Recently Seen

Discuss anything you want.
Post Reply
User avatar
Takoma1
Posts: 2808
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:51 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Fri Oct 25, 2019 12:26 am

Class Trip

So this was an interesting little film.

A boy's class goes off to a week long field trip. Nicholas has a lot of anxieties, and as things on the trip get more intense, he increasingly retreats into his dreams and daydreams. As he involves one of his classmates in his fantasies--telling the other boy about having witnessed a kidnapping--the line between fantasy and reality begins to blur. Even as Nicholas begins to earn some acceptance from the other boys, the bond threatens to break down.

I myself was a child with an active imagination, and I thought that the movie did a great job of showing how a small word or gesture can easily trip a child like that into a fantasy sequence. For example, Nicholas gets some words of encouragement from his teacher, which propels him into a fantasy where she kisses him to comfort him. Nicholas's dreams/daydreams often reveal a potent mix of adolescent desires and fears, especially heightened when he imagines his father dying in a car accident.

Regarding the ending, I wish that
there had been a little less ambiguity. I understand that the film is really about the boy's point of view, but setting up a lurid plot element like the sadistic murder of a child and then not being clear in the ending as to the reason for the father's arrest struck me as the film wanting to have its cake and eat it too.
User avatar
DaMU
Posts: 801
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:19 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Fri Oct 25, 2019 5:26 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Thu Oct 24, 2019 9:25 pm
You haven't seen Firemen's Ball? It's a real treat.
You know you're in the right film forum when this is the reaction to not having seen a 1967 Czech language film.
NOTE:
The above-written is wholly and solely the perspective of DaMU and should not be taken as an effort to rile, malign, or diminish you, dummo.
User avatar
Wooley
Posts: 3170
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:25 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Fri Oct 25, 2019 6:48 am

DaMU wrote:
Thu Oct 24, 2019 5:03 pm
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - B / B-

As a fable-like story of resistance against authority, it's fine, but I couldn't help thinking, most of the time I was watching, that MacMurphy was fundamentally dangerous to these men, and the "relief" he was providing them was ill-considered, and that things like Billy losing his stutter thanks to some good sex seemed like a misunderstanding of how stutters develop and function. Within that, though, the flick features some fantastic acting work from Louise Fletcher, Brad Dourif, and Will Sampson as Chief. They all feel plausible, lived-in. Despite her presence on so many "villain" movie lists, I found Nurse Ratched empathetic up to a point (as a middle-aged single woman in 1975 in charge of a stressful mental health ward with many men who are there (by their own admission) voluntarily). I've seen two other films directed by Milos Forman, Amadaeus and Man on the Moon, and I find them significantly better. Still, it's a sign of his ability to direct with control and work with actors that, despite my concerns about the story's varying level of reality with regard to mental illness, the film caught my breath once or twice and made me almost cry during one tragic turn. (But also I'm an easy mark.)
I mostly think you got this right, I mean, one of the issues I've had with Nicholson's portrayal of McMurphy, which is very different from the book IMO, is that he's actually just as bad as she is. He's more of a parody of freedom than a symbol of it.
User avatar
Patrick McGroin
Posts: 330
Joined: Fri Mar 15, 2019 6:01 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Fri Oct 25, 2019 1:58 pm

Eye of the Devil - 7/10 - This would be close to a middling movie if not for the strength of it's eclectic cast. David Niven stars as the aristocratic Philippe de Montfaucon. His family has owned a vineyard in the French countryside for generations and he's called back to castle Bellenac because of an ongoing problem with a drought. He insists his wife (Deborah Kerr) and two children stay behind but they follow him and she quickly takes note of all sorts of shady shenanigans transpiring. This involves an aunt (Flora Robson) who won't come out of her room or see anyone, twins blondes and odd birds (played by a young David Hemmings and Sharon Tate in, what was, her debut movie role), and a creepy priest (played, of course effectively, by Donald Pleasence). Edward Mulhare rounds out the cast in a smaller role as a family friend. The script is sort of muddled but the true mystery reveals itself in due time. It all has to do with
pagan rituals and sacrifice and a centuries old symbiosis between the Montfaucon family and their ancestral land.
Niven turns in a detached sort of performance, I suppose in keeping with his character's fate, so it falls to Kerr and the talented supporting cast to carry the movie. It's not a waste of time and many will love the atmospheric goings on.
My heart is still and awaits its hour.
User avatar
Macrology
Posts: 4313
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 4:54 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Fri Oct 25, 2019 3:13 pm

Something to keep in mind when viewing One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest: Milos Forman had only recently left a Communist country after an intense crackdown on expressive freedoms, and it can readily be seen as a political allegory. Its aims are pretty universal, I'd say, but it's clearly informed for Forman's experiences under Communist rule.
That isn't to say one can't question its politics on the issue of mental health, but I don't think it was really striving for accuracy. It's almost like criticizing Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor for scientific inaccuracies.
Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.
User avatar
Jinnistan
Posts: 3025
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 5:47 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Jinnistan » Fri Oct 25, 2019 7:13 pm

My favorite Forman is probably Taking Off, kind of the best blend of his humor in New Hollywood shoes.

I think Cuckoo's Nest is much better than given credit here though. In comparison, I actually rather despise Man on the Moon, with its (for me) unconvincing Carrey performance, riddled with blatant inaccuracies (things evident in available Kaufman videos), and the ill-advised indulgence of casting cameos which are 20 years older. Such a lazy hump of a motion picture. A similar shallowness also sinks his Larry Flynt.
User avatar
Jinnistan
Posts: 3025
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 5:47 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Jinnistan » Fri Oct 25, 2019 8:38 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:27 pm
If Bickle and Pupkin aren't mentally ill, those narratives cease to exist. Pupkin even implies his illness stems from a neglectful, alcoholic mom and abusive dad. Jerry explicitly says that Pupkin's excuse will be he "was crazy at the time."
Their mental illness is never, however, the explicit focus of their motivations. Joker doesn't exactly trust itself to have a lot of subtext.


ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:27 pm
The amount of people that seemingly wanted the film to bring out the worst audiences and illicit violence is pretty astounding.
:? I have to admit, I'm unaware of anyone who is actually disappointed that the film didn't inspire violence on release. I understand there was some concern, not entirely irrational, that it was a possibility. So far in my criticisms, I've avoided broaching the subject of the "responsibiliy" of its portrayal of vindictive violence. In the context of our current cultural context, this also isn't an irrational concern. I would say this says more about the film's failure to establish its own society that is plausibly on the brink of boiling over. Maybe Phillips should have given Do The Right Thing a nod or two. This Gotham is filthy, but what's the overriding crisis? Giant rats? The film has a handful of street toughs, nothing on the scale of civil unrest to suggest the precipice of class-based rioting. If the world here were more realistic, maybe I would take more umbrage at its real-world implications. This is all part of the film's muddled politics.


ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:27 pm
I think that KoC is significantly different as he's not projecting onto Jerry, exactly. It is more in the correlation of Jerry with fame than Jerry as an icon himself. He wants what Jerry has, not to be Jerry. It's similar to the usage of De Niro, which is a transparent connection, but very different from the use of Joker. Society's projection onto the icon is a far cry from one man's extended delusion.
I think Rupert is exactly emulating Jerry Langford for similar reasons that Arther emulates Murray Franklin. I agree that De Niro provides a "transparent connection". And my complaint about the lack of social development in Joker directly affects the impact of this projection.


ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:27 pm
That's why I appreciated the NBK comparison. I think it's apt and it reflects how shallow the criticism for this film has been.
Don't get me wrong, I think that NBK also does what it intends much more effectively and successfully than Joker. Its media criticism gives it a focus that Joker doesn't have. I only mentioned it to point out its precedence.


ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:27 pm
In the context of the cacophonous attempt to shame and slander any defender of the film....
Let's just stick to the conversation that we're actually having here.


ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:27 pm
I find it to be one of the more frustrating of all current film criticism as it implies that all who criticize have the same beliefs and that one can not be intrigued or fascinated by art unless it aligns with ones ideology.
I would agree that it's frustrating, across the board of modern discourse largely steeped in the poor impulse control encouraged by social media, that so many people devolve into these kinds of all/nothing binary ultimatums. I haven't exactly done that, so I'll move on to the second part. My beef with the muddled politics in Joker is not based on whether or not it aligns with my ideology. My beef is that the ideology, as presented, is too incoherent to align with. This incoherency (or what I called thoughtlessness) dramatically makes the film less intriguing to me.

The film happened to piss me off. It's not the first. Maybe that's what it intended to do. I admit that my mood wasn't helped by then reading this Phillips interview, which just happens to be chock full of exactly the same kind of duplicitous bullshit that I suspected was the baseline intelligence behind the movie. "We didn't make the movie to push buttons." Like hell. What kind of cowardly spit is this? It's a provocative film. One of the few successes of the film is that it successfully pushes our buttons. Why can't he own this? He's admitted that he intended a subversive film, ie, "a way to sneak a real movie in the studio system under the guise of a comic book film". "Isn’t it good to have these discussions about these movies, about violence? Why is that a bad thing if the movie does lead to a discourse about it?” Now, again, social media isn't exactly the best forum for discourse, but isn't that the discussion we're having around the film? About the implications of its violence, its empowerment, its redemptive potential? These are not comfortable issues, especially for those who may have been victims of real-life violence caused by those who are desperate for empowerment and redemption (which is a more common occurance in today's culture than 1980)? Why does Phillips exclusively call out "the far left" and political correctness? Does he possibly have an opinion on (currently more statistically likely) violence coming from the kinds of people who would be motivated to identify with the Joker's pathologies? Is the film equally as provocative to those who would project this icon onto society in more toxic ways? I'm very open to these discussions, but I'm not convinced that Phillips or his film are interested in saying anything about that. And so, inevitably, you get the other shoe that drops, and flipping through the film's positive reviews, you get a number of "it's only a comic book movie", "it doesn't have to mean anything", etc. And you have Phillips who also chooses to cop out. It starts to look like a pretty bad faith movie to me.


ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:27 pm
you can give the film more props than garbage and trash.
Almost as if I chose those specific words for a reason?


ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:27 pm
I figured you’d watched enough films to not value narrative unilaterally over craft and recognize that redundancy doesn’t negate quality. Italian cult cinema would implode on sight if that were the case.
I value what the films have to offer. This film is clearly offering something more conceptually substantial than either the average comic book escapism or exploitative thrills. So I judge it based on how badly it fails to deliver its purported concepts.
User avatar
crumbsroom
Posts: 2602
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 3:15 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Oct 25, 2019 10:38 pm

One of the things I've always loved about Cuckoo's is the fact that as villainous Nurse Ratchet seems to the patients , one can understand her pathological reliance on the 'rules' that has made her this way. Similarly, McMurphy's attempts to liberate the inmates, is at best only mildly altruistic and is frequently for his benefit and amusement. Neither are a hero or villain even if they can be all to lazily stuffed into one of those categories.

I also like the fact that as austere as the film feels and looks, it doesn't become bogged down in its portrayal of reality too seriously. While the characters feel authentic, they are also somewhat absurd and exaggerated and of the grotesque. It is movie that feels caught between reality and a dream, and so I am fine if it plays fast an loose with such things as allowing the criminal and delinquent to be portrayed as liberation, and the inmates to be tinted with hints of being in a state of grace that ultimately could simplifiy what it is saying about mental illness.

As for his other films fireman, blondes and Amadeus are all different shades of great. I think I mostly hate Man on the Moon and Larry Flynt, even if they are warchably entertaining enough
User avatar
Wooley
Posts: 3170
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:25 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Sat Oct 26, 2019 4:08 pm

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Fri Oct 25, 2019 1:58 pm
Eye of the Devil - 7/10 - This would be close to a middling movie if not for the strength of it's eclectic cast. David Niven stars as the aristocratic Philippe de Montfaucon. His family has owned a vineyard in the French countryside for generations and he's called back to castle Bellenac because of an ongoing problem with a drought. He insists his wife (Deborah Kerr) and two children stay behind but they follow him and she quickly takes note of all sorts of shady shenanigans transpiring. This involves an aunt (Flora Robson) who won't come out of her room or see anyone, twins blondes and odd birds (played by a young David Hemmings and Sharon Tate in, what was, her debut movie role), and a creepy priest (played, of course effectively, by Donald Pleasence). Edward Mulhare rounds out the cast in a smaller role as a family friend. The script is sort of muddled but the true mystery reveals itself in due time. It all has to do with
pagan rituals and sacrifice and a centuries old symbiosis between the Montfaucon family and their ancestral land.
Niven turns in a detached sort of performance, I suppose in keeping with his character's fate, so it falls to Kerr and the talented supporting cast to carry the movie. It's not a waste of time and many will love the atmospheric goings on.
I also saw this and liked it enough.
Felt a bit like a cross between The Wicker Man and The Innocents.
User avatar
Charles
Posts: 361
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2018 2:54 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Sat Oct 26, 2019 5:10 pm

On Hereditary.
So I rewatched half of Hereditary, and then I stopped it because I actually enjoyed it less than the first time. Not because of any fault of the movie, but because those movies where someone is just doomed from the start and the ending is sort of inevitable, like 1408, is specifically the kind of movie I don't like. I can't think of anything else as I'm watching it. Though I will admit the movie is more coherent and well put-together than I saw at first. Kind of using the family drama to throw you off from what's really happening, putting you in the position of Toni, essentially. I'll pick up Midsommar eventually.
User avatar
Takoma1
Posts: 2808
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:51 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sat Oct 26, 2019 5:37 pm

Charles wrote:
Sat Oct 26, 2019 5:10 pm
On Hereditary.
So I rewatched half of Hereditary, and then I stopped it because I actually enjoyed it less than the first time. Not because of any fault of the movie, but because those movies where someone is just doomed from the start and the ending is sort of inevitable, like 1408, is specifically the kind of movie I don't like. I can't think of anything else as I'm watching it. Though I will admit the movie is more coherent and well put-together than I saw at first. Kind of using the family drama to throw you off from what's really happening, putting you in the position of Toni, essentially. I'll pick up Midsommar eventually.
I am also immensely put off by stories where it's like
well, they were toast before the opening credits even rolled and there was no escape.

To refer to a film upthread, it's part of why I really like The Seventh Victim. That movie also has a sense of powerful forces working against someone, but ultimately it's the internal stuff that threatens them.

Now, I do think that you could argue that the family does make choices that lead to what happens. It's really up to the viewer to determine to what degree the coven influenced their behavior prior to the events we see. Was it the coven that made Annie let her mother back into her life? Or was that just a really poor choice that Annie made?

I actually prefer to think that there's a degree of autonomy to the family until almost the very end. I do think that the father could have made the choice to take his son to a hotel or to a mental health facility instead of taking him back to the house.

Similarly, I choose to believe that getting Annie to do the spell/seance was just good old fashioned psychological manipulation instead of some magical force.

And also, the emphasis on Annie and Charlie does nicely create some misdirection in terms of realizing that it was Peter they were really after all along.
I found that I appreciated the film a lot more on the second viewing (partly because I could actually SEE the film on my second viewing!), but I also just noticed some nice little things that I didn't super tune into the first time around, like the mourners at the grandmother's funeral.
User avatar
Macrology
Posts: 4313
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 4:54 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Sat Oct 26, 2019 6:16 pm

So y'all just aren't into, like, half of the world's canonical literature?
Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.
User avatar
Takoma1
Posts: 2808
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:51 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sat Oct 26, 2019 6:19 pm

Macrology wrote:
Sat Oct 26, 2019 6:16 pm
So y'all just aren't into, like, half of the world's canonical literature?
There's a difference, to me, between a general sense of inevitability and
there were nuts in a cake because MAGIC!
User avatar
Charles
Posts: 361
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2018 2:54 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Sat Oct 26, 2019 6:25 pm

Macrology wrote:
Sat Oct 26, 2019 6:16 pm
So y'all just aren't into, like, half of the world's canonical literature?
I mean... no? Maybe?

It's not the thing itself that's the problem, I love a good tragedy as much as anyone. I just don't think it makes for good horror.
User avatar
Charles
Posts: 361
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2018 2:54 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Sat Oct 26, 2019 7:06 pm

Dead Birds, 2004 (C)

A movie about bank robbers who stole money from confederate soldiers being haunted as they hole up in a farmhouse somewhere. It's a movie about monsters, or ghosts, or demons. Not clear. It's also a movie where eyes go black and mouths go wide open, and that's the bulk of the horror. It also has the most blatant ignoring of a monster you've ever seen anywhere this side of parodies.
User avatar
crumbsroom
Posts: 2602
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 3:15 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Sat Oct 26, 2019 7:11 pm

And here I thought all of these years that inescapable doom was the horror ideal.

I want horror to confirm all of my darkest suspicions about this horrible universe.
User avatar
Wooley
Posts: 3170
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:25 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Sat Oct 26, 2019 7:49 pm

Charles wrote:
Sat Oct 26, 2019 7:06 pm
Dead Birds, 2004 (C)

A movie about bank robbers who stole money from confederate soldiers being haunted as they hole up in a farmhouse somewhere. It's a movie about monsters, or ghosts, or demons. Not clear. It's also a movie where eyes go black and mouths go wide open, and that's the bulk of the horror. It also has the most blatant ignoring of a monster you've ever seen anywhere this side of parodies.
Yeah, this is a movie that gets way too much credit for being "better than it should be".
Is it?
Maybe, yeah-ish, but it still ends up being mediocre. The fact that it probably should have sucked ballz and didn't totally doesn't actually make it good.
User avatar
Takoma1
Posts: 2808
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:51 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sat Oct 26, 2019 8:11 pm

Safe House

I continue to work my way through movies that are inexplicably on my Amazon Prime watchlist.

This was actually an interesting little film. It's a TV movie from New Zealand about a woman with two kids who is a witness to a murder committed by her on-again-off-again boyfriend. As their only witness, she is put into a safe house with three police officers while the lead detective tries to track down the killer.

It seems like this would be a straight-ahead thriller, but the film is kind of two movies in one. One the one hand, yes, it is about the killer boyfriend and if he'll find them and the woman trying to protect her kids. But it's also a drama about the treatment of this woman in police custody. She is openly mocked by the (all male) police who are "protecting" her. They repeatedly imply that she's a slut, intentionally walk in on her while she is showering, manhandle her, threaten to take away her children, and do a downright disastrous job of safely handling their guns.

As a thriller, the film is decent. I think that the extra angle of exploring the treatment of witnesses gives the film a little lift. This woman is truly trapped between two horrible outcomes. The police do not care about her safety (or her children's safety)--they only need her as a means to catching her boyfriend. It's a chilling portrayal of what happens when you are up against a system that is stacked against you. When the man who is assigned to protect you "accidentally" walks in on you in the shower, what is your recourse? They disable her car and cut the phone lines, so she is truly on her own trying to protect her kids.

Anyway, this film is like a 6/10, but I was pleasantly surprised by how it balanced the thriller stuff with the drama about life in witness protection.
User avatar
Macrology
Posts: 4313
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 4:54 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Sat Oct 26, 2019 8:37 pm

I was just joking, y'all. But I do agree with crumb that impending doom does has its finer points in horror. I watched Blair Witch last night (for the first time, somehow), and they succeed at that - partly by letting you know from the start that things are not going to go well.
Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.
User avatar
DaMU
Posts: 801
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:19 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sat Oct 26, 2019 9:27 pm

For what it's worth, what I've found is that I don't like horror where the inevitability seeps into the behavior of active heroes. Rosemary Woodhouse is doomed in Rosemary's Baby, but I feel her resistance and the "fight" in her every step of the way. Pulse is another film I love, equally doomed and even predetermined in how the curse just spreads and spreads-- but, again, its two heroes go down swinging (one with resilience, the other with childlike denial). My issue is less about the bleakness of a doomed universe and more about character agency in narrative. Pentheus in The Bacchae and Oedipus in Oedipus the King are just as doomed as the characters in many of these tragic horror narratives, but they behave as though they have agency, they seek things out, they act from their nature and desires, and it's those actions in tandem with the larger world that leads to doom. Impending doom can be great. But achieving that impending doom through character passivity or supernaturalism that drags heroes like helpless dowsing rods (hello, Quantum Flux) can very easily (for me) tip into what feels like contrived writing.

Basically, I support inescapable horror-- but it means more to me when the heroes valiantly try to escape it.
NOTE:
The above-written is wholly and solely the perspective of DaMU and should not be taken as an effort to rile, malign, or diminish you, dummo.
User avatar
Takoma1
Posts: 2808
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:51 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sat Oct 26, 2019 9:48 pm

DaMU wrote:
Sat Oct 26, 2019 9:27 pm
Basically, I support inescapable horror-- but it means more to me when the heroes valiantly try to escape it.
Exactly. When agency is taken away from the characters, then where is the conflict? There's nothing engaging about watching a train of doom roll neatly down the tracks if the people on that train aren't at least trying to do something about it.

In the case of Hereditary, the characters
don't know what they are up against and therefore do not quite grasp the urgency of resistance.

But, for example, the father not doing more to protect his son walks a fine line for me between "What a person might really do" and "Well, he does that because it's important for the script".
User avatar
crumbsroom
Posts: 2602
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 3:15 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Sat Oct 26, 2019 10:38 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Sat Oct 26, 2019 9:48 pm
There's nothing engaging about watching a train of doom roll neatly down the tracks if the people on that train aren't at least trying to do something about it.
Um...errrr...

Too apathetic to mount a rebuttal.
User avatar
Takoma1
Posts: 2808
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:51 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sat Oct 26, 2019 10:49 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Sat Oct 26, 2019 10:38 pm
Um...errrr...

Too apathetic to mount a rebuttal.
Could you summon the name of one title for context?
User avatar
Charles
Posts: 361
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2018 2:54 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Sat Oct 26, 2019 10:52 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Sat Oct 26, 2019 10:38 pm
Um...errrr...

Too apathetic to mount a rebuttal.
Boo! Fight!
User avatar
Charles
Posts: 361
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2018 2:54 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Sat Oct 26, 2019 10:55 pm

Personally, I'm okay with characters versus impending, inevitable doom-type stories, like Melancholia or Kairo, versus stories like 1408 or Hereditary where it's specifically targeted at them.

I also enjoy found footage, because it's a given that they're all dead, but they mostly have agency during the thing.

On that topic, any thoughts on Grave Encounters?
User avatar
crumbsroom
Posts: 2602
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 3:15 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Sat Oct 26, 2019 10:56 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Sat Oct 26, 2019 10:49 pm
Could you summon the name of one title for context?
Funny Games?

I guess that's an easy answer.

But there are lots of movies that I would deem as without hope and fated to despair that I also like for that reason. Last House on Dead End Street. Jeanne Dielman. Salo.
User avatar
Patrick McGroin
Posts: 330
Joined: Fri Mar 15, 2019 6:01 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Sat Oct 26, 2019 11:00 pm

White Zombie - 7.5/10 - There's a couple of things standing in the way of this being a great movie. The sound mix is muddy and with no subtitles available I struggled to make out a good deal of the dialogue plus the acting ranges from wooden to downright campy. But it is a short one, clocking in at around 69 minutes. In Haiti a lovelorn man named Beaumont is spurned by a woman and he seeks the help of sugar mill owner/zombie master Murder Legendre (one of the coolest and most outrageous names in cinematic history) played by Bela Lugosi. After instructing Beaumont to dose her with his zombie powder at her wedding, Legendre decides to keep the girl for himself. This sets up a showdown between the two men and her grieving husband. The movie is effectively atmospheric and while this was the first studio production ever to feature zombies, the makeup and overall look and comportment of the actors playing the "undead" is really quite good. There's also an interesting shot of Legendre's castle as seen from a beach below that must have been some kind of matte effect that I didn't think was widely used in 1931 when this was filmed. This is considered a classic so by all means try and catch it.
My heart is still and awaits its hour.
User avatar
Takoma1
Posts: 2808
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:51 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sat Oct 26, 2019 11:20 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Sat Oct 26, 2019 10:56 pm
Funny Games?

I guess that's an easy answer.

But there are lots of movies that I would deem as without hope and fated to despair that I also like for that reason. Last House on Dead End Street. Jeanne Dielman. Salo.
So I've only seen the Funny Games remake, but it seems to me that for the most part the characters did the best that they could in their circumstances.

I'm not saying characters can't be doomed. But it's not fun when there's a feeling of artificiality as to how they end up in their predicament. I think that you can have characters sliding down a slope with no hope of recovery, and each stage of that can feel organic to the characters and the situation.
User avatar
Patrick McGroin
Posts: 330
Joined: Fri Mar 15, 2019 6:01 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Sun Oct 27, 2019 4:13 am

The Fog - 8/10 - I had never seen this from beginning to end so I expected more of a drawn out affair. But it turns out I had seen most of this very concise and efficient example of horror in fits and starts. It's also essentially (and surprisingly) gore free with much of it's chills earned the old fashioned way with people being stalked by and running from an otherworldy terror. The town of Antonio Bay is holding it's centennial celebration which coincides with the arrival of the aforementioned fog. I won't give away any more of the plot in case there's any holdouts who haven't seen it yet. This is a decent 90 minute horror offering from director John Carpenter.
My heart is still and awaits its hour.
User avatar
Death Proof
Posts: 1909
Joined: Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:14 pm
Location: South Jersey

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Death Proof » Sun Oct 27, 2019 4:30 am

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Sun Oct 27, 2019 4:13 am
The Fog - 8/10 - I had never seen this from beginning to end so I expected more of a drawn out affair. But it turns out I had seen most of this very concise and efficient example of horror in fits and starts. It's also essentially (and surprisingly) gore free with much of it's chills earned the old fashioned way with people being stalked by and running from an otherworldy terror. The town of Antonio Bay is holding it's centennial celebration which coincides with the arrival of the aforementioned fog. I won't give away any more of the plot in case there's any holdouts who haven't seen it yet. This is a decent 90 minute horror offering from director John Carpenter.
As I said in Wooley's thread, big fan of The Fog. Just a really solid horror flick all the way around.
Ain't no grave gonna hold this body down
User avatar
Wooley
Posts: 3170
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:25 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Sun Oct 27, 2019 3:22 pm

Death Proof wrote:
Sun Oct 27, 2019 4:30 am
As I said in Wooley's thread, big fan of The Fog. Just a really solid horror flick all the way around.
Word.
User avatar
Death Proof
Posts: 1909
Joined: Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:14 pm
Location: South Jersey

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Death Proof » Sun Oct 27, 2019 7:44 pm

Wooley wrote:
Sun Oct 27, 2019 3:22 pm
Word.
Image
Ain't no grave gonna hold this body down
User avatar
DaMU
Posts: 801
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:19 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Mon Oct 28, 2019 12:20 am

The Fog is good solid horror. Sturdy. You couldn't knock it over with a pail of water.
NOTE:
The above-written is wholly and solely the perspective of DaMU and should not be taken as an effort to rile, malign, or diminish you, dummo.
User avatar
crumbsroom
Posts: 2602
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 3:15 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Mon Oct 28, 2019 1:11 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Sat Oct 26, 2019 11:20 pm
So I've only seen the Funny Games remake, but it seems to me that for the most part the characters did the best that they could in their circumstances.

I'm not saying characters can't be doomed. But it's not fun when there's a feeling of artificiality as to how they end up in their predicament. I think that you can have characters sliding down a slope with no hope of recovery, and each stage of that can feel organic to the characters and the situation.
But doesn't Funny Games deliberately undo whatever efforts they make to survive, or did that scene get excised from the American version?

The other films I mention are pretty deliberate about not giving their characters much agency. Dead End Street makes it feel as if the crimes that are committed are inevitable. The captives in Salo hardly rebel against their abusers and passively accept their debasement. Jeanne Dielman is trapped forever in a universe of mundane tasks. None of these films are very much fun, but they at least have a sense of urgency or poetry regarding their deliberate hopelessness. It's possible these movies could be argued artificially put their characters into these miserable constructs they can't escape, but they are effective regardless of this. Probably because of it.
User avatar
Takoma1
Posts: 2808
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:51 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Oct 28, 2019 1:50 am

crumbsroom wrote:
Mon Oct 28, 2019 1:11 am
But doesn't Funny Games deliberately undo whatever efforts they make to survive, or did that scene get excised from the American version?

The other films I mention are pretty deliberate about not giving their characters much agency. Dead End Street makes it feel as if the crimes that are committed are inevitable. The captives in Salo hardly rebel against their abusers and passively accept their debasement. Jeanne Dielman is trapped forever in a universe of mundane tasks. None of these films are very much fun, but they at least have a sense of urgency or poetry regarding their deliberate hopelessness. It's possible these movies could be argued artificially put their characters into these miserable constructs they can't escape, but they are effective regardless of this. Probably because of it.
I think that it's more about a sense of artificiality in terms of the inevitability.

It's not that characters have to fight back, per se. It's more about what makes sense for their characters. With the character of the father in Hereditary there were points where I felt like his actions didn't make sense. And a character doing something just because the script needs them to, it pulls me out of the "reality" of the film.

I think that there are masterful films where characters are doomed, but I find those types of plots less interesting. If they are done really well, they pull you in. If there are issues with how the script directs characters to their fates, it starts to feel, I don't know, just like an exercise in misery.
User avatar
Wooley
Posts: 3170
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:25 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Mon Oct 28, 2019 3:47 am

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Sat Oct 26, 2019 11:00 pm
White Zombie - 7.5/10 - There's a couple of things standing in the way of this being a great movie. The sound mix is muddy and with no subtitles available I struggled to make out a good deal of the dialogue plus the acting ranges from wooden to downright campy. But it is a short one, clocking in at around 69 minutes. In Haiti a lovelorn man named Beaumont is spurned by a woman and he seeks the help of sugar mill owner/zombie master Murder Legendre (one of the coolest and most outrageous names in cinematic history) played by Bela Lugosi. After instructing Beaumont to dose her with his zombie powder at her wedding, Legendre decides to keep the girl for himself. This sets up a showdown between the two men and her grieving husband. The movie is effectively atmospheric and while this was the first studio production ever to feature zombies, the makeup and overall look and comportment of the actors playing the "undead" is really quite good. There's also an interesting shot of Legendre's castle as seen from a beach below that must have been some kind of matte effect that I didn't think was widely used in 1931 when this was filmed. This is considered a classic so by all means try and catch it.
I'm a fairly big fan of this one, it's pretty grim and dangerous for its time and it sorta plays like all is lost before the final push. Love the castle and of course all the zombies.
User avatar
Thief
Posts: 2052
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Puerto Rico
Contact:

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Thief » Mon Oct 28, 2019 1:05 pm

Charles wrote:
Sat Oct 26, 2019 10:55 pm
Personally, I'm okay with characters versus impending, inevitable doom-type stories, like Melancholia or Kairo, versus stories like 1408 or Hereditary where it's specifically targeted at them.

I also enjoy found footage, because it's a given that they're all dead, but they mostly have agency during the thing.
I agree. I enjoy these kind of films because, even on a surface level, they invite to a conversation between fate vs. free will, which I always find interesting. I find the notion of a fate you just can't escape extremely terrifying and appealing from a horror film perspective.
--- UNDER CONSTRUCTION ---
User avatar
Patrick McGroin
Posts: 330
Joined: Fri Mar 15, 2019 6:01 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Mon Oct 28, 2019 9:40 pm

The Living Skeleton - 6/10 - 1968 B&W Japanese horror story. It's got fog and bats, burlesque dancers and ghosts, priests and pirates, hints of necrophilia, twins and one goofy twist after another. A ship's doctor and his newlywed wife are spending their honeymoon on a freighter that's attacked by pirates. They're after a load of gold bullion and they massacre everyone on board. This isn't a spoiler because it happens in the opening seconds of the film. Flash forward three years and we meet the dead brides twin sister. She's a ward of a coastal village priest. But then the missing freighter pops up mysteriously. Maybe this was John Carpenter's inspiration for The Fog. I have heard there's a 1977 Yugoslavian flick titled Dark Echo that directly influenced Carpenter. Who knows? From there on the story veers into revenge territory with the malefactors being called to account one by one. I haven't seen all that many Japanese kaidan but I did notice hints of other movies throughout and without having researched it I can't say how big of an overall affect it had.
My heart is still and awaits its hour.
User avatar
Wooley
Posts: 3170
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:25 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Tue Oct 29, 2019 12:08 am

Image
User avatar
Rock
Posts: 1940
Joined: Wed Aug 21, 2013 12:48 am
Location: From beyond the moon

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Rock » Tue Oct 29, 2019 1:17 am

Image
"We're outgunned and undermanned. But you know somethin'? We're gonna win. You know why? Superior attitude. Superior state of mind." - Mason Storm
____
Blog!
User avatar
Jinnistan
Posts: 3025
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 5:47 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Jinnistan » Tue Oct 29, 2019 3:42 pm

The Laundromat - 7.5/10

The Panama Papers rendered as a kind of sketch comedy, ala Big Short. Maybe "vignette" is a better term than sketch, but some of it is messy and loses the focus of the narrative. A lot of distracting stunt casting, although Oldman and Banderas ham it up gleefully and Meryl Steep only gets preachy at the very end. Animated tutorials are added to help explain the complicated world of money laundering to help shed light on a subject that is deliberately obscure to discourage the curious. I actually find that these more Big Short-inspired attempts at humor are the weak spots of the film. The best of the vignettes are not particularly humorous (the piece with Rosalind Chao and Matthias Schoenaerts is a highlight), while the funniest moments are more hit-and-run (like the Will Forte Mexican tourist). Still, I enoyed the film overall, and it's definitely a story that many people seemingly don't quite understand despite being the largest financial scandal of the decade. There's clearly a reason for that, and I can see perfectly well why a major studio wouldn't touch this with a mile-long pole.


Dolemite Is My Name - 7/10

I'm not the biggest fan of Rudy Ray Moore. His various ventures into music, comedy and film have been rightfully ridiculed for their lameness, but here Eddie Murphy celebrates his Ed Wood-esque irrational passion and devotion to his incredibly shallow talents. Murphy is absolutely terrific in the role, his best since Dreamgirls, making it the only other film this century where he's shown any indication of caring about his own work, and, given the recent hype for his belated comedy comeback, adds to the pleasure of seeing Eddie Murphy care about anything again. That's about the bulk of the rating right there. Unfortunately, the film is hacky, typically cliched bioflick fodder, hitting all of the predictable beats like a metronome. (And why do extras in all bioflicks seem so happy to be there, as if confident with decades of hindsight of the significance of the moment?) Unlike, say, Burton's Ed Wood, the film only glancingly acknowledges the feebleness of Moore's talent, instead, incredulously, making him appear to be a far more significant figure in black culture. That would be fine, if the film were solely from Moore's own deluded POV. In fact, the original Dolemite is a film that was more laughed at than with, and this is occasionally made more egregious when this film takes potshots at better films, like say Cornbread Earl & Me, a film that is distinctly and rather uncontroversially superior to anything Moore produced. Pretty much everything that the film attempts to credit to Moore can be attributed to more talented people, but sure enough, Moore was endowed with a supernatural devotion to his brand, and, as Murphy recently said, this confidence is an essential ingredient to success. Whether it can compensate for actual talent is another question.
User avatar
Charles
Posts: 361
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2018 2:54 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Tue Oct 29, 2019 7:06 pm

Rosemary's Baby, 1968 (A-)

I'm not sure what I think about this movie. First off, I'm slightly miffed at how not horror it is, but it doesn't matter. I enjoyed it.

It, for reasons I mentionned, isn't my type of movie, but I do appreciate the theme behind her lack of power, as well as her creeping but never cartoonish surroundings. I like when movies are clearly build around a point I how the supernatural is there as a cover for a more worldly theme rather than what Hereditary did. It feels weightier and more memorable. It'll probably grow on me eventually, I think there's more there to enjoy that I didn't get here. I'll probably watch it again.
User avatar
DaMU
Posts: 801
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:19 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Tue Oct 29, 2019 8:32 pm

Rewatching The Thing piecemeal over the past few nights.

Hope I'm not speaking out of turn, but this is a pretty good flick.
NOTE:
The above-written is wholly and solely the perspective of DaMU and should not be taken as an effort to rile, malign, or diminish you, dummo.
User avatar
Death Proof
Posts: 1909
Joined: Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:14 pm
Location: South Jersey

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Death Proof » Tue Oct 29, 2019 11:00 pm

DaMU wrote:
Tue Oct 29, 2019 8:32 pm
Rewatching The Thing piecemeal over the past few nights.

Hope I'm not speaking out of turn, but this is a pretty good flick.
:up:

I do hope Garry finally gets off that fucking couch.
Ain't no grave gonna hold this body down
User avatar
Macrology
Posts: 4313
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 4:54 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Wed Oct 30, 2019 12:41 am

The Addiction

Fuck. I need to see more Abel Ferrara.
Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.
User avatar
Jinnistan
Posts: 3025
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 5:47 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Jinnistan » Wed Oct 30, 2019 1:42 am

Macrology wrote:
Wed Oct 30, 2019 12:41 am
Fuck. I need to see more Abel Ferrara.
I recently watched Driller Killer for the first time in years, and the first time where it wasn't a cheap VHS copy. The HD restoration (the Arrow release which is on Prime) erases all of the homemade quality, enhances the colors and generally rids the washed out indie grittiness and makes it seem more like a genuinely good film rather than just a brash guerrilla shoestring indulgence that looked as if it may have been shot directly onto the cheap VHS I was watching. In other words, I recommend it.

Not horror, but The Funeral is another favorite. Ferrara was on fire in the early 90s.
Melvin Butterworth
Posts: 630
Joined: Thu Nov 23, 2017 5:11 am

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Melvin Butterworth » Wed Oct 30, 2019 4:04 am

Dolemite. This is basically a remake of Ed Wood. Right down to the last scene being the triumph of the film premiers. I like it, but one more film like this and it will be a genre unto itself.
User avatar
Rock
Posts: 1940
Joined: Wed Aug 21, 2013 12:48 am
Location: From beyond the moon

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Rock » Wed Oct 30, 2019 4:14 am

Jinnistan wrote:
Wed Oct 30, 2019 1:42 am
I recently watched Driller Killer for the first time in years, and the first time where it wasn't a cheap VHS copy. The HD restoration (the Arrow release which is on Prime) erases all of the homemade quality, enhances the colors and generally rids the washed out indie grittiness and makes it seem more like a genuinely good film rather than just a brash guerrilla shoestring indulgence that looked as if it may have been shot directly onto the cheap VHS I was watching. In other words, I recommend it.
You gotta play it at the right volume to really enjoy it.

Image

(I probably should pop in my Arrow Blu-ray one of these days. I saw a shitty public domain print on YouTube a while back, pleased to hear it plays even better with a nicer transfer.)
"We're outgunned and undermanned. But you know somethin'? We're gonna win. You know why? Superior attitude. Superior state of mind." - Mason Storm
____
Blog!
User avatar
Macrology
Posts: 4313
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 4:54 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Wed Oct 30, 2019 4:55 am

Just finished up an October of Halloween themed Samurai Movie Nights:

Kuroneko - Three Cup Chicken
Kwaidan - Mongolian chicken
Ugetsu - Asian sticky ribs
Onibaba - Indian butter chicken
Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.
User avatar
Patrick McGroin
Posts: 330
Joined: Fri Mar 15, 2019 6:01 pm

Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Thu Oct 31, 2019 6:12 am

Goke, Body Snatcher From Hell - 7/10 - This movie is fucking bananas, but in the best way possible. This is the IMDb synopsis:
The survivors of a plane crash in a remote area are attacked by blob-like alien creatures that turn their victims into blood-thirsty vampires.
It sounds cheesy as hell but even though it's an obviously low budget Japanese horror/sci-fi hybrid from 1968 it still captures and holds your attention. It also does a pretty respectable job of relating it's cautionary tale of a story. The villain is also intriguing in a mondo/freaky guy-wearing-eyeliner-who-grows-a-vagina-in-the-middle-of-his-face way. The FX are eye-catching as well with the Gokemidoro oozing in and out of people like so much soft serve ice cream. This is supposed to be one of Tarantino's favorites and also hard to track down but it's worth it.
My heart is still and awaits its hour.
Post Reply