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 A noob's journey through cinema 
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Wooley wrote:

I don't get it. Never will. The movie is rarely funny and it rarely works on any other level. Few of the characters are even amusing, when Geoffrey Rush wasn't on-screen my eyes were sore from rolling or I was just sighing and checking my watch. But I heard people praise this movie a lot on RT.


Having being compared to a spoof of superhero films is correct. But its not even remotely close to the likes of "Galaxy Quest", spoof wise.


Wed Jan 17, 2018 12:07 am
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Just wanted to point out that Haxan is way better than Vampyr, and neither may not be as good as Gance's Napoleon.


Wed Jan 17, 2018 2:22 am
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Let the Corpses Tan (2017)

This movie is just pure style. The narrative is stripped down to the bare minimum. And you know what, it's damn entertaining.

It's like Godard said "All you need for a movie is a girl and a gun.".


Sat Jan 20, 2018 9:48 pm
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I want to see that out of interest in the genre it's supposed to be riffing on, but am wary because I hated the directors' last movie.

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Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:13 am
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I have not seen any of their previous work, so I can not compare.


Sun Jan 21, 2018 5:57 pm
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Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Although, like Thief said, watch films from other places other than just one list. Many of my favorites made it on this list, but many more weren't on it.

And, Slentert, never be afraid to make up your own list of films to see, such as "All Kubrick films" or "All Kurosawa films" or "All Tarkovsy" films or "All Bava movies" or "All Claire Denis films" or "All [insert any director's name here] films." In other words, don't be afraid to pick out one or two filmmakers and watch everything that's still published that he/she created. Unless you get started and don't like anything they did. Then pick another director. You can choose anyone you know about, old-timer or newbie. I sort of favor directors with short filmographies for projects like that. :D But you don't have to select a director; an actor or actress, a set designer, an audio technician...anyone could be the basis for such a list.

If nothing else, seeing all Alfred Hitchcock's many films from the silents through Family Plot will teach you the range one person can have. And you don't have to see them in order. It took me 30 years to work through all of them. And I get the idea that you already know you don't have to agree with anyone's assessment of any film you see. But it's okay to agree if you agree with their points about any film. ;)

If you love the Marvel Cinematic Universe it doesn't preclude you liking any kind of art-house film, or silent films. Or any kind of film at all. And if you don't like MCU there's nothing wrong with you in that case, either.

Speaking of silents (which no one was, but I am now), I didn't read all four pages, so if no one else suggested Sunrise (1927) and/or Wings (1927) give those a shot when you feel ready to watch some silent masterpieces. The places they put cameras to get some really cool angles before sound blimps had to be developed! Wow! And the special effects back then...well, knowing the history of cinema because you discovered it yourself is much better than reading about it in books (or threads).

When I was 16 I saw my second Kubrick film. It was my favorite film of all time for decades. The first one of his films I saw in a high school film club, and that film was Paths of Glory. The second one I saw is still my second-favorite movie of my entire life. Only one film has ever eclipsed it in my opinion. Still, I've seen my number two film over a dozen times, all told. In fact, I lost count.

Your tastes seem quite broad already. That is a good thing, as far as I can see. So, if you're curious about any film, watch it. You seem to be doing that already, but encouragement is ... well, usually encouraging.

Take my advice and stay away from the internet drivel listed in my signature. It's going to become a vast wasteland of nothing but text pretty soon, anyway.

Last, I admire your distinctly brief reviews.

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The Future Unreels


Wed Jan 24, 2018 11:27 am
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Gort, thank you so much. :)


Wed Jan 24, 2018 6:07 pm
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Wed Jan 24, 2018 11:07 pm
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On the plus side, Hazel hasn't found this place...yet...

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Thu Jan 25, 2018 12:21 am
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Gort wrote:
Speaking of silents (which no one was, but I am now), I didn't read all four pages, so if no one else suggested Sunrise (1927) and/or Wings (1927) give those a shot when you feel ready to watch some silent masterpieces. The places they put cameras to get some really cool angles before sound blimps had to be developed! Wow! And the special effects back then...well, knowing the history of cinema because you discovered it yourself is much better than reading about it in books (or threads).


Silents were covered on page 3. Get on with the program, Gort!

Something that wasn't mentioned, but I would really recommend seeing some early, early shorts... Méliès, Lumière, and the likes.

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Thu Jan 25, 2018 3:04 am
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Thief wrote:
Silents were covered on page 3. Get on with the program, Gort!

That would have required not jumping from page 1 to page 4, Thief!

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"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


The Future Unreels


Sun Jan 28, 2018 10:02 am
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20th Century Women (2016)
Sometimes, you just want to cuddle a movie to death.

Drunken Master (1978)

I'm sorry, Jackie Chan- lovers, but I didn't like this at all. The jokes were never funny, the fight scenes never particularly exciting.

My Little Pony: The Movie (2017)
A friend of mine wanted to know what kind of movies I liked, so she started watching some titles from my top 100. She loved My Neighbor Totoro, was amazed by Pulp Fiction, and The Night of the Hunter became her first b/w film.

After all that, she wanted me to return the favor. She forced me to watch this. I found it annoying. She loved it.

A Futile and Stupid Gesture (2018)
Some jokes don't change the fact that this still feels like an adaptation from a Wikipedia page, a disease not rare among biopics. Don't get me wrong, it was funny sometimes, but the more emotional scenes left me completely cold.

Little Women (1994)

This movie walks the fine line between utterly charming and quite annoying. It tends to lean more towards the former.

The Chase (1966)

Well, this was a nice surprise! A rather underseen Arthur Penn- movie starring Marlon Brando, Robert Redford, Jane Fonda, Robert Duvall and James Fox. When Bubber (Redford) escapes out of prison, a little Southern town starts to revolt. Because they're scared, or because they're angry, or maybe just because they are bored. Sheriff Calder (Brando) tries to do good in this wrong situation, but eventually this can only lead to misery.

This movie often switches from melodrama to social satire and I can understand how this can put people of, but for me this worked like a charm. Great characterization, strong dialogues, and Brando is just outstanding. Highly recommended.


Wed Jan 31, 2018 6:39 pm
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my recollection of MLP is a positive one, surely some of that Lauren Faust magic that buoyed Foster's Home and The Powerpuff Girls.

but, uh, there's nothing I can say about its adult-male fanbase that hasn't already been said. but it's a free country I guess. *shrug*


Wed Jan 31, 2018 10:12 pm
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Slentert wrote:
Drunken Master (1978)[/b]
I'm sorry, Jackie Chan- lovers, but I didn't like this at all. The jokes were never funny, the fight scenes never particularly exciting.


Well, at least you liked The Chase.


Thu Feb 01, 2018 12:10 am
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Slentert wrote:
A Futile and Stupid Gesture (2018)
Some jokes don't change the fact that this still feels like an adaptation from a Wikipedia page, a disease not rare among biopics. Don't get me wrong, it was funny sometimes, but the more emotional scenes left me completely cold.

Pretty much agreed, but as a fan of vintage Lampoon, I can't deny enjoying it on that level. I would recommend the documentary Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead which is more informative, more faithful to the real Doug Kenney, and ultimately more successfuly told.

Slentert wrote:
The Chase (1966)
Well, this was a nice surprise! A rather underseen Arthur Penn- movie starring Marlon Brando, Robert Redford, Jane Fonda, Robert Duvall and James Fox. When Bubber (Redford) escapes out of prison, a little Southern town starts to revolt. Because they're scared, or because they're angry, or maybe just because they are bored. Sheriff Calder (Brando) tries to do good in this wrong situation, but eventually this can only lead to misery.

This movie often switches from melodrama to social satire and I can understand how this can put people of, but for me this worked like a charm. Great characterization, strong dialogues, and Brando is just outstanding. Highly recommended.

Arther Penn, in general, is a bit of an underappreciated director who isn't as likely to get mentioned in the same breath as his peers (Lumet, Nichols, Altman, etc). Of course Bonnie and Clyde gets recognition, but I don't even feel that film compares to his best (Little Big Man, Night Moves, Missouri Breaks). The Chase actually got some pretty steady rotation on TCM in America, but a number of his earlier films, like Left-Handed Gun, The Train, and Mickey One are also worth seeking out. Oh, and Miracle Worker, if you're into that sort of thing.


Thu Feb 01, 2018 8:30 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
Pretty much agreed, but as a fan of vintage Lampoon, I can't deny enjoying it on that level. I would recommend the documentary Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead which is more informative, more faithful to the real Doug Kenney, and ultimately more successfuly told.


Yeah, that doc was a real eye-opener for me on the subject but also really kinda depressed me.


Thu Feb 01, 2018 2:11 pm
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Jinnistan wrote:
Arther Penn, in general, is a bit of an underappreciated director who isn't as likely to get mentioned in the same breath as his peers (Lumet, Nichols, Altman, etc). Of course Bonnie and Clyde gets recognition, but I don't even feel that film compares to his best (Little Big Man, Night Moves, Missouri Breaks). The Chase actually got some pretty steady rotation on TCM in America, but a number of his earlier films, like Left-Handed Gun, The Train, and Mickey One are also worth seeking out. Oh, and Miracle Worker, if you're into that sort of thing.

I'll echo Janson's endorsement of all of these films, although I'd rank them differently than he would. Didn't realize Penn co-directed Train. I've been halfassedly exploring both Penn and Frankenheimer since the beginning of the year so perhaps, so perhaps that's worth a revisit.

I liked The Chase when I saw it last year. Brando is obviously the highlight, but drunk Janice Rule and southern James Fox add to the fun.

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Thu Feb 01, 2018 2:25 pm
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Slentert wrote:
Drunken Master (1978)
I'm sorry, Jackie Chan- lovers, but I didn't like this at all. The jokes were never funny, the fight scenes never particularly exciting.
I remember feeling that the first old-school Chan film that I watched, Police Story (which a lot of people say is one of his best movies, mind you), had really good action in it, but a lot of the material outside of the fighting didn't make much on an impression, so don't feel too alone in criticizing Jackie. I'm still probably interested in checking out Project A someday, though.

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Fri Feb 02, 2018 2:40 pm
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Rock wrote:
I'll echo Janson's endorsement of all of these films, although I'd rank them differently than he would. Didn't realize Penn co-directed Train. I've been halfassedly exploring both Penn and Frankenheimer since the beginning of the year so perhaps, so perhaps that's worth a revisit.

I'm curious, then, what your rank would look like. I'm going to assume that Missouri Breaks will fall out of the top-tier, because it doesn't usually earn such high accolades and because I already know your feelings on the other two.

I was also surprised by The Train, but I saw it on his filmography and said, well, it is a damn fine film.


Sat Feb 03, 2018 10:39 am
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I really like Nicholson and Stanton in The Missouri Breaks. I find Brandon's performance interesting, but I'm not sure Penn really knew how to handle him (not many did, to be fair).

My rankings don't contain any surprises, aside from the scene, aside from the absence of The Miracle Worker, which I haven't seen (just realized I missed that last sentence). The top four I'd say are great or close to it, the bottom four are still quality.

Bonnie & Clyde
Little Big Man
The Train
Night Moves
Mickey One
The Missouri Breaks
The Left Handed Gun
The Chase


Have you by any chance seen Target with Gene Hackman or his Penn & Teller movie? I haven heard much about either and doubt they're all that good, but the subject matter of both sounds right up my alley(s).

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Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:20 am
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Arthur Penn

1) Night Moves
2) Bonnie and Clyde
3) Left Handed Gun
4) The Chase
5) Missouri Breaks
6) The Miracle Worker
7) Little Big Man

I have seen Penn and Teller Get Killed but I was about 12 or 13 and remember nothing other than the fact that I hated it. It definitely wouldn't have been my kind of thing at that age though, even though I loved Penn and Teller. I just clearly didn't want to see them in a movie. I'd be more than happy to revisit it though.


Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:31 am
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Rock wrote:
I find Brandon's performance interesting, but I'm not sure Penn really knew how to handle him (not many did, to be fair).

It's an eccentric performance, but it's kind of grown endearing to me. Probably because it allows Jack to believably deliver the best line in the film.

Rock wrote:
Bonnie & Clyde

It's hard to find anything to hate about this classic, but outside of cerebrally appreciating its cultural significance, I haven't connected to it the way I have certain others.

Rock wrote:
Have you by any chance seen Target with Gene Hackman or his Penn & Teller movie? I haven heard much about either and doubt they're all that good, but the subject matter of both sounds right up my alley(s).

Target is not bad at all, a quality political thriller. Penn and Teller is pretty funny.....back when they were still funny. Of the rest, I haven't seen Four Friends, Inside and Dead of Winter are pretty good. I've never liked Alice's Restaurant.


Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:43 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
7) Little Big Man

Well, this is just distressing.


Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:44 am
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Jinnistan wrote:
Well, this is just distressing.


There would be nothing substantive about what I'd have to say about it, but my memories of watching it were not good. There are at least two much loved classic Westerns from around this period that I actively dislike, this one and Outlaw Josey Wales, for ambiguous reasons I was unable to put my finger on. I can't even hedge on it and talk about any performance in it that worked for me, which makes even me uncomfortable, considering how I generally like pretty much everything Hoffman did for the first 2/3's of his career.

If I ever watch it again, which I always ultimately do with films I feel this negatively towards, I'll try and clarify what I didn't like. But I didn't like.


Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:52 am
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fwiw, I liked Four Friends although I get why a lot of people didn't. for one, you could argue that it's 6hrs of story packed into 2hrs but for me that gives it a poetic charm, of life moving fast and furiously.


Sat Feb 03, 2018 1:09 pm
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crumbsroom wrote:

There are at least two much loved classic Westerns from around this period that I actively dislike, this one and Outlaw Josey Wales, for ambiguous reasons I was unable to put my finger on.

:shock:


Sun Feb 04, 2018 12:31 am
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Ravenous (1999)
I love the way this movie progresses. It establishes a certain status quo and isn't afraid to go a completely different direction after that. These are 3 movies for the price of one, and they are all great.

Kramer vs Kramer (1979)
I have to be honest, this feels like a tv movie that happens two have two great leads. Don't get me wrong, it's not a bad movie, it is just a bit too mannered for my taste.
For some reason, Possession (1982) is still my favorite movie about divorce.

The Verdict (1982)
Nobody can direct actors like Sidney Lumet.

Network (1976)
Satire done right.

The Darjeeling Limited (2007)

This movie looks stunning, India looks like paradise. Unfortunately, we have three uninteresting characters wandering through it. For a 90 minutes movie, this is so tediously paced, it feels like Wes Anderson is tired of his own schtick. Luckily enough, after this he would start his best period.
Weird, I used to really love this movie.

Harold and Maude (1971)
This movie shows how you can have quirky characters yet still make their relationship feel real, and go into darker and more emotional moments, without losing it's sense of comedy. The kind of movie Wes Anderson wants to make, but doesn't always succeed to.

The Men Who Stare at Goats (2009)
Some fun ideas, a great cast, but the problem is I kept thinking: 'What would the Coen Brothers have done with this story?'

Pickpocket (1959)

I'm intrigued by this, although I have no idea what to think of it.

Fargo (1996)

Third watch. Still great. This is my idea of an entertaining movie.


Sat Mar 10, 2018 10:01 pm
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Pickpocket was my first Bresson and in retrospect probably not the best Bresson to start with. I dunno how much Bresson you've seen (assuming you're still a noob) but you might like it better once you get a better feel for his style (or lack of).


Sat Mar 10, 2018 11:28 pm
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I'd recommend A Man Escaped as the first Bresson to start with.

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Sat Mar 10, 2018 11:31 pm
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Pickpocket was indeed my first Bresson. Elric Kane on Pure Cinema Podcast recommended it (and also A Man Escaped) as a good entry point for his filmography.
Like I said, I'm intrigued by the movie, so I'll definitely watch AME.


Sun Mar 11, 2018 1:13 am
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Slentert wrote:
Ravenous (1999)
I love the way this movie progresses. It establishes a certain status quo and isn't afraid to go a completely different direction after that. These are 3 movies for the price of one, and they are all great.

The Verdict (1982)
Nobody can direct actors like Sidney Lumet.

Network (1976)
Satire done right.

The Verdict is one of my favorite "underseen" movies and is Lumet and Newman at their best. When people ask me what Paul Newman movies to watch to get why he was so great, I always include The Verdict.

I think Network is really one of the great American films and Finch, Holden, and Dunaway are all at their best, but, of course, Ned Beatty absolutely steals the fucking movie in like 2 minutes.


Sun Mar 11, 2018 1:36 am
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As far as Bresson goes, Au Hasard Balthazar and Mouchette are my favourites, but I also haven't anything from him that's less than very good. What I've seen from him has been quite similar stylistically, but in a way that makes them better the more you see of his work.

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Sun Mar 11, 2018 1:48 am
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Is there really an ideal entry point for Bresson? Even something that feels more conventional (A Man Escaped) could end up being frustrating to someone unfamiliar to his style since it frequently undercuts the expected tropes of the jailbreak film, and intentionally diffuses the typical suspense scene by drawing it out and highlighting the crushing monotony of such an act. To get on board what Bresson is doing it really is just about immersing yourself in his work, from whichever angle you want to come at him. Or, if not that, simply just watching and watching and rewatching Au Hasard Balthasar over and over again until you come to the conclusion that he's better than nearly anyone else.


Sun Mar 11, 2018 2:03 am
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your appreciation of Pickpocket might grow with the consumption of more Paul Schrader as well. American Gigolo and Light Sleeper have two very overt homages to Pickpocket's end scene in their end scenes though their lonesome lead characters are a lot easier to approach for a viewer.

but yeah, if you're going to watch Bresson for the first time, maybe go for one with a more immediately sympathetic lead character. his sort of minimalism can be off-putting enough as it is.

crumbsroom wrote:
Is there really an ideal entry point for Bresson?


if I had to introduce someone it would be with Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne which is far from his usual Bresson-ness but still more austere than something by say Autant-Lara (let alone Ophuls). and it's still a very humane story.


Sun Mar 11, 2018 2:10 am
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Slentert wrote:
The Darjeeling Limited (2007)
This movie looks stunning, India looks like paradise. Unfortunately, we have three uninteresting characters wandering through it. For a 90 minutes movie, this is so tediously paced, it feels like Wes Anderson is tired of his own schtick. Luckily enough, after this he would start his best period.
Weird, I used to really love this movie.
I think Wes ran out of ideas after Darjeeling and is now just making fun children's movies. Some are better than others, but I miss the man with the ideas!

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Sun Mar 11, 2018 4:20 am
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Slentert wrote:
For some reason, Possession (1982) is still my favorite movie about divorce.

This is reasonable.

Slentert wrote:
Luckily enough, after this he would start his best period.

I like his new movies just fine, but I'm not sure if Anderson can top his Rushmore-Tenenbaums-Zissou peak.

Slentert wrote:
The kind of movie Wes Anderson wants to make, but doesn't always succeed to.

Well. I can't argue with that.

Slentert wrote:
'What would the Coen Brothers have done with this story?'

Sure, there ought to be a law that mandates that every motion picture is made by the Coen Brothers. But they can't do it. Have mercy on the non-Coens.

Slentert wrote:
Pickpocket (1959)

I think this is an ideal starting point for Bresson. Lock the doors.


Sun Mar 11, 2018 6:11 am
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crumbsroom wrote:
Is there really an ideal entry point for Bresson?


First one I saw was The Trial of Joan of Arc in a film class and I loved it. It shows on TCM every once in a while.


Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:23 am
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Slentert wrote:
Network (1976)
Satire done right.
I'll be honest with you, I was a really big fan of Network too when I first watched back in '07, but a rewatch of it five years later revealed to me that it wasn't much of an actual narrative, so much as it was just an excuse for a bunch of shrill, over-the-top, unrealistic speeches; not even monologues, mind you, but just speeches, one after another, full of unnaturally coached dialogue that no human being would ever assemble in real life in a million years. The premise had promise, of course, but Chayefsky just couldn't reign his writing in to make it work on a real-world level in it, IMO.

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Wed Mar 14, 2018 2:22 pm
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Stu wrote:
I'll be honest with you, I was a really big fan of Network too when I first watched back in '07, but a rewatch of it five years later revealed to me that it wasn't much of an actual narrative, so much as it was just an excuse for a bunch of shrill, over-the-top, unrealistic speeches; not even monologues, mind you, but just speeches, one after another, full of unnaturally coached dialogue that no human being would ever assemble in real life in a million years. The premise had promise, of course, but Chayefsky just couldn't reign his writing in to make it work on a real-world level in it, IMO.
What is the "real-world level" of the movie, though? The film's whole point is that these characters who think they're in command of the medium of television end up instead co-opted by it. Like how Beale in his madness fashions himself into a secular televangelist, only to have his gospel perverted by Jensen's corporate cosmology. Or how the Ecumenical Liberation Army go from Maoist radicals to corporate hit men live on TV. Or how just as Max gets fired when the entertainment division absorbs news, his personal life also turns into a tawdry daytime soap opera. Is the dialogue there supposed to be particularly naturalistic? Isn't its stilted nature part of what the movie is saying, how television both blatantly and subtly corrupts everyday human interaction?

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Wed Mar 14, 2018 11:00 pm
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Jeremy (1973)
Cute little movie, nothing groundbreaking, but a sweet observation of two young people in love.
Head-On (2004)
Both lead perfomances are on Kinski-level of insanity. So this would be interesting no matter what.
I like the first half more than the second.
The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964)
I liked this so much I watched this twice in three days. It was even better the second time.
Annihilation (2018)
My feelings about this one are similar to my thoughts about Ex Machina. Interesting scifi movie, but not the groundbreaking masterpiece everyone calls it.
Frances Ha (2012)
Why is Woody Allen still making movies when we have Noah Baumbach and Greta Gerwig?
The Lady Vanishes (1938)
Entertaining, early Hitchcock, that only really gets going once they enter the train.
Duel (1971)
Spielberg peaked with Duel, he should've stopped after this.
Veronica (2017)
No, this is not "the scariest movie on Netflix" like people want to make you believe. It is, actually, a quite boring, middle of the road horror film.
Do The Right Thing (1989)
Why did it took me so long to watch this? I really loved this.
Assassins (1995)
I like Julianne Moore a lot. Sylvester Stallone used to be a very handsome man. I don't have anything more to add.
Zodiac (2007)
Rewatch. Probably my favorite Fincher?!
Cronos (1993)
Seeing this movie with a crowd really elevates it. My favorite Del Toro, but I have not seen all his movies yet.
Jurassic Park (1993)
I did not care for this movie as a kid. But while rewatching this, on the big screen no less, made me realize this is actually a fun, thrilling blockbuster.
Dredd (2012)
Entertaining action film, a bit too flashy for my taste perhaps.
Rumble Fish (1983)
This is the kind of movie that makes me want to be a filmmaker myself.
Near Dark (1987)
God, Bill Paxton was such a treasure. The rest of the movie is also pretty good.
Lost Highway (1997)
One of the best films I've ever seen. I love the intensity of it all.
The Outsider (2018)
I. Do. Not. Care.
Das Boot (1981)
I do not know why, but I did not love this movie as much as I hoped to. I do not know why. Yes, I am ashamed of myself too.
Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008)
Del Toro should've gotten his Oscar for the "I'm not a baby. I'm a tumor." line. I wish more blockbusters would be this much fun.
Rushmore (1998)
My love for this movie increases the more I watch it.
Hail, Caesar (2016)
I'm glad the Coen brothers exist, but I'm sorry, this movie feels a lot like a joke without a punchline.
Side Effects (2013)
Entertaining, yet unbelievable thriller with a great cast. I watched this a few days ago and forgot most of it.
True Romance (1993)
Fun all the way through. Tony Scott, sir, you are dearly missed.
Videodrome (1983)
Disturbing and thought-provoking. That is how I like my horror best.
Harvey (1950)
A regular dose of James Stewart is good for the soul.


Fri Mar 30, 2018 5:49 pm
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Slentert wrote:
The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964)
I liked this so much I watched this twice in three days. It was even better the second time.

I agree, this movie really stopped me in my tracks when I saw it.

The Lady Vanishes (1938)
Entertaining, early Hitchcock, that only really gets going once they enter the train.

And yet this is one of my favorite Hitchcock movies, kind of the original of this trope.

Cronos (1993)
Seeing this movie with a crowd really elevates it. My favorite Del Toro, but I have not seen all his movies yet.

I wouldn't argue with anyone who said it was Del Toro's best, although I think I still slight prefer The Devil's Backbone.

Rumble Fish (1983)
This is the kind of movie that makes me want to be a filmmaker myself.

I often think this is actually, secretly, Coppola's best film.

True Romance (1993)
Fun all the way through. Tony Scott, sir, you are dearly missed.

I agree but I can never watch it and not wonder how it would have been if Tarantino had actually directed it and not just written it.

Videodrome (1983)
Disturbing and thought-provoking. That is how I like my horror best.

Literally one of my favorite movies ever, this was the first "truly adult" film I ever saw, when I was 13 or 14. My parents were so oblivious.


Fri Mar 30, 2018 11:51 pm
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maybe the big overarching joke in Hail Caesar is the way the Coens portray Eddie Mannix vs. who the real Eddie Mannix was.

it still didn't do much for me either though.


Sat Mar 31, 2018 12:06 am
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She's Gotta Have It (1986)
Interesting debut feature by Spike Lee. Charming, yet a bit flat.
The Wild Bunch (1969)
It took me a while to get hooked, but once I got there, it was great.
Fight Club (1999)
This used to be my favorite movie... Guess I have outgrown it.
John Wick (2014)
I didn't expect much from this, but damn this was fun. One of those movies that know how to properly use Keanu.
Ikiru (1952)
"It could make a stone cry."
Orson Welles said the above about Make Way For Tomorrow, but the same could be said about Ikiru. My first Kurosawa and I loved it.
The Devil's Backbone (2002)
Guillermo Del Toro has swiftly become one of my favorite directors. Especially his Spanish films are excellent.
White House Down (2013)
Dumb, but fun I guess. But for what fucking reason does this have to take 2 hours and 11 minutes?!!
Akira (1988)
Looks amazing, but I wasn't completely convinced by some choices in the script. Still, that ending really gets under your skin.
Suspiria (1977)
I don't really know what to think about this. Hauntingly beautiful, phenomenal score, but some scenes felt a bit... laughable? I mean, I liked it a lot, but I think I need to see this one again.
Rebecca (1940)
My favorite Hitchcockup till now. I loved every second of this.
Catch Me if You Can (2002)
Entertaining is the ideal word to describe this. Although I was often annoyed by how all women were depicted as dumb and desperate, willing to do everything if only Leonardo Dicaprio would smile at them.
Funny Girl (1968)
Great first half, then it becomes meh. I get why they want to "ground their relationship in realism", but I really can't feel sorry for someone whose biggest problem is his wife earning more than him.
Barbra Streisand really earned that Oscar, 'though.
Lady Bird (2017)
This was a bit of a letdown. I mean, it's a good movie, obviously, but... very similar to a lot of other indie coming-of-age stories.
Shadow of a Doubt (1943)
This works better when you look at it as a dark comedy, rather than a thriller. Entertaining, but I did not like the police men. They were really bad at their jobs.
Kiki's Delivery Service (1989)
Cutest movie if there ever was one.
Thor: Ragnarok (2017)
This movie ruined its own epicness by its own jokiness. That doesn't mean its not funny, 'cause it is (it's Taika Waititi, for God's sake) but the tonal shiftings didn't really work for me.
A Zed & Two Noughts (1985)
My first Greenaway. It feels like this movie was made especially for me.
Chungking Express (1994)
My first Wong Kar-Wai. I think this comes close to a "perfect movie". This movie is so good, Tarantino started his own distribution company, just to release this in the U.S. If this doesn't convince you, what would?


Sat Apr 14, 2018 3:03 am
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Lots of firsts here. Kurosawa, Kar-Wai and Greenaway all have much to offer to you in the future.


Sat Apr 14, 2018 4:16 am
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Slentert wrote:
Let the Corpses Tan (2017)

This movie is just pure style. The narrative is stripped down to the bare minimum. And you know what, it's damn entertaining.

It's like Godard said "All you need for a movie is a girl and a gun.".


The Strange Color of Your Body's Tears is great. So much style but oh so so good.


Sat Apr 14, 2018 7:46 am
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Slentert wrote:
.
Kiki's Delivery Service (1989)
Cutest movie if there ever was one.


Yeah I love this one. Miyazaki in general made good stuff. I think he's retired now.


Sat Apr 14, 2018 7:50 am
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I really neglected this thread, huh.


Wed Jul 11, 2018 4:45 pm
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You failed us all.

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Wed Jul 11, 2018 9:58 pm
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Slentert wrote:
The Wild Bunch (1969)
It took me a while to get hooked, but once I got there, it was great.

I had exactly the same experience.

The Devil's Backbone (2002)
Guillermo Del Toro has swiftly become one of my favorite directors. Especially his Spanish films are excellent.

Still my favorite Del Toro and I agree his Spanish-language films are his best.

Suspiria (1977)
I don't really know what to think about this. Hauntingly beautiful, phenomenal score, but some scenes felt a bit... laughable? I mean, I liked it a lot, but I think I need to see this one again.

Yeah, I felt there was the exact same problem but I liked it enough to want to go back and watch it again and those scenes sit better once you've already seen them. I've actually come to think of this movie as kind of a masterpiece. Kind of.

Thor: Ragnarok (2017)
This movie ruined its own epicness by its own jokiness. That doesn't mean its not funny, 'cause it is (it's Taika Waititi, for God's sake) but the tonal shiftings didn't really work for me.

Here we differ. I thought this movie did an amazingly deft job specifically at tone and the navigation thereof, probably the best of all the Marvel movies at this, and I actually thought it did it better than a most "serious" movies. And I also thought it was epic AF. The opening scene and Thor's final battle just blew me away, and I loved his battle with Hulk, too. I think Waititi put on a clinic on how to make an epic fun.

Chungking Express (1994)
My first Wong Kar-Wai. I think this comes close to a "perfect movie". This movie is so good, Tarantino started his own distribution company, just to release this in the U.S. If this doesn't convince you, what would?

Also my first WK-W and I loved it about as much as you did.


Wed Jul 11, 2018 10:47 pm
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A selection of the stuff I watched the last couple of weeks.

Gladiator (2000)
Yeah, not really a prestigious Oscar contender, but still a fun dumb popcorn film.
I really expected to hate this movie, but is actually quite enjoyable.
Under The Silver Lake (2018)
Or how I like to call it: Millenials' Inherent Vice.
This movie is really unbalanced, but also a whole lot of fun. I should really check out the director's other films. I heard great things about It Follows.
Beyond the Black Rainbow (2010)
Sorry, but this movie is so vague, I have nothing to grab onto.
Matchstick Men (2003)
My problem with most con men movies is that there always has to be a fucking twist at the end. Usually, this twist lacks any real logical, is completely unnecessary, or seem out of character.
In case of this movie, the twist isn't completely illogical, but it is still the most uninteresting way to end this. The whole movie is about the relationships between these characters, and it just throws it all away at the end.
Incredibles 2 (2018)
I think the first Incredibles film is one of the best superhero movies ever made. And this sequel is really fun, but also a bit too similar to the first one to actually feel fresh. It also lacks a compelling narative or an interesting villain. But still, some scenes had me cackling in the theatre. That counts for something.
It's Such A Beautiful Day (2012)
Rewatch

In my opinion, this is the greatest animated movie ever made. Yeah, it has stick figures, so what?!
Mandy (2018)
Heavy metal cover art come to life.
I've never seen a film that's so pretentious and consciously stupid at the same time. If you liked the trailer of this, that should give a good idea what this movie is like.
Also, best score of the year. R.I.P. Jóhann Jóhannsson...
Climax (2018)
I haven't seen any other Gaspar Noe films, but apparantly this is pretty tame for him. That's... worrying.
Hereditary (2018)
Yeah, this didn't click with me. Some scenes were great, but as a whole, it left me kind of cold. I do not know exactly why...
The Squid and the Whale (2005)
My parents are going through a divorce right now, so this movie really meant a lot to me.
Anomalisa (2015)
Rewatch.
I think this movie is actually directed by John Cusack's character in Being John Malkovich, who secretly controls Charlie Kaufman's body.
Manhattan (1979)
Rewatch.
I think this is a wonderfully made film, but I can't watch this anymore. No matter how much I believe in separating the art from the artist, I can't get over the fact that Woody Allen's character, a 42 year old man, is dating a fucking 17 year old girl. Everything else about it is great, but that part left a sour taste in mouth. I don't think I'll ever watch this again.
Arthur and the Invisibles (2006)
Rewatch.
I grew up in the 2000's, so most of the movies I watched as a little kid, were pretty shitty. This is not an exception.
The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985)
What if Midnight in Paris was actually good.
The High Sign (1921) + Cops (1922) + One Week (1920)
Don't talk to me about Tom Cruise when Buster Keaton did all of this 100 years ago.
2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
Seeing this for the first time, in a theater, with a brand new 4k-release, was a beautiful experience. This movie could've been made yesterday (or rather, tomorow).
Amélie (2001)
Rewatch.
I used to think this movie was hilarious, but now, I found it to be rather annoying. It's just quirky and cute without any real substance behind it.
But still, this movie looks gorgeous, so I didn't mind seeing this on the big screen.
The Apartment (1960)
Rewatch.
I realized this is actually a perfect movie.


Thu Jul 19, 2018 6:40 pm
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