Recently Seen

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Wooley
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Tue Jan 21, 2020 5:54 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Tue Jan 21, 2020 5:52 pm
I love the climax of Westworld. The lack of score and prolonged chase with just the clicking of boots on the ground is just my kinda cinema.
Yeah, that's what I'm on about.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Tue Jan 21, 2020 7:06 pm

Don't get me wrong, I like Yul Brynner's implacable, proto-Michael Myers/Terminator/It Follows antagonist, and I like he just won't die. But the sequence is so prolonged, and so much of it is humdrum and uninventive, especially the part in the desert and the corridors of the complex.

I did enjoy the incongruity of cowboys chasing each other and fighting in ancient Rome and a medieval castle, though.
Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Slentert » Tue Jan 21, 2020 7:49 pm

DaMU wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 7:18 am
Out of the Wilders I've seen, in very loose order:

Sunset Boulevard
The Apartment
Double Indemnity
Ace in the Hole
Witness For the Prosecution
Some Like It Hot
The Lost Weekend
Stalag-17
Sunset Boulevard
The Apartment
Ace in the Hole
Double Indemnity
Some Like It Hot
The Lost Weekend
The Seven Year Itch

I feel bad for having seen so few of his pretty extensive filmography.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Tue Jan 21, 2020 7:57 pm

Macrology wrote:
Tue Jan 21, 2020 7:06 pm
Don't get me wrong, I like Yul Brynner's implacable, proto-Michael Myers/Terminator/It Follows antagonist, and I like he just won't die. But the sequence is so prolonged, and so much of it is humdrum and uninventive, especially the part in the desert and the corridors of the complex.

I did enjoy the incongruity of cowboys chasing each other and fighting in ancient Rome and a medieval castle, though.
I think the "humdrum and uninventive" qualities of the chase are so protracted that it becomes inventive and engaging. It seems to go on FOREVER and manages to accomplish that feeling of genuine relentlessness that Halloween and Terminator evoke but never capture in such a pure form. He keeps running and running, the endless clacks of his boots on new terrain, spanning from the past into the future and the gunslinger follows.

It's one of the most effective chase scenes in my eyes because it so dogmatically adheres to repetition and it's utter avoidance of anything flashy or cinematic.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Tue Jan 21, 2020 8:00 pm

Wilder rankings:

Sunset Blvd.
The Apartment
Ace in the Hole
Double Indemnity
Some Like It Hot
Witness for the Prosecution
The Fortune Cookie
Sabrina
Stalag 17
The Seven Year Itch
The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes

I need to watch much more. I own the Lost Weekend and the Spirit of St. Louis so I'll likely start with those. The man is the master of film endings.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Tue Jan 21, 2020 8:07 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Tue Jan 21, 2020 7:57 pm
I think the "humdrum and uninventive" qualities of the chase are so protracted that it becomes inventive and engaging. It seems to go on FOREVER and manages to accomplish that feeling of genuine relentlessness that Halloween and Terminator evoke but never capture in such a pure form. He keeps running and running, the endless clacks of his boots on new terrain, spanning from the past into the future and the gunslinger follows.

It's one of the most effective chase scenes in my eyes because it so dogmatically adheres to repetition and it's utter avoidance of anything flashy or cinematic.
I'll agree on the lack of anything flashy or cinematic.

Westworld is a dog.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Tue Jan 21, 2020 8:12 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Tue Jan 21, 2020 8:07 pm
I'll agree on the lack of anything flashy or cinematic.

Westworld is a dog.
Who doesn't like dogs? Aside from the US President. Are you the US President?
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by wichares » Wed Jan 22, 2020 3:11 am

I did a chronological watch project of available Wilder filmography one year, which was very rewarding.

Masterpiece
Sunset Boulevard
The Apartment
Ace in the Hole
Some Like It Hot

Great
One, Two, Three
Double Indemnity
Love in the Afternoon
Avanti!
Five Graves to Cairo

Very Good
Stalag 17
A Foreign Affair
The Major and the Minor
Sabrina
Kiss Me, Stupid
Witness for the Prosecution

Good
The Front Page
The Lost Weekend
The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes
The Seven Year Itch
The Fortune Cookie
The Spirit of St. Louis

Just OK
Irma la Douce
Bad Seed
Buddy Buddy

Eh
The Emperor Waltz
Fedora
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by topherH » Wed Jan 22, 2020 7:33 pm

Vampires was Carpenter letting people know he could still do stuff. Kinda.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by undinum » Wed Jan 22, 2020 10:00 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Tue Jan 21, 2020 7:57 pm
I think the "humdrum and uninventive" qualities of the chase are so protracted that it becomes inventive and engaging. It seems to go on FOREVER and manages to accomplish that feeling of genuine relentlessness that Halloween and Terminator evoke but never capture in such a pure form. He keeps running and running, the endless clacks of his boots on new terrain, spanning from the past into the future and the gunslinger follows.

It's one of the most effective chase scenes in my eyes because it so dogmatically adheres to repetition and it's utter avoidance of anything flashy or cinematic.
You might also enjoy...

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Jurassic Park (Spielberg, '93)

Post by Stu » Thu Jan 23, 2020 9:04 am

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An adventure 65 million years in the making.
Me and Jurassic Park have had a bit of an up-and-down relationship over the years; I can remember wanting to see it back in '93 when I was 5, only for my mom to forbid it until I turned 10 because she thought it would be too "scary" for me, only for my father to override her the next year when we watched its world broadcast debut on NBC (thanks dad!). And, even though it was playing on a relatively inadequate TV screen, I can still remember the incredible magic of that first viewing very vividly, as Spielberg (along with a lot of help from ILM, of course) brought dinosaurs back to awe-inspiring life, resulting in one of the most defining viewing experiences of my very young life. However, when I revisited it as a teen, the film failed to give me the same sort of jolt, as the overall tone now came across as overly campy, and a lot of that old magic had now worn off of the film, unfortunately. But, returning to Jurassic Park yet again as a 30-something, I find that my current verdict is inbetween those two extremes, but closer to how 5 year-old me felt than my teenage self, as the overall execution of the film strikes a great balance between Spielberg's abilities to both overwhelm us with awe, and utterly terrify us as well, and the film still holds up strongly as a seminal blockbuster of the early CGI era, despite certain undeniable flaws.

First off, yes, the characterizations do tend to be a bit exaggerated at times, which both works for and against Park's favor; on one hand, the trial-by-fire bonding Dr. Malcom undergoes with the children as they attempt to survive the steadily mounting carnage gives him a nice little character arc, no one can imagine Ian Malcolm being portrayed as anything other than the ball of neurotic, stammering quirk that Jeff Goldblum, just entering his "unlikely leading man" phase here, has built his entire career on, and John Hammond's foolish desire to give people something "real" to marvel at, and his crestfallen realization at how much he's overstepped natural boundaries by trying to play God, ultimately renders him a surprisingly sympathetic, tragic figure... but, on the other hand, roles such as Donald "the blood-sucking lawyer" Gennaro or Wayne Knight's traitorous, candy-noshing computer programmer feel like they were manipulated to be the most obnoxious, stereotypical caricatures of their respective professions possible, and I feel like the only thing the film could've done to try to force me to hate them even more would be to tape handwritten, all-caps "Hate me!!!" signs to their backs. Yeah... they're that annoying.

Fortunately, they're not nearly bad enough to ruin the film as a whole, as Park still manages to entertain on a massive, Brontosaurus-sized level, partly due to ILM's ground-breaking CGI work, making the film (along with Terminator 2, of course) one of the game-changers that elevated that art from the occasional novelty it had been previously (see the X-ray scene in Total Recall), to a staple (and sometimes crutch) of modern movie effects, creating literally larger-than-life creatures that look and (more importantly) move with the kind of sinewy fluidity they should have, and saving the film from having to rely on the relatively janky stop-motion technique originally planned for the production. Not to imply that Park didn't have some superb traditional effects as well, as the CGI is smartly only utilized when necessary to portray the creatures in their more "active" moments, and are well-balanced with the use of Stan Winston's astonishingly life-like animatronics, retaining a irreplaceable sense of tangibility to the dinos, so that when Dr. Grant the movie character is laying his head on the massive, inhaling stomach of a sick Triceratops, Sam Neil the actor is actually interacting with a physical object on location, and not just a digital effect to be filled in at some later point.

Of course, all the effects in the world wouldn't mean a thing without a skillful hand directing at all, but Park has just such one with the magic of that patented Spielberg touch, the one that, in his prime, seemed to produce intelligent, crowd-pleasing entertainment at will, the kind that you didn't have to "just turn your brain off" to enjoy, and Park is no exception to that rule, as it finds a nice balance between Senor Spielbergo's two greatest strengths, one being the all-encompassing, awe-inspiring sense of spectacle its characters (and we by extension) are constantly feeling due to the overwhelming sights of resurrected dinosaurs once again roaming the Earth (a one time, genie-in-the-bottle sensation that none of the sequels have ever been able to match... not that they've really tried), and the other, the similarly all-encompassing sense of horror at said dinos being set free to relentlessly hunt vulnerable, unarmed humans, and turn them into the next midnight snack.

It's a sensation that's driven spectacularly by Spielberg's mastery of the high-impact setpiece, including, of course, the T-Rex escape, a sequence that somehow manages to maintain a constant, ever-escalating sense of dread and terror for 10 minutes straight from start to finish, from the now-legendary introduction of the apex predator's presence with the ominous, earth-shaking vibration of the glass of water, to the skin of the teeth, "objects in the mirror are closer than they appear" escape by Jeep; whew, baby! With individual sequences like that, and with the overall film coming from the father of the modern blockbuster himself, it's no surprise that Park was as big as it was, not just in terms of money grossed, with the way it rampaged all over the box office like an angry T-Rex, and became Spielberg's 3rd movie to be the highest-grossing film of its time, but also in the way it redefined, for better or worse, the way the movie industry uses special effects to this day, creating a modern classic that, like its tagline says, is an adventure that was "65 million years in the making", but whose Chicxulub-sized impact will likely be felt on Hollywood for just as long after.

Favorite Moment:
Final Score: 8.5
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Thief
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Thief » Thu Jan 23, 2020 2:14 pm

I watched that one with the kids the other day (they're 5 and 6 so I was hesitant, but my wife insisted :D ) but they really liked it. It was fun to see their reactions when each dinosaur shows up.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Fri Jan 24, 2020 4:23 am

May also fuck around and see how far I last through Bordello of Blood.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Fri Jan 24, 2020 4:48 am

DaMU wrote:
Fri Jan 24, 2020 4:23 am
May also fuck around and see how far I last through Bordello of Blood.
It is not without any charm but is nowhere near up to the standard of Demon Knight.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Stu » Fri Jan 24, 2020 8:25 am

Thief wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 2:14 pm
I watched that one with the kids the other day (they're 5 and 6 so I was hesitant, but my wife insisted :D ) but they really liked it. It was fun to see their reactions when each dinosaur shows up.
Heh, that's the exact opposite of the way my parents reacted, because mom wasn't too happy when she came home and saw that dad was letting me watch it; I bet your kids really went crazy during the T-Rex escape scene, huh? I love how Spielberg didn't just shove the CGI & animatronics in our faces the whole time, but instead took the time to build up to them, using the power of suggestion so perfectly, from the vibrating glass/rear view mirror, to that suggestive close-up of just the claws caressing the now-deactivated fence, before the cables suddenly snap, one after another... such a great, great setpiece. Also, I can remember freaking out when my dad fake-freaked out at Dr. Grant's fake-freak out during this part:



:D
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by topherH » Fri Jan 24, 2020 1:29 pm

DaMU wrote:
Fri Jan 24, 2020 4:23 am
May also fuck around and see how far I last through Bordello of Blood.
There are some boobs worth the time if I remember correctly.
State of Siege |Gavras, 1972| +
Deadpool |Miller, 2016| +
Z |Gavras, 1969| -
The Confession |Gavras, 1970| +
Missing |Gavras, 1982| +
The Revenant |Inarritu, 2015| +
The Hateful Eight |Tarantino, 2015| +

+ Recommended
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Thief » Sat Jan 25, 2020 2:11 am

Stu wrote:
Fri Jan 24, 2020 8:25 am
Heh, that's the exact opposite of the way my parents reacted, because mom wasn't too happy when she came home and saw that dad was letting me watch it; I bet your kids really went crazy during the T-Rex escape scene, huh? I love how Spielberg didn't just shove the CGI & animatronics in our faces the whole time, but instead took the time to build up to them, using the power of suggestion so perfectly, from the vibrating glass/rear view mirror, to that suggestive close-up of just the claws caressing the now-deactivated fence, before the cables suddenly snap, one after another... such a great, great setpiece. Also, I can remember freaking out when my dad fake-freaked out at Dr. Grant's fake-freak out during this part:



:D
Obviously, the T-Rex escape was the highlight, but Laura Dern's raptor scare was another big one :D
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sat Jan 25, 2020 2:24 am

City Lights

A film with a reputation can be both a blessing and a curse. Sometimes expectations that are too high can lead to a "Oh, that's it?" feeling.

This film for me was a tale of two halves.

For the first half I was like, "Okay, this is cute." There were some nice setpieces (like Chaplin's boozy dance with an unsuspecting woman and then a miraculously balanced waiter), but the central plots of Chaplin's drunk millionaire friend and the blind flower girl he pined after honestly weren't doing a whole lot for me.

But then that second half. Dang.

Around the center of the film we learn that the flower girl is set to be evicted from her home unless she can scrape together $22 by the next day. Determined to help her, Chaplin sets out to earn the money, first through an ill-fated job, then through an ill-advised boxing match, and finally by returning to his wealthy friend to beg for money.

I think that the boxing match (in which Chaplin desperately tries to avoid the fists of his far superior opponent) is one of my favorite sequences I've ever seen in a silent film. It has everything. It's funny, it's brilliantly choreographed, and unlike many silent film set-pieces, it has some genuine dramatic tension in between the laughs as Chaplin's character depends on the winning purse to rescue his lady love. The fight is a long sequence, but it never wears out its welcome.

And while it doesn't quite live up to the boxing sequence, the scene where Chaplin returns to ask for money only to end up on the wrong side of the law also manages a brilliant balance between humor and tragedy.

One of my anxieties when watching older films is waiting for the "No, please don't put on that blackface" or "Um, maybe don't trick that woman into kissing you" moment. And I was really relieved to find that City Lights has very few moments of "Oh, man", and those that it does have are very mild, such as Chaplin standing on a barrel to watch his crush (without her knowledge) through her window. The film does play a few gay panic jokes, but they are done in a lighthearted way for the most part, by which I mean that characters sort of roll their eyes at it or even don't really seem to care. A black character (actually speaking in real English and not some cringe-y dialect) comes across as a nice enough person (loaning Chaplin matches and later a lucky--or not so lucky--rabbit's foot). The film is hardly progressive, but there was nothing that's aged really poorly.

I had actually known very little about this film aside from its very positive reputation. I can see why it's so loved--it combines really excellent set-piece choreography with a compelling and suspenseful plot.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sat Jan 25, 2020 9:06 pm

Little Women (Gerwig, 2019) - B+ / A-

Charming as all hell, fantastic central work from Ronan. My only issue is that the pacing at times felt just a wee bit slack, esp. in the middle stretch, but even then it's not like those scenes aren't forwarding the story. A real pleasure to see these actresses work together and to mostly play as well-adjusted and happy people who have their struggles but genuinely love each other. Gerwig's direction and control stays subtle but is as precise, in its own way, as the work of a Spielberg or (more aptly) a Howard Hawks. The four women (and often more, especially in the back half of the film) are always framed and blocked in ways that read easily to my eyes and also communicate small details about their personalities and current status. Maybe that subtlety is why it wasn't quite as noticed as other Oscar nominees? Oscars tend to reward the "most" directing or the "most" editing, so the aggressively Scorsese-an Joker and look-at-me style of 1917 (a flick I loved, to be clear) understandably got more attention.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sat Jan 25, 2020 9:09 pm

Currently vibing the BP nominees in about this order:

Parasite
1917
Little Women
The Irishman
Jojo Rabbit
Joker


So far, I honestly think the BP nominees this year have been mostly excellent.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Sat Jan 25, 2020 9:18 pm

DaMU wrote:
Sat Jan 25, 2020 9:09 pm
Currently vibing the BP nominees in about this order:

Parasite
1917
Little Women
The Irishman
Jojo Rabbit
Joker


So far, I honestly think the BP nominees this year have been mostly excellent.
I haven't seen Jojo, but I'd rank the other 5 the same way. I have a feeling that this BP winner might actually be a legitimately great film, not just good entertainment like they usually are.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sat Jan 25, 2020 9:22 pm

Tak, how many Chaplin have you seen? In my experience, his films aren't the minefield of black face and period specific ugliness that many of his contemporaries are. This largely has to do with Chaplin's obsession with social issues and equality. If you haven't seen Modern Times, that would be a great follow up.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sat Jan 25, 2020 9:25 pm

Tentative BP rankings:

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
The Irishman
Marriage Story
Parasite
Joker
1917
Jojo Rabbit
Ford v. Ferrari
Little Women

I’m a fan of all of them though so it’s much stronger than last year.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Thief » Sat Jan 25, 2020 10:09 pm

I need to see CIty Lights. I think it's the only "big" Chaplin I haven't seen.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sat Jan 25, 2020 11:52 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sat Jan 25, 2020 9:22 pm
Tak, how many Chaplin have you seen? In my experience, his films aren't the minefield of black face and period specific ugliness that many of his contemporaries are. This largely has to do with Chaplin's obsession with social issues and equality. If you haven't seen Modern Times, that would be a great follow up.
I've admittedly only seen a handful. You guys can sigh about this all you want, but I get kind of an "off" vibe from Chaplin. No idea why. And it keeps me from actively wanting to watch his films, despite the fact that I've really liked the ones I have seen (The Kid and The Gold Rush).
Thief wrote:
Sat Jan 25, 2020 10:09 pm
I need to see CIty Lights. I think it's the only "big" Chaplin I haven't seen.
It's certainly in the top 10 silent films that I've seen, that's for sure. Like I wrote, I felt like the first half wasn't that spectacular, but the second half was pretty amazing.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Sun Jan 26, 2020 12:01 am

I've only seen A Dog's Life, The Kid, and The Gold Rush but I liked all three of them quite a bit. I'll consider City Lights as the next one I watch from him.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Thief » Sun Jan 26, 2020 12:29 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Sat Jan 25, 2020 11:52 pm
I've admittedly only seen a handful. You guys can sigh about this all you want, but I get kind of an "off" vibe from Chaplin. No idea why. And it keeps me from actively wanting to watch his films, despite the fact that I've really liked the ones I have seen (The Kid and The Gold Rush).

It's certainly in the top 10 silent films that I've seen, that's for sure. Like I wrote, I felt like the first half wasn't that spectacular, but the second half was pretty amazing.
You really should see The Great Dictator. I'm pretty sure you'd like that one.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Jinnistan » Sun Jan 26, 2020 12:46 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Sat Jan 25, 2020 11:52 pm
I get kind of an "off" vibe from Chaplin. No idea why.
I assumed it had to do with his habit of marrying teenagers.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Jinnistan » Sun Jan 26, 2020 1:15 am

Jojo Rabbit - 9/10

Out of all of this year's acclaimed films, this one may have the honor of most nonsensical detractors. I'm sure that many of those offended by the notion of a light-hearted comedy about Hitler Youth (the allusion to Beatlemania at the beginning is a beautiful touch) either had not bothered to see the film or had the bad faith to ignore all of the emotional weight that the film finally delivers in its back half. Saying it "makes light" of Nazi atrocities is relative, given the film's limited (juvenile) POV, but it also ignores a lot of unsubtle gallows terror. Having Sam Rockwell play a "good" butch Nazi is also not exactly sufficient to cite Charlottesville comparisons, as some have done. The point of the film is a humanism that transcends propaganda, badges, flags, stars and other fashionable detritus. Perhaps Hidden Life (which I haven't had a chance to see yet) will prove to be a more sensitive portrayal of the complexity of German character under this fervid regime. As it is, Jojo isn't ambiguous enough for anyone to credibly claim it as a fascist apologetic, and those that try also need a swift kick out the window.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Jan 26, 2020 1:25 am

Thief wrote:
Sun Jan 26, 2020 12:29 am
You really should see The Great Dictator. I'm pretty sure you'd like that one.
In a very loose sense, it's been on my to-see list for quite a while.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Jan 26, 2020 1:30 am

Jinnistan wrote:
Sun Jan 26, 2020 12:46 am
I assumed it had to do with his habit of marrying teenagers.
"Actually, I'm just an ephebophile!"
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Jan 26, 2020 1:32 am

Great Dictator is great, but that final speech is a bit much for me. Not saying to ditch it, but maybe pare it down some.

Also, if any of you use Kanopy, that's loaded with prime Chaplin-ery.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by wichares » Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:58 am

Last year's BP nominees would have made any year look good, but yeah even by that metric 2019 slate is pretty great.

4.5/5
Parasite
The Irishman
Marriage Story
Little Women
Once Upon a Time in... Hollywood

4/5
1917

3.5/5
Ford v Ferrari

3/5
Joker
Jojo Rabbit
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Jan 26, 2020 4:08 am

DaMU wrote:
Sat Jan 25, 2020 9:06 pm
Little Women (Gerwig, 2019) - B+ / A-

Charming as all hell, fantastic central work from Ronan. My only issue is that the pacing at times felt just a wee bit slack, esp. in the middle stretch, but even then it's not like those scenes aren't forwarding the story.
I've heard this a few times now, and I kind of loved how it was paced. There was something really nice about the unrushed and yet vibrant vibe of the film. Like when Laurie first comes to the house and all six women are bustling around and talking over each other, and all that's happening is that someone with a twisted ankle is getting an ice pack. I thought that the pace of the film really mirrored the way that life can seem to move slowly and quickly at the same time.
The four women (and often more, especially in the back half of the film) are always framed and blocked in ways that read easily to my eyes and also communicate small details about their personalities and current status.
There were several times that the shots/framing used strongly evoked to me a really, really good book illustration (especially when they are all in their colored dressed trooping to the neighbor's house on Christmas).

I'm not sure I can exactly put this to words, but this film felt like one of the best "I'm watching a book on film" creations I've ever seen, feeling both literary and visual at the same time. Seeing it with a group of women I adore certainly helped the vibe as well.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by LEAVES » Sun Jan 26, 2020 5:06 am

How does Little Women compare to Our Little Sister?
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Jan 26, 2020 9:18 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Sun Jan 26, 2020 4:08 am
I've heard this a few times now, and I kind of loved how it was paced. There was something really nice about the unrushed and yet vibrant vibe of the film. Like when Laurie first comes to the house and all six women are bustling around and talking over each other, and all that's happening is that someone with a twisted ankle is getting an ice pack. I thought that the pace of the film really mirrored the way that life can seem to move slowly and quickly at the same time.
It's a movie I'd be interested to come back to at some point and see how those sequences play now that I have more of a sense of Gerwig's overall approach to the material (I haven't read the book or seen any prior versions). That pacing element reminded me, just a little bit, of Into the Spider-verse, which I thought was also pretty great but sometimes just a bit too quick for its own good (and there are a lot of people who fairly argue why it's paced exactly right for its goals).
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The above-written is wholly and solely the perspective of DaMU and should not be taken as an effort to rile, malign, or diminish you, dummo.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Torgo » Sun Jan 26, 2020 5:48 pm

If you're also catching up on highly-rated movies from 2019, check out Transit. Set in an alternate present-day France that is under fascist occupation, it follows Georg, who assumes the identity of a dead author who was lucky enough to have a means of escape. While waiting in Marseilles for his ship to arrive, he consoles the wife and son of a fellow traveler who was not so lucky and gets intimate with the dead author's wife. Georg's situation truly captures what it's like to be in a state of limbo, especially its appeal of getting to take on another identity. Even so, as Marseilles changes from a stop to a residence for Georg and as the consequences of his decisions pile up, he comes to appreciate the value of using one's own name and having a place to call home. The end result is a story about being in a transitory state that is as compelling as it is accurate, not to mention an effective damnation of the governments that create such states. It was hard for me to wrap my head around the movie's alternate reality; after all, it's inspired by Nazi-occupied France yet modern vehicles and technology like LCD flat screens abound. However, that disconcerting sensation is kind of the point, and besides, occupations and refugee crises didn't exactly go away when World War II ended.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Ergill » Sun Jan 26, 2020 10:23 pm

Torgo wrote:
Sun Jan 26, 2020 5:48 pm
If you're also catching up on highly-rated movies from 2019, check out Transit.
Everyone's Petzolding right now. I liked this, but for some reason, when he drifts into more fantastical territory, he loses me a little bit. Not that I don't like that stuff, but something about how he handles it that I can't quite put my finger on. Maybe I'm just unfairly comparing them to Phoenix and Barbara, which pulled me in damn near every which way.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Jan 26, 2020 11:17 pm

LEAVES wrote:
Sun Jan 26, 2020 5:06 am
How does Little Women compare to Our Little Sister?
I was not familiar with this, but it looks like something I might love. Thank you for mentioning it!
DaMU wrote:
Sun Jan 26, 2020 9:18 am
It's a movie I'd be interested to come back to at some point and see how those sequences play now that I have more of a sense of Gerwig's overall approach to the material (I haven't read the book or seen any prior versions). That pacing element reminded me, just a little bit, of Into the Spider-verse, which I thought was also pretty great but sometimes just a bit too quick for its own good (and there are a lot of people who fairly argue why it's paced exactly right for its goals).
I think that the pacing is tricky because there is simply so much plot to follow, two separate timelines, and so many characters. The fact that the film was able to create a sense of lingering was something I actually admired. Like when you're sitting around a fireplace with family. I think that having relationships somewhat akin to the ones in the film made me feel an affinity for the characters that made those moments more enjoyable. I'd imagine that one's connection to the characters would largely determine whether those moments feel like something to be savored, or a "C'mon, c'mon!" feeling.
Torgo wrote:
Sun Jan 26, 2020 5:48 pm
If you're also catching up on highly-rated movies from 2019, check out Transit. Set in an alternate present-day France that is under fascist occupation, it follows Georg, who assumes the identity of a dead author who was lucky enough to have a means of escape.
I've repeatedly skipped over this, mistaking it for an action film (possibly Liam Neeson's The Commuter?). Anyway, I just watched Yella by this same director and really liked it, and made a note of Transit. I still also need to see Barbara.
Ergill wrote:
Sun Jan 26, 2020 10:23 pm
Everyone's Petzolding right now. I liked this, but for some reason, when he drifts into more fantastical territory, he loses me a little bit. Not that I don't like that stuff, but something about how he handles it that I can't quite put my finger on. Maybe I'm just unfairly comparing them to Phoenix and Barbara, which pulled me in damn near every which way.
I'll adjust my expectations a bit. But I really enjoy both the way he explores his characters and the way he films spatially.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Mon Jan 27, 2020 12:35 am

The Hidden, 1987 (B-)

It starts off well, nice early intrigue, but then goes too deep into the alien shenanigans and the chase, which takes up a solid, solid portion of the movie, doesn't do much to add depth to anything.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Jan 27, 2020 12:39 am

Charles wrote:
Mon Jan 27, 2020 12:35 am
The Hidden, 1987 (B-)

It starts off well, nice early intrigue, but then goes too deep into the alien shenanigans and the chase, which takes up a solid, solid portion of the movie, doesn't do much to add depth to anything.
I looooooove The Hidden. And I think that it has a fantastic ending.

Also, it's really nice to see an action-ish film that values empathy in its lead character.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by LEAVES » Mon Jan 27, 2020 1:18 am

If you’re watching Petzold, you should only watch Ghosts, and you should only watch that for Sabine Timoteo, and then you should watch The Days Between and L’argent, l’amour, l’argent, and then you should think long and hard before deciding whether watching the best actress in the world is worth watching The Free Will, and then you should be sad that few other good directors cast her. Shame! Shame! Shame!
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Rock » Mon Jan 27, 2020 1:21 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Mon Jan 27, 2020 12:39 am
I looooooove The Hidden. And I think that it has a fantastic ending.

Also, it's really nice to see an action-ish film that values empathy in its lead character.
+1

I'd be lying if I said I didn't get a bit emotional at the ending.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by LEAVES » Mon Jan 27, 2020 1:27 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Sun Jan 26, 2020 11:17 pm
I was not familiar with this, but it looks like something I might love. Thank you for mentioning it!
Interestingly, this is the only other time I mentioned Our Little Sister on the forum:

“Lady Bird is a film that exists to remind you to watch less cliche films about young women, like Our Little Sister or Goodybe, First Love or The Holy Girl or Margaret or...”
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:05 am

Rock wrote:
Mon Jan 27, 2020 1:21 am
+1

I'd be lying if I said I didn't get a bit emotional at the ending.
I think that it has one of my favorite sci-fi/horror endings. Considering there's some shaky acting in other parts of the film, they got really lucky with
the little girl who played the daughter. Those moments of eye contact between them at the house and then later the hospital are really, really powerful.
The sequel, though, is total garbage. And it does things with the characters that completely betrays the spirit of the original. It's one of very few sequels that actually made me really angry.
LEAVES wrote:
Mon Jan 27, 2020 1:27 am
Interestingly, this is the only other time I mentioned Our Little Sister on the forum:

“Lady Bird is a film that exists to remind you to watch less cliche films about young women, like Our Little Sister or Goodybe, First Love or The Holy Girl or Margaret or...”
To be fair, I bumped Margaret up my queue after this because it was the only title of the three that I knew I had on my to-watch list.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:14 am

No Blade of Grass is not good.

Demon Seed isn't bad, but one can't shake the feeling that it could have been far more interesting with some relatively minor tweaking.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Mon Jan 27, 2020 3:17 am

The Gentlemen is Ritchie returning to what he does best with perhaps his best cast he’s ever assembled.

Underwater is the best underwater Alien rip-off around. DaMU needs to see this one if he hasn’t.

Both are my kind of well made, genre films that know exactly what they are and hit their marks with panache.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by LEAVES » Mon Jan 27, 2020 3:20 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:05 am
To be fair, I bumped Margaret up my queue after this because it was the only title of the three that I knew I had on my to-watch list.
That’s interesting! I would have figured some of those would have been on your radar. Even more of a shame, then, that Gerwig’s debut is more well known than two of the best female filmmakers’ most underrated films (probably because they’re realistic films about young women and... well, coming of age films are wildly popular but they are typically about boys. I guess that’s one reason why Lady Bird seemed so fresh! Except... the others are also recent!)
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Jan 27, 2020 10:54 pm

LEAVES wrote:
Mon Jan 27, 2020 3:20 am
That’s interesting! I would have figured some of those would have been on your radar. Even more of a shame, then, that Gerwig’s debut is more well known than two of the best female filmmakers’ most underrated films (probably because they’re realistic films about young women and... well, coming of age films are wildly popular but they are typically about boys. I guess that’s one reason why Lady Bird seemed so fresh! Except... the others are also recent!)
I was really, really on top of film releases and especially more "under the radar" films . . . right up until about 2007.

These days I really depend on word of mouth/recommendations to find interesting or lesser known stuff. Having the Criterion Channel subscription has helped a bit. But also I tend to get a little overwhelmed when there are too many things thrown my way, so I tend to latch on to just one or two titles.

Also, I've just unabashedly transitioned myself to more "comfort" programming (film/TV) in the last few years. Both of my jobs are very emotionally intense, and it can be hard to come home from work and want to watch a film about someone surviving a harrowing childhood or a failing marriage.

Another coming-of-age film I've been wanting to see is All This Panic, and yet two years after putting it on my to-see list I still haven't watched it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by LEAVES » Mon Jan 27, 2020 11:08 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Mon Jan 27, 2020 10:54 pm
I was really, really on top of film releases and especially more "under the radar" films . . . right up until about 2007.

These days I really depend on word of mouth/recommendations to find interesting or lesser known stuff. Having the Criterion Channel subscription has helped a bit. But also I tend to get a little overwhelmed when there are too many things thrown my way, so I tend to latch on to just one or two titles.

Also, I've just unabashedly transitioned myself to more "comfort" programming (film/TV) in the last few years. Both of my jobs are very emotionally intense, and it can be hard to come home from work and want to watch a film about someone surviving a harrowing childhood or a failing marriage.

Another coming-of-age film I've been wanting to see is All This Panic, and yet two years after putting it on my to-see list I still haven't watched it.
That makes sense!

Well, Margaret is the LEAST comforting film of those mentioned! By FAR! Our Little Sister is both intricately detailed and heartwarming, and the former makes the latter feel more justified and enduring and applicable to your own life. I would also recommend Goodbye, First Love in the same vein. It’s heartwarming and hopeful, but in a different context. You can almost see it as a good follow up to the first; one established an idea of family, the other and individual identity. Or perhaps they can be flipped, depending on your own personal situation and preference!
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