Recently Seen

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Patrick McGroin
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Tue Dec 24, 2019 10:45 pm

The Haunted Palace - 7/10 - This is officially listed as another Roger Corman/Edgar Allan Poe/Vincent Price project but American International took the title from an EAP poem while lifting the plot from a H.P. Lovecraft novella, The Case of Charles Dexter Ward. It stars Price as both Joseph Curwen, a warlock burned at the stake in 1765 and Charles Dexter Ward, Curwen's great great grandson. Curwen curses the village and it's inhabitants, swearing revenge against them and their descendants. In 1875 Ward and his wife journey to the fog shrouded village of Arkham after he inherits the aforementioned palace. He's quickly possessed by Curwen's malevolent spirit and things go the way you might expect. Even though the movie isn't true to either the poem or the novella a good time can still be had by simply enjoying Price do his thing. And if you're anything like me you'll get a kick out of all the passing references to Cthulhu, Arkham and The Necronomicon.
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wichares
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by wichares » Wed Dec 25, 2019 1:53 am

Two last remaining Scorsese films I hadn't seen yet, then it's on to The Irishman.

Kundun (1997)

Tired standard biopic structure and script can subsume even Scorsese, apparently, especially with a by-design passive figure at the center. Filmmaking graces abound in the margin though -- his swooping direction, what’s surely one of Roger Deakins’ top 5 works ever (that craning-out shot of an imagined massacre…), and Philip Glass’ magnificently soul-stirring score. One My Problem thing is that the Buddhist lessons I’ve known since childhood sound so banal in English, in this context. 6.5/10

Bringing Out the Dead (1999)

"The first step is Love. The second is Mercy." Ving Rhames’ supporting Oscar nom when? Taxi Driver with the protagonist on a Christianity path of spiritual death, hell, and (on Sunday) rebirth. Cage’s vulnerability really did a number on me. 8/10
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by topherH » Wed Dec 25, 2019 4:51 pm

The Naked Gun 1-33 1/3: 8/10

"Like a midget at a urinal, I was going to have to stay on my toes."

Leslie Nielsen was funny.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Thief » Thu Dec 26, 2019 2:36 pm

I think the first two are genius, but the third one? I don't think I laughed at all.
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Death Proof
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Death Proof » Thu Dec 26, 2019 2:37 pm

A Christmas Story - 10/10
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topherH
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by topherH » Thu Dec 26, 2019 3:38 pm

Thief wrote:
Thu Dec 26, 2019 2:36 pm
I think the first two are genius, but the third one? I don't think I laughed at all.
I laughed enough during the opening. It's eerily relevant today.
State of Siege |Gavras, 1972| +
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Z |Gavras, 1969| -
The Confession |Gavras, 1970| +
Missing |Gavras, 1982| +
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The Hateful Eight |Tarantino, 2015| +

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DaMU
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Thu Dec 26, 2019 4:41 pm

Movies watched in the last few days

Wild Strawberries > Her > Hustlers > Missing Link > A Boy and His Dog
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Patrick McGroin
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Thu Dec 26, 2019 5:15 pm

I don't know how many people have seen A Christmas Carol in one form or another but I still think the '51 version with Alastair Sim is the best. Best between the '38 version with Reginald Owen that is. I've seen parts of the George C. Scott and Patrick Stewart ones but as far as the actual portrayal goes I think Sims nails it. '38 is a bit too Hollywood-y for my taste and even though '51 might be too dark for some, Sims' turn as Scrooge carries the day.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Fri Dec 27, 2019 3:17 am

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Tue Dec 24, 2019 10:45 pm
The Haunted Palace - 7/10 - This is officially listed as another Roger Corman/Edgar Allan Poe/Vincent Price project but American International took the title from an EAP poem while lifting the plot from a H.P. Lovecraft novella, The Case of Charles Dexter Ward. It stars Price as both Joseph Curwen, a warlock burned at the stake in 1765 and Charles Dexter Ward, Curwen's great great grandson. Curwen curses the village and it's inhabitants, swearing revenge against them and their descendants. In 1875 Ward and his wife journey to the fog shrouded village of Arkham after he inherits the aforementioned palace. He's quickly possessed by Curwen's malevolent spirit and things go the way you might expect. Even though the movie isn't true to either the poem or the novella a good time can still be had by simply enjoying Price do his thing. And if you're anything like me you'll get a kick out of all the passing references to Cthulhu, Arkham and The Necronomicon.
I'm sure you know this, but if you'd like to see another good version of "Charles Dexter Ward", check out The Resurrected from '91 with Chris Sarandon. "CDW" is tied (three ways) for my favorite Lovecraft story and I've read it at least half a dozen times and I thought this was a really strong adaptation despite the era and the low budget.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Fri Dec 27, 2019 3:23 am

It's a Wonderful Life is pretty much perfect in every way. I've seen it several times in the past, but since it was a while ago, I don't think I ever paid much attention to it. When my Mom got it for me this year, I wasn't entirely sure if it would live up to its reputation, but yeah, it sure as hell did.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Dec 27, 2019 3:54 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 3:23 am
It's a Wonderful Life is pretty much perfect in every way. I've seen it several times in the past, but since it was a while ago, I don't think I ever paid much attention to it. When my Mom got it for me this year, I wasn't entirely sure if it would live up to its reputation, but yeah, it sure as hell did.
I put it off for a a long time, and when I finally got around to watching it, I loved it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Rock » Fri Dec 27, 2019 4:36 am

Speaking as someone who doesn't celebrate Christmas and couldn't give two shits about the holiday, I concur that it's pretty great.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Fri Dec 27, 2019 4:52 am

DaMU wrote:
Thu Dec 26, 2019 4:41 pm
Movies watched in the last few days

Wild Strawberries > Her > Hustlers > Missing Link > A Boy and His Dog
Haven't seen Hustlers or Missing Link, but this seems about right.

We were going to watch Missing Link, but we ended up going with our now-official Christmas movie: The Long Kiss Goodnight. "Hey, should we get a dog?"
Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 3:23 am
It's a Wonderful Life is pretty much perfect in every way. I've seen it several times in the past, but since it was a while ago, I don't think I ever paid much attention to it. When my Mom got it for me this year, I wasn't entirely sure if it would live up to its reputation, but yeah, it sure as hell did.
I highly, HIGHLY recommend that you check out the miniseries Five Came Back. It's a documentary about five different directors (William Wyler, Frank Capra, George Stevens, John Ford, and John Huston) who filmed the War for the United States. The documentary follows what they did in the war, but also how their experiences shaped the films that they made afterward.

In particular I enjoyed the section on It's A Wonderful Life and how the War impacted both the director and the actors (for Jimmy Stewart, it was filmed very soon after his return from serving).

Maybe my favorite piece of trivia for the film is that Jimmy Stewart really broke down crying in the one scene, and Capra re-framed and enlarged the shot to capture the fraught expression on Stewart's face, which is why that one shot is grainier compared to the look of the rest of the film.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Fri Dec 27, 2019 6:01 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 4:52 am
I highly, HIGHLY recommend that you check out the miniseries Five Came Back. It's a documentary about five different directors (William Wyler, Frank Capra, George Stevens, John Ford, and John Huston) who filmed the War for the United States. The documentary follows what they did in the war, but also how their experiences shaped the films that they made afterward.

In particular I enjoyed the section on It's A Wonderful Life and how the War impacted both the director and the actors (for Jimmy Stewart, it was filmed very soon after his return from serving).

Maybe my favorite piece of trivia for the film is that Jimmy Stewart really broke down crying in the one scene, and Capra re-framed and enlarged the shot to capture the fraught expression on Stewart's face, which is why that one shot is grainier compared to the look of the rest of the film.
Okay, I'll keep an eye out for it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Fri Dec 27, 2019 7:03 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 4:52 am
We were going to watch Missing Link, but we ended up going with our now-official Christmas movie: The Long Kiss Goodnight. "Hey, should we get a dog?"
I wanna finally watch that one since we're still sort of in the holiday season. Heard a lot of good things.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Fri Dec 27, 2019 8:19 am

Uncut Gems and Good Time both feel like they could be titled Pusher 4 and 5 and I love that about them. Great, relentless, claustrophobic thrillers.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Thief » Fri Dec 27, 2019 1:51 pm

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Thu Dec 26, 2019 5:15 pm
I don't know how many people have seen A Christmas Carol in one form or another but I still think the '51 version with Alastair Sim is the best. Best between the '38 version with Reginald Owen that is. I've seen parts of the George C. Scott and Patrick Stewart ones but as far as the actual portrayal goes I think Sims nails it. '38 is a bit too Hollywood-y for my taste and even though '51 might be too dark for some, Sims' turn as Scrooge carries the day.
Yeah, I saw it last December and I really enjoyed it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Fri Dec 27, 2019 3:21 pm

DaMU wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 7:03 am
I wanna finally watch that one since we're still sort of in the holiday season. Heard a lot of good things.
It is hilariously over the top (especially's Craig Bierko's villain who just WON'T DIE). I hadn't realized it was written by Shane Black, but his sensibilities are all over it.

It's free on Netflix.
Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 6:01 am
Okay, I'll keep an eye out for it.
It was produced by Netflix.

Here is the trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JuiCTz6Khw
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Dec 27, 2019 5:48 pm

As a lover of Bergman, I sometimes wish I liked Wild Strawberries more.

Outside of the lead performance, and opening dream sequence, it really does nothing for me.

I'd have to go to the very beginning of his career to find anything of his I like less (can't really count Serpent's Egg since I never finished it, unintentionally)

EDIT: Oh, I forgot about Face to Face. I didn't like that much at all.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Fri Dec 27, 2019 6:20 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 5:48 pm
As a lover of Bergman, I sometimes wish I liked Wild Strawberries more.

Outside of the lead performance, and opening dream sequence, it really does nothing for me.

I'd have to go to the very beginning of his career to find anything of his I like less (can't really count Serpent's Egg since I never finished it, unintentionally)

EDIT: Oh, I forgot about Face to Face. I didn't like that much at all.
What are your issues with the film?
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Fri Dec 27, 2019 8:26 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 3:21 pm
It is hilariously over the top (especially's Craig Bierko's villain who just WON'T DIE). I hadn't realized it was written by Shane Black, but his sensibilities are all over it.

It's free on Netflix.
Damn, you got that free Netflix? Lucky.

;)
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Fri Dec 27, 2019 8:32 pm

The Killing, 1956 (?)

I'm not sure what to think about this one. It didn't feel like Kubrick at all, which, whatever, but usually Kubrick has a nice tone running throughout his movies, but this one, I dunno. There's an almost constant, vaguely upbeat music in most scenes, which contrasts with the subject. Nothing really sticks out in my mind as good or bad. Very much enjoyed the structure, however. The narration was bad and really didn't fit, and was apparently forced by the studio. Shame.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Fri Dec 27, 2019 8:40 pm

DaMU wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 8:26 pm
Damn, you got that free Netflix? Lucky.

;)

Ha--I'm used to recommending things on Amazon and having to clarify if it's free or for rental.

I mean, my Netflix is free in the sense that the account I use . . . may not have my name on it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Fri Dec 27, 2019 9:04 pm

Wooley wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 3:17 am
I'm sure you know this, but if you'd like to see another good version of "Charles Dexter Ward", check out The Resurrected from '91 with Chris Sarandon. "CDW" is tied (three ways) for my favorite Lovecraft story and I've read it at least half a dozen times and I thought this was a really strong adaptation despite the era and the low budget.
No, when it comes to Lovecraft I'm a tourist. I loved stuff like Dagon and The Dunwich Horror and Call of Cthulhu but I've never read any of his stuff. I have sort of indirectly experienced his work reading some Lovecraftian influenced stuff. Stephen King and the like. Interestingly (or not) enough I'm currently rereading Nightworld by F. Paul Wilson. He revised it in 2012 I think and I had read the original years before. He rewrote major parts to include the Repairman Jack character. I'm also rereading the last 5 or so novels featuring Jack that figure heavily into Wilson's The Adversary Cycle. It's got a healthy (unhealthy?) Lovecraftian streak running through it. I think I'll borrow my niece's anthology. She's part of a Lovecraft inspired D&D type gaming group that meets twice a week and she recently got into his works.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Fri Dec 27, 2019 10:12 pm

The Harder They Come - 7.5/10 - This was released during the height of the American blaxploitation era but having seen a few of the lower budget efforts this still has an authenticity that most of those lacked. It's the first film produced in Jamaica so it features a lot of the Jamaican creole patois and slang and of course local scenery. It's the story of Ivanhoe Martin, who comes to big city Kingston in hopes of starting a reggae career. He gets taken advantage of by a rapacious music producer who has a stranglehold on the islands music scene and is forced to turn to petty crime and drug dealing to pay the bills. The police in turn hold a monopoly of their own on the ganja trade and claim the majority of the profits. Ivan soon runs afoul of the law and goes on the run, becoming a folk hero to the downtrodden of Kingston. It's got a great soundtrack and must have been considered groundbreaking when it was first released. As it is, it should still be considered a seminal film.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Fri Dec 27, 2019 10:56 pm

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 10:12 pm
The Harder They Come - 7.5/10 - This was released during the height of the American blaxploitation era but having seen a few of the lower budget efforts this still has an authenticity that most of those lacked. It's the first film produced in Jamaica so it features a lot of the Jamaican creole patois and slang and of course local scenery. It's the story of Ivanhoe Martin, who comes to big city Kingston in hopes of starting a reggae career. He gets taken advantage of by a rapacious music producer who has a stranglehold on the islands music scene and is forced to turn to petty crime and drug dealing to pay the bills. The police in turn hold a monopoly of their own on the ganja trade and claim the majority of the profits. Ivan soon runs afoul of the law and goes on the run, becoming a folk hero to the downtrodden of Kingston. It's got a great soundtrack and must have been considered groundbreaking when it was first released. As it is, it should still be considered a seminal film.
You're the second person in the last week or so who has mentioned watching this one for the first time (I think Apex also just watched it?).

Yeah, it's a decent film given a boost by the music and the backdrop.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Sat Dec 28, 2019 12:00 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 10:56 pm
You're the second person in the last week or so who has mentioned watching this one for the first time (I think Apex also just watched it?).

Yeah, it's a decent film given a boost by the music and the backdrop.
We probably both caught it on TCM.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Sat Dec 28, 2019 1:00 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 6:20 pm
What are your issues with the film?
It's not that I have issues as much as I just don't click with it. I'm mostly invested in the present life of the old man, and his reminiscing doesn't interest me, so every time it goes back in time I check out.

It also might have to do with the fact that these flashback scenes are tinged with optimism and some joy and I don't know if I want Bergman as my guide into friendlier territories. It seems like an alien emotion to him, like Wes Anderson doing dour realism (which thankfully has about zero chance of ever happening).
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Sat Dec 28, 2019 2:21 am

Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia - 8/10 - Hadn’t seen this in years but anything with Warren Oates in it is certainly worth (re)watching. The daughter of a wealthy Mexican landowner is impregnated by a womanizer and the rancher announces a one million dollar bounty for the head of the man in question. Oates plays Benny, a down on his luck American expatriate playing piano in a Mexico City bar. When two bounty hunters (Gig Young and Robert Webber) come in asking about Alfredo, Benny decides to take them up on their offer of 200 dollars for any information leading to the man’s whereabouts. He finds out that his prostitute girlfriend has recently been in contact with Alfredo and decides to cut out the middle men and embark on a road trip to find the man. He figures the real bounty is much more and that it’ll set him and his girlfriend up for life. The rest of the film deals with them finding and acquiring the head and fighting off competitors. Outside of Peckinpah’s trademark slow motion violence the big draw here of course is Warren Oates. This was Peckinpah’s project from beginning to end as he supposedly had final cut on the editing for the only time in his career. But then there were also reports that he had been using cocaine after being introduced to it by Oates. So this may or may not be rightly judged the "ideal" Sam Peckinpah film.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sat Dec 28, 2019 2:41 am

I really enjoyed John Mulaney and the Sack Lunch Bunch.

I had been under the impression that it was several episodes as opposed to one big long special, so that took me a bit by surprise.

I don't really have any criticisms, aside from wishing that it had resisted the two or three jokes that actually make it not appropriate for kids, because keeping it in that mostly actually child-friendly zone was part of the charm.

I grew up watching the same type of shows that Mulaney is referencing here (Sesame Street-type stuff), so I had a nostalgic appreciation for the way that they evoked the different segments and transitions.

The most pleasant surprise for me was the children that they found for their cast. Child actors can sometimes have this sad and kind of off-putting *LOOK AT ME* desperation behind their performances. I heard in an interview that many of the kids are professional child actors, and that makes sense. But many of them also felt real in a way that reads as more than cultivated child quirkiness. I especially enjoyed the kid named Tyler, who shares a strange chess game with Mulaney.

Throw in some truly eclectic cameos (including Jake Gyllenhaal's Mr. Music), and this was a really fun way to spend an hour.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Sat Dec 28, 2019 8:44 pm

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 9:04 pm
No, when it comes to Lovecraft I'm a tourist. I loved stuff like Dagon and The Dunwich Horror and Call of Cthulhu but I've never read any of his stuff. I have sort of indirectly experienced his work reading some Lovecraftian influenced stuff. Stephen King and the like. Interestingly (or not) enough I'm currently rereading Nightworld by F. Paul Wilson. He revised it in 2012 I think and I had read the original years before. He rewrote major parts to include the Repairman Jack character. I'm also rereading the last 5 or so novels featuring Jack that figure heavily into Wilson's The Adversary Cycle. It's got a healthy (unhealthy?) Lovecraftian streak running through it. I think I'll borrow my niece's anthology. She's part of a Lovecraft inspired D&D type gaming group that meets twice a week and she recently got into his works.
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Read any two of The Call Of Cthulhu, The Haunter Of The Dark, The Dreams In The Witch House, Pickman's Model, The Shadow Over Innsmouth, or The Case Of Charles Dexter Ward. If you like those then read the rest and ultimately read them all. If not, you'll still have some of the real flavor in your mind. There are plenty others I could recommend to get further into the mythology like The Statement Of Randolph Carter (a recurring character in Lovecraft Universe), The Doom That Came To Sarnath, or The Dream Quest Of Unknown Kaddath, but that first group are probably the ones I'd start somebody with to get the flavor and the sense of how common haunting ties into a much larger evil in Lovecraft's world.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Sat Dec 28, 2019 9:11 pm

Call of Cthulhu is 40 pages and his most famous work, so it's worth reading. CDW is, I'd say, the most conventional story he wrote, so it's nice in that way. I'd recommend Shadow Out of Time, as it adds the most scope to his world and of course, hella short stories, which is the bulk of what he wrote. He has one starring Houdini, to whom he was ghost writer, interestingly enough. The Pyramid, I believe.

I think reading a lot of his stuff is the only way to really grasp his point, but if you're not into stories that end with a guy going mad because he can't even explain what he saw, maybe he won't be your favorite author.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Sat Dec 28, 2019 9:36 pm

I like Lovecraft's Music of Eric Zahn, which never gets mentioned much. Maybe for a reason. Or maybe because the world is mad
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DaMU
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sat Dec 28, 2019 11:24 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Sat Dec 28, 2019 9:36 pm
I like Lovecraft's Music of Eric Zahn, which never gets mentioned much. Maybe for a reason. Or maybe because the world is mad
Nah, you're right, it's one of his best. I think it doesn't get mentioned as much because it's not as tethered to his fun-to-talk-about cosmology-- even though it's one of the most effective distillations of his anxiety over cosmic insignificance. Maybe the most effective.

The Colour Out of Space, The Outsider, and The Rats in the Walls are probably next up for me.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Dec 29, 2019 5:32 am

I was lured into the city with the promise of getting to watch In Fabric, but then two people at movie night "don't like horror" so we watched John Wick 3 instead.

While I liked it, I definitely felt like it was the weakest of the three in terms of my emotional investment in the characters. I thought that there were some really interesting, fun stunts and action sequences. There were also a ton of "Oh, hey! Is that . . .?" secondary roles like Anjelica Huston as "The Director".

My favorite section of the film was probably the part with Halle Berry, if only because it's one of the few times that the film offers up some emotional heft (Berry's complex feelings about her daughter and obvious transference onto her dogs) and a chance to breathe. It's also one of the few times that the film gets actually specific (as we learn that Wick helped get the daughter to safety), which stands in fine contrast to the vague statements by most of the characters in the rest of the film.

And speaking of the dogs, OMG THE DOGS!!! Hands down the best part of the film. Yes, the dogs each only had two moves: the Steal Your Jacket or the Genital Destroyer, but it was a different and neat type of choreography to see, and they were integrated really well with the gunfight around them. I would totally buy a ticket to John Wick 4: Kennel Pups! featuring only Keanu Reeves, Halle Berry, and those two dogs dispatching nameless baddies.

I hope that the next installment of this series (if there is one) can bring the story down in scale to something more intimate. I feel like the sleekness of the stunts has far overtaken the feeling of the characters and their relationships, and thus most of the action felt inconsequential, no matter how beautiful it was.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by snapper » Sun Dec 29, 2019 7:11 am

Help! Desperately trying to remember the name of this movie. made between 1979-1981, french movie, female director, based on the lives of two female clerks at a (porn?) cinema, i think the title was both their names? there is an extended scene with a sad man in a car played by a famous french stage or vaudeville actor maybe? it's also quite short. it was good but i can't remember what it was calledddd loll
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** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


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snapper
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by snapper » Sun Dec 29, 2019 10:13 am

Ohhhh I got it lolll it was Simone Barbès ou la vertu xoxo
Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


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Wooley
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Sun Dec 29, 2019 7:41 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Sat Dec 28, 2019 9:36 pm
I like Lovecraft's Music of Eric Zahn, which never gets mentioned much. Maybe for a reason. Or maybe because the world is mad
No, that is also a good one.
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Wooley
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Sun Dec 29, 2019 7:42 pm

DaMU wrote:
Sat Dec 28, 2019 11:24 pm
Nah, you're right, it's one of his best. I think it doesn't get mentioned as much because it's not as tethered to his fun-to-talk-about cosmology-- even though it's one of the most effective distillations of his anxiety over cosmic insignificance. Maybe the most effective.

The Colour Out of Space, The Outsider, and The Rats in the Walls are probably next up for me.
I was gonna mention The Rats In The Walls as a great lesser-known one. I love The Colour Out Of Space and considered including it in my top rec list above.
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Patrick McGroin
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Sun Dec 29, 2019 8:43 pm

Wings of Desire - 9/10 - Finally watched this and I'm glad I did. It's one of those sanguine art house films secure in its message and in its audience's ability to appreciate it. The only other movie I can think of at the moment that had the same affect on me was Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. Something that I started watching and felt an immediate connection to. But then the other Wim Wenders project I watched, Paris, Texas, also had the same effect to a certain degree. Maybe I’m reading too much into it, who knows? Maybe it’s just the mark of a good movie. All I know is that I enjoyed this and can see myself watching it again. Bruno Ganz plays the angel Damiel who, along with his companion angel Cassiel and many others, watch over the people of Berlin right in the months before the wall came down. They can listen in on people’s thoughts and are there to document their moments of spirituality. Damiel runs across a trapeze artist named Marion and eventually falls in love with her and decides that he wants to be human and experience what it means to be a part of something temporal. The cast is quite good with Solveig Dommartin playing Marion in her first movie role and Otto Sander playing Cassiel. There’s also an engaging performance from Peter Falk playing himself and an appearance by Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds. There’s also a sequel titled Faraway, So Close! that I need to watch even though the reviews aren’t as good.
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Popcorn Reviews
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Sun Dec 29, 2019 10:18 pm

I finally got around to Knives Out, and I enjoyed it quite a lot. The humor is both well-written and appropriately dumb and the individual twists and turns of the plot are often surprising and intriguing (I had a hunch as to where I thought the film would go about half an hour in, but I'm glad I was wrong). While it doesn't break much new ground in terms of murder mysteries other than subverting the
"The person who's most likely to be guilty ends up being innocent"
trope, since the film is so well-made and since the narrative and the character motivations hold together really well, you don't mind it and you welcome the familiar exposition dump Craig goes into at the end. I don't know if this will make my top five of the year, but I could see it making my top ten at the very least.

8/10
ThatDarnMKS
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Mon Dec 30, 2019 1:38 am

Ip Man 4 is easily the worst in the franchise, fully caving into Chinese propaganda to the point that it feels like a Kirk Cameron film. It's sappy and melodramatic to a cloying degree, even to someone familiar with Hong Kong/Chinese martial arts films. Scott Adkins is wasted but seems to be the only one trying, while Yip, Yen and Yuen seem content to phone in the direction, acting and action respectively.

Master Z is far superior and it was fairly mediocre.

I still laughed a lot. So that's something.
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Takoma1
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Dec 30, 2019 2:37 am

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Sun Dec 29, 2019 8:43 pm
Wings of Desire - 9/10 - Finally watched this and I'm glad I did. It's one of those sanguine art house films secure in its message and in its audience's ability to appreciate it. The only other movie I can think of at the moment that had the same affect on me was Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives.
What an interesting comparison. I wouldn't have thought to put those two films in the same category, but I see exactly what you mean and I know the response you're talking about.

I love Wings of Desire. There is something very human and gentle about it that I respond to intensely. I felt better about life after watching it, even though it was also sad in its own way. I can't remember exactly what I was dealing with at the time I watched it, but I do know that it was a movie I needed at that time and it was a wonderfully pleasant surprise.
There’s also an engaging performance from Peter Falk playing himself and an appearance by Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds. There’s also a sequel titled Faraway, So Close! that I need to watch even though the reviews aren’t as good.
I'm a big fan of Peter Falk generally speaking, but I adore him in this film. He is the perfect actor for the job and every minute he was on the screen I was feeling feelings, if you know what I mean.
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Patrick McGroin
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Mon Dec 30, 2019 3:10 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Mon Dec 30, 2019 2:37 am
What an interesting comparison. I wouldn't have thought to put those two films in the same category, but I see exactly what you mean and I know the response you're talking about.
With both of these movies I just sat there sort of mesmerized. Like it was speaking a language I never knew I could follow.
Takoma1 wrote:
Mon Dec 30, 2019 2:37 am
I love Wings of Desire. There is something very human and gentle about it that I respond to intensely. I felt better about life after watching it, even though it was also sad in its own way. I can't remember exactly what I was dealing with at the time I watched it, but I do know that it was a movie I needed at that time and it was a wonderfully pleasant surprise.
Exactly. From what I hear it had that effect on quite a few people.
Takoma1 wrote:
Mon Dec 30, 2019 2:37 am
I'm a big fan of Peter Falk generally speaking, but I adore him in this film. He is the perfect actor for the job and every minute he was on the screen I was feeling feelings, if you know what I mean.
He was great wasn't he? I'm not sure if any other performer could have pulled off that little aside he so casually dropped about selling a certain something in a Brooklyn pawnshop. It left you feeling both surprised and unsurprised.
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Takoma1
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Dec 30, 2019 4:16 am

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Mon Dec 30, 2019 3:10 am
With both of these movies I just sat there sort of mesmerized. Like it was speaking a language I never knew I could follow.
Have you seen Tropical Malady? I thought that it had a lot of the same vibe as Uncle Boonmee (and, in fact, the two films share the same small universe, as a character in the film talks about his uncle who remembers his past lives). It was made about six years before Uncle Boonmee and it's maybe a little less polished, but it has that same mesmerizing effect. It's the story of a slow-burn affair between a soldier and a young man living in the countryside, and also the story of a man who can change into a tiger. I may have even liked it a bit more than Uncle Boonmee, especially in it's foreboding and moving second half.
He was great wasn't he? I'm not sure if any other performer could have pulled off that little aside he so casually dropped about selling a certain something in a Brooklyn pawnshop. It left you feeling both surprised and unsurprised.
I love Peter Falk so much. There's an episode of Columbo where a woman's husband is dead or missing or something, and he just sits her down in the kitchen and starts cooking her an omlette (edit: here it is!. There is an underlying humanity to the man that few actors can convey in such small ways.

I mean, there's also this: ("I'll give you another cookie anyway, 'cause I love ya." *SWOON*)
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DaMU
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Mon Dec 30, 2019 5:39 am

Cats

Never seen the play, so I did not know most of the songs were cats introducing themselves and explaining what they're all about. Like, James Corden likes to eat, and Jason DeRulo likes milk (?). Anyway, they sing and do ballet, and it kinda hangs together but also not, and it could've been about 30% more insane than it was. As an example, you hear a dog but don't see it crash into the bedroom with what I assume is a weird human face, and that, my friends, is cowardice. I don't think there's a way to evaluate this movie meaningfully, at least not in the post-cinema haze of watching Rebel Wilson eat a cockroach and Idris Elba disrobing to reveal an uncomfortably sleek fur-body. Even with that last detail, furries will probably wish the film was more horny than it is, while regular viewers will wonder why the film is horny at all. Also, are they all dead? I think they're all dead. They keep singing about a new life / reincarnation. At the end, Old Deuteronomy chooses one cat for rebirth. Are they in limbo? If they're not all dead, we're left with the idea that they're hoping Old Deuteronomy kills them. Or maybe "kills" them. I don't know. The movie's got cats in it, anyway.
NOTE:
The above-written is wholly and solely the perspective of DaMU and should not be taken as an effort to rile, malign, or diminish you, dummo.
ThatDarnMKS
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Mon Dec 30, 2019 5:41 am

DaMU wrote:
Mon Dec 30, 2019 5:39 am
Cats

Never seen the play, so I did not know most of the songs were cats introducing themselves and explaining what they're all about. Like, James Corden likes to eat, and Jason DeRulo likes milk (?). Anyway, they sing and do ballet, and it kinda hangs together but also not, and it could've been about 30% more insane than it was. As an example, you hear a dog but don't see it crash into the bedroom with what I assume is a weird human face, and that, my friends, is cowardice. I don't think there's a way to evaluate this movie meaningfully, at least not in the post-cinema haze of watching Rebel Wilson eat a cockroach and Idris Elba disrobing to reveal an uncomfortably sleek fur-body. Even with that last detail, furries will probably wish the film was more horny than it is, while regular viewers will wonder why the film is horny at all. Also, are they all dead? I think they're all dead. They keep singing about a new life / reincarnation. At the end, Old Deuteronomy chooses one cat for rebirth. Are they in limbo? If they're not all dead, we're left with the idea that they're hoping Old Deuteronomy kills them. Or maybe "kills" them. I don't know. The movie's got cats in it, anyway.
I suggested that they were a cult and that it was all a sacrifice. Jellicle Midsommar.
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Takoma1
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Dec 30, 2019 6:13 am

DaMU wrote:
Mon Dec 30, 2019 5:39 am
furries will probably wish the film was more horny than it is, while regular viewers will wonder why the film is horny at all.
Ha!

Yes. This should be on all the posters for the film.
The movie's got cats in it, anyway.
No, wait. This should be on all the posters.

"Not as long as some musicals"
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Patrick McGroin
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Mon Dec 30, 2019 5:01 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Mon Dec 30, 2019 4:16 am
Have you seen Tropical Malady? I thought that it had a lot of the same vibe as Uncle Boonmee (and, in fact, the two films share the same small universe, as a character in the film talks about his uncle who remembers his past lives). It was made about six years before Uncle Boonmee and it's maybe a little less polished, but it has that same mesmerizing effect. It's the story of a slow-burn affair between a soldier and a young man living in the countryside, and also the story of a man who can change into a tiger. I may have even liked it a bit more than Uncle Boonmee, especially in it's foreboding and moving second half.
No, I'd never heard of that but I read some of the reviews on RT and it sounds intriguing. Something I'd really like. Thank you, I'll keep an eye out for it.
Takoma1 wrote:
Mon Dec 30, 2019 4:16 am
I love Peter Falk so much. There's an episode of Columbo where a woman's husband is dead or missing or something, and he just sits her down in the kitchen and starts cooking her an omlette (edit: here it is!. There is an underlying humanity to the man that few actors can convey in such small ways.
Absolutely. And he also had a natural feel for comedy with The In-Laws being one my all time favorites. And Murder By Death? Holy crap, he was sooooo good in that. And then there was his earlier stuff like The Great Race and Robin and the Seven Hoods. The man was an all-star.
Takoma1 wrote:
Mon Dec 30, 2019 4:16 am
I mean, there's also this: ("I'll give you another cookie anyway, 'cause I love ya." *SWOON*)
Ha. I always liked the moments with his dog. The way he'd end up carrying "Dog" around because he'd get easily worn out.
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Takoma1
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Dec 30, 2019 6:18 pm

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Mon Dec 30, 2019 5:01 pm
No, I'd never heard of that but I read some of the reviews on RT and it sounds intriguing. Something I'd really like. Thank you, I'll keep an eye out for it.
I didn't know it was the same director until I was halfway through the film and the one character references his relative who remembers his past lives. I didn't realize it was a 2004 film, so I was like "Aw, is that a cute nod to Uncle Boonmee?", checked the IMDb and realized it was the same director and it came out before Uncle Boonmee. I'm pretty sure I watched it on Amazon Prime, though I just checked and it's not currently streaming there (or anywhere).
Absolutely. And he also had a natural feel for comedy with The In-Laws being one my all time favorites. And Murder By Death? Holy crap, he was sooooo good in that. And then there was his earlier stuff like The Great Race and Robin and the Seven Hoods. The man was an all-star.
The Great Race was a frequent rewatch in my house growing up.
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