-legged creature that is climbing up to him as he hides beneath the cliff in a cave, to fall back into the chasm it came from.

The elongated lead-in is necessary because a triceratops which threatens the crew as they try to run away from Kong was also cut out of the release print. Jackson's team replaces that aspect of the story as well. I have several links to pages with more information, as well as the reconstructed scene on Youtube, in the Weblinks below.

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Was the scene so frightening to test audience viewers that it had to go? There is some doubt over that question. A note exists in Cooper's handwriting, and a still of the note appears on the DVD extras in which he says that he removed it.
Merian C. Cooper wrote:
'...so don't know about the spider sequences. After all I invented them, and personally cut them out of the rough studio print of "King Kong". They stopped the story'.
Robert Berry adds, when revealing this at retrocrush
Robert Berry wrote:
It was cut merely to tighten up the pacing and keep the focus of the terror on Kong.
Since Cooper obviously made the cuts himself, and because he had a reputation of destroying footage he removed, the finished scene, if it ever existed, probably no longer does. And if he removed it from the studio rough cut, as the note says, this might never have been shown to test audiences at all!

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Thus, the Weta Works re-creation fulfills some fantasy desires, and lets us see what the excised scene might have been like. Other scenes in other films could be re-created in this way, but it's clearly not the same as seeing the original version, even when, as Jackson and Weta Works did in this case, contemporary materials and techniques are used in the reconstruction. Jackson used 1930s cameras and lenses, and superimposition techniques that match what you see in the rest of the original film when reconstructing the scene. It's a very well-done job. But Jackson is the first to admit that it isn't really the lost scene from King Kong (1933).



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King Kong (1933): The Lost Spider Pit Sequence - Peter Jackson's superb recreation of the infamous lost scene. Youtube
THE MISSING SPIDER PIT SCENE! A HISTORY OF THE LONG LOST SCENE FROM KING KONG AND PETER JACKSON'S ATTEMPT TO RECREATE IT from Retro Crush.com "Popular legend says that Cooper cut the footage because it was 'too shocking' when shown to a test audience, but as the screen capture of one of Cooper's notes from one of the special features in the new Kong DVD shows, '...so don't know about the spider sequences. After all I invented them, and personally cut them out of the rough studio print of "King Kong" They stopped the story'. It was cut merely to tighten up the pacing and keep the focus of the terror on Kong."
King Kong (5/10) Movie CLIP - Giant Bugs Attack (2005) HD from Youtube, a clip of the spider pit from the 2005 remake for comparison
Peter Jackson Talks 'King Kong' Spider Pit posted [Friday, December 9th, 2005 at KillerMovies.com "Jackson also revealed that he helped re-create the original spider pit scene as an extra on the current DVD release of the original King Kong, using 1930s-era film techniques. Jackson's King Kong opens on December 14th."

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

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The Future Unreels


Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:02 am
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)
Making Kong King

This time I want to talk about the character Kong, and the men and women who put Kong in motion for each of the films.

1933
Willis H. O'Brien had a staff of 16 people working with him to create the special visual effects in the 1933 film. O'Brien was one of those people who can work in any aspect of the movies and be competent. But he is best known for his special effects work on films like The Lost World (1925), this first Kong film, and the remake of The Lost World (1960), but he also created the visual effects of It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1960). Early in his career, O'Brien pioneered many of the stop motion effects that dominated films with giant monsters or fantasy creatures for over half a century. His student and associate Ray Harryhausen surpassed him in both technique and fame. In the silent era O'Brien worked out how to animate pencil drawings, Plasticine figures, and rubber figures with a posable armature hidden from view.

Marcel Delgado rarely got a screen credit, but his name is familiar to many who read about early special effects (like me, when I was a kid and young adult). IMDb points out that Delgado contributed to the stop motion industry a new, better way of making puppets with armatures inside, changing what these creatures could do. For example, Delgado used inflatable bladders inside a creature's body so that it could appear to breathe. His models for King Kong look much more realistic than prior animation models. In addition, he was a technician on that film. We have already considered a movie that he made miniatures for: The Wizard of Oz. Delgado made special effects props for Mary Poppins (1964), and created miniatures for the 1954 film of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.

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1976
Carlo Rambaldi has the screen credit of "designer/engineer/constructor: Kong" although the original plan to have a 40-foot mechanical Kong did not work out. The Kong hands we see in close-ups are giant mechanical hands built and operated by Rambaldi and his crew of technicians.

Rick Baker is given two IMDb credits for the 1976 film. "Special Contributions: Kong" and "Makeup Effects" which is not a film credit. Too many of Baker's 69 makeup credits are well-known films for me to list many of them here. The most recent is special makeup effects in Maleficent (2014), which isn't even released yet. He started in the business of making what isn't seem like what is, in 1972, working on a film called Bone. He has often received paired credits for makeup effects and special effects on the same film. I first noticed his name in a film called An American Werewolf in London (1981), and had the privilege to see a segment about his effects work on that film in a short documentary entitled Behind the Scenes: 'An American Werewolf in London' which came out the same year. Needless to say, I was impressed with his grasp of how to use air bladders and stretchy rubber membranes to make such a "realistic" werewolf transformation seem totally plausible. For King Kong (1976) Baker's most special contribution was to don a suit and play Kong in most scenes (all but one, I've read) due to the inability of Carlo Rambaldi's full-scale electro-mechanical Kong to function. Baker did a good job, but his human-length legs are not disguised, and that removes some of the "believability" from the film. Just another of its long list of dismal misfires.

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2005
King Kong (2005) used a completely different system for creating Kong from its predecessors. In a sense, though, it is a combination of the two methods, but it isn't truthfully that. It's a kind of animation, but not stop motion, and it uses a model of Kong, but not a tangible one. There is someone performing Kong's part, but in real time, not a frame at a time, and Andy Serkis is kind of wearing a suit in the way Rick Baker did, except it's not a gorilla suit. Weirdly wonderfully confusing, eh? New stuff always is.

There are literally hundreds of technicians' names in the credits, all of whom worked with Weta Digital to create the most life-like Kong of the three on the screen. In addition, hundreds of others worked for Weta Workshop designing creatures that would later be created digitally. It was a huge undertaking. I guess Epi didn't work on those crews, though.

It was difficult to pull names out of the soup, but I did find two names that you probably know if you watch making of effects features on DVDs or Blu-rays. The first is this one: Scott E. Anderson, visual effects supervisor. Anderson has 26 credits in the visual effects realm, with more than one effects house. He started as a computer graphics animator on The Abyss (1989), soon worked in the same job on Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991), but not before working on Terminator 2. His titles are some of the biggest, most complex (if not financially successful) films of the last 25 years. Anderson has also gotten into directing a bit over the years. And has tried his hand at writing a short film. He has created effects for children's films, actioners, science fiction and fantasy.

Another prominent name buried in the list of credited artists is Joe Letteri, senior visual effects supervisor. Letteri has 28 visual effects credits across the years, beginning in 1977 with Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope, the film that started the film effects revolution. Letteri has worked on a dozen projects since Kong (his 15th film) wrapped. Some of his titles are not big box-office winners, but they all pushed the realm of visual effects and digital effects forward.

Take a look at these men's IMDb filmographies to see just how influential they have been in what we see on the screen. And remember that just as with Rick Baker's and Carlo Rambaldi's, Willis O'Brien's and Marcel Delgado's contributions to the art, those who work on a specific film that might become very well-known, also influence those who work on less famous films that you or I might see, and even on direct to disc and cable shows that won't get looked at in a Remake Rematch.




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Willis H. O'Brien from Wikipedia
Carlo Rambaldi from Wikipedia
Rick Baker (makeup artist) from Wikipedia
Joe Letteri from Wikipedia
Q & A: King Kong vs. Galileo: are bigger animals possible? from the Physics Van at U of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne
Man in an Ape Suit from pulp and dagger.com "Who do you think went through there -- some guy in an ape suit?" -- "Nonetheless, he had little reason to worry as, in spite of the misleading press, it was well known that he had played Kong in the 'ape suit', and he received only praise, even from those who pilloried the film itself. And it seems likely that Baker owes his present status as a top Hollywood make-up man to the initial boost given him from the publicity surrounding King Kong 1976."
The Stop-Motion Influence: From King Kong
to Ladislaw Starewitch
a pdf file. "Even though O’Brien’s use of stop motion itself contributed to make King Kong look very
good for its time, O’Brien implemented another technique with stop motion to effectively place the actors and miniatures in the same shots together. This process is known as rear projection."
KING KONG TURNS 70!!! posted by robertberry@retrocrush.com "It's funny that despite all the technical advances in filmmaking through the years, every attempt to remake King Kong has resulted in a laughable failure. The 1976 Dino DeLaurentis remake resorted to using a guy in a gorilla suit and generally made audiences laugh out loud."
Stop-Motion Animation posted by Michael Delahoyde Washington State University. "With a screaming Fay Wray in his grip, King Kong climbs the Empire State Building. At the top, Kong's expressive face seems to register human emotion; we think we can tell what he feels--all this due to a successful use of the special photographic process called stop-motion. This film technique (also known as stop-action photography) involves the slight manipulation of inanimate objects or models between successive photographs of a scene proceeding frame by frame."
How King Kong Works from howstuffworks posted by Julia Layton. "In 1933, King Kong was bear fur and motors. In 2005, King Kong is digital -- but there's also an actor who plays the 24-foot ape. In this article, we'll find out how the latest King Kong incorporates human performance and digital animation to recreate the most famous gorilla of all time."
King Kong (2005) from Janaisa, Janas Editing Blog. "However human emotions would not transfer well onto that of a CGI gorilla and so a new system was created that would figure out the muscular and emotional correspondence between a human and a gorilla’s face to allow Serkis’ expressions on Kong (Urban Cine File, 2005)."
Motion capture from Wikipedia
The Mechanical Hand!
CARLO RAMBALDI R.I.P. (1925 - 2012) from horrorphile.net
Willis O”Brien (1886-1962) from rayharryhausen.com (scroll down)
KING KONG Turns 80: A Retrospective By Tom Stockman September 25, 2013 at we are movie geeks.com
King Kong 1976 cine SFX blogspot.
BAKER, Rick from filmreference.com
Andy Serkis Performance Capture from serkis.com

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Tue Mar 11, 2014 10:44 am
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)

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Cast to Cast to Cast


John Driscoll - First Mate (Bruce Cabot)
Jack Prescott - Princeton Primate Paleontologist (Jeff Bridges)
Jack Driscoll - Playwright (Adrien Brody)

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Bruce Cabot's role as First Mate of the trawler Venture doesn't seem to be all that important to the plot at first. Through half the film he is more or less in the background, occasionally chatting with Fay Wray's character, Ann Darrow. There are hints, well-played, that he is becoming attached to her, and feeling protective of her. But there isn't any sense of romance until he risks his life to save her from Kong. Cabot plays the character as a very likable, somewhat naive sailor. He isn't smitten by Ann the way Kong is, but he gets to like her by the time she is taken from him. Perhaps absence makes the heart grow fonder, eh?

Jeff Bridges creates the only fully trustworthy character in the entire de Laurentiis production of King Kong. He isn't full of himself, but he is confident of what he knows. This is proved when he tells a man who keeps asking questions, "I don't know, Carnahan! I'm as ignorant as you. Quit asking me so many dumb questions." Only a person who is sure they know something, can admit that they don't know everything. Even though he feels affection for Dwan, he recognizes that she has tastes that would easily outpace his salary, leaving her unhappy if they hooked up permanently. Bridges shows his character's certain knowledge of the facts, and sad confrontation of what they mean for him and his personal happiness in a way that makes it easy to see the man's delight and disappointment.

Adrien Brody makes Jack Driscoll, the writer, a bit of a stuffed shirt at times. But dealing with all that is going on after he gets hornswaggled into taking the cruise aboard Venture, and meeting the young actress Ann Darrow, he becomes reasonably humbled by it all. He certainly is willing to risk everything, and does so in order to rescue Ann from Kong's clutches. Brody manages even to make the stuffed shirt Driscoll easy to like, and he becomes more sympathetic as the program drags on. He plays Jack's emotional changes quite adeptly, and his ordinary good looks make him identifiable for viewers.

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Ann Darrow - Unemployed Former Film Extra (Fay Wray)
Dwan - Aspiring Actress (Jessica Lange)
Ann Darrow - Unemployed Comic Actress (Naomi Watts)

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Jessica Lange was unknown before the 1976 film debuted. Fay Wray was not unknown before the original Kong carried her across an unknown island, and then across New York City. And Naomi Watts was a well-known factor in Hollywood when she was chosen to reprise the Fay Wray role (in her 42d film).

The characters Ann and Dwan are unusually good looking. But the female lead's experiential and emotion state varies widely from film to film! The 1933 Ann Darrow is beaten down by circumstance. Fay Wray plays her with a solid moral compass, though, with that aspect of her character not damaged by misfortune and empty stomach. Once Kong has her in his grip, though, she seems only terrified. She never makes much of an attempt to escape, although she gives it a go once or twice. She learns that Kong can outrun her easily, and doesn't even have to move fast in order to do it. Whereas John Driscoll clearly falls for her, she doesn't exactly fall for him until he rescues her from Kong's high nest. By the end of the movie they are engaged, but Fay Wray's demeanor and style of speech remain much as they have throughout the film. This Ann Darrow may fall for Driscoll, but she never falls for Kong at all.

Dwan doesn't even have the good fortune to have a last name. At least, not one that she wants to share with anyone. Jessica Lange plays an ingénue so well in her first starring role that we can't tell whether she's being Lange, or being Dwan. Because she played basically the same character (only hornier) in The Postman Always Rings Twice, it was difficult to tell whether Lange is an actress or a mere movie star even by that time. Frances would out her as a competent actress, so in retrospect I can assume that Dwan is an acting job, a camouflage of Jessica Lange behind a contrived set of personality traits. But Dwan is not likable, even though she is easy to look at. She is much too ditzy, and too talkative to be easy to like. She isn't hate-able, of course. There is nothing despicable about her. And she does have a sense of regard for the giant Kong. Ultimately, Lange is not given enough to do acting-wise to come across as doing a good acting job in this film.

Naomi Watts gets to play an older Ann Darrow, who has achieved something notable, but whose fortunes have waned to a frightening degree. She doesn't give up. Just as Fay Wray's 1933 Ann retains her sense of morality, this Ann also refuses to pimp herself to a burlesque review. She looks better than most of the girls we see going into the theater, but she turns and walks away. Not before her look of disappointment is noted in the front door glass by Carl Denham, who needs an actress something awful. I think Watts plays Ann's cynical revulsion when she thinks that Denham wants her for some sex film even better than Wray does in the '33 movie. She recovers, of course, and comes along on the voyage. She is the strongest of the three women, probably because by 2005 it was okay for a woman to be that way. Lange's take on "strong woman" comes off as ditzy and pushy, whereas Watts is able to play all her emotions with an undercurrent of inner strength.

-------------------------- -------------------------- --------------------------
Carl Denham - Film Producer/Director (Robert Armstrong)
Fred Wilson - Oil Company Executive (Charles Grodin)
Carl Denham - Besieged Film Director (Jack Black)

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Robert Armstrong's Carl Denham incarnation is a self-assured film producer. As nearly as we can tell he is still in good stead with Hollywood, and seems to be capable of calling the shots from where he is in his career. He has a certain reputation with even dock workers. And Armstrong plays this man as a fast-talking, confident man with a goal. When a theatrical agent flatly refuses to trust Denham with the life and career of any of his actresses, Denham leaves the ship intent on finding someone. But, as close to desperation as he might be, he doesn't bamboozle Ann Darrow. In fact, he levels with her, coming off as a mostly honest man. When things go wrong, he doesn't duck out, but follows Kong into the deep jungle along with his crew, intending to bring her back. Of course, he wants to make his film, but more than that he feels responsibility for Ann Darrow's well-being. His hubris leads to a bad end for a lot of people, but it is honest hubris, not blind hubris. Denham in the 1933 film is played as a man who is largely responsible and trustworthy, with a clear tendency to aggrandize success and to mentally miniaturize the chances of defeat.

Fred Wilson, on the other hand, as played by Charles Grodin, is a slimy, oily, untrustworthy dickhead of an oil company executive. I wouldn't even trust him with his own life, much less mine. Charles Grodin's performance is difficult to judge. I want to say it's terrible, but maybe it's just the character that is terrible. I get the sense that, even though Fred Wilson is written a certain way, and it was the style of the day for villains to be self-centered corporate executives, Grodin wasn't putting very much into the part. I don't recall any subtlety in his presentation of the character (nothing like the subtlety that Jeff Bridges manages with Jack Prescott). Not that anyone in the film does an award-winning performance. Grodin seems to be there, hit his marks, recite his lines, and not much more.

Jack Black brings a certain kind of feeling to Carl Denham that isn't present in Armstrong's 1933 performance. In part that is because Jack Black is a comic actor with fine comic timing, and not the same kind of actor that Armstrong was. But the part is not written the same way, either. This Carl Denham is on the skids, is amoral, and you can't really trust much of anything he says. He's a shyster at times, a liar at others, sometimes unnecessarily brave, and a fraidy-cat in other instances. Who wouldn't be a fraidy-cat with Kong around? I have to admit that Black's take on Denham is interesting, and consistent. But we admire Carl Denham 1933 for his guts, which makes us somewhat forgive his self-aggrandizement. This 2005 Denham is likely to say whatever the moment calls for, even if it isn't what he really thinks. He would be a difficult person to live with or work for. And at the end, Black's acting skill is evident, as he finds exactly the right tilt of the shoulders, and contortion of facial features to demonstrate that Denham knows he's in really deep shit, but doesn't want to completely face up to it yet.

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Captain Englehorn (Frank Reicher)
Captain Ross (John Randolph)
Captain Englehorn (Thomas Kretschmann)

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Frank Reicher plays Captain Englehorn as a man nearing retirement, who is going on one or two final voyages before settling down to live out his life in peace. He broadcasts his character's life situation without having any lines that tell us these things. From 1915 to 1931 Reicher directed 43 films. From 1915 until 1951 he played 229 screen roles. As a consummate character actor, Reichert makes Englehorn believable, and draws the character to center stage once or twice when the writing doesn't necessarily call for him to be there. The part as written, of course, makes a wizened old salt of Englehorn, who serves as translator between the islanders and the interlopers. Reicher makes this seem plausible, that the man might have picked up native languages as he sailed around the Pacific during a long career.

John Randolph's character, Captain Ross, is rarely the center of any scenes. But when he is, the actor makes the best of it. There is a scene with Fred Wilson where the delivery of the line "Like you said: 'The hell with the weather.'" is delivered well. It could have steered into sneering, but Randolph manages to get sarcasm out of a relatively flat delivery. He plays Ross as someone who isn't going to lick Wilson's boots, no matter what the man's position in the corporation appears to be on paper.

Thomas Kretschmann naturally makes Captain Englehorn a German captain. He is played as no-nonsense by Kretschmann, and comes across as abrasive on more than one occasion. He is the sort of man who you would expect to sail away and strand his passengers simply because they weren't on board at his predetermined time to weigh anchor. A couple of scenes show that he is a man who will bend the rules, or break them, but he never verbally agrees to do this. In fact, before the voyagers accidentally find themselves at Denham's uncharted island, Englehorn is ready to sail back to Singapore and turn Denham in because of a warrant call received via radio-telegraph.

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New Character in 1976
Roy Bagley - Geologist (Rene Auberjonois)

A geologist who knows his stuff, as played by the man who would become Odo on Deep Space Nine. Auberjonois has fun with his part. He may be the only cast member to do so. But it might also be because his character is always two to five steps ahead of Fred Wilson, and makes no secret that he has more than a little bit of contempt for the man. This leads Bagley to gloat, and Auberjonois plays gloating quite well.

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New Characters in 2005
Preston - Denham's Assistant (Colin Hanks)
Bruce Baxter- Preening Action Star (Kyle Chandler)
Mr. Ben Hayes - First Officer (Evan Parke)
Jimmy - Sailor discovered as a stowaway by Mr. Hayes (Jamie Bell)

Preston bears all the worst fallout from Carl Denham's over-sized and directionless personality. Usually, Preston suffers in silence as played by Tom Hanks' son Colin. Preston is the one who says whatever sparks Carl to say, "Defeat is always momentary." Of course, Hanks plays Preston as someone who, despite being young, knows that sometimes defeat is forever. And saying otherwise doesn't change things. But he stays with Denham despite having no reason to smile.

Kyle Chandler plays Bruce Baxter as a man who doesn't realize that he isn't really a star any more. And perhaps he never really was a star, given the types of movies he has made. But he is also played as a man who can spout off nonsense, believing it fully at the time, and then reflect on what he said and decide that it is nonsense, after all. Basically, Baxter is playing himself as a part. Making up everything as he goes along. This is made most clearly by the writers having Baxter abandon a party of searchers who have just seen four of their number die, only to insist on rescuing them later on. Chandler doesn't have a huge part in the story, but he manages to play with the ebb and flow of the character's circumstances. At the end, because Jack Driscoll won't appear on the New York stage as himself, Denham declares Bruce Baxter the man who saved Ann Darrow. He is still playing a part.

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Ben Hayes is possibly First Officer of the Venture, but I don't remember hearing anyone say that. Four years earlier he found a boy with an arm broken in two places who was stowed away in one of the animal cages in the hold. Since that time he has filled the role of father to Jimmy. The characters as portrayed by Evan Parke and Jamie Bell make an interesting pair. Jimmy is older, now, nearing the age of majority (21 years in those days), but perhaps only 19 years old at the time of the story. He depends on Mr. Hayes, relies on the man's experience and uprightness. He trusts Hayes, and knows that the man is serious when he tells him that he needs to get educated. Perhaps an anomaly in the merchant marine, Ben Hayes seems educated himself. He assigns Jimmy to read Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, and when the boy asks a question, in his answer Hayes quotes a few lines of the story. Although the parts are small in terms of dialog, the characters are present in a large number of scenes. The pair is an aside to Merian Cooper's original realization of the story, but it is not a bad addition. Both actors peg their roles, and make you like them. Parke is just stable enough to believably balance out Jimmy's petulance and tomfoolery.


-------------------------- -------------------------- --------------------------
Kong actors
Rick Baker (1976) - wore the Kong suits
Andy Serkis (2005) - on set, then mo-cap

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Rick Baker was hired because he had a gorilla suit. But his suit didn't have the range of facial expressions needed for Guillermin's Kong. Carlo Rambaldi was building a 40-foot tall mechanical Kong. His reputation to that time made it seem entirely likely that he would make it work. But the necessary technology didn't exist, and the giant Kong didn't function as desired. So, Rambaldi made life-sized mechanical hands for closeups, and he created the arm extensions and facial masks for Baker's man-in-a-suit Kong. All you see of Rick Baker is his eyes, rather the contact lenses he had made to cover his human irises. But Baker's performance is evident in Kong's body language. It's said that he wanted to knuckle-walk, but Guillermin and de Laurentiis overruled that bit of authenticity. Just another example of how they consistently made the wrong choices throughout production.

Andy Serkis plays Lumpy the cook in the 2005 film,
but he is also the actor who brings movement and vocalizations to Kong. His performance is one part of realizing Kong for this film. The other part is in the hands of motion-capture programmers and techs who translate Serkis' human movements into seemingly authentic animal movements for the CGI ape. You can admire Serkis' sighs, calls and the like, but you have to give much of the credit for his ability to perform as Kong, to the electronic wizardry of the staff at Weta Digital. I read that Serkis first performed on set to give Naomi Watts another actor to react to, and then he repeated his performance in the mo-cap arena to make Kong appear on screen. The successful fusion of his performances and the visualization of the character he was breathing into life, is what makes King Kong (2005) tolerable for an enormous run time of over three hours.

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_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Wed Mar 12, 2014 8:29 am
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)

The Writers

1933
Sometimes I can't believe the number of writers involved in film scripts. Get this IMDb listing for the 1933 King Kong: James Ashmore Creelman... (screen play) and Ruth Rose...(screen play); Merian C. Cooper...(from an idea conceived by) and Edgar Wallace...(from an idea conceived by); Merian C. Cooper...(story) (uncredited); Leon Gordon...(contributing writer) (uncredited), Edgar Wallace...(story) (uncredited).

Learning all this takes research, so I'd never have come up with this list. There are people out there who pore over books and articles to learn all this. Thank goodness for the IMDb contributors. Of course everything isn't on the internet, and maybe this wouldn't be if someone hadn't read a book or two.

Several of these people were also producers, Cooper among them. But also Gordon. The old studio system had easy access to staff writers, so if you look at Leon Gordon's filmography you'll see the notation (uncredited) on a lot of his entries. Edgar Wallace actually died before King Kong appeared in theaters. Yet he has writer credits that range up to today. Naturally, he was a novelist whose books have been made into movies, leading to the claim in his IMDb bio: "For a 20th-century author he has had the greatest number of novels made into movies." Amazing. But, how do you check a purported fact like that? Or this one: "In his heyday, he was one of the most popular writers in the UK, second only to Charles Dickens." I have no way to doubt either one of them. If they're close to true, then I'm impressed. The same bio page lets us know that Wallace died of double pneumonia on 10 February 1932 while in Hollywood working on what would become King Kong. Ruth Rose was an actress who married Ernest Schoedsack. Cooper hired her to streamline the script by Creelman.


1976
Merian C. Cooper, Edgar Wallace, James Ashmore Creelman, and Ruth Rose get credit for the 1933 screenplay. For the 1976 film, Lorenzo Semple Jr. is credited for writing the screenplay. Semple's first writing credit came in 1955 for an episode of The Alcoa Hour on television. He was one of the writers for the Batman TV series, but more than that, he developed the series. It might be easy to make jokes about this being the reason the 1976 Kong script is so campy, but in fact Semple penned Papillon (1973). He wrote Three Days of the Condor (1975), and Never Say Never Again (1983). But he also wrote Flash Gordon (1980). His last writing credit occurred in 1993, though he got credited for the original 1968 screenplay for Pretty Poison when it was remade for TV in 1996. Semple is still alive. He is 91 years old in 2014. His career is not without awards, although neither nominations nor awards came his way for King Kong (1976).

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2005
Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, and Peter Jackson are credited for the 2005 screenplay), while Merian C. Cooper and Edgar Wallace receive screen credit for the original 1933 story. As you're well aware these three often work together on screenplays. All three worked together on writing the trip of Lord of the Rings films, on the trio of Hobbit films, and on King Kong. Just as Peter Jackson is a celebrity director, these three are a celebrity writing team, featured on the extended versions and making of features for some very high-grossing internationally successful films. You probably don't even have to click on any of the links above to know what they are.



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King Kong - 1933 Screenplay 1933 film, part 1 of 5. from atlantis online
King Kong (1976) Movie Script actually a transcript of the dialog. from Springfield! Springfield!
King Kong Script - Dialogue Transcript 2005 film. from script-o-rama
KING KONG Screenplay by Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens & Peter Jackson © Universal Pictures 2005 Based on a Story by MERIAN C. COOPER and EDGAR WALLACE. pdf version from dailyscript
Script Preface by Lorenzo Semple Jr. from Pulp and Dagger.com. "As I understand it, the situation was this. While King Kong 1933 started as a movie, a novelization was also published written by Delos W. Lovelace. Thus King Kong basically existed in two forms, with two separate copyrights. Years later, Dino De Laurentiis acquired the copyright for the movie King Kong (and thus for subsequent movies), while Universal held the copyright for the original novelization (and thus any subsequent novelizations). For that reason, De Laurentiis, unable to release a novelization of his own remake, got around the problem by publishing the screenplay itself. But, that, as I say, is just a guess. Don't quote me on it."
King Kong (1933) a New York Times movie review published March 3, 1933. By MORDAUNT HALL. "During certain episodes in this film Kong, with Ann in his paw, goes about his battles, sometimes putting her on a fifty-foot high tree branch while he polishes off an adversary. When he is perceived on exhibition in New York he is a frightening spectacle, but Denham thinks that he has the beast safely shackled. The newspaper photographers irritate even him with their flashlights, and after several efforts he breaks the steel bands and eventually gets away."
Picture of James Ashmore Creelman
Bundesarchiv Bild 102-13109, Edgar Wallace.jpg
Ruth Rose from Wikipedia
Director Merian Cooper studies a storyboard from the film King Kong 1933
Lorenzo Semple Jr.jpg
Fran Walsh, Peter Jackson, Phillippa Boyens

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Fri Mar 14, 2014 6:18 am
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)
Lines Worth Remembering

1933ImageImage
These lines were taken from a set of British English subs found at podnapisi.net. Most are taken directly from the srt file. Some are corrected to match the spoken dialog.

Weston: Say, is this the moving-picture ship?
Dockworker: The Venture? Yeah. Are you going on this crazy voyage?
Weston: What's crazy about it? about that crazy fella running it.
Weston: Carl Denham?
Dockworker: Guess that's the name. He ain't scared of nothing. If he wants a picture of lion he just goes up to him and tells him to look pleasant.
Weston: He's a tough egg. Why all this talk about this voyage being crazy?
Dockworker: Everybody around the docks is talking about the cargo, for one thing. And I never did see a ship this size with such a crew.
Weston: Not enough men to handle her?
Dockworker: Not enough! Three times more than the ship needs. I don't see where they're gonna have room enough to sleep.

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(Ann Darrow is finishing a rather large meal in a diner. Carl Denham is sitting with her.)
Carl Denham: Feeling better?
Ann Darrow: Yes, thank you. You're very kind.
Carl Denham: Don't you fool yourself. I'm not bothering about you just out of kindness. How'd you ever get into this fix?
Ann Darrow: Bad luck, I guess. There are a lot of girls like me.
Carl Denham: Not many with your looks.
Ann Darrow: I can get by in good clothes all right. But when a girl gets too shabby...
Carl Denham: No family?
Ann Darrow: Supposed to have an uncle someplace.
Carl Denham: Did you ever do any acting?
Ann Darrow: I used to do extra work now and then over on Long Island. The studio's closed now.
Carl Denham: What's your name?
Ann Darrow: Ann Darrow.
Carl Denham: Fine. I've got a job for you. Costumes on the ship will fit you. If the shops are still open, I can get clothes for you. - Come on.
Ann Darrow: But... But what is it?
Carl Denham: It's money and adventure and fame. It's the thrill of a lifetime. A long sea voyage that starts at 6:00 tomorrow morning.
Ann Darrow: No, wait. I don't understand. You must tell me. I do want the job so but I can't.
Carl Denham: Oh, I see. No, you've got me wrong. This is strictly business.
Ann Darrow: I only wanted...
Carl Denham: Sure. Sure you did. I got a little excited and I forgot you didn't understand. Listen, I'm Carl Denham. Ever heard of me?
Ann Darrow: Yes, yes. You make moving pictures in jungles and places.
Carl Denham: That's right. And I pick you as lead in my next picture. We sail at 6.
Ann Darrow: Where to?
Carl Denham: A long way off. And listen, Ann, I'm on the level. No funny business.

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(Ann Darrow is watching the loading of the Venture. John Driscoll accidentally hits her.)
John Driscoll: What are you doing up here?
Ann Darrow: I just wanted to see.
John Driscoll: Oh, you just wanted to see. Well, I'm sorry. Make that line fast! You're that girl Denham picked, aren't you?
Ann Darrow: Yes. I think this is awfully exciting. I've never been on a ship before.
John Driscoll: I've never been on one with a woman before.
Ann Darrow: I guess you don't think much of women on ships?
John Driscoll: No, they're a nuisance.
Ann Darrow: I'll try not to be.
John Driscoll: You've been in the way already.

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Carl Denham: Did you ever hear of Kong?
Captain: Why, yes. Some native superstition, isn't it? A god or a spirit or something.
Carl Denham: Well, anyway, neither beast nor man; something monstrous, all-powerful. Still living, still holding that island in a grip of deadly fear.

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Carl Denham: I found out from experience to keep my cast and cameras with me. You never can tell when you'll want them.
John Driscoll: But you're crazy to risk...
Carl Denham: Jack run along and get the rifles and ammunition. And get me a couple of huskies to carry my stuff. And, Jack, don't forget the costume box.

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Ann Darrow (upon seeing Kong for the first time): Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaauuuggghhh!!!!! Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaauuuggghhh!!!!!

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Carl Denham: Yeah, that's his track, all right. Look at the size of that thing. He must be as big as a house.

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(Several members of the expedition are clinging to a giant log bridge that Kong has picked up and is rotating side to side.)
Expedition Member (falling off log and into pit): Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaauuuggghhh!
(The sound of his voice stops instantly when he hits the bottom.)

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Carl Denham: We're millionaires, boys. I'll share it with all of you. In a few months, it'll be up in lights on Broadway: "Kong, the Eighth Wonder of the World."

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(Denham walks out in front of the curtain and addresses the audience.)
Carl Denham: Ladies and gentlemen, I am here tonight to tell you a very strange story. A story so strange that no one will believe it. But, ladies and gentlemen, seeing is believing and we, my partners and I have brought back the living proof of our adventure.... An adventure in which 12 of our party met horrible deaths. And now, ladies and gentlemen, before I tell you any more, I am going to show you the greatest thing your eyes ever beheld. He was a king and a god in the world he knew, but now he comes to civilization merely a captive, a show to gratify your curiosity. (Curtain rises to reveal Kong, chained on a platform.) Ladies and gentlemen, look at Kong. The Eighth Wonder of the World. (Audience gasps and applauds) And now I want to introduce Miss Ann Darrow the bravest girl I have ever known. (Ann walks onto the stage.) There the beast and here the beauty. She has lived through an experience no other woman ever dreamed of. And she was saved from the very grasp of Kong by her future husband. I want you to meet a very brave gentleman, Mr. John Driscoll. And now before I tell you the full story of our voyage I will ask the gentlemen of the press to come forward so that the audience may see them take the first photographs of Kong and his captors.

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1976ImageImage
These lines were taken from a set of British English subs found at podnapisi.net. Most are taken directly from the srt file. Some are corrected to match the spoken dialog.

(Terrible storm outside the officer's mess, where the Captain and Wilson are eating as the items on the table slide around constantly, stopping only when they reach the safety edge of the table, or another object.)
Captain: I'm reminded of Amsterdam. Ever eat a raw herring with a beer chaser and a scoop of ice cream?
(He receives a message from the radio room)
Captain: Captain here.
Radio Operator: I picked up a mayday call. It faded before I could get a fix.
Captain: Keep listening. Let me know if you get anything. (To Fred Wison as the ship continues to pitch and roll) Like you said: "The hell with the weather." We can get out of this by backtracking around Timor. It'll only cost us a few days.
Fred Wilson: Keep on course, I'm fine.
Captain: I gotta admit, for a New York desk guy, you got a lot of guts.
Fred Wilson: I sold this one to the board. If that island doesn't produce huge, I'll be wiping windshields.

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Captain: We're sorry, ma'am.
Dwan: So am I. Harry had discovered me. He was going to put me in a movie he was making in Hong Kong. Dumb luck. But I guess I really can't complain. When you're alone adrift in the Pacific and somebody just...Who spotted me, by the way?
Captain: That young fellow.
Dwan: How can I ever thank you? I'm Dwan. D-W-A-N. That's my name. Like Dawn, - except that I switched two letters to make it more memorable.
Jack Prescott: I'm a mere Jack.
Dwan: You must be kidding. How could anybody who saved my life be mere to me?

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Fred Wilson: Holy Mother! That looks as old as the pyramids.
Jack Prescott: Could be. But the pyramids weren't repaired six months ago. There's earth on those timbers. It has to be replaced after each monsoon.
Fred Wilson: Are you telling me there's people here?
Jack Prescott: What's more, I'll characterize them. Scared people.
Fred Wilson: Scared of what?
Jack Prescott: I don't exactly know what it is. But apparently, they thought they needed a wall to keep it out.
Fred Wilson: Let me straighten you out on a couple of points. One: This wall is an ancient ruin. Two: The island is uninhabited.
(They hear the sound of the islanders' drums begin off screen.)
Jack Prescott: And three: There's an uninhabited German beer hall in there.

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Carnahan: If he's not going to eat her, why did he take her?
Jack Prescott: Apes are very territorial. He'll probably take her to his turf.
Carnahan: What for? Joe said you said that the ape was going to marry her. Is that some kind of joke or...
Jack Prescott: I don't know, Carnahan! I'm as ignorant as you. Quit asking me so many dumb questions.

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Roy Bagley:Well, Fred...I finished testing the samples from that pool. It'll be real great oil!
Fred Wilson: Son of a bitch! Fred Wilson is crazy, is he? Wait till those candy-asses in New York hear about this. I'll grind them...
Roy Bagley:Like I said, it will be great oil. As soon as Mother Nature finishes cooking it a little longer.
Fred Wilson: How much longer?
Roy Bagley:Hardly a tick of the clock, in geological terms. Say 10,000 years. Till then you'd get better mileage filling your Cadillac with mule piss.
Fred Wilson: Oh, my God!
Roy Bagley:I hate to kick a fella when he's dead, but I told you. You shouldn't have told New York you were bringing in the big one.
Fred Wilson: The big one. Jesus! Who says I ain't gonna? Wilson to Explorer. Get me a channel to Surabaya, I want an engineer drop.

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Dwan: You know, after all these years, now I'm gonna finally end up with a shrink. I mean, how can I become a star because of someone that was stolen off that gorgeous island and locked up in that lousy oil tank?
Fred Wilson: It's not someone. It's an animal, a beast that tried to rape you.
Dwan: That's not true. He risked his life to save me.
Fred Wilson: He tried to rape you, honey. And before you cry a lot, you oughta ask the natives on that island what they thought of losing Kong.
Jack Prescott: Actually, they'll miss him a lot.
Fred Wilson: Like leprosy.
Jack Prescott: No, you're dead wrong. He was the terror, the mystery of their lives. And the magic. A year from now, that'll be an island full of burned-out drunks. When we took Kong, we kidnapped their god.

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Dwan: Jack! Buy me a drink, will you? Come on, buy me a drink.

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Dwan (to Kong who has climbed the World Trade Center while carrying her): No! Don't put me down. Hold on to me. Hold on to me, or they'll kill you.

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Jack Prescott (as the helicopter gunners continue to shoot Kong): Assholes!

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Dwan (as Kong falls from the building roof): Kong!

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(Last lines)
Jack Prescott (pushing through the crowd surrounding Kong's body): Dwan!
Dwan (shouting to Jack, who does not come to where she is; shouting each time with less force): Jack! - Jack! - Jack! - Jack! - Jack! - Jack! - Jack!

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2005ImageImage
These lines were taken from a set of British English subs found at podnapisi.net. Most are taken directly from the srt file. Some are corrected to match the spoken dialog.

(Ann Darrow spots Mr. Weston, the theatrical agent on the street and walks up to keep pace with him.)
Ann Darrow: Oh, hello, Mr. Weston.
Weston: Oh, jeez. Look, miss, I told you already, call my office. Leave your résumé with my secretary.
Ann Darrow: Now, why would I want to do that when we can talk about it in person?
Weston: Because that's what a smart girl would do.
Ann Darrow: But I already sent you my resume. You returned it unopened.
Weston: What can I say? Jack Driscoll's very particular about who he works with.
Ann Darrow: Please, just an audition. That's all I'm asking.
Weston: Jesus, you don't give up, do you?
Ann Darrow: Mr. Weston, I know this role backwards.
Weston: Well, that's too bad, 'cause we just gave the part to someone else. I'm sorry, kid. The play is cast.

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Carl Denham: Defeat is always momentary.

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(Jimmy is sitting reading Heart of Darkness while the crew prepares to go ashore on the island.)
Jimmy: Why does Marlow keep going up the river? Why doesn't he turn back?
Hayes: There's a part of him that wants to, Jimmy. A part deep inside himself that sounds a warning. But there's another part that needs to know. To defeat the thing which makes him afraid.
(Quotes the Joseph Conrad text) "We could not understand because we were too far, and could not remember because we were traveling in the night of first ages, of those ages that are gone, leaving hardly a sign, and no memories. We are accustomed to look upon the shackled form of a conquered monster, but there, there you could look at a thing monstrous and free."
Jimmy: It's not an adventure story, is it, Mr. Hayes?
Hayes: No, Jimmy. It's not.

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Carl Denham: We got away. We gotta be grateful for that, gentlemen.
Preston, Denham's assistant: What about Mike? He didn't get away! He's still there!
Carl Denham: Mike died doing what he believed in! He didn't die for nothing. And I'll tell you something else. I'm gonna finish this film for Mike! I'll finish it and I'll donate the proceeds to his wife and kids. Because that man is a hero, and he deserves nothing less.
Herb,the cameraman: Hear, hear!

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Preston: What happened to Herb is no one's fault.
Carl Denham: You're absolutely right, Preston. And I'll tell you something else. Herbert didn't die for nothing. He died for what he believed in, and I'm gonna honor that.
(etc. etc.)

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Bruce Baxter: All right, we gotta get back to the ship. Englehorn sails in nine hours.
Jimmy: So? We gotta find Miss Darrow.
Bruce Baxter: Hey, do you hear me? We're gonna be stranded here. Miss Darrow was a great gal, no question. And she was a wonderful person. It's a terrible loss and we're all gonna miss her.
Jack Driscoll: I always knew you were nothing like that tough guy you play on screen. I just never figured you for a coward.
Bruce Baxter: Hey, pal! Hey, wake up. Heroes don't look like me, not in the real world. In the real world, they got bad teeth, a bald spot, and a beer gut. I'm just an actor with a gun, who's lost his motivation. Be seeing you.
(Baxter walks away.)
Hayes: Anyone else?

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(The few men left alive climb up a rope out of the spider pit. Captain Englehorn is at the top.)
Carl Denham (as he reaches the ledge): Thank God.
Captain Englehorn: Don't thank God. Thank Mr. Baxter. He insisted on a rescue mission. Me? I knew you'd be okay. That's the thing about cockroaches. No matter how many times you flush them down the toilet, they always crawl back up the bowl.
Carl Denham: Hey, buddy? I'm out of the bowl. I'm drying off my wings and trekking across the lid.

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Carl Denham (as he looks at Kong, asleep from the chloroform bottle hurled at his nose): The whole world will pay
to see this. We're millionaires, boys! I'll share it with all of you! In a few months his name will be up in lights on Broadway! Kong! The Eighth Wonder of the World!

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(Carl Denham walks out in front of the curtain. The audience applauds.)
Carl Denham: Thank you. Ladies and gentlemen, I'm here to tell you a very strange story. The story of our adventure in which 17 of our party suffered horrible deaths, their lives lost in pursuit of a savage beast, a monstrous aberration of nature. But even the meanest brute can be tamed. Yes, ladies and gentlemen, as you will see, the beast was no match for the charms of a girl.
(Audience laughs)
Carl Denham: A girl from New York
(Audience applauds)
Carl Denham: who melted his heart, bringing to mind that old Arabian proverb, "And lo, the beast looked upon the face of beauty, and beauty stayed his hand. And from that day forward, he was as one dead." And now, ladies and gentlemen, I'm going to show you the greatest thing your eyes have ever beheld. He was a king in the world he knew, but he comes to you now a captive. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you Kong, The Eighth Wonder of the World!

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(Jack Driscoll is in the balcony, where he finds Preston. He sees that the girl on the stage with Kong is not Ann Darrow.)
Jack Driscoll: Where is she? Where's Ann?
Preston: I have no idea. I heard he offered her all kinds of money and she turned him down flat.

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(Photographers climb onto Kong's body to take photos. One looks up at the building from which Kong plunged to his death.)
Photographer 1: Why'd he do that? Climb up there and get himself cornered? The ape must have known what was coming.
Photographer 2: He's just a dumb animal. Didn't know nothing.
(Denham pushes through the crowd and stands, stunned, looking at Kong.)
Man in crowd: What does it matter? Airplanes got him.
Carl Denham: It wasn't the airplanes. It was beauty killed the beast.

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King Kong (1933) - English subtitles
King Kong (1976) - English subtitles
King Kong (2005) - English subtitles
1933 Quotes page IMDb
1976 Quotes page IMDb
2005 Quotes page IMDb

_________________
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I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

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Fri Mar 14, 2014 9:04 pm
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)

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Captive Kong/Captive Ann


Kong takes Ann Darrow prisoner, but ultimately Kong becomes a prisoner as well, in the 1933 film. The girl travels from the island of Manhattan to the nameless island where Kong is a god, and then she travels back. Kong travels from his home island to Manhattan, where he meets his destiny. Ann goes on her journey blindly, but mostly of her own will. Kong doesn't elect to travel to New York City.

But Ann Darrow becomes a prisoner before she ever sees Kong. By accepting Carl Denham's motion picture role, the girl becomes a captive of the production itself. She cannot leave, because she's on the S.S Venture out at sea. It is the worst kind of captivity: she has no idea what she will see or be subjected to. Desperation has led her to this point. Despite her misgivings she has agreed to go along on the journey. And she becomes the bride of Kong only after being kidnapped by the island natives. These captors turn her over to the gigantic ape-like Kong who lives on the island on the other side of a great protective wall.

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In the 1976 film Dwan is less a captive, although she doesn't find herself aboard the Petrox Explorer by choice. She, too, is kidnapped by the island natives and given over to Kong. Dwan isn't exactly the victim of desperation, rather she is grateful to have been saved after the yacht on which she was a guest exploded and sank in the middle of the ocean.

Ann Darrow 1933 is not in show biz, although she has worked as an extra at a closed Long Island film studio. But Dwan wants to be an actress and is supposedly on her way to Hong Kong to appear in a film when the yacht sinks. In the 2005 movie Ann is co-headliner in a Vaudevillian review playing in New York City, until the show closes abruptly leaving her without cash and without a job. She rejects joining a burlesque review, and is rescued by Carl Denham. Denham will later take not only this young woman captive, but will capture the Kong-beast, and all three will be hurled together toward a common, though different destiny.

The John or Jack characters and the Ann or Dwan characters are the only ones who come through the whole ordeal mostly unscathed in all three versions. Even they are scarred by the events that take place. If you wanted to find symbolism in this story you could have a great time. It would be easy and fun to do with a basic story that is so full of iconic characters. But if you didn't include "being a captive," or "gaining freedom, or losing it" in your thematic sources for whatever symbols you wish to claim, you would be missing a large vein of literary ore. You can find sexual symbolism, feminist symbolism, national symbolism, ideological symbolism, racist symbolism, and many other kinds in this tale of captivity and demise. You can make Kong a symbol of Nature's power, or wrath, or make it seem that Nature is putty in human hands. You can make Ann the symbol of all women downtrodden and oppressed by all men. Or you can make Ann a figure of womanly strength, choosing her own course, and choosing to risk her life in order to save a creature she respects.

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But you cannot deny that both Ann and Kong become captives during the course of the story. Perhaps that's the source of Dwan's and '05 Ann's Stockholm Syndrome: being captive together with the great beast. In fact, after I wrote this I went looking for net-based analyses by others that might have seen the same thing, or something similar, or even an interestingly different theme! The links I found are posted below.





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The Nightmare Vision: King Kong as Captivity Narrative from History News Network. Posted by by Ron Briley, Assistant Headmaster, Sandia Preparatory School. "It is within this cultural context of racial relations and captivity narratives that we must place the powerful mythology of King Kong. Jackson attempts to offset the racial implications of the story by introducing a heroic black sailor Hayes (Evan Park), who is paternalistic in his caring for the young white Jeremy (Jaimie Bell) rather than sexually aggressive toward Darrow."
Tracking King Kong: A Hollywood Icon in World Culture By Cynthia Marie Erb. from Google Books. "In contrast to contemporary viewers' inclination to interpret King Kong according to codes of the horror genre, audiences of the 1930s were probably more sensitive to images and themes culled from the classic jungle film tradition."
It was beauty Killed the beast. from techno-noir. "One theme present in the movie is that of captivity and civilization as a dominant force. Kong was like a god, an all-powerful predator in his native island. But once Carl and his crew captured him, they took him to a land he did not know and could never survive in--civilization." -- "When Carl visited that remote island, he couldn't leave it alone. He wanted to exploit Kong and turn him into a show."
[url]The Symbolism of King Kong[/url] By Harry R. Davidson, Ph.D. from FinalCall.com News. Updated Apr 16, 2008 - 10:35:00 AM. "At no time has a gigantic gorilla been known to terrorize New York City. So, who does the giant monkey represent? The movie was originally released in 1933, an era when White racists commonly referred to Blacks as monkeys."
King Kong, the White Woman, and 2005: Appropriating Racism posted Monday, January 18, 2010 "In as much, by dehumanizing and suppressing African-Americans as they were when the original King Kong was made, the remake suggests that the inhumanity was on the part of the white man who shot King Kong down more than it was on the big black gorilla who fell from the top of the Empire State building."
Is King Kong a racist movie? from World Historia International Community forum. OP posted 03 May 2011 at 13:03 by Carcharodon. "Those who claim that the films are racist see the racism on two levels. One is the rather stereotyped image of the native people of the island, who are portraid as very savage, nearly inhuman (in Jacksons version some have seen a resemblance with the orcs or Uruk hai of his LOTR films) and who sacrifices their own young girls to the beast. Some also see another level of racism where King Kong himself becomes a symbol of the superpotent and bestial black man who lusts for white women (while he trashes women of his own color)."
King Kong: An Entertaining Monster from Talkingpix.co.uk. "King Kong has been regarded as a symbol of the unrepressed id, the lumpen-proletariat or the Afro-American, however Goldner and Turner prefer to regard the film as ‘a highly entertaining, shrewdly conceived work of pure cinema.’"
Of Monsters and Myths: Colonial Representations in King Kong (1933) By Bryan McKay at *blogcritics.org, posted Tuesday, December 20, 2005. "Perhaps the first and most obvious sign we can discuss in the context of the film’s racial discourse is that of the monstrous ape himself. Throughout the history of colonial and racial texts, the Black has consistently been represented in popular culture and science as a primitive (and often sexualized) creature: 'a set of external organs—woolly hair, flat broad nose, thick lips, and especially an oversized penis' (Gibson 2003)."
A Tale of Three Kongs: Race and Gender in King Kong and its Remakes posted by Jack Kerwick at belief.net "In an article for intellectualconservative.com, Lisa Fabrizio remarks on the dramatic changes in cinematic depictions of masculinity that have occurred over the decades. While the extent to which such depictions have become “feminized” has been greatly exaggerated by right-leaning commentators—not only is the “tough guy” at least as visible a character in contemporary cinema as it has ever been in the past, this generation’s movie macho men are typically bigger, stronger, and more aggressive than their counterparts from yesteryear—it is hard to avoid the verdict that the popularity of the figure of the strong and silent man has indeed been eclipsed by that of the man who is sweet and sensitive."

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Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

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The Future Unreels


Sat Mar 15, 2014 10:59 am
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Kong kan't komprehend the komplete lack of komebacks to his komparison. Krazy kreature, he is off in a korner, krying. I am trying to konsole him. But, so far, I kan't. I told him that people are reading, but probably no one has any komments they krave to make. I keep enkouraging him to smile, but he hasn't kome around so far. Maybe he will. I kontinue to tell him that everything will be kool. I am kommitted to helping him kast off his krestfallen mood over it, but at the moment he kan not be komforted. :D

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

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Sun Mar 16, 2014 12:15 am
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)
Behind the Lens

1933
The cinematography credit for the original film is as muddled as the writing credits. IMDb shows that there is an uncredited photographer for the film. The credits read Edward Linden...(photographed by), J.O. Taylor...(photographed by), Vernon L. Walker...(photographed by), and IMDb adds Kenneth Peach...(uncredited).

I grew up watching the cinematography of Kenneth Peach. His familiar accomplishments are too numerous for me to list here, just click on his name above and you can read for yourself as many of his 82 photography credits as you like. I will point out that he was the man who showed me Lassie in the series that came on when I was a first-grader. He's also the one who framed up the astronauts in IT! The Terror from Beyond Space, which I wouldn't discover for another several decades, although he made it before Lassie. Toward the end of his career he shot 59 episodes of Taxi, the TV series. Peach worked back and forth between TV and features from 1951.

Edward Linden shot a lot of Westerns before King Kong. On the other hand, after King Kong, Linden shot a lot more Westerns, but there were sci-fi and horror films mixed in. He didn't get into television until 1955, close to the end of his career. J.O. Taylor has 51 credits as Cinematographer, but his last two are King Kong and The Son of Kong, both released in 1933. He lived for another four decades, but he changed careers. From 1933 to 1946 Taylor concentrated on visual and special effects. You've seen Vernon Walker's name associated with higher profile films such as Citizen Kane (1941), Notorious (1946), Bringing up Baby (1938) and Suspicion (1941). Between 1941 and 1945 Walker received four nominations, but no wins, from the Oscar people. On Kong he was the visual effects cinematographer. Thus, his lighting work made Kong look as real as he does.


1976
Richard H. Kline photographed 55 films in his career. I have seen over twenty of them, if you include TV series on which he worked. I didn't even know his name until I looked him up for this blurb. As I've often written, it is rarely the cinematographer who is responsible for a film being not good. Kline received an Oscar nomination for his work on King Kong (1976); ten years earlier he had been nominated for the same technical role in Camelot (1967).

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2005
The cinematographer who created the real portions of what we see in the 2005 Kong film is Andrew Lesnie. When you learn that he has won an Oscar (along with 23 other awards) and see what it's for, you'll know who he is. Yeah, he's part of Jackson's Australo-Kiwi powerhouse of modern filmmakers. But he has 46 credits for photography, and they aren't all Jackson films. For example, Lesnie shot one of the most beautiful children's films of all time, Babe (1995) which I probably enjoyed more than my 13-year old or his 9 year old brother when it came out. He has other credits for I Am Legend (2007) and The Last Airbender (2010) and Rise of the Planet of the Apes (2011) which means he works across genres. Although, I guess much of his work is fantasy and sci-fi. Lesnie started out shooting TV shows in 1979, moved into documentaries and shorts, and moved up to theatrical feature work in 1984. His career began when he was 23, so he probably has a long career ahead at only 57 years old.




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Edward Linden from Wikipedia
Vernon L. Walker from Wikipedia
VERNON L. WALKER from IEC
Richard H. Kline from Wikipedia
Richard H. Kline, ASC from asc.com
Andrew Lesnie ACS ASC from cinematographer.org.au

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

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Sun Mar 16, 2014 12:17 am
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YouTookMyName wrote:
Kong kan't komprehend the komplete lack of komebacks to his komparison. Krazy kreature, he is off in a korner, krying. I am trying to konsole him. But, so far, I kan't. I told him that people are reading, but probably no one has any komments they krave to make. I keep enkouraging him to smile, but he hasn't kome around so far. Maybe he will. I kontinue to tell him that everything will be kool. I am kommitted to helping him kast off his krestfallen mood over it, but at the moment he kan not be komforted. :D

Maybe I am the only Korrie who kares about Kong.

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


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Sun Mar 16, 2014 12:22 am
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)

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Soundtracks


I heard on a commentary track that the score for King Kong (1933) was an unusual departure for early sound films. The thought at that time was reportedly that the movies could talk now, and that's what they should do. In the days of yore, silent films often had custom scores written for them. There was almost always piano or organ accompaniment during showings. But when sound films came along (which seems like the perfect vehicle for scores, doesn't it?) the use of music became very restricted.

Think about Tod Browning's Dracula (1931), and how it has music only beneath the titles. The rest of the film is talking and sound effects. It seems needlessly austere to us these days. And it must have seemed needlessly austere to Cooper and Schoedsack, because a composer was hired to create music specific to King Kong. It is written that Cooper paid for the composition and recording out of his own pocket. And what a soundtrack it is! So if what I've read is true, and that Max Steiner's score was the first for a sound feature film, then in a sense John Williams owes his great financial success to the fact that Max Steiner knocked one out of the park with the King Kong score. I hear that Steiner's score coupled with the attention the Kong film garnered, led other directors and producers to want the same kind of nifty musical underpinnings for their celluloid adventures.

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I'm impressed with the Steiner score. But I'm less impressed with the score for the 1976 remake. John Barry's music, if you listen to it in isolation and with certain tracks selected, sounds really good. The 14 minutes of music in the excerpt video on Youtube would make you expect to be blown away by the tracks in the film. But my notes from the most recent viewing, tell me that the way the music is used gets repetitive and distracting.

James Newton Howard did a better job (or the music editor did) with the 2005 re-remake. Howard's scores are often self-derivative, but this one has a tonal richness that you don't usually hear in his work. Even the 2005 score repeats Howard's Kong motif a little too often, especially at the end of the film when Kong is climbing the Empire State Building. But his main theme as a piece of music is more beautiful than anything Steiner or Barry wrote for their versions of the film. And, in a homage to Steiner, for the scene at the Alhambra Theater, Howard borrows some of Steiner's themes for the stage presentation that takes place just before Kong pulls those "chrome steel" chains loose.

My notes from the 1933 use of the Steiner score also clue me in that the same cues are repeated too often at the end of that film. Perhaps I would have done the same thing given the same material to work with. But I'm pretty picky about music, so I don't think I would have been so relentlessly repetitive.

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You can't slight Max Steiner for his score being brasher than the other two. That was the style of music back then, although it became even more-so after the release of King Kong. Steiner more or less set the tonal style for action films in the 1930s, and it didn't change much for 20 years. As for the Guillermin movie, so many scores in the 1970s were synthesizer-based, I suppose we are lucky that Barry and de Laurentiis decided to use an orchestral score. It could have been a pop combo, if you think about it. That would have been weird!

And if the music in a film gets boring or repeats too often
it's probably not the composer who should be blamed. It is probably the production staff for ordering up too little music, and the music editor for selecting the same bits over and over.

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James Newton Howard from IMDb
James Newton Howard Awards from IMDb
John Barry from IMDb
John Barry Awards from IMDb
Max Steiner from IMDb
Max Steiner Awards from IMDb
1933 Youtube: Soundtrack compilation video. By Lordhelmchen76. Stereo, based on the Stromberg recording. 14:05
1976 Youtube: Soundtrack compilation video. By Lordhelmchen76. Stereo 14:51
2005 Youtube: King Kong 2005 Soundtrack : Best of James Newton Howard. By WOWTheFlyingPalaces, stereo 14:16
King Kong Soundtrack Suite-James Newton Howard from Youtube. Upload by Marko Detweiler, stereo 19:48
Jersey Shore: Branchage Film Festival 2011 David Moats , October 3rd, 2011 09:46 "Branchage is famous for its live soundtracks, and this year is no exception. We sadly miss Rob Da Bank's King Kong live soundtrack but manage to catch Serafina Steer and her brother Sam presenting a selection of films along with a new soundtrack collaboration in a remote church on the north of the Island."
King Kong (1933 Version) + Live Soundtrack an event I wish I could have experienced!
The Film Music of Max Steiner with Emphasis on King Kong (1933) and Gone With the Wind (1939) September 3, 2009 by Michael Pratt "The film’s director Merian C. Cooper was convinced of the potential for the film and the importance of a good score by Max Steiner. “Cooper said the magic words, which I quote: ‘Maxie, go ahead and score the picture … and don’t worry about the cost, because I will pay for the orchestra.’ And so he did, to the tune of fifty thousand dollars – an enormous sum to expend on music then; and to hear him tell it, it was worth every dime."
King Kong Soundtrack Highlights - James Newton Howard from Youtube

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
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The Future Unreels


Sun Mar 16, 2014 9:18 pm
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!!! Too many notes!!!

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I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Sun Mar 16, 2014 9:23 pm
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)

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Defending 1976


I'm convinced that no movie ever released has zero fans. There are always those who find some kind of glimmering gemstone in a flick that critics and most viewers call tripe. In fact, I've been known to find nothing particularly wrong with certain films from time to time -- films that are quite unpopular. I've also been on the bandwagon declaring certain other films to be worthless.

I guess whether you like or dislike a film is a very personal thing. It would have been possible to do an essay similar to this one for the 2002 version of Rollerball, if I had wanted to. But my aim for this essay is to scour the internet and find praise for John Guillermin's 1976 King Kong film. Praise that certainly won't mirror my opinion of it.

The idea for this essay came when I located a link to include with the 1976 review, a treatise from Den of Geek entitled "Reconsidering King Kong (1976)" (link repeated in Weblinks below). I also found a very supportive Youtube comment at the link for a full upload of the film:
SpreadingtheMuse at Youtube wrote:
This Kong is my favorite of the three, mainly because the scenario is more realistic. A oil company scouring the world is far more believable than a washed-up movie director with a ragged treasure map. And the ape suit is severely underrated. Sure its a guy in a suit. And its one of the BEST guys in the whole business who is inside that suit. He made Kong believable. And one year after this, he was one of the Cantina Band in Star Wars.? They gave a reasonable explanation as to why the island hadnt been found yet. It took a satellite to finally nail it down?
It astonishes me that someone would consider any particular scenario surrounding the story of a giant ape to be more plausible than...another. But poster SpreadingtheMuse obviously considers this kind of thing.

So these are minority views. When I pressed forward with my quest for lovers of this film I tried several word combinations in Google, and I just didn't find that many who defend the Guillermin film. I found some, but honestly, I expected to see more. Usually, even bad films have their vocal internet-posting fans. The search results are in the Weblinks block below.



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Reconsidering King Kong (1976) from den of geek. "In the end the overhyped, and almost completely immobile, robot only appeared onscreen for a few seconds during the Shea Stadium sequence in which Kong escapes. Even those few brief moments left audiences laughing. It looked pretty bad. So much so that those scenes were cut from the home video release."
The Second Coming of KING KONG (1976) posted Monday, January 21, 2013 at Space: 1970. "I'm going to put my reputation (such as it is) on the line here and publicly state for the record that I do not believe that Dino DeLaurentis and John Guillermin's King Kong (1976) is quite as bad as everyone says it is."
KING KONG (1976) - monstrous disaster movie posted November 06, 2008 at Black Hole Reviews. "Storywise, King Kong '76 improves on rival versions with a story that launches straight away with the ship heading off for Skull Island, this time in search of oil, a rare and expensive commodity in that inflation-ridden decade."
i love king kong 1976 Google search result
king kong 1976 is great Google search result

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Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

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Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Sun Mar 16, 2014 9:24 pm
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)
In the Cutting Room

1933
Ted Cheesman has the credit for Film Editing on the original film. He earned 27 editorial credits between 1928 and 1954. His last theatrical feature was Mighty Joe Young, where he cut the film, including putting the special effects footage into the film after it was worked on by Willis O'Brien, and his new protegé, Ray Harryhausen. Cheesman also edited Son of Kong (1933), and She (1935).


1976
Ralph E. Winters' editorial career spanned from 1941 to 1995. His talent for cutting film was applied to movies across genre barriers. Ben-Hur (1959), The Pink Panther (1963), Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954), Victor Victoria (1982), 10 (1979), The Thomas Crown Affair (1968), High Society (1956), Little Women (1949), King Solomon's Mines (1950), Mr. and Mrs. North (1942), Quo Vadis (1951) are all among his accomplishments. Winters won two Best-editing Oscars for King Solomon's Mines, and Ben-Hur. He died at age 94, but not before writing his memoirs, on his PC, and seeing it published, according to his IMDb bio page.


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2005
After he edited Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003), and was an associate producer on all three films in that trilogy, Jamie Selkirk edited the most recent King Kong film. He was supervising editor on the first two LotR films. Kong is Selkirk's most recent IMDb editor credit. He has been more active as a producer since then. He has 15 editorial credits that range in time from 1980 to 2005. He was the editor on several of Peter Jackson's early horror films. And he has one visual effects credit for producing the miniatures sequences for Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003).




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Ralph E. Winters from Wikipedia
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Jamie Selkirk

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Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
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The Future Unreels


Tue Mar 18, 2014 9:08 am
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)

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Why Not A Boy?


Here's a problem that all three Kong films share: the natives sacrifice a maiden to Kong, a giant ape who is presumed to be male. So, when Kong sees Ann she is so different from the native girls that he usually gets for "brides," that he is smitten. It's the old beauty and the beast story updated for the 1930s. And updated in 1976 to a kind of interspecies "erratica." Except, at the root of it, this all makes no sense!

See, I was watching the '76 film and the scene with the native woman all dressed up to become Kong's bride played, and I thought, "It wouldn't matter to Kong whether it's a boy or a girl, would it? It's a human being. Not an ape. He might, might, I remind you, get excited over a female gorilla. But then there's the relative size problem. Maybe he's into living dolls or something.

Why not a boy? What difference would it make to the giant ape? Think about it this way:

Imagine yourself being a human being. Okay, got that? Now, a tribe of chimpanzees, in order to appease you, sacrifice a female chimp to you (if you are male) or a male chimp to you (if you are female), or adjust those pairings if you're same-sex oriented. And what do you do? Are you smitten by the beauty of the chimp? Does your world get turned on its head?

Nah. It's a chimp. A completely different species. Pet, maybe, lover, no. And if you want a size-relative comparison, make it a tribe of spider monkeys. Would you care if your pet spider monkey was male or female? That is, other than concern over whatever relative tendencies to do furniture and architectural damage there are that may be sex-linked in the monkeys.

So this whole Kong smitten by Ann thing makes no sense at all, unless you realize that it's a white man's fantasy. A very very lonely white man's fantasy, to be exact. Ann looks pretty good to male human eyes, of course, but Kong doesn't have those. Kong is an ape. A giant ape. He has giant ape eyes. And he wouldn't fall in love with a human being. Would he? Otherwise we're talking about whatever bestiality would be called if it's the beast having it for a human.

I can understand the islanders taking blonde, pale Ann Darrow (or Dwan) for a sacrifice, because she just might appeal to them. But the other species involved? This stretches credulity for me. Although I did find some articles (links in Weblinks block below) that claim this kind of attraction is documented. Just not between gigundo apes and normal-sized human females.

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Am I wrong? Would a gorilla be able to "fall in love with" a human being? The films suggest this, rightly or wrongly. Especially the 1976 version. So is Kong supposed to be turned on by Ann? In the '76 film Jack Prescott keeps referring to Kong as "turned on." In pursuit of Kong and Dwan in the island jungles he radios to Fred, "The girl might be running for her life from a gigantic turned-on ape." But that makes zero sense, except to lonely white guys. The ape being turned on, that is. Running for her life makes complete sense.

I keep saying white because Kong has had any number of beautiful islander girls over the years. And what exactly did he do with them? Does he use them for a protein supplement to his usual vegetarian diet of trees? They don't tell us in any of the films, dadgummit. (Pete Jackson includes a scene in his film with a lot of islander lady bones in a carpet on the floor of the Kong cave, but doesn't explain why they got there.) But Ann, the white person, is somehow more beautiful than all the others. Kong is smitten by her lily whiteness and beauty of a "superior kind." Isn't this white supremacy talk? You know, without actually saying anything? Because a motion-picture is worth ten-thousand words.

And these pictures are complete fantasies. Just a bit of fridge logic for you, there. I guess if you can ask "Why not a boy?" in order to be cheeky and fridgy-logical, you can also ask, "Why not a girl?" And that sets everything back to status quo,because we already have a girl in all. three. films.



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King Kong's Monkey Love - Intimacy on the primate family tree by Joshuah Bearman Thursday, Dec 15 2005 at LA Weekly News. " There’s always suspicion they may have already; for some reason, Japan often gets fingered as the place that has secretly developed primate crossbreeds. And then there was the case of Oliver, a circus chimpanzee who seemed so human — he lived with a family in South Africa, where he liked to feed the dogs and sip whiskey while watching TV — that he was tested for human parentage. He came up negative, but in the end Oliver had to be sold because he developed an overpowering sexual interest in his female owner and woman visitors."
Death of a Showman: Dino De Laurentiis (1919-2010) By Richard Corliss Friday, Nov. 12, 2010 from time.com "That description might also fit the New York–shot King Kong, except that Dino, in a TIME cover story on the production, called it 'the greatest love story ever made.' He was enthralled with Jessica Lange, his young leading lady (whom he had signed after nixing another promising ingenue, Meryl Streep, as 'ugly'), and with the emotional bond between her character and the big ape. 'No one cry when Jaws die,' Dino told TIME. 'But when the monkey die, people gonna cry. Intellectuals gonna love Kong. Even film buffs who love the first Kong gonna love ours. Why? Because I no give them crap.'" Ah. If only that last sentence had been true.
King Kong (1976) By Keith Phipps Feb 23, 2012 12:00 AM at avclub.com Secret Cinema. "Universal wanted to do a remake set in the 1930s. De Laurentiis had other plans: He set out to make a King Kong for, and set in, the 1970s. And a good one, too. 'Intellectuals gonna love Kong,” De Laurentiis promised Time. “Even film buffs who love the first Kong gonna love ours. Why? Because I no give them crap.'" and "If you were alive in the mid-’70s, even if you were just a tot at the time, as I was, you saw Kong. You knew Kong. Kong was a big, angry ape on top of a skyscraper." and "Once Kong is captured, she defends him vociferously against Grodin’s insistence that Kong 'tried to rape' her. Later, in what has to be one of the ickiest come-on lines ever, Bridges looks at her admiringly and says, 'The ape had the right idea' before kissing her."
The Biology Of King Kong from Forbes 12/12/2005 @ 3:00PM “What I would interpret as cross-species sexual attraction does happen,” says Barbara J. King, a biological anthropologist and professor at The College of William and Mary. She studies the social communication of great apes and once had the chance to introduce her college dean to one of the animals in her lab. “The female of the gorilla group was very attracted to him, she pursed her lips and pushed small gifts through the cage at him,” she says. “She clearly knew that he was the only male in the group, and she fixated on him.”

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Tue Mar 18, 2014 9:23 am
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)
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IMDb link 8.0/10 from 55,913 users -- RT-link Tomatometer 98%, audience rating 86% with 88,171 votes

Year: 1933 Directors: Merian C. Cooper & Ernest B. Schoedsack -- Cast: Fay Wray, Bruce Cabot, Robert Armstrong -- Length: 100 min. B&W/Mono -- estimated budget: $672,000; estimated box office $2,847,000

This film has so many firsts in it that it would be famous among students of film even if it wasn't a well-made film. To watch the film as if you haven't seen anything that came after it in history is likely impossible. But I would love to experience that, and know what it felt like to audiences of 1933. To whatever extent you can, you should watch the film with that frame of mind. Stop-motion animation hadn't been used in many widely-released films prior to Kong, so for nearly every movie-goer who sat in a darkened room and watched this story unfold, the effect must have been amazing.

How many special effects wizards of the middle and late 20th century confess to having gotten their love of film and their desire to tell stories in the medium from their first viewing of King Kong? I can't make you a list, but I know I've heard that attribution from many famous special effects guys and directors. No doubt there are films with CGI Visual FX that have and will inspire young minds to new flights of fantasy. My grandchildren will sit in theaters and watch that magic on huge screens.

But King Kong was unlike anything that had ever been accomplished in film up until that time. There are sequences in The Lost World (1925) that feature dinosaurs, including one "brontosaurus" loose in London. And those stop-motion animation effects were created by Willis H. O'Brien, who would create Kong seven years later.

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As with most films of the era, King Kong is told in a coherent way, but with little specifically explained. No specific explanation was necessary for those audiences. But much of the implied "explanation" is based on pop cultural standards of the day. The island shrouded in perpetual sea fog was the kind of awesome thing that people of the 1930s could still believe in. The fact that it was "uncharted" was sufficient explanation for the purpose of story-telling in 1933. (By 1976 there was a need to explain the fog screen away, and even that the island was previously unknown! For story-telling reasons, Peter Jackson set his remake in the same era as the original film. So the original Merian C. Cooper film was contemporary in its setting, the second remake is historical in its setting. The 1976 first remake retains the contemporary setting, which works against it in every way.)

No doubt in a turn of story-telling influenced by The Lost World (novel 1912, film 1925), the explorers aboard the Venture are drawn into a world out of time. Implausible, except within the fictional world of the film, it entertains and thrills us with imaginary juxtapositions of critters that would never have existed at the same time. In effect, this throws the then-modern conception of how the world works out the window, and substitutes that baffling and timeless world of Kong for what we know about the way things work. It is, for that reason, total fantasy, meant to be taken as total fantasy, and enjoyed as a gripping tale of adventure. That it still works in that regard after 81 years is a compliment to its makers.

Here are some aspects of the film and whether I like them or don't care for them:

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Like: This movie is a ripping yarn, pulling out all the stops (a saying from playing a pipe organ) and using all the manuals at once. It is noisy, brash, a visual assault. It is not concerned with scientific accuracy, but much of what we see is "guided" by the science of the day. And then it is embellished. The writing and presentation is enough to draw in all but the least imaginative, most literal-minded viewer. The result is a good ride. I have never seen the film projected on a theater screen, but if I ever get the chance to....

Like: There are nuances to O'Brien's animation of the non-human characters that enhance the make-believe aspects of the film. It's all basically make-believe, with enough technical magic tossed in to help our imaginations along toward piecing the story together and imagining what it would be like to travel with the expedition. The technical magic uses straight-on stop-motion animation sequences, including tiny human figures, such as Jack climbing over and around rocks as he pursues Kong to rescue Ann. It uses rear projection, such as when Jack is in a cave below the edge of the cliff where Kong has twisted a huge log until all the men have fallen to their deaths. Every possible trick is used. In certain sequences we see tiny animated humans, then rear projection, then back to animated puppets. It had to be planned out in tedious detail, didn't it? Sometimes the slight-of-hand is not quite as slick as at other times. And we can see the trick, but we still go along with the magician.

Like: The characters are well-drawn, and for the most part likable. We don't have a villain conspiring to do anyone in, or to thwart anyone's plan of action. Kong is enough of a force to embody conflict without being a villain at all. If you think about it, just pulling off a story that has no bad guys is pretty slick. Of course, Denham is drawn as his own worst enemy, after a fashion.

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Like: This version of the story doesn't seem to have one of those stretches where it slows to a crawl. The other two versions do. This film, perhaps because of budgetary restrictions or something, doesn't seem to have excess story material. A few sequences might have been trimmed back, such as the attack Kong makes on the native village before his capture, but it isn't too long the way it is.

Like: Whether they are well thought out or not, and I tend to think they are well thought out, there are parallels in the visual construction of the story that are charming. First, Ann is the captive in Kong's world, then Kong becomes a captive. On the island where Kong lives when he escapes into the human village, there are men on a tower hurling weapons at him. Kong smashes their tower, and escapes. Later, when Kong is in the land of humans, he climbs a tower, but is unable to withstand the different kind of weapons hurled at him from airplanes. In that case there is no escape.

Like: At first Jack Driscoll would just as soon not have a woman along on the voyage. But it isn't long before he is protecting her, and then facing possible death to rescue her from an unbelievable adventure. It isn't as if he tries to fall in love with her, but events conspire to make it happen.

Like: Although to the eye of the day the islanders' actions concerning Ann Darrow are treachery, seen in a modern light they make some sense. Unable to bargain for her to be Kong's "bride" they skulk out to the ship by night and simply take her. It is a common literary ploy, especially in dime novels and paperbacks, so it was a plot turn that the audience would have been accustomed to. If you understand what seems to be treachery on the part of the Skull Islanders as something different, as a clash of cultural ethics, then it won't grate on modern nerves quite so much. In fact, it becomes a literary device used in this film to get the explorers beyond the great wooden wall, and into Kong's own living space.

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Don't Like: The film is stuck with the racism of its time. The way ethnic relationships are presented is the way in which audiences were perceived to comprehend the world around them and the people in it. So much of the film is timeless that the rather specific attitudes of the 1930s stick out to modern viewers, no doubt. That can't be helped. It has to be overlooked, but it may drive some potential 21st century viewers away from the movie.

Don't Like: Screaming. There is so much screaming in this film that it makes my throat raw just to listen to it. It's repetitious, and annoying. Mostly it's Ann Darrow or other women, but there are even a lot of male voices screaming in terror and death. Too much of it, as a matter of fact. Plus, the sound designer only had so many screaming voice clips to work with, and you hear them again and again...sometimes back-to-back!

Don't Like: The acting is still a bit too strident for modern tastes, and for some viewers this might detract as much as the black & white images might. On balance, the acting is far more naturalistic than many films made in the same year. But that's not saying that it was done with the Stanislowski style, or Lee Strasberg's Method.

Don't Like: As good as the Max Steiner music written specifically for this film is, the ending sequence in New York reuses cues until you get tired of them. At least I do. Perhaps Cooper and Schoedsack thought there was enough music, and then decided more music was needed, and they had no option but to cut in the same tracks again and again. Or, perhaps they knew they needed music, but figured the same scoring would work, and that's what they'd want, so why record any extra tracks? Which is it? I don't know. Maybe the truth is something I haven't thought of.

Don't Like: The big ol' Kong head that they built seems to have been designed by someone who never saw the 18 inch animation puppets. So it's supposed to be the same beast, but it's like cutting back and forth between classical Japanese renderings of a face and 17th century Flemish paintings of the same face. It's difficult to recognize that they are supposed to be the same due to stylistic differences. We're familiar with this from the Godzilla Rematch. The hand puppet and the suit had different faces, too.


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There are flaws in this movie that were there from the beginning. They remain present for today's audiences. There are other aspects that aren't inherent flaws, but appear as flaws to the modern viewer. In spite of these, the film still grips many people's imaginations in a way that is hard to resist. Of the three films it has the highest Tomatometer because it's a classic film, and they always get critical raves. But it is the only one that rates highly with plain old viewers who have bothered to vote at IMDb and Rotten Tomatoes. There is still something fresh and enchanting about the Cooper-Schoedsack vision of the Kong story that the two remakes don't seem to be able to match. Clunky old stop-motion animation and black and white film stock triumph in some way that creates sufficiency, if not beauty, in the eyes of many beholders!



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King Kong (1933 film) from Wikizilla
Scale Models Based on King Kong
King Kong 1/35 Scale vinyl model kit review by Alan Nadel
Aurora King Kong model Kit
King Kong, Son of Kong, and Mighty Joe Young in the Model Museum
King Kong resin kit models
King Kong model news page
King Kong (1933 film) from Wikipedia "King Kong was re-released in 1938, 1942, 1946, 1952 and 1956 to great box office success. Stricter decency rules had been put into effect in Hollywood since its 1933 premiere and each time it was censored further, with several scenes being either trimmed or excised altogether." "King Kong was released on Laserdisc in 1984 by the Criterion Collection, and was the very first movie to have an audio commentary track included."
Merian C. Cooper from Wikipedia
Ernest B. Schoedsack from Wikipedia
Fay Wray from Wikipedia
Bruce Cabot from Wikipedia
Robert Armstrong (actor) from Wikipedia
Max Steiner from Wikipedia "The score for King Kong (1933) became Steiner's breakthrough and brought his name to everyone’s attention. Actor and musician Oscar Levant later called the film "a symphony accompanied by a movie," and an expression of Steiner's mastery of "illuminating action with sound." According to music critic and writer Bruce Eder, many critics at the time attributed a quarter of the film's success to the music."
Frank Reicher from Wikipedia
Noble Johnson from Wikipedia
Victor Wong (actor born 1906) from Wikipedia
In case you're curious:
The Lost World (1925) **½ a predecessor with many ideas that you find in King Kong. from 1000 Misspent Hours
The Lost World (1925) [HD] from Youtube
The Lost World by Arthur Conan Doyle from Project Gutenberg
The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Lost World, by Arthur Conan Doyle

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Wed Mar 19, 2014 6:14 pm
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)

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Censored!


Some of you are aware that King Kong was censored by the MPPDA's Hays Office, but that wasn't upon its original 1933 release. If you've read about the film you know that the US cuts were eventually restored for video release from various prints found around the world.

In a 1987 direct to video documentary
entitled Hollywood Uncensored, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. points out that Joseph Breen, who became chief of the Production Code Administration in 1934, demanded that 6 minutes be cut out of the film. That would have been for its 1938 re-release. In the early 20th century there were many groups that protested against what they saw as immorality and hyper-violence in the typical Hollywood output. This culminated in Breen having the power to enforce the MPPDA Production Code in a way his predecessor never attempted. For people born after 1970 the effects of the Production Code are merely mythical, and hard to believe. But they were real for nearly 40 years.

What I didn't know was that the USA was not the only country to censor the movie. In Europe, we have records of censorship in Germany, Austria, and Czechoslovakia.
Quote:
KING KONG was censored twice in Germany. In 26th July 1933 the film was banned outright by the Censorship Office in Berlin.
This was appealed, and eventually
Quote:
Although the National Health Office still recommend the ban of KING KONG, the verdict of 26th July 1933 was reversed. The censorship committee stated that “this typical American sensational film” would be far too “unreal” and “fantastic” and that it would rather cause general merriment in Germany. Therefore a “permanent unhealthy effect” on the “average cinemagoer” was not expected.

However, KING KONG was banned for young people and cuts were imposed. The background story, all close-ups showing the screaming women in the hands of King Kong were cut out because of a supposed “health damage”. In addition King Kong’s attack on the elevated railway was removed, because the scene would endanger the public safety.
This may seem silly in light of the general situation surrounding films in 2014, but it was similar to what governments around the world were doing to films in the 1930s. The US is not the only country with a religiously conservative segment. And the quotes above refer to the 1933 release, the original release of the film in Germany. Remember that the National Socialists had come to power before King Kong was made. In fact, it was Kong's release year of 1933 that saw the Nazis with so much power that Adolf Hitler was appointed Chancellor of Germany.

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I've used the retrocrush page "KING KONG TURNS 70!!!" as a reference for another essay, but it contains some information pertinent to this discussion.
Quote:
Kong also holds the distinction of being the first film successful enough to be re-released. Prior to that, "older" films never saw the light of day again in first run theater. Its also one of the first films to get censored to appease conservative studio bosses, fearful that Kong was a bit too shocking and gruesome with his behavior.
The article goes on to detail just which sections were clipped out of the film for the 1938 re-release. Among them are some still-shocking shots of Kong stepping on two of the native men, grinding them beneath his foot. I can understand cutting that, but I don't understand cutting the scene where Kong tears Ann Darrow's dress. Nothing more than her legs are revealed in this shot.

My review said that Kong was a film with many firsts!
I had no idea that it was the first film to be re-relased to first-run theaters. I also didn't know that it was among the first to be severely censored due to conservative backlash, in order to allow a re-release. Remember that The Maltese Falcon (1931) got remade after 5 years because the PCA Hays Office said it would have to be cut. I guess there was no way to remake King Kong into a quirky comedy with a new title!.

I was unaware that there was such extensive cutting of the film when it was 5 years old, although I knew that some scenes had been cut. I was unsure which scenes they were until the restoration DVD came out many years ago. But censorship in other countries? I had no idea of that until this Multimatch was underway. Evidently, the stop motion effects didn't create enough other-worldly look for 1933 audiences, to keep it from being potentially frightening.

Then again, it could simply be that some busy-bodies in a lot of countries wanted to pretend that it would be frightening to people, so that they could make use of their authority to censor. Who will ever know?

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Hollywood Uncensored (1987) from IMDb
Motion Picture Production Code from Wikipedia
Joseph Breen from Wikipedia
The Case studies KING KONG USA 1933 from deutsches film institut.de
KING KONG TURNS 70!!! from retrocrush

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Thu Mar 20, 2014 8:42 pm
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)
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IMDb link 7.3/10 from 253,052 users -- RT-link Tomatometer 84%, audience rating 49% with 33,751,971 votes

Year: 2005 Director: Peter Jackson -- Cast: Naomi Watts, Jack Black, Adrien Brody, Thomas Kretschmann, Jamie Bell, Evan Parke, Andy Serkis -- Length: 187 min. Color/Stereo -- estimated budget: $207,000,000; est. gross $550,517,357 (worldwide)

This film evokes responses that are all over the place. Notice the IMDb 7.3 rating above, notice the critics' rating of 84%, and then notice the RottenTomatoes audience approval of 49%. Out of over 33 million votes, only about 1 in 2 viewers say they liked the film. As you read this review you'll begin to understand that my reaction to the film is all over the place, too!

My guess is that the dislike shown by the RT rating is dislike of Peter Jackson's inability to edit himself sufficiently. The man is an excellent filmmaker. Everything I've seen from him is great to look at. But sometimes he does include the things he wants to include without any regard for whether I want to spend that much time watching something he wants to show me.

Remember when Peter Jackson would make tightly plotted, regular length films that still hold your attention all the way through? Yeah, so do I. It was a long, long time ago, wasn't it? We were all much younger.

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Maybe the famous deleted spider pit sequence wasn't removed from the 1933 film because it was too scary after all. Maybe it was excised because it made the film too long, and too full (like the Emperor claims in Amadeus, "There are too many notes.") and removing it keeps things moving along at a good pace. So Jackson recreated it here with the amour of a true cinema history devotee. Whether it's needed or not. And it comes at a point in the film when everything is ratcheted up to eleven, so that in order to not slow everything down the action in the spider pit is just totally frenetic. And lacks impact because of it. It moves so fast that it grinds the film to a halt. Maybe that's your favorite scene from the entire movie. Obviously, it's not mine.

Some have criticized Jackson's version by saying that "it's too close to the 1933 version." An inane critique at best. I think the 2005 would have been much better if Pete had sat down, gritted his teeth, and clipped out nearly any scene that wasn't in the original. That would have made his film the right length, too. There is character development in the newest version that really isn't needed for this kind of movie. My support for this argument? The 1933 film gets by just fine without that extra character development. It does so because the germs of development are there, and the viewer's brains fill in the rest!

Not that the character development in the film is not good. It is. Very good. And well-done. There's just too much of it.

This film is a delight in so many ways (which explains the 84% Tomatometer), it's just that the servings are too large (which likely explains the 49% audience approval). Jackson becomes like a grandmother who won't believe that her grandchild can possibly be full of food, and keeps ladling more grub onto the plate. Sure, that extra food is objectively as delicious as the part already consumed, but it isn't needed. And as the grandchild chews and swallows the subjective deliciousness of the food loses a lot simply because it really isn't wanted.

Here are some aspects of the film and whether I like them or don't care for them:

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Like: Kong as played by Andy Serkis wearing the mo-cap suit seems alive in a way that the stop-motion puppet of 1933 and the rubber-suited Rick Baker of 1976 don't. And I don't think it loses anything, either. I think this is the best depiction to date of the Kong creature. The big beast seems alive, has emotions, and seems old and tired. This is due to Serkis' acting ability, of course, but it is equally due to the visual effects wizards who rigged him up to be able to play the beast in the way he did.

Like: The era looks accurate as depicted with CGI set extensions. At times it is almost like a 3-color litho printed in that time period. Scenes from National Geographic. A time when "things were better," although it was the Great Depression.

Like: The addition of a washed-up B-movie actor to the cast of Denham's film. Also, the trumping of of Denham's greediness and self-aggrandizement is interesting. Although, it's taken one step too far. A single repeat of his claim to be generous would have been fine. And on my first viewing on 30 March 2006, I didn't like Jimmy (the character Jackson created especially so that Jamie Bell could be in his movie). This time I really enjoyed Jimmy, and his relationship with the man who saved him four years earlier, Mr. Hayes.

Like: Jackson doesn't add a villain to the story, using the original idea that Denham is both semi-hero and villain, or at least anti-hero. He actually doesn't need a foil, because he is, as the old saying goes, his own worst enemy.

Like: The look on Jack Black's face as Denham stands on the stage of the ruined Alhambra Theater with the audience, his giant ape, and any hope for making this defeat merely momentary, all gone.

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Like: There is humor in the movie that doesn't quite seem silly, but adds a light touch just when needed. If only all the humor in the movie was that adeptly deployed.
Don't Like: The movie doesn't always skirt the boundaries of campiness. It sometimes runs in waving its arms and making funny mouth noises. Sadly, I don't think the campy parts fit very well with the rest. And I usually like campy humor in places. Love the 1966 Batman The Movie movie.

Like: Jackson's willingness to milk each situation for the most he can get from it. To run everything to its logical conclusion. For example the 45-minute sequence where Kong, Ann and the dinosaurs fall sloooowwwwly down through a net of vines into a chasm. Oh, it isn't 45 minutes? Seemed like it. Or the sequence where a T-Rex shows up and then another T-Rex. How clever. Oh, and then there's another T-Rex that comes out from behind some rocks. Surprize!

Yeah, well, having written that: obviously there's a reason or two why I put off the second viewing for 8 years.

Don't Like: Goes on for too long. Has one or two too many chases. Has one or ten too many dinosaurs. Although I do like the apatasaurus chase where the dinosaurs always manage not to step on the fleeing humans, and then have a massive interstate-style pileup. But on balance the film has an overabundance of excess.
Don't Like: For example, in the spider pit sequence and the Kong vs Dinos WWE segment, which overlap by the way, there is always something else to happen. That's okay to use once. Or twice. But this just goes on and on until the stacks of complications become über campy. It must have been fun to write, and damned fun to produce, but it is only fun to watch for a little while, and then you have to endure until they get another idea. Nearly every sequence in the film is like that. And that's what makes a lot of them dribble over into campiness. For the purposes of writing or filmmaking, I like that. But for watching it's too much.

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Don't Like: Ann Darrow needs all this backstory? All those other characters who we will never see again? She does not. The 1933 film shows us all of the girl's history we need to see in order to get into the story.

Don't Like: Kong on ice. It comes at the wrong time. It doesn't establish anything that we don't already know about Ann and Kong. And it would have been more interesting if the giant ape had almost immediately fallen through the ice into the lake. At least the army shows up and puts an end to it. Kong is not cutesy, okay? I don't need Kong to be cutesy. Okay? I like him being old, battle-scarred, grizzled, kind of jaded. I like that part a lot. Cutesy Kong sucks.

Don't Like: Jackson's repetition of the Lorenzo Semple Jr. idea that Dwan (Ann) should fall in love with Kong. I don't object to this on any kind of moral grounds or anything. It just seems silly. The 1933 Ann Darrow always just wants to get away from the beastie that has her in his hand, but the 1976 and 2005 versions invoke Stockholm Syndrome and make her fall in love with her captor. My objection is that S.S. doesn't always happen. And that it weakens the story in my eyes. Plus, I hate to see Jackson copying that piece of carp 1976 movie.


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I can see the three writers giggling at their inside jokes and multi-layered plotting as they worked. I can see them giggling as producers as the film came together and all their jokes were still in place. And the worldwide box office receipts weren't bad.

To claim that a film is worse because there is too much good stuff seems illogical. But enjoyment is not only in seeing good stuff, but in reaching the end when it feels like the end. Peter Jackson's more recent films have multiple denouements, feel to me as if they run on past the point where they should have ended, and he does this consistently. It's his style. Perhaps I do the same with my novels. I can't tell. And my point is, neither can he. Everything that's on the screen is something that he loves, and wants to share with us. He's like a little kid in that regard, and that's not bad. What works against enjoyment of Jackson's films is that he cannot lop off the arm or toe or upper body of one of his films if it needs to go for purposes of making it more enjoyable. That is, the right amount of time you want to spend watching it. And I must admit, the longer version of The Two Towers is better for me. The other two extended versions of LotR films are simply...longer. Not better. The same thing happened when he remade King Kong. It is very good, but without so much goodness it would have been great.

In some ways the 2005 re-remake is better than the 1933 film. In other ways it tries to be, but merely equals the earlier effort. And in too many ways it falls short, when it could have at least equaled the Cooper-Schoedsack film the whole way.



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King Kong (2005 film) from Wikizilla
King Kong Box Office Mojo
Around the World Roundup: 'Kong' Strong But Disappointing in Global Launch Box Office Mojo
King Kong (2005 film) from Wikipedia
Peter Jackson from Wikipedia
Naomi Watts from Wikipedia
Jack Black from Wikipedia
Adrien Brody from Wikipedia
Thomas Kretschmann from Wikipedia
Evan Parke from Wikipedia
Andy Serkis from Wikipedia
James Newton Howard from Wikipedia
Top 10 Worst CGI Movie Effects see example #6

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Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Thu Mar 20, 2014 8:46 pm
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We're at 1118 feet above 5th Avenue, now. With only a bit left to go before we clamber onto the pinnacle of the Empire State Building.

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Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Thu Mar 20, 2014 8:53 pm
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Methinks I hear Roger Corman's engine revving in the distance.

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Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Thu Mar 20, 2014 8:59 pm
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)
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IMDb link 5.8/10 from 17,279 users -- RT-link Tomatometer 46%, audience rating 30% with 57,048 votes

Year: 1976 Director: John Guillermin -- Cast: Jeff Bridges, Charles Grodin, Jessica Lange, Rene Auberjonois, John Agar -- Length: 134 min. Color/Stereo -- estimated budget: $24 million; estimated gross: $90,614,445 worldwide

If you've ever seen a movie that comes across as if no one really cared about the quality, it would be like King Kong in the hands of Dino de Laurentiis. (If you ignored my advice not to watch the 2003 edition of Rollerball you've seen two films like this one -- if you've watched this one.) This movie is bad not because its parts are bad, but because nearly all its parts are mediocre. It reminds me of Konga in this regard. But even the story is mediocre. There is nothing to distinguish a single aspect of this film in a positive way. Usually, the special effects devices built by Carlo Rambaldi work flawlessly. In this case, his biggest efforts failed. Because the Carlo Rambaldi full-scale mechanical Kong creature never worked right (moved too slowly) the production had to rely on Rick Baker in a suit to play Kong. This changes Kong from a giant Gorilla to some unspecified type of bipedal ape with legs in proportion to human legs. Even the gait is human-like. If you take Kong as being a different kind of ape, and not a gorilla, you might get past that strangeness. (That approach didn't work for me, though.)

But even if the Kong creature had been a giant gorilla, the movie would not have improved. The writing is worse than vapid, but not all the way to sucks. If Semple wanted to camp up the place why didn't he just go friggin' Batman all over it and make it consistent, at least? The only thing that's better than passable in this film is the photography and one or two visual effects, although angles and shot distances are rather pedestrian. I thought the score was going to be good, until it started repeating itself as if 6th graders were making it up as they went along.

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But I wasn't disappointed in this film for one simple reason: everyone told me it was lousy long before I ever watched the whole thing. I'll admit it was a chore to include it in this Multimatch, but it's only fair to do so. It did ruin my dreams of passing through the remainder of my life without ever seeing the film again.

You can still read to this day about how de Laurentiis used "a 40 foot mechanical ape" in the film. But Rambaldi's contraption appears in one laughable scene, and that's all. Furthermore, inclusion of that scene makes it clear why they were unable to use the full-scale critter. Now, Rambaldi's full-scale separate hands used in a number of shots work nicely for closeups of Dwan being picked up or carried by Kong. The realization of Kong isn't entirely bad. The Rambalidi-built masks for Rick Baker's gorilla suit are mostly passable. The giant Rambaldi-built hands are technical marvels. Jessica Lange was very brave to be so trusting of Rambaldi and his crew. One scene mentioned in the list below is very well-done.

Here are some aspects of the film and whether I like them or don't care for them:

Like: This movie pegs corporate promotional excess. The Petrox crown on Kong's head in the New York debut is really campy, but it's also right on the money.

Like: John Barry's score is actually fine, when isolated from the film. It is really very listenable music, but doesn't help elevate the tripe that it's edited into because it, like the film, becomes repetitious. There is currently a 14 minute mix of some of the tracks on Youtube (check the Find-it post and see if it's still there) that is really nice to listen to. I have never heard the entire score as an isolated recording. In the film it becomes tedious.

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Like: On a third viewing, the film is not really terribly bad until Kong shows up. In fact, Jessica Lange's introductory scene where she talks about being saved because she didn't want to stay below decks on a yacht and watch Deep Throat are kind of nice. Once she is kidnapped by the islanders the movie goes to hell and never recovers. Her pre-Kong ingenue is likable. Her post-Kong ingenue is grating. At least to this writer. Then again, there are moments, such as when the pressmen surround Dwan beside Kong's corpse, and she flinches, as if she hadn't realized this would be her entry into the fame she wants; the way she plays that fraction of a second is really good.

Like: A scene where Kong explores Dwan using his fingertips is really beyond the capability of anything that could have been realized in 1933. The ape's gigantic hands are real things, pneumatic marvels that move with the joints of a living hand, so they can be photographed in the frame with actors and actresses. I'll give them that. And the scene where Kong gives Dwan a waterfall shower and then dries her with puffs of breath is pretty cool. On the other hand,
Don't Like: When Dwan pounds on Kong's upper lip it is so disappointingly clear that it is a big sheet of rubber.

Don't Like: "I'm Dwan. D-W-A-N, Dwan. That's my name. You know, like Dawn, except that I switched two letters to make it more memorable." Hell, Semple had a typo and decided to be inspired by it. What a load of carp.

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Don't Like: Even given that Kong is not a gorilla, his smile expressions are just creepy.

Don't Like: Most of the films I review for these Rematches actually seem to get better, if only slightly, with repeated viewings. Not this one. Watching it again was just a chore. I hated it when I first saw it in the early 2000s. I still hate it. Not irrationally, but for good reason (I think).

Don't Like: They changed the story to make it "more believable" and trendy for the hoppin' 70s. And destroyed the point of the movie in the first place. It doesn't have to be the kind of film that every other film in the 70s was. They didn't have to hate on corporate greed, and so forth. They could have made a film that was a total fantasy like the Cooper version. But they blew it by trying to make it relevant and giving it a social message.

Don't Like: In changing the story to make it "more believable" they added a villain, oil company executive Fred Wilson. The original story does just fine without a traditional foe, but Semple had to "improve" his retelling by adding a person who is a greedy bad-guy foil to Jack Prescott's good-guy environmentally positive Princeton Primate Paleonthologist.

Don't Like: The totally unbelievable ineptitude of this film. Where it is not meh, it is gah! I can only think that the talent list involved with this production should have yielded something much better. Or at least it seems like it to me. The people had good track records at the time. I tried to reassure myself that my earlier dislike of the film was due to watching it at a time when I wasn't receptive to it, and it would not seem as bad during the prep for this Rematch. I was wrong. Really wrong.

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Don't Like: The constant need to make it all plausible. The original film gets away with just doing things. You only realize that they don't make any real sense after the movie is over (what Alfred Hitchcock referred to as fridge logic, the reasoning that overtakes you when you're getting something from the refrigerator and think, "Now, wait a minute, it wouldn't work that way..."). The Cooper-Shoedsack production stays true to its internal, completely fictional world. This one tries to be an adventure into strange country and still conform to the sense of the external, real world. Kong doesn't make sense. Kong is not supposed to have to make sense. Trying to make him make sense belittles the wonder of fantastic storytelling, and cripples this film beyond repair.

Don't Like: There has to be a love story, eh? That's one of the themes of the 1933 film. In the original version the love story between Jack and Ann fulfills that need quite well. And without overpowering any other aspect of the film. A good action film plot should probably appeal greatly to a 12-year old boy. But the Lorenzo Semple/ de Laurentiis treatment of the story throws in another love story. Dwan is overcome by Stockholm Syndrome and falls in love with the ape. Not to the extent that Peter Jackson would have Ann Darrow falling for Kong when he borrowed the notion 29 years later, but I'll rant about that mistake in the appropriate review!


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As with almost every film there are those who love this movie and elevate it above the Cooper/Schoedsack and Jackson films. I'll leave it to them to love it. I simply cannot. But I think that point's been belabored more than enough already. The film was a financial success, but it had the same problem that the 1998 Godzilla film did (also a financial success): the critics hated it, and the audiences didn't like it. They saw it, but then they razzed it, for the most part.

By 1976, fantasy stories of the 1933 type had fallen out of favor. The resurrection of Kong in what was then modern times failed artistically in 1976, and it fails now because the re-told story is not presented as a free-wheeling straight up adventure. That wasn't allowed by the zeitgeist of the 1970s. Fortunately, the phenomenon of ballsy pure fantasy would get a shot in the arm the following year. Who knows how the de Laurentiis version of King Kong would have changed if it had been started in, say, 1980, post Star Wars?



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Death of a Showman: Dino De Laurentiis (1919-2010) By Richard Corliss Friday, Nov. 12, 2010 from time.com "That description might also fit the New York–shot King Kong, except that Dino, in a TIME cover story on the production, called it 'the greatest love story ever made.' He was enthralled with Jessica Lange, his young leading lady (whom he had signed after nixing another promising ingenue, Meryl Streep, as 'ugly'), and with the emotional bond between her character and the big ape. 'No one cry when Jaws die,' Dino told TIME. 'But when the monkey die, people gonna cry. Intellectuals gonna love Kong. Even film buffs who love the first Kong gonna love ours. Why? Because I no give them crap.'"
Battle of the Titans! Two new Kongs Challenge the King. Starlog issue 001, pg 15+. from Archive.org. "Yet despite Universal's seemingly clear field, RKO filed a suit against the studio for copyright infringement and asked for an injunction to keep their movie from being made. Universal, meanwhile, sued RKO and Paramount's producer, Dino De Laurentiis — who, in turn, filed a $90 million countersuit against Universal and attacked the latter studio with a second injunction."
King Kong (1976 film) from Wikizilla
The Legend of King Kong from monster kid classic horror forum. "This was the first script for Universal's planned "remake" of King Kong back in 1976. I put remake in quotes because it was actually based on the King Kong story rather then being a remake of the original film (which Universal didn't have the rights to). Universal was racing Paramount and Dino De Laurentis to the big screen to see who's King Kong film would get made first. Universal would cut a deal with De Laurentiis and Paramount and scrap their Kong plans for at least 6 months." The link to the script is dead.
Reconsidering King Kong (1976) from den of geek. "In the end the overhyped, and almost completely immobile, robot only appeared onscreen for a few seconds during the Shea Stadium sequence in which Kong escapes. Even those few brief moments left audiences laughing. It looked pretty bad. So much so that those scenes were cut from the home video release."
King Kong 1976 models
King Kong (1976 film) from Wikipedia
John Guillermin from Wikipedia
Dino De Laurentiis from Wikipedia. I'll never forget this man saying on more than one talk show in 1976, "You gonna love-a Kong!"
Lorenzo Semple, Jr. from Wikipedia
Jeff Bridges from Wikipedia
Charles Grodin from Wikipedia
Jessica Lange from Wikipedia
John Barry (composer) from Wikipedia
FAQ for King Kong (1976) from IMDb
The Biology Of King Kong from Forbes 12/12/2005 @ 3:00PM “What I would interpret as cross-species sexual attraction does happen,” says Barbara J. King, a biological anthropologist and professor at The College of William and Mary. She studies the social communication of great apes and once had the chance to introduce her college dean to one of the animals in her lab. “The female of the gorilla group was very attracted to him, she pursed her lips and pushed small gifts through the cage at him,” she says. “She clearly knew that he was the only male in the group, and she fixated on him.”
Dino De Laurentiis' King Kong 1976 Posted by Anthony at 9:17 PM Tuesday, September 3, 2013 at Giant Monsters Among Us blogspot. "But even less convincing is the gorilla itself. As an actor in a suit, Kong lumbers around appearing like... well... like a man in a costume. He doesn't hunch over like an ape, or move as if he were of a gigantic size navigating the landscape. He strolls along, upright, and moves so nimbly that it's excessively awkward to see his movements in one shot compared to the movements of his giant animatronic limbs which interact with actors in close up shots. Rick Baker, who designed the ape suit along with Carlo Rambaldi, was extremely disappointed in the final suit, which he felt wasn't at all convincing."

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Fri Mar 21, 2014 5:33 pm
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A Comparison of King Kong (1933) King Kong (1976) and King Kong (2005)

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Fakey?


When I was a film student one of my classmates got hold of a VHS copy of Halloween (1978), and about five of us sat and dissected it to learn what we could about making movies. One thing we noticed was that a certain segment was shot with SteadiCam in three takes, and the weather didn't match. Still, the three takes were intercut and because of the acting, or editing, or the fact that the dialog involved us as viewers, it was only on the second viewing that we saw the changes in the background and ambient lighting.

We marveled at "what you can get away with" when making a film. And that's rightful, isn't it? After all, film is imagination, and fiction film even moreso. Literally. "Image" is the root word of "imagination," which is to make mental images of something. And if it's fiction you're only helping your audience to pretend. So, for young film students it's refreshing to know that the rules aren't hard and fast, and the parameters aren't inflexible when it comes to representing something that doesn't actually exist on the screen. All your takes for a "dry" day don't have to be done on a dry day. You can get away with things. That's great!

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Sometimes that attitude can lead to disaster, and especially when the desire to get away with something extends to visual effects. Think of Robot Monster (1953). Of course, musicians have compendia of popular songs called Fake Books, and that works with music, because if you play a reasonable facsimile of a well-known song, it doesn't matter whether you ever played the song before. It still sounds "real" to the listener's ear. But the villain's costume in Robot Monster screams fake. It doesn't matter though; the film made over sixty times its $16,000 production cost in its initial release. So, I guess you can get away with things in movies. Even if you've never done them before.

Analyzing the Kong films, and contemplating how the adjective "fakey" fits or doesn't fit with each of them leads to some interesting thoughts. Clearly, any 25 to 50 foot tall gorilla or ape would be fake. Period. So are audiences forgiving about the way the fake creature looks on the screen? If so, to what extent?

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The 1933 Kong film uses stop-motion animation and superimposition to create the monster and to place him in the same frame with live actors. Does it look "real?" Well, the Kong puppet doesn't exactly look like a real gorilla. Or move just like one. And there are two puppets that don't look exactly alike. Plus the giant Kong head doesn't really match the faces on the animation models. The frame-by-frame creation of the illusion that Kong is moving on his own doesn't truly look like he's alive. Yet the stop-motion technique sort of winks at you. The screenwork looks "otherworldly" rather than fakey. After all, we know it's fake. And, although it's true that we sit in our seats saying, "Fool me! Fool me!" we know that nothing on the screen can totally obliterate our knowledge that this is not real. All the work that's done trades off the desire to be fooled with an amazement that we're actually looking at half-meter tall puppets that were painstakingly photographed in order to let us pretend. We feel as if the film's creators respected our desire to imagine, and are helping us out rather than trying to scam us.

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In the creation of King Kong (1976) the half-assed production values use a fakey gorilla suit with some pretty well-designed Kong masks and in doing so it all ultimately fails. It's almost exactly like Robot Monster if there had been something other than a diving helmet sprouting TV rabbit ears atop the gorilla suit. This Kong doesn't look anything but fake from its human gait to everything else about the costume (apart from the animatronic heads). The giant head looks fake in the shots where we see it. The giant hands, on the other hand, don't look fake, because they aren't. They aren't alive, but they are real. But the overall impression is that the producers were trying to fake us out, without respect for our ability to see their fakes. It wasn't produced cheaply, but it looks like it was.

In terms of lighting and volume, the fake Kongs in the 1933 and 1976 films always appear to be real things, because they were real objects photographed by a lens. This lighting reality changes with the 2005 depiction of the giant ape.

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The 2005 King Kong goes into territory that makes the assessment of fakey more difficult. The CGI Kong sometimes doesn't look like a real object, but moving artwork. And that's reasonable, because that's what it is. Sometimes it looks more real than other times. What saves it is the motion-capture animation applied to the CGI monster. The compositing is actually unfairly negatively-biased when you look at stills from the movie. There isn't as much noticeable edging when the images are in motion.

It is the combination of these techniques that makes Kong appear on screen in this movie. Yet, when Ann Darrow reaches up to touch Kong the extra amount of animation needed to cause his fur to move where her hand is supposed to touch isn't done, and that ruins the effect. The same thing happens in the 1976 film. Dwan's hand is clearly a blue-screen superimposition of a reduced size image of her onto the plate of Kong, having absolutely no effect on the beast when she is supposed to be touching him. It's as if the producers of the two films are shouting, "Forgive us for this moment! We were lazy!"

Ultimately, these are movies where a willing suspension of disbelief is necessary in order to enjoy the result on the screen. So, I guess the question to ask isn't "Does it look fake?" The answer in every case is "yes" because we know it is and we're looking for slip-ups on the part of the filmmakers. There is only total fakery in most of the Guillermin Kong, and I hear that it had audiences laughing out loud quite a lot. But the fake Kongs in the 1933 and 2005 films have their own charms, and they demonstrate enough respect for the audience so that we most often will "believe in them," rather than laugh at them.




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The Ultimate Fake Book (for C Instruments) from Amazon
Robot Monster from Wikipedia
Robot Monster (1953) Full Movie from Youtube. "It is frequently considered one of the worst films ever made."

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Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Fri Mar 21, 2014 5:49 pm
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

We're standing atop the pinnacle of the 1250 foot high Empire State Building, pounding our chests and straining to catch those pesky flying machines!

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Fri Mar 21, 2014 6:01 pm
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

The Kong Multimatch wasn't scheduled as a Quickmatch, but I still got it posted in 14 days.

8-)

Giving myself 21 days for the Death Race Quickmatch because I've got to re-watch a couple of movies.

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Fri Mar 21, 2014 6:03 pm
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Wow. I just read all the subtitles for Death Race (2008) in less than 10 minutes. Not exactly a quotable lines fest. :(

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Sat Mar 22, 2014 8:57 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Something we just ran across in an old box of photographs.

YouTookMyGort in a photo that was processed in 1966. 14 yrs old I guess. Sometimes Dad would keep exposed film in the camera for as much as a year before processing it, but I'm pretty sure this is incipient-teen YTMG.

Didn't want Dad to take this photo. Actually, I didn't ever want anyone to take any photos of me! It wasn't getting the photo taken, of course, that was the undesirable part. It was seeing the photo later.

Image

His framing is awfully strange here. Earliest evidence of my left-leaning tendencies on social issues? I didn't buy those shorts, although they are plaid. And I must confess that the weird plaid pants I wear in my avatar are self-inflicted. Ugh.

The door behind me goes out to the 1-car carport. I'm standing between the living room area and the dining room area. The entire house was only 30 feet by 24 feet, so not a lot of square footage. But they were buying it, not renting.

Less than a year later I would be force-relocated to Memphis, Tennessee where I would become a prisoner of circumstances for 38 long, unwanted years.

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Sun Mar 23, 2014 1:36 am
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Post Re: YTMN Presents a Remake Rematch Thread

Arizona desert. June 1971. Gort left. Gort-sib right.
Image

_________________
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Mon Mar 24, 2014 12:23 pm
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