Recently Seen

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Rock
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Rock » Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:06 pm

They were wearing sneakers...for sneaking.
"We're outgunned and undermanned. But you know somethin'? We're gonna win. You know why? Superior attitude. Superior state of mind." - Mason Storm
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DaMU
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:15 pm

Rock wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:06 pm
They were wearing sneakers...for sneaking.
NOTE:
The above-written is wholly and solely the perspective of DaMU and should not be taken as an effort to rile, malign, or diminish you, dummo.
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Torgo
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Torgo » Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:28 pm



His loincloth and skin are the same color. I hope someone got fired for that blunder.
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Rock
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Rock » Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:36 pm

Maybe it's intentional, like a nude-coloured dress.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Sun Mar 22, 2020 6:49 pm

DaMU wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 2:57 am
Sneakers (1992) - B-

Boilerplate in the opening act, overwrought in the final 20, but the middle cooks with the pleasure of watching misfits interact, seeing how their skills will come in at the right moment to help (except for River Phoenix, who's maybe there to appeal to younger demographics)... and enjoying the breezy charm of the Hawksian premise. There's even the single solitary dame who gives as good as the boys. Hell, this might've been better as a hangout procedural show. Bittersweet: the heroes are terrified at the prospect of government surveilling whoever they'd like. Can you imagine. How terrifying. O brave new world. Et cetera.
Sneakers is actually one of my favorite movies of all time. If I have one week to live, I am watching Sneakers.
Robert Redford is actually gonna get at least two movies on that list, actually.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Mar 22, 2020 7:08 pm

Wooley wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 6:49 pm
Sneakers is actually one of my favorite movies of all time. If I have one week to live, I am watching Sneakers.
Robert Redford is actually gonna get at least two movies on that list, actually.
Interesting! The people I've spoken to who have seen it really love it.
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The above-written is wholly and solely the perspective of DaMU and should not be taken as an effort to rile, malign, or diminish you, dummo.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Torgo » Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:05 pm

I love Sneakers as well. Like Back to the Future or Star Trek II, it's a comfort food movie in that I'll watch it any time it's on TV. It could be because it was the first movie of its kind my impressionable 11-year old mind processed and/or my partiality to techno thrillers, but it has the full package: mystery, intrigue, comedy, memorable and quotable dialogue, a classy score, atmosphere and strong senses of time and place. Oh, and lots of sweet, sweet competency porn.

I'd even go so far and say that Werner Brandes > Ned Ryerson.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:14 pm

So "Faces" is like a really raw, cinema verite companion to Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. My 3rd Cassavettes and my favorite thus far. Though Shadows had something truly special about it as well and A Child is Waiting proved he could make a polished studio film. Excited for A Woman Under the Influence.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:23 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:14 pm
So "Faces" is like a really raw, cinema verite companion to Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. My 3rd Cassavettes and my favorite thus far. Though Shadows had something truly special about it as well and A Child is Waiting proved he could make a polished studio film. Excited for A Woman Under the Influence.
I just finished my write-up of one of his films today, in fact. So far, I think Husbands is my favorite of his films, but I still have a lot to see.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:43 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:14 pm
So "Faces" is like a really raw, cinema verite companion to Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. My 3rd Cassavettes and my favorite thus far. Though Shadows had something truly special about it as well and A Child is Waiting proved he could make a polished studio film. Excited for A Woman Under the Influence.
I assume you are watching in chronological order, because having seen A Child Is Waiting before everything else is....weird?
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Mar 22, 2020 11:37 pm

Rock wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:36 pm
Maybe it's intentional, like a nude-coloured dress.
I hope that this was basically the conversation in the animation studio.

--"So what are you thinking for the Gollum character's costuming?"

--"Are you familiar with nude illusion?"
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Mon Mar 23, 2020 12:36 am

The Rider - 8/10 - This is a quietly affective film which tells it's story in a low key, unassuming way that ends up drawing you in. The Blackburn family of Brady, his sister Lilly and father Tim are Lakota Sioux living on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Brady is a rodeo rider who suffers a traumatic head injury while competing which threatens to end his dreams of earning a living doing what he loves. Director Chloe Zhao uses a cast of untrained actors to more or less play themselves but it's Brady Jandreau in the lead role who carries the movie. This does a powerful job of addressing what it means to be a man in this specific culture and the strictures placed upon you (both real and imagined) when you don't measure up. Pretty good movie.
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Patrick McGroin
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Mon Mar 23, 2020 12:41 am

Oh and just a quick heads up. On April 1st TCM is running 24 hours of Akira Kurosawa movies. 10 in all.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by topherH » Mon Mar 23, 2020 1:50 am

Spent the day indoors with Romero. Hadn't seen DAWN in quite a bit and threw in DAY for giggles. It's fun to pick up on things in movies after being a little older. Is there an argument where we could consider DAY > DAWN? Maybe?
State of Siege |Gavras, 1972| +
Deadpool |Miller, 2016| +
Z |Gavras, 1969| -
The Confession |Gavras, 1970| +
Missing |Gavras, 1982| +
The Revenant |Inarritu, 2015| +
The Hateful Eight |Tarantino, 2015| +

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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Mon Mar 23, 2020 1:51 am

crumbsroom wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:43 pm
I assume you are watching in chronological order, because having seen A Child Is Waiting before everything else is....weird?
I'm a weird dude!

But yeah. I happened to pick it up on sale and had the Criterion Cassavetes set waiting in the wings so decided to go through it chronologically.

A bit bummed I don't have Husbands or Love Streams already in the wings.

Woman Under the Influence is next.

Where's the write up, Popcorn?
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Takoma1
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Mar 23, 2020 1:54 am

The Very Edge

Tagline: No Woman Should See This Film Without a Man

Well, then.

Tracey (Anne Heywood) is a beautiful (ex-model) housewife, married to office worker Geoff. One day, after socializing with a little girl from the neighborhood, Tracey is attacked in her own home by an intruder. The intruder attempts to rape Tracey, but she fights him off, managing to splash him with an iodine concoction that stains his face. The attack is interrupted by Geoff returning home from work, but Tracey miscarries in the aftermath. Returning home from the hospital, Tracey must deal with Geoff's poor reaction to her newfound nervousness and the knowledge that the mysterious intruder is still after her.

This is a great example of a film with some really interesting and effective moments, and also some horribly dated notions of gender politics.

(Sidenote: I didn't even recognize one of my childhood favorites, Jeremy Brett (Adventures of Sherlock Holmes) as the obsessed stalker. I really only knew him as Sherlock Holmes, and it was shocking to find out he was the actor in the role.)

On the interesting side of things, I really appreciated how frightening some of the sequences are. The attack in the home is on the one hand kind of . . . genteel. It's a lot of struggling between the two actors (because these aren't stunt doubles and it's kind of clear that Brett is trying not to actually hurt Heywood). But little touches, such as the visual of the attacker's face splashed in the dark iodine, make it effective. Likewise his later phone calls to her ("It doesn't matter how closely they watch you, I'll find a way") are frightening. The detail of the miscarriage adds a physical element to the attack, and so Tracey's reaction to the attack isn't just "it's in her head".

Something I thought was interesting was the portrayal of Geoff's response to the attack. A doctor tells Geoff that Tracey may not want to have sex for a while after returning home from the hospital. And instead of understanding he whines "But we really love each other." He and the doctor (without his wife present), discuss how they can cure her "frigidity" (apparently frigidity = not wanting sex after being assaulted). Through the film Geoff deliberately withholds important information from his wife (such as the fact that someone has been watching her through their bedroom window). Geoff constantly leaves Tracey at home alone (basically while they are all waiting for the attacker to strike again), at one point telling her that she's just sitting around and wallowing in "self-pity and fright." But what is she supposed to do? He rails at her about how hard it is to sleep with her at night and not be able to touch her.

In the early part of the film, it seems like the film is kind of on Geoff's side. A more enlightened inspector who takes on the case even compliments him on his actions. But as the film goes on, it becomes clear that his self-centered behavior is not okay. His ultimatum to her in the kitchen one morning feels incredibly cruel--start having sex with him again or he's basically out of love with her. His sexy secretary (who earlier in the film was actively flirting with him), responds with thinly-veiled contempt when he shows up to work fussing. "Your wife's position is intolerable--why don't you do something about it instead of complaining?"

Unfortunately, Geoff's selfish behavior is resolved rather too quickly. And the middle sequence of Geoff finding Tracey (who has left) takes some air out of the thriller/stalker element. The film also goes back to the sexy secretary (trying to get over her crush on Geoff), and the domestic drama side of the movie is underwhelming. Geoff goes back to badgering Tracey for sex. We go back again to the secretary, whose charms finally work on Geoff. Meh.

The early promise of suspense is completely lost in the last act. And the domestic drama stuff feels too superficial to make much of an impact. In trying to mix a thriller about a housewife being stalked and a domestic drama about a couple grappling with the aftermath of violence, it ends up stranding itself. There's a last attempt at thrills when the attacker escapes police custody and tracks Tracey down in her new home, dressed as a motorcycle cop. But the film again goes back to Geoff, who continues to waffle between his wife and his secretary, including gaslighting his wife who catches him at the secretary's house. He's such a tool.

Anyway, the raging gender BS comes back in the final showdown. Confronting her attacker,
Tracey tells him that it's "her fault" what he's been doing and that "he can't help what he is". In the most infuriating part of the finale, Geoff gets to save Tracey, which, barf. Them walking off together all smiles at the end is the most disturbing thing about the whole film.
So a promising beginning with some interesting imagery that ends up totally half-baked and unsatisfying.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Mon Mar 23, 2020 3:09 am

Torgo wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:05 pm
I love Sneakers as well. Like Back to the Future or Star Trek II, it's a comfort food movie in that I'll watch it any time it's on TV. It could be because it was the first movie of its kind my impressionable 11-year old mind processed and/or my partiality to techno thrillers, but it has the full package: mystery, intrigue, comedy, memorable and quotable dialogue, a classy score, atmosphere and strong senses of time and place. Oh, and lots of sweet, sweet competency porn.

I'd even go so far and say that Werner Brandes > Ned Ryerson.
Exactly. I was 19, but exactly. One of my comfort movies.

And Werner Brandes DEFINITELY > Ned Ryerson. My name is my passport. Verify me.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Mon Mar 23, 2020 3:18 am

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 12:41 am
Oh and just a quick heads up. On April 1st TCM is running 24 hours of Akira Kurosawa movies. 10 in all.
:!:
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Mon Mar 23, 2020 3:19 am

topherH wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 1:50 am
Spent the day indoors with Romero. Hadn't seen DAWN in quite a bit and threw in DAY for giggles. It's fun to pick up on things in movies after being a little older. Is there an argument where we could consider DAY > DAWN? Maybe?
I've heard that argument so there definitely is one.
I don't support it, but it's there.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Mon Mar 23, 2020 3:26 am

Also, to my extreme surprise and disappintment, Bikini Valley Car Wash was not the masterpiece of filmmaking for which I had hoped.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Mon Mar 23, 2020 3:26 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 1:51 am
Where's the write up, Popcorn?
Here it is.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Mon Mar 23, 2020 3:27 am

Wooley wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 3:26 am
Also, to my extreme surprise and disappintment, Bikini Valley Car Wash was not the masterpiece of filmmaking for which I had hoped.
Try out Garbage Pail Kids instead. That's the best movie of all time.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by wichares » Mon Mar 23, 2020 5:30 am

Duplicity (2009) - Manages to avoid the pitfall of an overwritten con film for so long by being very playful (that opening credit sequence!), populating the film with charming actors having fun, and strategic flashbacks that ground the film in both light gravitas and potent subtext of romance/con game, only to have a final rug pull that feels too clever for clever’s sake, and thus unproductively deflating. Still old-school, almost screwball fun, even if I wonder that this theme of locating the real within the artifice wouldn’t be right up Zemeckis’ alley to direct the hell out Gilroy’s script instead. 7/10

Gaslight (1944) - I'd thought a film that helps give new, popular meaning to a word decades ago might have too much thorough cultural context for it to be effective. But this stands the test of time in term of how actually distressing it is to see Bergman receives every manipulative, "sensible" question as if it was a body blow. A great, psychologically raw performance that makes the story still relevant and feel modern, the latter not the least because the films allows a crucial ending space for her voice out loud at last. 8/10

The Swimmer (1968) - My glib alternate title of High then Low doesn't do justice to the film's deeply strange aura permeating every frame, and Burt Lancaster's expertly, incrementally dimming glamour over the course of its running time. Major, and makes me think of the later episodes of Mad Men Season 2, the series it influences. Also just learned that the director is Katy Perry's uncle. 8/10

Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One (1968) - Quite a singular thing. Makes me think of Close-Up if it's about filmmaking, but instead of blurring the documentary/fiction line, those meta, hybrid elements take place first only within the director's head, and then spread slowly and exhilaratingly outwards to the crew, implicating some of them (or at least their mindsets) in line with him. William Greaves takes on a paradoxical undertaking in that he has an ambitious, heady concept, in which most of its elements must also be made on the fly, improvisingly. This directing tension is pulled off and assembled beautifully, capped off by one of the most serendipitous finds of a speech to end the film on. 8.5/10
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Mon Mar 23, 2020 1:50 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 1:51 am
I'm a weird dude!

But yeah. I happened to pick it up on sale and had the Criterion Cassavetes set waiting in the wings so decided to go through it chronologically.

A bit bummed I don't have Husbands or Love Streams already in the wings.

Woman Under the Influence is next.

Where's the write up, Popcorn?
You have to get those. Gloria should also not be overlooked. I think you'd probably like even more than I did.

Before I moved out of place to go on lockdown at GFS, I made sure I brought my Cassavetes boxset as my security blanket. That is the place I'm going late nights when can't sleep.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Mon Mar 23, 2020 1:52 pm

Wooley wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 3:19 am
I've heard that argument so there definitely is one.
I don't support it, but it's there.
I support it! As far as I'm concerned it is an easy argument to make. I only slightly hesitate to put Day above Night, but I will save that heresy for another day.
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Takoma1
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Mar 23, 2020 2:16 pm

wichares wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 5:30 am
Gaslight (1944) - I'd thought a film that helps give new, popular meaning to a word decades ago might have too much thorough cultural context for it to be effective. But this stands the test of time in term of how actually distressing it is to see Bergman receives every manipulative, "sensible" question as if it was a body blow. A great, psychologically raw performance that makes the story still relevant and feel modern, the latter not the least because the films allows a crucial ending space for her voice out loud at last. 8/10
I think that the 1940 version is also pretty good.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by topherH » Mon Mar 23, 2020 5:31 pm

Wooley wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 3:19 am
I've heard that argument so there definitely is one.
I don't support it, but it's there.
I was surprised by how depressing DAY was, it kind of shocked me. DAWN felt like a "how to survive the Apocalypse tool kit" video.
State of Siege |Gavras, 1972| +
Deadpool |Miller, 2016| +
Z |Gavras, 1969| -
The Confession |Gavras, 1970| +
Missing |Gavras, 1982| +
The Revenant |Inarritu, 2015| +
The Hateful Eight |Tarantino, 2015| +

+ Recommended
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topherH
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by topherH » Mon Mar 23, 2020 5:33 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 1:52 pm
I support it! As far as I'm concerned it is an easy argument to make. I only slightly hesitate to put Day above Night, but I will save that heresy for another day.
I don't consider it a hefty mile but a slight better. I liked both.
State of Siege |Gavras, 1972| +
Deadpool |Miller, 2016| +
Z |Gavras, 1969| -
The Confession |Gavras, 1970| +
Missing |Gavras, 1982| +
The Revenant |Inarritu, 2015| +
The Hateful Eight |Tarantino, 2015| +

+ Recommended
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Mar 23, 2020 6:27 pm

Diva ('81) was a lot more of a *thriller* than I was expecting.

Loved the blatant use of blues all through the film.

I'm intrigued by a trivia note on the IMDb page that it's based on a book series in which Alba and Gorodish are the main characters since, among other things,
Gorodish almost seemed to border on Mary Sue territory.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Mon Mar 23, 2020 7:31 pm

topherH wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 5:33 pm
I don't consider it a hefty mile but a slight better. I liked both.
I don't either, but Day is definitely more in my wheelhouse
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Mar 23, 2020 8:15 pm

Black Moon feels like a poor person's Valerie and Her Week of Wonders.

Strange, yes. But also kind of boring? The awesomely plump unicorn was the best part. The dozen or so "oops I fell" upskirt shots were tedious.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Thief » Mon Mar 23, 2020 8:15 pm

topherH wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 1:50 am
Spent the day indoors with Romero. Hadn't seen DAWN in quite a bit and threw in DAY for giggles. It's fun to pick up on things in movies after being a little older. Is there an argument where we could consider DAY > DAWN? Maybe?
I rank them in order of release (Night > Dawn > Day > Land). Anyway, as far as the first three are concerned, they are all pretty close.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:58 pm

A Night To Remember - 9/10 - I haven't seen the James Cameron version of the Titanic story and have no plans to do so. I really doubt it could top this austere and aboveboard production. From what I've read of the cinematic attempts to tell the story, this 1958 B&W version comes the closest in terms of accuracy. Adapted from Walter Lord's meticulously researched novel, it could rightfully be described as a docudrama of sorts. The cast is uniformly excellent from Kenneth More's lead role of Second Officer Lightoller to David McCallum's Assistant Wireless Operator Bride. It's a gripping and sober recounting of one of the worst maritime disasters of the last century in which over 1500 passengers died while only 705 survived.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:16 pm

Goodbye to Language

I feel out of touch. I didn't get it. I liked the parts with the dog.

Okay, that's an oversimplification. But while I was visually interested in the film and the jarring style of it, I felt zero emotional investment (aside from being very concerned when Roxy the dog was swimming in the river with the quick rapids).
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:23 pm

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:58 pm
A Night To Remember - 9/10 - I haven't seen the James Cameron version of the Titanic story and have no plans to do so. I really doubt it could top this austere and aboveboard production. From what I've read of the cinematic attempts to tell the story, this 1958 B&W version comes the closest in terms of accuracy. Adapted from Walter Lord's meticulously researched novel, it could rightfully be described as a docudrama of sorts. The cast is uniformly excellent from Kenneth More's lead role of Second Officer Lightoller to David McCallum's Assistant Wireless Operator Bride. It's a gripping and sober recounting of one of the worst maritime disasters of the last century in which over 1500 passengers died while only 705 survived.
I have my issues with Cameron's film and I'm likely not going to watch it again (which isn't to say I don't think it's worth watching), but this version impressed me quite a bit more. I liked how, by sacrificing characterization by focusing on multiple characters, it gave the sense that everybody acted as numbers and they were just faces mixed in with the panic of the whole incident.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:42 pm

Everything not involving the ship sinking in Titanic is pretty awful. But I don't know, man, that ship sunk real good.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Mon Mar 23, 2020 11:10 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:16 pm
Goodbye to Language

I feel out of touch. I didn't get it. I liked the parts with the dog.

Okay, that's an oversimplification. But while I was visually interested in the film and the jarring style of it, I felt zero emotional investment (aside from being very concerned when Roxy the dog was swimming in the river with the quick rapids).
Godard doesn't want you to have an emotional investment. That's exactly what he's working against.
Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Mon Mar 23, 2020 11:19 pm

"A Night To Remember" dwarfs "Titanic."

Which reminds me that I need to watch my copy of the 1953 version.

Also, watched "A Woman Under the Influence." My favorite Cassavettes thus far. Will pick up "Husbands" and "Love Streams" next sale if Barnes and Nobles still exists this summer.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:34 am

Macrology wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 11:10 pm
Godard doesn't want you to have an emotional investment. That's exactly what he's working against.
Well then, success?

Though it really strains my attention when I'm not emotionally involved with what I'm watching.

And while I wasn't able to watch it in 3D, this review from Sight and Sound matches a lot of my feelings.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Ergill » Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:35 am

crumbsroom wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:42 pm
Everything not involving the ship sinking in Titanic is pretty awful. But I don't know, man, that ship sunk real good.
Billy Zane.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:55 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 6:27 pm
Diva ('81) was a lot more of a *thriller* than I was expecting.

Loved the blatant use of blues all through the film.

I'm intrigued by a trivia note on the IMDb page that it's based on a book series in which Alba and Gorodish are the main characters since, among other things,
Gorodish almost seemed to border on Mary Sue territory.
I grew up watching this on HBO when I was literally 11-12 years old.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Ergill » Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:06 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:16 pm
Goodbye to Language

I feel out of touch. I didn't get it. I liked the parts with the dog.

Okay, that's an oversimplification. But while I was visually interested in the film and the jarring style of it, I felt zero emotional investment (aside from being very concerned when Roxy the dog was swimming in the river with the quick rapids).
I've watched a lot of Godard recently for some reason. Purposeful alienation is a right alright, since he fancies himself a Brecht, but it seems less because he considers it an effective strategy at this point, and more an ongoing expression of disgust and dismay at everything. Certainly much less interesting in his late cine-essay stuff where it's not balanced out against the fun subversions of genre films in his earlier work. He wants to be didactic and preach at us, but he also wants to undermine language as a dangerous and constricting institution. It's been there throughout all his movies, and has made for some of the more interesting moments, but for every bit that pops it seems like there's a half hour's worth of noodling. I think I fancied myself getting more out of it than I really did back when I first watched his Histoire (s) du Cinema or maybe I've just forgot. Maybe I'm just more of a Marker guy.

Last thing fully seen was Hail Mary, a curiously straight recreation (for Godard at least) of the Mother Mary story set in present day. Still has the purposefully flat performances and the Gordarian tics, but tosses in some lyrical moments too. I liked the opening short film the best, though that wasn't even Godard.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Ergill » Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:15 am

And fwiw, I'd watched a handful of Hideo Gosha's lately too. Gotta say that nothing else has stood up as well as Three Outlaw Samurai and Sword of the Beast. He got bit by the exploitation bug in the seventies that infected the rest of the samurai genre, and it's a style that doesn't play with me. A lot of boringly complicated plot machinations too. Death Shadows has a lot of over-the-top style and dance interludes to speak for itself though the story didn't exactly hook me. I have not given his gendaigeki films a shot yet.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:30 am

Ergill wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:15 am
And fwiw, I'd watched a handful of Hideo Gosha's lately too. Gotta say that nothing else has stood up as well as Three Outlaw Samurai and Sword of the Beast.
I just watched Three Outlaw Samurai a week or two ago and loved it! I'm excited to see more of his stuff.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:35 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:34 am
Well then, success?

Though it really strains my attention when I'm not emotionally involved with what I'm watching.

And while I wasn't able to watch it in 3D, this review from Sight and Sound matches a lot of my feelings.
Well his late period work is aggressively Brechtian - so much that I'd say he's gone beyond any kind of Brechtian dialectic and into an aesthetic/theoretic territory of his own making. To say he's anti-emotional would be reductive and dismissive, but if you find any emotional payoff it's going to be very roundabout and more often than not intellectually driven. There's a real melancholy there but it's obscured by his poststructuralist semantic smokescreen.

The Imagebook is my favorite of his recent work (although most say it's a callback to Histoire(s) du cinema, which I haven't watched yet). I definitely liked Adieu au langage more than Film socialisme. But probably my favorite part (certainly the only moment I remember with any vividness) was his devious implementation of 3D, which you missed out on.
Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Ergill » Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:38 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:30 am
I just watched Three Outlaw Samurai a week or two ago and loved it! I'm excited to see more of his stuff.
Beast is the only thing I've seen so far that has a similar feel, I'm afraid to say. Some people seem fond of Tenchu, though I haven't found a decent version, just a Youtube rip split into ten-minute segments. Has Katsu of Zatoichi fame, Mishima of books and actual seppuku fame, and Nakadai of just all around acting fame. One day. One day.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Ergill » Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:43 am

Macrology wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:35 am
I definitely liked Adieu au langage more than Film socialisme. But probably my favorite part (certainly the only moment I remember with any vividness) was his devious implementation of 3D, which you missed out on.
That's something I regret missing because he did some good, weird stuff from what I heard. I like it when he's breaking movies in ways that feel more liberating than just plain old deflating.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:50 am

Macrology wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:35 am
Well his late period work is aggressively Brechtian - so much that I'd say he's gone beyond any kind of Brechtian dialectic and into an aesthetic/theoretic territory of his own making. To say he's anti-emotional would be reductive and dismissive, but if you find any emotional payoff it's going to be very roundabout and more often than not intellectually driven. There's a real melancholy there but it's obscured by his poststructuralist semantic smokescreen.
I'm not opposed to intentional alienation, and I find that I can still glean emotional "echoes" from it (because I feel like there has to be feeling even if it is negative and despairing behind the desire to be alienating). But Goodbye to Language just didn't give me any footholds, even on that front.
But probably my favorite part (certainly the only moment I remember with any vividness) was his devious implementation of 3D, which you missed out on.
Yeah, there were certain shots where I could tell that the 3D was probably being used to interesting effect. I mean, I also really liked the split/overlapped shot sequence (where the camera pans and yet also stays and the images overlap).
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:52 am

Ergill wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:38 am
Beast is the only thing I've seen so far that has a similar feel, I'm afraid to say. Some people seem fond of Tenchu, though I haven't found a decent version, just a Youtube rip split into ten-minute segments. Has Katsu of Zatoichi fame, Mishima of books and actual seppuku fame, and Nakadai of just all around acting fame. One day. One day.
Heck, even two really fun films is something to be grateful for.

Sword of the Beast is on the Criterion Channel, so I'll be sure to check it out soon.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Tue Mar 24, 2020 2:09 am

I really liked Sword of the Beast when I watched it but outside of some distinct images and scenes, much of it has been lost to time. When I watched it, I’d come down with a MASSIVE sinus infection that resulted in me getting sent home from work on account of my nose suddenly gushing blood all over the place.

I’m working my way through my Criterion sets so I may rewatch it and Samurai Rebellion before diving into the other “Rebel Samurai” flicks.

But I may hit up some Fassbinder first.
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