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 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema 
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Mon Jan 31, 2011 4:54 am
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
And as Kim Kyung-hyun writes, alcohol often plays an important part:

"Hong's characters are always conniving, never direct, immediate, and transparent in their relationship to the real, and can only reveal their true feelings after a few drinks. The desire and the will that have been restrained and ordained by bureaucratic order, social decorum, and formal etiquettes seep out of their repressive containments when their words become slurred and their body movements staggered."
There's a lot of drinking in his films, yes, but these are young adults in school or just a few years out of it, for the most part. I think that quote may be exaggerating its importance a little. In the last two Hong films I saw, alcohol caused people to get belligerent, to sleep with someone they'd just met, to make a jealous scene, and to share details about their sexual histories that they probably wouldn't have otherwise. Pretty standard stuff for alcohol in any society, I'd say.

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Mon Jan 31, 2011 10:29 am
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
There's a lot of drinking in his films, yes, but these are young adults in school or just a few years out of it, for the most part. I think that quote may be exaggerating its importance a little. In the last two Hong films I saw, alcohol caused people to get belligerent, to sleep with someone they'd just met, to make a jealous scene, and to share details about their sexual histories that they probably wouldn't have otherwise. Pretty standard stuff for alcohol in any society, I'd say.

Perhaps in any British or American society, yes, but I'm not sure Korea is as similar as you make it out to be. I think that what the writer, Kim Kyung-hyun was getting at is that we never see the true faces of Hong's characters - be they male or female - until they are influenced by alcohol, and even then it's a distorted version of the truth. This ties in with the writer's general conclusion that the Korean New Wave is a "cinema of post-trauma", since these characters are never happy in life, despite how they appear on the surface. This can of course also be applied to love, which is another point the writer makes when mentioning about the beach scene in The Power of Kangwon Province:

"A trait that crucually impinges the discourse of insobriety is forgetfulness. As much as waiting motivates a narrative of repetition, so too does forgetting to usher in an iterative cycle. In the beginning of The Power of Kangwon Province, Chi-suk and her two friends sing the Korean-versed "My Darling Clementine" together while sitting on a beach. A small quarrel breaks out between the two friends over the words of the song. The debate over the words of the song underscores the theme of The Power of Kangwon Province, which tells the story about the inability of leaving behind love that is out of reach. It appears at the end of the film that love can "smell foul" when one does not accept the fact that love too has an expiration date."

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Mon Jan 31, 2011 5:42 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
Perhaps in any British or American society, yes, but I'm not sure Korea is as similar as you make it out to be.
That's a very good point, especially in relation to the women, probably. I realize, too, that I've been comparing the characters to my Korean-American friends, which doesn't make much sense! I thought the characters were somewhat happier in Woman on the Beach, which is one reason I enjoyed it so much more. Despite the big scenes, the female lead, anyway, seemed more content with her life than any Hong character I've seen yet. And I think the male lead actually made some progress.

Interesting quote about the song in Kangwon Province! I'd forgotten all about it. I obviously need to to some reading about these movies.

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Mon Jan 31, 2011 10:37 pm
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Jeong Jae-eun's Take Care of My Cat is often described as a coming-of-age drama, though I'm not sure this is entirely correct. Yes, the film concerns itself with five young women and the difficult, angst-filled period in their lives between childhood and adulthood, but it does so in a way that defies the general conventions we have come to associate with this genre. To use a point of reference, Take Care of My Cat was released the same year as Kwak Kyung-taek's Friend, a coming-of-age "buddy" movie that tells the tale of four boyhood friends and their fluctuating relationships while growing up in Busan. This kind of movie, as we find with Kwak's Friend, is typically directed by a male and features males as the main characters. In his book New Korean Cinema, author Julian Stringer suggests that this is because: "The specific socio-cultural system in Korean society presumes 'true' friendship exists only between men", since "the traditional patriarchal system has confined women to the domestic arena, thus preventing them from forming strong social ties with anyone outside the family." Take Care of My Cat, which is directed by a female and features female characters, not only breaks this convention in a socially conscious manner but also goes against the typical narrative we are used to finding in such films. Needless to say, Friend went on to become the highest grossing Korean film of the time, whereas Take Care of My Cat was largely ignored by audiences upon release.

Take Care of My Cat, which is fundamentally an art-house film, consciously avoids the portrayal of drugs and sex that we have come to expect from teen movies. In fact, there are no drugs or sex to speak of. These girls are not concerned with fashion or romance, as we are usually told - though, this is often used to illustrate the self-centered attitude of one particularly naive character - but with the mundane aspects of real life: finding a job, dealing with landlords, deaths in the family, etc. Bearing in mind the fact that Take Care of My Cat was, at the time, the first film to be directed by a Korean woman in close to three years, it gives us a rare insight into what it is like to be young and female, growing up in contemporary Korea: the gender boundaries and social hurdles one must overcome, and difficulties associated with pursuing a career, regardless of ability or ambition. This is most effectively depicted in a scene in which one of the girls goes looking for work on a ship, only to be dismissed by a male sailor who patronisingly reminds her that this is real work, and not a cruise. The cat referred to in the film's title is a stray taken in by one of the characters and then passed around among the group as a sign of friendship, but of course each character reacts differently to such responsiblity. It can also be seen as an important symbol for the vulnerability, resilience and potential independence of these young women as portrayed by director Jeong Jae-eun.

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Tue Feb 01, 2011 3:32 am
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I really like this one! South Korea needs more female directors.

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Tue Feb 01, 2011 8:46 am
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Oh man, I LOVED Take Care of My Cat SO MUCH. Stayed up until 6 AM watching it the other night! D:

I know I've only watched nine movies so far this year but right now it's my favorite viewing of 2011!

Also worth repeating: Bae Doo-na :heart: :heart: :heart:

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Tue Feb 01, 2011 11:03 am
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Tue Feb 01, 2011 4:24 pm
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
I really like this one! South Korea needs more female directors.

It does! I couldn't quite believe that, when I read it: not one Korean female director had released a film in the three years preceding Take Care of My Cat. That said, we have seen quite a few emerge in the last decade or so, with the likes of Park Chan-ok (Jealousy is My Middle Name) and Yim Soon-rye (Forever the Moment), though perhaps the most successful has been the Korean-American director Kim So-yong (Treeless Mountain). Have you seen any of her films?

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Wed Feb 02, 2011 3:34 am
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
It does! I couldn't quite believe that, when I read it: not one Korean female director had released a film in the three years preceding Take Care of My Cat. That said, we have seen quite a few emerge in the last decade or so, with the likes of Park Chan-ok (Jealousy is My Middle Name) and Yim Soon-rye (Forever the Moment), though perhaps the most successful has been the Korean-American director Kim So-yong (Treeless Mountain).
It's still ridiculously skewed. Jeong Jae-eun hasn't done anything since 2005!

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Have you seen any of her films?
I haven't, no. Do you recommend them?

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Wed Feb 02, 2011 4:44 am
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The French epistolary novel Les Liaisons Dangereuses, by Choderlos de Laclos, has been used as the foundation of many a cinematic tale over the years. Indeed, it is our familiarity with this story through such adaptations as Stephen Frears' Dangerous Liaisons and Milos Forman's Valmont that Korean filmmaker Lee Jae-yong relies upon for his own effort, the 2003 film Untold Scandal. Unlike these earlier adaptations, Lee sets his film not in France but in 18th century Korea, during the Joseon dynasty. Aside from one or two tweaks so as to slide this story neatly into such a different setting, most of the characters are the same and there are few departures from this well-trodden narrative: a cynical noble-woman makes a wager with her free-spirited cousin, agreeing to have sex with him if he is able to seduce a young local woman of great virtue - though, of course, this is merely a trap laid by the noble-woman into which her cousin then unsuspectingly walks. This in itself may be the film's most rewarding aspect; the idea of taking such a well-worn story and setting it so successfully against such a different backdrop. Contrary to the predictions of some, and largely thanks to the star power of actresses Lee Mi-sook (who also starred in Lee Jae-yong's An Affair) and Jeon Do-yeon (The Contact, Happy End, Secret Sunshine), the film was a huge success, with over 3 million admissions nationwide.

The success of Untold Scandal confirmed its place alongside a number of new Korean films that were released in the early 2000s and, because of their success, grouped under the umbrella term: "well-made". Most of these films are based on pre-sold property, as is the case with Bong Joon-ho's Memories of Murder and Park Kwang-Hyun's Welcome to Dongmakgol (both of which are based on plays), so as to boost sales through this familiarity audiences may have with the material. Well-made films are also marketed in a similar way, usually involving the western method of employing a one-line catchphrase or tag-line that is designed to encapsulate the film's star/genre/style in order to sell it. The marketing campaign for Memories of Murder, for example, was designed to draw a parallel between it and the successful thrillers produced in Hollywood. Thus, the film's tag-line when released was something along the lines of: "David Fincher's Se7en, set in rural Korea." Another thing that ensured such success for Untold Scandal is the controversy surrounding the film's approach to sex and sensuality. The scenes of an explicit nature, as well as the stances held by certain characters in regard to sex, go against our preconceived notions of what old Korea must have been like at that time - notions that are almost confirmed by the elegance manner in which Lee's characters conduct themselves in public.

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Wed Feb 02, 2011 6:55 am
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So the different setting and explicit sex are more than enough to sell it even if you've seen the Frears and Forman versions?

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Wed Feb 02, 2011 10:19 am
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Valmont was fun. Cruel Intentions is a masterpiece, though. This Korean one's probably terrible.

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Wed Feb 02, 2011 10:30 am
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dreiser wrote:
So the different setting and explicit sex are more than enough to sell it even if you've seen the Frears and Forman versions?

Something like that. Explicit is the wrong word, though. Racy? Those scenes make a good contrast to the way each character acts around people in the street, for example.

Untold Scandal is probably worth seeing for Jeon Do-yeon (The Contact, Happy End, Secret Sunshine), who is great in just about everything.

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Wed Feb 02, 2011 7:04 pm
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A man and a woman meet, grow fond of each other, and eventually start a relationship. Such a course of events must be initiated thousands of times a day throughout the romantic world, with the resultant and usual host of inquisitive questions asked by friends and loved ones: "Who?", "What?", "When?", "Where?", "Why?", and "How?" With his third feature film, Virgin Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Korean auteur Hong Sang-soo bypasses all of these inquiries in favour of one that may provoke an entirely different response: "Does it matter?" Does it really matter how and when these two people met each other for the first time, if they now find themselves in love? What good is analysing the past, when surely what matters most in any relationship is the present? This is the general concept behind Hong's Virgin Stripped Bare, which tells of the relationship between a 24-year-old assistant named Soo-jung and her significantly older and wealthier colleague, Jae-Hoon, both of whom work for a small video company. Their story of love - if it is indeed love, and not just a convenient coming together of lonely people - is recounted from the point of view of each character, Rashomon-style, and then arranged into several un-chronological chapters that do little to explain the course of events but offer some interesting changes that help us understand how each of these steps in the evolution of their relationship was initially perceived by each character.

Since the equivoque associated with the film's original title of Oh! Soo-jung (a pun on a common Korean name, one that also means 'fertilisation') would be lost on international audiences, Hong decided to alter it in reference to the Marcel Duchamp artwork The Bride Stipped Bare By Her Bachelors, Even - a hint at the modernist film to come, perhaps. As with Hong's previous The Power of Kangwon Province, Virgin Stripped Bare adopts a "forking-path" narrative form in which two separate narrative strands split from an original point. This challenge to the conventions of linear narrative is, as many authors have pointed out, Hong attempting to capture the fragmented and disjointed state of contemporary Korean society. This can also be said of another film released in the year 2000, Lee Chang-dong's Peppermint Candy. The difference being that Lee's film filters everything through the distorted consciousness of its central character, whereas here there are no protagonists to speak of. We have already mentioned how political trauma has shaped many of the stories produced by the Korean New Wave, but Hong Sang-soo and his complex narratives seem to stand apart from this. His pessimistic, self-absorbed and (sexually) frustrated characters are less a product of Korea's painful political past and more a result of the country's fast-moving present; its relentless quest for modernisation.

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Wed Feb 02, 2011 7:19 pm
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By the end, I wasn't convinced the halves were defined by his and her perspectives. What does define the two, I don't know.

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Thu Feb 03, 2011 12:55 pm
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Trip wrote:
By the end, I wasn't convinced the halves were defined by his and her perspectives. What does define the two, I don't know.

Hmm. I'm not even convinced that many of those scenes actually happened. The alleyway one, for instance. We'll never know which of its instances holds the truth.

I mentioned Rashomon during the write-up, but that's a bit misleading, since the change in perspective sheds little new light on events.

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Thu Feb 03, 2011 4:28 pm
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It's a film you probably have to watch more than once!

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Thu Feb 03, 2011 4:29 pm
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"How is it that you have such a hold on the villagers, without ever raising your voice?", is the question posed to one seemingly wise village elder during Park Kwang-hyun's successful Welcome to Dongmakgol. "What is the secret to your great leadership?", the enquirer asks again. The old man, with his white hair and pensive facial expression, turns and replies: "You've just got to feed them a lot." This particular moment, though it arrives well into the second half of the film, does well to encapsulate the overall tone to be found in Welcome to Dongmakgol: it is a feel-good movie, set during a period in Korean history that, as we have seen in many of the films to portray the Korean War that have preceded this one, isn't quite so jovial. Based on the long-running play by Jang Jin, Welcome to Dongmakgol is set in a secluded village where the inhabitants know nothing of the war in which their country is so irrevocably engaged. One day, an American pilot crash lands in the area and is tied up by the villagers as they figure out where he has come from and what he wants. Soon enough, soldiers from both sides stumble upon the village, and after an initial stand-off involving a grenade that destroys the locals' storehouse, decide to put aside their differences and remain in the village in order to replenish lost supplies.

As previously mentioned, Welcome to Dongmakgol is an excellent example of the "well-made" sensation that swept the Korean film industry at the beginning of the new millennium. This group of films, which includes Bong Joon-ho's Memories of Murder and Lee Jun-ik's The King and the Clown, puts an emphasis on high production values and western marketing philosophy. The success of these films, both in Korea and internationally (Welcome to Dongmakgol became the fourth-highest grossing Korean film of all time and was the country's official entry for the foreign language film category of the Academy Awards in 2005), allowed for new production companies to flourish and a new, domestic spin on the Korean box office. However, the term "well-made" eventually came to carry some unwanted connotations, as many of the films associated with this particular industry-driven movement were deemed unworthy of such attention by critics. Many critics also lambasted them for their lack of originality, since most if not all of them base their success on well-known stories or concepts. If nothing else, with its CGI-laden spectacles and impressive score from Hayao Miyazaki favourite Joe Hisaishi, Welcome to Dongmakgol represents a product of the Korean film industry that can finally rival its western counterparts for production value.

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Thu Feb 03, 2011 4:42 pm
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Trip wrote:
By the end, I wasn't convinced the halves were defined by his and her perspectives. What does define the two, I don't know.
JediMoonShyne wrote:
Hmm. I'm not even convinced that many of those scenes actually happened.
Totally agree here. I don't think the "truth" is necessarily in any scene, but I admit I don't know what Hong is trying to do here. Too bad it's so dreary that I don't particularly want to sit through it again.

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Thu Feb 03, 2011 11:20 pm
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Fri Feb 04, 2011 12:37 am
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I don't feel the need to pursue the films or read the text. Jedi gives the prettiest thread.

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Fri Feb 04, 2011 6:14 am
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Blevo wrote:
I don't feel the need to pursue the films or read the text. Jedi gives the prettiest thread.

Shame, I think Hong Sang-soo would agree with you!

Yeah, I know. Hukkle, Hukkle, etc.

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Fri Feb 04, 2011 6:17 am
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Kim Shin-rak, better known by his stage name of Rikidozan, was an influential figure in professional wrestling. As a Korean immigrant living in Japan during the forties he decided to become a sumo wrestler, but came up against a wall of racism that prevented him from his goal. This led to him embracing western pro-wrestling, which he then made popular in Japan at a time when the country perhaps needed it most. Starring popular Korean actor Sol Kyung-gu in the titular role, Song Hae-sung's Rikidozan: A Hero Extraordinary tracks the rise of this important cultural figure, from humble beginnings to his time in America and eventual triumphant return to Japan as a national hero. While a clichéd and certainly overlong attempt at a bio-picture - one of two commercial Korean films about a Japanese hero to be released during 2004, the other of which was Yang Yun-ho's Fighter in the Wind - Song's Rikidozan is worth watching if only for the performance delivered by Sol Kyung-gu (also seen in Peppermint Candy, I Wish I Had a Wife and Oasis), who put on a lot of weight and even learned basic Japanese - or, at least, learned his lines well enough to supply a convincing Japanese accent - in order to play the central role here. Not only does Sol's acting ability help provide a layered character full of hopes, dreams, and hard-headed tendencies, but he also provided his own body for many of the film's more physically demanding scenes.

Unlike Kim Ji-woon's The Foul King, which despite being a comedy shows the inner workings of professional wrestling with some degree of candour, Rikidozan never really pulls back the curtain in this sense. Perhaps understandably, given the amount of effort those such as Kim Shin-rak have invested in it throughout their lives, director Song treats it more like a professional sport such as boxing rather than the soap opera that many of us have come to both know and love. Despite being a Korean production, Rikidozan was filmed almost entirely in Japanese which, while lending the film a certain level of authenticity, proved to have a rather disastrous effect on the film's domestic box office success. As with Failan, an earlier Song Hae-sung film mentioned previously, Rikidozan is clearly a film designed for the Japanese market rather than the Korean one. The difference being that where Failan offers an interesting and emotionally resonant take on the romance/drama genre, Rikidozan seems intent on embracing every possible conventional bio-pic trait in sight, from its dramatic montages to its bloated run-time. That said, it is good to see what a Korean filmmaker is able to do with the kind of budget that must have been granted to Song Hae-sung for his work here: Japan of the forties, fifties and sixties is quite wonderfully recreated throughout the film.

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Wed Feb 09, 2011 4:39 am
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I'll take your word for it and queue The Foul King instead.

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Wed Feb 09, 2011 5:07 am
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Song's Calla looks interesting, but both people who had it on KG lost it.


Wed Feb 09, 2011 5:22 am
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Mod Hip wrote:
I'll take your word for it and queue The Foul King instead.

That's probably you're best option. Wrestling comedies seem to be a lot more enjoyable than sprawling wrestling biopics, anyway.

MrCarmady wrote:
Song's Calla looks interesting, but both people who had it on KG lost it.

I'd like to see Calla at some point. Did you try looking for it on AsiaTorrents, by any chance?

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Wed Feb 09, 2011 4:31 pm
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Post Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

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As Korean films began to take back the domestic box office at the turn of the millennium, certain new industry trends became apparent. Perhaps the most important of these was the realisation by studios that movie-going audiences in the country were primarily under thirty. Thus, a host of new films appeared that were designed to cater for younger viewers, many of which - such as Kim Kyeong-hyeong's My Tutor Friend and Shin Dong-yeob's 100 Days With Mr. Arrogant - were actually adapted from internet novels written by teenagers, so as to better relate to the youth. Kwak Jae-young's My Sassy Girl, which is based on a series of real-life incidents published on the internet in serial form, was the first of these films to find success - second only to Kwak Kyung-taek's Friend at the box office in 2001, and the highest grossing homegrown comedy in the country's history - actively paving the way for the rest. Indeed, such was the success of My Sassy Girl that it has even spawned a handful of remakes. The film follows a naive college student named Kyun-woo (played by the Korean pop singer Cha Tae-hyun - a casting trend that would become even more popular in following years), and his misadventures with an unnamed 'sassy girl' after one particularly eventful evening at the local subway station in which he saves her from drunkenly falling onto the tracks, only to be blamed for her subsequent vomiting by passengers who mistake him for her boyfriend.

The titular character seen in My Sassy Girl, played by the delightful Jun Ji-hyun, represents a recurring type of female character found in contemporary Korean cinema, particularly in romantic dramas/comedies. These eccentric young female characters aren't quite tom-boys, but are boyish both physically and in the way they behave. They often wear baggy clothing which hides their femininity, lacking the adult sexuality and sexual development we are used to seeing in the female characters found in similar western productions. Jun Ji-hyun's character, with her slim body, immaculate appearance and big eyes almost resembles a manga character, but her personality is obnoxious: she vomits in public, and regularly attacks strangers over everything from their manners to the clothes they wear. This is in direct contrast with the actress's image and many television commercials, in which she usually markets products based on the sensuality of her body. My Sassy Girl is a mixture that takes elements from the teen comedy, screwball comedy and romantic comedy, as well as other western influences in order to create a product that successfully appeals to the youth. Somewhat weak and fleeting attempts are made by director Kwak to parody conventional Korean melodrama and the country's love for it, but by the end My Sassy Girl has - perhaps unwittingly, perhaps not - actually strayed into such territory itself.

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Wed Feb 09, 2011 4:39 pm
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Lee Jeong-hyang's Art Museum by the Zoo, which was released in cinemas a week before Christmas in 1998 and ended up being well received by audiences and critics alike, furthers the point made previously about the eccentric and boyish female characters found in contemporary Korean cinema. In this case, it is the popular actress Shim Eun-ha (also seen in Christmas in August) who plays a lonely young woman whose quest for perfect love is rudely interrupted when the boorish boyfriend of a friend comes to stay. On returning from military service, Cheol-soo (Lee Seong-jae) decides to surprise his girlfriend at home, but instead finds that a different woman - Choon-hee (Shim) - is now living in her house. His attempts to reconcile with his girlfriend fail, so Cheol-soo decides to move in with Choon-hee, quite against her will. The pair, finding themselves in an impossible living situation, kick things off by arguing continuously: Choon-hee likes her own space, quietly daydreaming of the one man she pines for while working away a script for a romantic comedy, whereas the chauvinistic Cheol-soo enjoys drinking beer and pulling everyone around him down to his own moody level. To this end, he immediately picks apart Choon-hee's movie script, which leads to them scrapping it and collaborating on a script between them, titled Art Museum by the Zoo.

Shim Eun-ha's infectious character, with her loose clothes and bush of unkempt hair, rejects the conventional feminine traits associated with the heroines of typical western romance films, instead boasting a sexuality that is both refreshing and at the same time somewhat naive. Indeed, while this character appears to break certain genre conventions, one might argue from a feminist standpoint that her innocence is an aspect typical to most romantic comedies. While the transformation and eventual coming together of the couple in Art Museum by the Zoo is mutual, it is the male who educates the female in love, rather than the other way round: it is because of him that she stops walking barefoot in the apartment and starts behaving properly at the dinner table. Based on events from debutant female director Lee Jeong-hyang's life, Art Museum by the Zoo actively mocks the very genre it represents - using the script that the characters are writing, which of course comes to life and plays out parallel to the film itself - despite owing much to such commercial western efforts as When Harry Met Sally and You've Got Mail. One thing it does do differently however is to ignore the typical narrative approach of putting hurdles in the path of the film's romantic couple: their union is not hindered by such external factors as parents, rivals or differences in class, but by character flaws.

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Thu Feb 10, 2011 4:47 am
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It's over. Wonderful as always, Jedi, only seen JSA though :/
As for Calla, I did look on Asiatorrents, but they had a version with half of KG's bitrate and their rules are ridiculously strict. I might just order the DVD and get a replacement for KG some time (when I've seen enough Korean cinema from other directors, maybe).


Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:44 am
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Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:47 am
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MrCarmady wrote:
It's over. Wonderful as always, Jedi, only seen JSA though :/

Thanks, and thanks to everyone for following!

MrCarmady wrote:
As for Calla, I did look on Asiatorrents, but they had a version with half of KG's bitrate and their rules are ridiculously strict. I might just order the DVD and get a replacement for KG some time (when I've seen enough Korean cinema from other directors, maybe).

Ah, that's a shame. The larger rip must be on the net somewhere, I'll have a look.

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Thu Feb 10, 2011 8:27 am
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
Based on events from debutant female director Lee Jeong-hyang's life, Art Museum by the Zoo actively mocks the very genre it represents - using the script that the characters are writing, which of course comes to life and plays out parallel to the film itself - despite owing much to such commercial western efforts as When Harry Met Sally and You've Got Mail. One thing it does do differently however is to ignore the typical narrative approach of putting hurdles in the path of the film's romantic couple: their union is not hindered by such external factors as parents, rivals or differences in class, but by character flaws.
Another female director! This one sounds interesting.

I'm not a big fan of My Sassy Girl. I did shed a few tears at the end, though, and felt manipulated. :P

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Thu Feb 10, 2011 9:47 am
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It's over. Good. I mean. Well done.

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Thu Feb 10, 2011 12:12 pm
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
I'm not a big fan of My Sassy Girl. I did shed a few tears at the end, though, and felt manipulated. :P

Me neither, but I felt it was too important not to be included.

Thanks again to everyone who posted in the thread. :)

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Thu Feb 10, 2011 4:37 pm
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Whatever any of you Korean films fans decide to watch, please stay away from the latest overrated thriller Bedeviled. It was more miserable to me to watch than I Saw The Devil. The twist is, it doesn't take place on the Mainland but rather a backwards, inbred village that's inhabited by only a few people. Other than that it's a bland and utterly disgusting at times revenge thriller with over the top acting and characters you rather would not like to spend time with.

Korean thrillers need some kind of reinvention. They're getting too Western and reliable on cliches and ever more slick production techniques. It's why director's like Chang dong-lee and Sang-soo are doing more entertaining films than what's suppose to be mainstream. The mainstream is getting overly nihilistic and Saw-minded. More classical directors like Sang-soo are what's refreshing right now.

Just my two cents. The state of Korean thrillers is really iffy at the moment. So many of them and so very few worth paying attention to.


Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:37 pm
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I didn't even notice it was over! I'm in denial. Aren't there some more letters we could squeeze out of the alphabet?

Jedi, I really enjoyed this, and I'll use it for reference. Awesome thread!

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Thu Feb 10, 2011 9:38 pm
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Jedi's thread-creating talents are not unparalleled, but his completion record is.


Fri Feb 11, 2011 6:41 am
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