Recently Seen

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Jinnistan
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Jinnistan » Tue Jul 28, 2020 7:14 pm

Macrology wrote:
Mon Jul 27, 2020 9:30 pm
His animations don't seem quite as fluent as his mixed media films, but I haven't seen any of them except for his short film Inspirace, which is somehow crude and delicately beautiful at the same time. It's most remarkable for being (I assume) the only stop-motion animation using glass as the dominant medium:

Fantastic :up:
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by topherH » Tue Jul 28, 2020 9:26 pm

The Man who Shot Liberty Valance -9/10

One of the better John Wayne movies, love the showdown with Stewart and Marvin. B & W looked crisp. Maybe the end goes on just a tad bit too long.
State of Siege |Gavras, 1972| +
Deadpool |Miller, 2016| +
Z |Gavras, 1969| -
The Confession |Gavras, 1970| +
Missing |Gavras, 1982| +
The Revenant |Inarritu, 2015| +
The Hateful Eight |Tarantino, 2015| +

+ Recommended
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Tue Jul 28, 2020 11:33 pm

Both Persona and Soylent Green are great and are parodied to the point of unavoidable damage.

To Joy and Summer Interlude are excellent, tragic early Bergman that try to deal with the plight of doomed love through a series of flashbacks. It's fitting that the Bergman collection packages these together on the same disc.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Stu » Thu Jul 30, 2020 5:39 am

MrCarmady wrote:
Mon Jul 27, 2020 12:14 am
Re-watched Collateral which holds up pretty well apart from that Audioslave song. Tom Cruise should play psychopathic villains more often, he's absolutely perfect here.
Absolutely; it still baffles me how the Academy nominated Foxx for his performance in it (who was very good as an everyman pushed to the limit of his patience, granted), but completely snubbed Cruise in the process, when it's clear that he put in what was easily the finest performance of that entire film by disappearing entirely into that character in a manner that he almost never does anymore. It's criminal, I tell ya, criminal!
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Thief » Thu Jul 30, 2020 1:00 pm

The Nameless Two wrote:
Mon Jul 27, 2020 12:27 am
Interesting that you mention Bergman as I added his collection to my Criterion library last night :shifty: :shifty: :shifty:

Starting with Seventh Seal as I've only seen snippets of it on TV
I know I'm in the minority, but I wasn't very impressed with Seventh Seal, which I've mentioned quite often here. That said, Persona really blew me away. It took me two watches, within the same week, but it's an excellent film. I also saw Smiles of a Summer Night, which is "simple", but fun. I think that's all I've seen from Bergman.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Torgo » Thu Jul 30, 2020 1:59 pm

Have a Nice Day is a lean and mean Chinese animated noir that's like an indie graphic novel come to life. It also has one of the most accurate depictions of post-2016 life I've seen yet. Everyone in its inner city setting has accepted that life is only fair for the very rich, that they would kill even those close to them if they had to and they all know exactly what they'd do if they were lucky enough to find such a bag. The way the animation depicts their city has a lot to do with this, which manages to be realistic while subtly and surreally highlighting its decay and hopelessness at the same time. While I've praised the look and feel quite a bit, this is not all the movie has going for it. I've seen my fair share of movies about people taking things that don't belong to them, but this one had me in suspense until the very end. Speaking of graphic novels, the snappy way the movie depicts motion resembles turning the pages of one, which has the added benefit of making each shocking moment even more shocking. For many, if not most of us, post-2016 life has been no picnic. Thankfully, there are movies like Have a Nice Day that not only let us have catharsis, but also beautiful, thrilling catharsis.
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Have a Nice Day (Liu, 2017)
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Thu Jul 30, 2020 3:22 pm

Thief wrote:
Thu Jul 30, 2020 1:00 pm
I know I'm in the minority, but I wasn't very impressed with Seventh Seal, which I've mentioned quite often here. That said, Persona really blew me away. It took me two watches, within the same week, but it's an excellent film. I also saw Smiles of a Summer Night, which is "simple", but fun. I think that's all I've seen from Bergman.
I share your views for both The Seventh Seal and Persona. Was underwhelmed by the former, was completely blown away by the latter. I think our reasons for being underwhelmed by The Seventh Seal are similar, as I recall (how it focused much more attention on the side characters than Antonius).
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Torgo » Thu Jul 30, 2020 3:50 pm

MrCarmady wrote:
Mon Jul 27, 2020 12:14 am
Re-watched Collateral which holds up pretty well apart from that Audioslave song. Tom Cruise should play psychopathic villains more often, he's absolutely perfect here.
It is a great performance, probably because it's not as Cruise-y, i.e. lacking his mannerisms that make you see the actor first and the character second. It's a lot like Bruce Willis' performance in 12 Monkeys in that way.
I do like that Audioslave song, though. Is it the song or the placement you disapprove of? The best of both in that movie, however, is Ready Steady Go. 8-)
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Thief » Thu Jul 30, 2020 4:08 pm

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Thu Jul 30, 2020 3:22 pm
I share your views for both The Seventh Seal and Persona. Was underwhelmed by the former, was completely blown away by the latter. I think our reasons for being underwhelmed by The Seventh Seal are similar, as I recall (how it focused much more attention on the side characters than Antonius).
Yes.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Fri Jul 31, 2020 4:56 am

The Dead Pool (1988) - B

About as featherweight as a Dirty Harry can be, coming in at a trim 90 minutes, featuring a partner who survives, and peaking during an elaborate chase where the aggressor is a toy car (!). But that's not a bad thing necessarily. After the last couple flicks, I was worn out by the contrived grimness of it all and the struggle for the series to keep Harry interesting without ever really confronting him, and this film kind of just kicks all that under the bed and switches into a fun slasher / caper / whodunnit. The solution isn't as much fun as you'd hope, but the process is-- especially with the boost from up-and-comers like Patricia Clarkson and Liam Neeson, who are some of the best actors to land in Harry's world. The meta angle on violence in the media gets some laughs largely because I'm assuming deliberate winking from the fuckin' Dirty Harry series.

I Married a Witch - B+

Some of the plotting loses the tightness of the farce style it's chasing (this movie also peaks in the middle, but with a series of second-floor near-trysts), but this soars as a performance piece for Veronica Lake, who carries a similar wise-despite-her-years poise and voice as Lauren Bacall. The age gap between her and hapless beau Frederic March feels a bit much, but hell, 1942. You can just acknowledge it and move on. My favorite element, apart from Lake, was the impressive special effects work. I paused and rewound a couple times to realize that one shot of souls "misting" into the snoots of two bottles-- with people walking the deep background-- must've been created by filming (at a reduced shutter speed) mist pouring out of the bottles, while the people in the deep background were trained to walk backward at a slower speed. It's not a perfect effect, but it's goddamn impressive as problem-solving.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Fri Jul 31, 2020 6:00 am

DaMU, I can't believe you mentioned up and comers and left out Jim Carrey' wicked Axel Rose impression and Welcome to the Jungle music video!

That toy car chase is surreal. It feels like a Naked Gun gag. Played straight so it's hilarious... But it's supposed to be serious? Oh my.

I still dig it though. Slight and fun is right.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Fri Jul 31, 2020 6:13 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 6:00 am
DaMU, I can't believe you mentioned up and comers and left out Jim Carrey' wicked Axel Rose impression and Welcome to the Jungle music video!
*: Jim Carrey also appears.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Fri Jul 31, 2020 6:15 am

DaMU wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 6:13 am
*: Jim Carrey also appears.
Now that's more like it!
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by MrCarmady » Fri Jul 31, 2020 8:08 am

Torgo wrote:
Thu Jul 30, 2020 3:50 pm
It is a great performance, probably because it's not as Cruise-y, i.e. lacking his mannerisms that make you see the actor first and the character second. It's a lot like Bruce Willis' performance in 12 Monkeys in that way.
I do like that Audioslave song, though. Is it the song or the placement you disapprove of? The best of both in that movie, however, is Ready Steady Go. 8-)
I don't like the song or the scene, the whole 'Vincent and coyote are kindred spirits' thing feels laughable. I do like the Oakenfold song a lot though.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Fri Jul 31, 2020 3:38 pm

DaMU wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 4:56 am

I Married a Witch - B+

Some of the plotting loses the tightness of the farce style it's chasing (this movie also peaks in the middle, but with a series of second-floor near-trysts), but this soars as a performance piece for Veronica Lake, who carries a similar wise-despite-her-years poise and voice as Lauren Bacall. The age gap between her and hapless beau Frederic March feels a bit much, but hell, 1942. You can just acknowledge it and move on. My favorite element, apart from Lake, was the impressive special effects work. I paused and rewound a couple times to realize that one shot of souls "misting" into the snoots of two bottles-- with people walking the deep background-- must've been created by filming (at a reduced shutter speed) mist pouring out of the bottles, while the people in the deep background were trained to walk backward at a slower speed. It's not a perfect effect, but it's goddamn impressive as problem-solving.
Yeah, I found this movie pretty enjoyable. I thought her father was fucking hilarious. And of course, as Takoma pointed out, the wedding-singer gag is a hoot.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Aug 02, 2020 3:16 am

Wooley wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 3:38 pm
And of course, as Takoma pointed out, the wedding-singer gag is a hoot.
Oh yeah, that was a great gag that just kept paying off.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Aug 02, 2020 3:36 am

The Lighthouse (2019) - B+

Effective mood piece, pressure-cooker, abstract fever dream, and riot of symbolism. The film name-checks Melville (as does the closing credits, Eggers once again unable to help himself when it comes to self-adulation), but the film swirls through the murk of Poe and Lovecraft, Byron and Coleridge. There's a Kubrickian ax and a Promethean evisceration and countless shots of the Junji Ito staircase that leads to the furnace above. There's also a siren whose inviting, labial tail mocks the men's self-imposed, overcompensating fortitude; later on, a moment of tenderness leads immediately to a stupid macho fistfight. (Eggers allows more humor in this film than in his last, for the better.) Sometimes the film's chaos spirals so wide that moments and scenes play arbitrary instead of cumulative. Like we'd sidestepped into the language of Jodorowsky, or Parajanov, or Wheatley's A Field in England. But the film, even at its most disconnected and wild, roots itself in the filthy earth and rain and muck (and blood and piss and sperm) of its fallen gnostic environment, to which the divine light endlessly emanating above promises either elevation... or perhaps, per Browning, an accounting of what it took these fallen men to reach the tower.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Aug 02, 2020 5:48 am

Coherence (2013) - B- / B

More fun to think about than to watch, largely due to the irritating mumblecorey assemblage of middle class whites (with an assist from the needlessly jittery / zoomy camera), but the premise is just too goddamn juicy. It's hard to not engage with ordinary people trying to sort out an extraordinary event. The strategies, the screwups, the surprising turns in the overall premise. This premise (a passing comet might've split reality) feels nice and pulpy. And... well, okay, there's one good character. Nicholas Brendon (Buffy) plays a former actor turned alcoholic, a surprisingly honest excavation of his own real-world baggage. A solid recommendation for fans of high-concept no-budget sci-fi flicks like The Endless, Primer, and Circle.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sun Aug 02, 2020 5:51 am

That's a Kubrickian ax, sir! Or at the very least, a Mattssonian ax.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Aug 02, 2020 6:11 am

Currently diverting all Shining-based artistic capital back to King, for the twisted kicks I get out of it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Sun Aug 02, 2020 6:18 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Thu Jul 30, 2020 3:22 pm
I share your views for both The Seventh Seal and Persona. Was underwhelmed by the former, was completely blown away by the latter. I think our reasons for being underwhelmed by The Seventh Seal are similar, as I recall (how it focused much more attention on the side characters than Antonius).
I'll offer a modest defense of The Seventh Seal, even if it's not my favorite Bergman film. (It's at an inherent disadvantage because it's his most famous film, with all the expectations that come with that.)

Actually, it occurs to me that I'll have to carry this argument uphill, because I think The Seventh Seal is great for precisely the reason you find it lacking. So many of Bergman's films deal with a man's existential angst, faith in God, fear of death - and this is ostensibly the premise of The Seventh Seal. But this film diverges from his other films that tackle similar subject matter.
For one, it has a playfully candid approach to the material. Death is not an invisible, unstoppable force one must reckon with in solitude, but a wry figure one plays a game of chess with. The film is set in the middle ages, and it employs two of the storytelling tropes most common during that period: allegory and memento mori.

But the side characters are the most important element; I wouldn't even call them "side characters" insofar as they're central to understanding the essence of the film. Rather than honing in on one man's solipsistic obsession with his own mortality (as he did so often), Bergman starts from that premise only to broaden his scope to include an array of other characters. He depicts their suffering and casual cruelty, but also their decency and hope. He dwells on the joy that can reside in sharing life with other people. It is, ultimately, an embrace of humanity in all its complications and a recognition that life goes beyond one's self, that your own mortality is just a drop in the continuum of mankind's collective mortality.
It is also willing to accept the answers to difficult and despairing questions with simplicity and grace without ever de-complicating those questions. I think it's significant that the film operates primarily as an allegory (albeit one endowed with 20th century psychological heft). This mode was common in the middle ages because with it, one could communicate to the broadest possible audience, in direct and understandable terms. That may be why it's Bergman's most popular film, and perhaps his most accessible.

I've pulled this Melvyn Bragg quote from Wikipedia, but it captures beautifully what I find so moving and admirable about the film:
Melvyn Bragg wrote:[It] is constructed like an argument. It is a story told as a sermon might be delivered: an allegory...each scene is at once so simple and so charged and layered that it catches us again and again...Somehow all of Bergman's own past, that of his father, that of his reading and doing and seeing, that of his Swedish culture, of his political burning and religious melancholy, poured into a series of pictures which carry that swell of contributions and contradictions so effortlessly that you could tell the story to a child, publish it as a storybook of photographs and yet know that the deepest questions of religion and the most mysterious revelation of simply being alive are both addressed.
Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sun Aug 02, 2020 6:21 am

DaMU wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 6:11 am
Currently diverting all Shining-based artistic capital back to King, for the twisted kicks I get out of it.
You better be Special Editioning the Shining and turning that ax into a goddamn mallet! No half measures, DaMU.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Aug 02, 2020 6:27 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 6:21 am
You better be Special Editioning the Shining and turning that ax into a goddamn mallet! No half measures, DaMU.
FML, this is what I get for posting late, you gotcha-ing me on pedantic technicalities while I try my goddamnedest to write something that comes close to evoking how I felt watching it. Enjoy your internet points, you fiend.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Aug 02, 2020 6:28 am

Still think it's weird btw that The Shining book to film went from mallet to ax and Misery book to film went from ax to sledgehammer. It was like the universe struggling for balance.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sun Aug 02, 2020 6:55 am

DaMU wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 6:27 am
FML, this is what I get for posting late, you gotcha-ing me on pedantic technicalities while I try my goddamnedest to write something that comes close to evoking how I felt watching it. Enjoy your internet points, you fiend.
*Crushes up internet points and rips it off a credit card*
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Sun Aug 02, 2020 4:19 pm

Macrology wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 6:18 am
I'll offer a modest defense of The Seventh Seal, even if it's not my favorite Bergman film. (It's at an inherent disadvantage because it's his most famous film, with all the expectations that come with that.)

Actually, it occurs to me that I'll have to carry this argument uphill, because I think The Seventh Seal is great for precisely the reason you find it lacking. So many of Bergman's films deal with a man's existential angst, faith in God, fear of death - and this is ostensibly the premise of The Seventh Seal. But this film diverges from his other films that tackle similar subject matter.
For one, it has a playfully candid approach to the material. Death is not an invisible, unstoppable force one must reckon with in solitude, but a wry figure one plays a game of chess with. The film is set in the middle ages, and it employs two of the storytelling tropes most common during that period: allegory and memento mori.

But the side characters are the most important element; I wouldn't even call them "side characters" insofar as they're central to understanding the essence of the film. Rather than honing in on one man's solipsistic obsession with his own mortality (as he did so often), Bergman starts from that premise only to broaden his scope to include an array of other characters. He depicts their suffering and casual cruelty, but also their decency and hope. He dwells on the joy that can reside in sharing life with other people. It is, ultimately, an embrace of humanity in all its complications and a recognition that life goes beyond one's self, that your own mortality is just a drop in the continuum of mankind's collective mortality.
It is also willing to accept the answers to difficult and despairing questions with simplicity and grace without ever de-complicating those questions. I think it's significant that the film operates primarily as an allegory (albeit one endowed with 20th century psychological heft). This mode was common in the middle ages because with it, one could communicate to the broadest possible audience, in direct and understandable terms. That may be why it's Bergman's most popular film, and perhaps his most accessible.

I've pulled this Melvyn Bragg quote from Wikipedia, but it captures beautifully what I find so moving and admirable about the film:
What you said and the Melvyn Bragg quote are fine ways of wording the film's themes. However, while I appreciated Bergman's intentions of shaping Block by having his actions be informed by fleshing out the other characters he encountered, I think what kept me from finding him compelling is that there weren't enough scenes which showed how the time Block spent with the other characters effected and influenced his actions and decisions throughout the film. Without these scenes, I didn't feel like I got much out of his character and didn't get to see enough of how they were changing his behavior as the film rolled along. The only scenes which showed this were the far too brief scenes of Block sharing milk and wild strawberries (pun) with Jof and Mia where he felt seemingly at peace. More intimate moments like that would've probably worked wonders for me. His climactic scene of knocking over the chess pieces didn't mean quite a lot to me since I felt like he lacked the proper development to make that scene resonate as well as it could've, and I'm not sure that's how Bergman wanted me to react to it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Sun Aug 02, 2020 6:50 pm

Paul Blart Mall Cop 2, 2015 (F)

The opening 2 minutes are really good, both jokes land really well and the movie looks off to a great start, but it's trash beyond that. The writing is terrible, the jokes pretty much never land, most of them are about how a bunch of loser, middle-aged mall cops being that.

The biggest issue I have with the movie is this creepy, sleazy thing with the super hot hotel manager. She meets paul to apologize on behalf of the hotel about something or other and he's like, oh, lady, I know you're into me, but I'm not interested. That's pretty bad, but it stays a plot point in the movie where she's actually into him for no reason and he asks something that's against hotel policy and she's all breathing heavy and flustered and after she says no and he insists, she says oh, I can't say no to you. It's really gross and it would seem really bad even in a movie from the 50s.

Paul Blart 1 is still the best in the series, but it's still a paul blart movie, so pleases don't watch it either.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Sun Aug 02, 2020 6:56 pm

I thought the first Mall Cop was okay :shifty:
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Sun Aug 02, 2020 8:30 pm

Man, Dial M For Murder is just so damn good.
Really tight, kinda nerve-wracking suspense-film with a very, very well-constructed plot that really never falters and doesn't require much suspension of disbelief from the audience. (There is one nit I might pick but it's a fairly small one.) Tense up to the very end, even though you know how it has to end, and some really great little Hitchcock moments, too (like the two shadows on the door, LITERAL foreshadowing, hilarious).
I mean, seriously, with this shot, Hitchcock is telegraphing to the audience that the whole movie will end up hinging (ha!) on that door. Seriously, seven minutes into the film, a shot of the door with the shadows of the two secret-lovers on whom the whole murder-plot hangs on the door which will prove to be the incriminating evidence against the murderer. It's almost corny, but I think it's actually genius instead.
Anyway, the police-inspector utterly steals the show from Ray Milland, who carries it, but everyone does a marvelous job at what they are given (bit of a shame that Grace Kelly is given little to do but play the victim but I guess that was somehow considered a good role for women back then, in a major Hitchcock film).
Ray Milland really makes every movie he's in better in my opinion (especially X: The Man With The X-Ray Eyes).
Another thing I thought was really cool was that
there are only a few shots in the whole film that take place outside of the apartment and maybe less than ten minutes of the whole film take place outside of that one room, yet the movie feels very tense the whole time and never becomes dull. In fact, I didn't actually even notice it until after the movie was over.
Just top-notch, top-tier Hitchcock and movie in general.

PS - If anyone cares, my nit is that
every detail required to make all three versions of the murder, the one where the killer just breaks in to steal, attacks Grace Kelly, and gets killed, the one where she murders the blackmailer, and the one where her husband hired someone to kill her but she survives, credible are all on-screen. Every clue in any version is either a physical piece of evidence the audience sees or something that someone has said for all to hear... except that ultimately Milland is suspected because of something that happens entirely off-screen that the police find out about off-screen and just tell the other characters that's how they came to suspect him and re-open the investigation, by way of exposition, really to the audience. It was unfortunate they couldn't close that loop somehow but, c'est la vie.
It's otherwise perfect.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Sun Aug 02, 2020 8:37 pm

I should revisit Dial M for Murder. I remember finding it impressive, but I don't remember much about it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Thief » Sun Aug 02, 2020 8:38 pm

Macrology wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 6:18 am
I'll offer a modest defense of The Seventh Seal, even if it's not my favorite Bergman film. (It's at an inherent disadvantage because it's his most famous film, with all the expectations that come with that.)

Actually, it occurs to me that I'll have to carry this argument uphill, because I think The Seventh Seal is great for precisely the reason you find it lacking. So many of Bergman's films deal with a man's existential angst, faith in God, fear of death - and this is ostensibly the premise of The Seventh Seal. But this film diverges from his other films that tackle similar subject matter.
For one, it has a playfully candid approach to the material. Death is not an invisible, unstoppable force one must reckon with in solitude, but a wry figure one plays a game of chess with. The film is set in the middle ages, and it employs two of the storytelling tropes most common during that period: allegory and memento mori.

But the side characters are the most important element; I wouldn't even call them "side characters" insofar as they're central to understanding the essence of the film. Rather than honing in on one man's solipsistic obsession with his own mortality (as he did so often), Bergman starts from that premise only to broaden his scope to include an array of other characters. He depicts their suffering and casual cruelty, but also their decency and hope. He dwells on the joy that can reside in sharing life with other people. It is, ultimately, an embrace of humanity in all its complications and a recognition that life goes beyond one's self, that your own mortality is just a drop in the continuum of mankind's collective mortality.
It is also willing to accept the answers to difficult and despairing questions with simplicity and grace without ever de-complicating those questions. I think it's significant that the film operates primarily as an allegory (albeit one endowed with 20th century psychological heft). This mode was common in the middle ages because with it, one could communicate to the broadest possible audience, in direct and understandable terms. That may be why it's Bergman's most popular film, and perhaps his most accessible.

I've pulled this Melvyn Bragg quote from Wikipedia, but it captures beautifully what I find so moving and admirable about the film:
Those are great points. I've been meaning to revisit it. It's been around 10 years since I first saw it, so maybe my reaction to it would be different now at 42, almost 43, than it was at 30-something. Thanks for sharing.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Thief » Sun Aug 02, 2020 8:56 pm

Wooley wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 8:30 pm
Man, Dial M For Murder is just so damn good.
Really tight, kinda nerve-wracking suspense-film with a very, very well-constructed plot that really never falters and doesn't require much suspension of disbelief from the audience. (There is one nit I might pick but it's a fairly small one.) Tense up to the very end, even though you know how it has to end, and some really great little Hitchcock moments, too (like the two shadows on the door, LITERAL foreshadowing, hilarious).
I mean, seriously, with this shot, Hitchcock is telegraphing to the audience that the whole movie will end up hinging (ha!) on that door. Seriously, seven minutes into the film, a shot of the door with the shadows of the two secret-lovers on whom the whole murder-plot hangs on the door which will prove to be the incriminating evidence against the murderer. It's almost corny, but I think it's actually genius instead.
Anyway, the police-inspector utterly steals the show from Ray Milland, who carries it, but everyone does a marvelous job at what they are given (bit of a shame that Grace Kelly is given little to do but play the victim but I guess that was somehow considered a good role for women back then, in a major Hitchcock film).
Ray Milland really makes every movie he's in better in my opinion (especially X: The Man With The X-Ray Eyes).
Another thing I thought was really cool was that
there are only a few shots in the whole film that take place outside of the apartment and maybe less than ten minutes of the whole film take place outside of that one room, yet the movie feels very tense the whole time and never becomes dull. In fact, I didn't actually even notice it until after the movie was over.
Just top-notch, top-tier Hitchcock and movie in general.

PS - If anyone cares, my nit is that
every detail required to make all three versions of the murder, the one where the killer just breaks in to steal, attacks Grace Kelly, and gets killed, the one where she murders the blackmailer, and the one where her husband hired someone to kill her but she survives, credible are all on-screen. Every clue in any version is either a physical piece of evidence the audience sees or something that someone has said for all to hear... except that ultimately Milland is suspected because of something that happens entirely off-screen that the police find out about off-screen and just tell the other characters that's how they came to suspect him and re-open the investigation, by way of exposition, really to the audience. It was unfortunate they couldn't close that loop somehow but, c'est la vie.
It's otherwise perfect.
It's a great film and my #3 Hitchcock. Ray Milland is *chef kiss* excellent. If I were to pick one issue with it, it would be that the character of Holliday felt useless, and more like an excuse for having a young, "noble" male character there for Kelly.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Sun Aug 02, 2020 9:01 pm

For what it's worth, it's been a few years since I've seen The Seventh Seal. I've also been meaning to revisit it for some time as I may warm up to it some more. Being that it was my first Bergman when I originally watched it, that I've seen several of his other films might help me to appreciate it more. Who knows.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Captain Terror » Sun Aug 02, 2020 9:03 pm

Wooley wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 8:30 pm
the police-inspector utterly steals the show from Ray Milland,
He's my favorite. "Highly irregular I know, but my blood was up!"
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Sun Aug 02, 2020 9:04 pm

Thief wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 8:56 pm
It's a great film and my #3 Hitchcock. Ray Milland is *chef kiss* excellent. If I were to pick one issue with it, it would be that the character of Holliday felt useless, and more like an excuse for having a young, "noble" male character there for Kelly.
I liked him specifically because
the whole movie it feels like they're setting you up for him to solve the crime (they seem to dangle it even before the crime with the conversation of whether he could design and commit "A Perfect Murder", not coincidentally the title of the remake, and the stiff police-inspector to have to be brought around to it by him, and he actually does accidentally figure the whole thing out by coming up with the only plausible alternative explanation of the events that Milland could offer to save his wife, but he doesn't even know it until he finds the briefcase. So then they're really walking you toward, ah the mystery-writer is gonna solve the case... which they then subvert with him and the audience discovering a bit later that the stiff police-inspector is one sharp tack and is actually way ahead of him, leaving him just a bystander as the police reveal all the essential clues that lock the case and then spring the trap. Setting up expectations and effectively subverting them generally pleases me, when it works as tightly as it did here.
I enjoyed that.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Sun Aug 02, 2020 9:04 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 9:03 pm
He's my favorite. "Highly irregular I know, but my blood was up!"
That was hilarious. I mean, it goes by quick and it's subtle but it got a real chuckle out of me.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Captain Terror » Sun Aug 02, 2020 9:08 pm

Wooley wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 9:04 pm
That was hilarious. I mean, it goes by quick and it's subtle but it got a real chuckle out of me.
The Prytania occasionally shows it in 3D. If the world survives long enough for them to do it again, I recommend it. You wouldn't think there's a lot to work with given the one-room setting but Hitch manages to find some cool angles that really pop. And then of course there's Grace's hand reaching toward the audience in "that" scene.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Thief » Sun Aug 02, 2020 9:27 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 9:08 pm
The Prytania occasionally shows it in 3D. If the world survives long enough for them to do it again, I recommend it. You wouldn't think there's a lot to work with given the one-room setting but Hitch manages to find some cool angles that really pop. And then of course there's Grace's hand reaching toward the audience in "that" scene.
He really moves the camera all around that room. From above, below, the sides...
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Sun Aug 02, 2020 9:41 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 9:08 pm
The Prytania occasionally shows it in 3D. If the world survives long enough for them to do it again, I recommend it. You wouldn't think there's a lot to work with given the one-room setting but Hitch manages to find some cool angles that really pop. And then of course there's Grace's hand reaching toward the audience in "that" scene.
Ah, the Prytania. I hope they manage to make it through all of this nonsense. They're still screening stuff, at least, and they have a very regular presence on social media.

When I first moved to New Orleans - back before I was giving tours, which changed my schedule - I would attend their classic movie screenings on Sundays and Wednesdays. This was back around 2010, when Rene Brunet was still alive and would greet people at the door wearing his classic movie ties and occasionally introduce the film. I saw It's a Wonderful Life there with my sister one Christmas season, a midnight screening of Eraserhead that redefined for me how momentous the difference between cinema and home video can be, and a screening of The Room with Tommy Wiseau in attendance (who may be from New Orleans?).
When I saw Citizen Kane there with some friends, Brunet talked about deciding to the screen the film on its original run in spite of Hearst's campaign against it - meaning that he was already running the theater back in 1941.
Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sun Aug 02, 2020 10:47 pm

Ya know, I just may have to watch my 3D Blu of Dial M For Murder. At the time I enjoyed it (there’s not a single Hitchcock I dislike out of the 40 or so I’ve seen) but I didn’t find it quite on par with the similarly plotted Strangers on a Train or the bottle structure of Rear Window or Rope. Much of that had to do with just how limited Hitchcock seemed to be in keeping the film fairly play-like. I suspect that 3D could really at a lot to that format though and I’m a sucker for the format to begin with...

But I’m also tempted to rewatch the Seventh Seal to gab about how wrong everyone who doesn’t love it is. It’s been too long to be particularly specific but it’s the gosh darn Seventh Seal! Certain films become standards and iconic for a reason.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:00 pm

But I’m also tempted to rewatch the Seventh Seal to gab about how wrong everyone who doesn’t love it is. It’s been too long to be particularly specific but it’s the gosh darn Seventh Seal! Certain films become standards and iconic for a reason.
:fresh:

The Seventh Seal was a gateway drug to foreign cinema for me, so I at the least will love it for that.

I also love it in general, though, so I don't know what y'all are on about.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:03 pm

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 6:56 pm
I thought the first Mall Cop was okay :shifty:
It has good scenes, especially the hot sauce one, but is it recommendable? It's a lot like Twilight in that its reputation is way worse than it, but it doesn't have the cultural relevance to be worth watching, unlike Twilight.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by MrCarmady » Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:06 pm

I watched The Seventh Seal for the first time recently and beyond the cinematography and Von Sydow's performance, I failed to grasp what was meant to be so masterful about it. The sombre 'why has thou forsaken me' parts don't mesh well with the picaresque stuff at all. But then again most of Bergman's stuff barring Wild Strawberries and Fanny and Alexander leaves me utterly cold.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:07 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 10:47 pm

Certain films become standards and iconic for a reason.

And hopefully that reason isn't to be put under glass and kept delicate. Pushing back on canon is healthy. Or rather, necessary. Art isn't only what is created, but the discussion it ignites. And if everyone is agreeing on the greatness of something, I'll quietly walk out the backdoor of that conversation.

As long as the objections or adulations aren't dumb as fuck, and are coming from people who at least respect the nature of art, I'll welcome every ingrate out there who wants to claim that Bob Dylan isn't the greatest artist of the 20th century, or that 2001: A Space Odyssey isn't perfection. Because those are the only actual truths in art, and I never want either of them to ever be universally accepted.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:12 pm

I don't think I've been disappointed by a Bergman film. A while back, I made it a goal to watch one Bergman, one Kurosawa, and one Wilder each year. The idea was that there'd be a long stretch of years where I'd be guaranteed at least three failsafe new views each year. Movies to anticipate with confidence.

Now, time to finally watch The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:13 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:07 pm
And hopefully that reason isn't to be put under glass and kept delicate.
Okay, but I would prefer to keep my love for Mortal Kombat under that safety glass, if that's all the same to you chums.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:16 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:07 pm
And hopefully that reason isn't to be put under glass and kept delicate. Pushing back on canon is healthy. Or rather, necessary. Art isn't only what is created, but the discussion it ignites. And if everyone is agreeing on the greatness of something, I'll quietly walk out the backdoor of that conversation.

As long as the objections or adulations aren't dumb as fuck, and are coming from people who at least respect the nature of art, I'll welcome every ingrate out there who wants to claim that Bob Dylan isn't the greatest artist of the 20th century, or that 2001: A Space Odyssey isn't perfection. Because those are the only actual truths in art, and I never want either of them to ever be universally accepted.
Sure. But I think these things do have to be kept in mind when discussing them because I would be similarly dismissive of someone disparaging Dylan because “he doesn’t sing well” or 2001 because “its boring.”

These are those “if you come at the king, you best not miss” works where criticism usually reveals ones own limitations rather than uncovering some hidden weakness within the art.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:17 pm

DaMU wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:12 pm
I don't think I've been disappointed by a Bergman film. A while back, I made it a goal to watch one Bergman, one Kurosawa, and one Wilder each year. The idea was that there'd be a long stretch of years where I'd be guaranteed at least three failsafe new views each year. Movies to anticipate with confidence.

Now, time to finally watch The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes.
Only one??? You have the self control of a monk.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by MrCarmady » Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:23 pm

But 2001 is kinda boring, though? I mean, what's with that Windows Screensaver bit, how long does that take? How long do the apes? It's obviously a good movie, still, the HAL bits are amazing, but I fail to see how that's not a valid criticism of it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:24 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:17 pm
Only one??? You have the self control of a monk.
You might be onto something. That would explain all the self-flagellation and chanting.
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