Recently Seen

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wichares
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by wichares » Thu Mar 26, 2020 3:39 am

Targets (1968) - Out with the old monster, in with the new Terror (so new it's still decades ahead of its time), intersected and changing hands through cinema. Days later some sequences of this are still seared into my brain; one shot in particular that begins with a crying kid is so brutal. One of the most striking debut films from Bogdanovich. 8.5/10

The Great Silence (1968) - Apiece of spaghetti western, beginning and majestically ambling very much in Leone mode, with many of its mythic pleasures along the way. But its sight is set to be as a gratifyingly distorted entry, accumulating little breadcrumbs of slow-mounting, subversive dreads -- most notably in Trintignant's vulnerability and Kinski's growing dominance. Then it throws down the gauntlet to traditional westerns, showing its worldview of what the natural endgame of such dog-eat-dog situations in most of the genre's stories would be, in one of the most nihilistic, memorable endings ever in filmdom. 8.5/10
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Patrick McGroin
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Thu Mar 26, 2020 4:20 am

Rock wrote:
Thu Mar 26, 2020 2:30 am
Mile 22 is not very good. I think Mark Wahlberg's character is supposed to be a tough-talking dude who doesn't take shit from anybody, but making him an unmitigated asshole who yells at everybody all the time regardless of context is not the way to do it.
That's what I took away from it too. I don't know what they were going for with his character but they obviously failed. Unless, like you said, they were going for irredeemable asshole in which case they nailed it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Thu Mar 26, 2020 4:26 am

wichares wrote:
Thu Mar 26, 2020 3:39 am
Targets (1968) - Out with the old monster, in with the new Terror (so new it's still decades ahead of its time), intersected and changing hands through cinema. Days later some sequences of this are still seared into my brain; one shot in particular that begins with a crying kid is so brutal. One of the most striking debut films from Bogdanovich. 8.5/10
I've got this on my DVR queue. The combination of Karloff basically playing a version of himself crossed with a present day (60's?) shooting spree hooked me. I didn't even know it was Peter Bogdanovich's directorial debut. That's just the cherry on top.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Fri Mar 27, 2020 12:03 am

wichares wrote:
Thu Mar 26, 2020 3:39 am

The Great Silence (1968) - Apiece of spaghetti western, beginning and majestically ambling very much in Leone mode, with many of its mythic pleasures along the way. But its sight is set to be as a gratifyingly distorted entry, accumulating little breadcrumbs of slow-mounting, subversive dreads -- most notably in Trintignant's vulnerability and Kinski's growing dominance. Then it throws down the gauntlet to traditional westerns, showing its worldview of what the natural endgame of such dog-eat-dog situations in most of the genre's stories would be, in one of the most nihilistic, memorable endings ever in filmdom. 8.5/10
I love the Great Silence and it’s probably my favorite Corbucci. Agreed with virtually everything you said, thought I’d rank it higher on the strength of how well it builds to such a brutal ending.

I am surprised you didn’t mention how much the Hateful Eight borrows from this film, directly lifting many scenes from it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Fri Mar 27, 2020 12:28 am

While it was a bit more bleak than I was prepared for this week, I really enjoyed The Man Who Fell to Earth.
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wichares
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by wichares » Fri Mar 27, 2020 2:29 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 12:03 am
I love the Great Silence and it’s probably my favorite Corbucci. Agreed with virtually everything you said, thought I’d rank it higher on the strength of how well it builds to such a brutal ending.

I am surprised you didn’t mention how much the Hateful Eight borrows from this film, directly lifting many scenes from it.
I remember noting it while watching, especially the characters of Kinski and Russell, and the images of corpses atop the wagon.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Rock » Fri Mar 27, 2020 2:50 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 12:28 am
While it was a bit more bleak than I was prepared for this week, I really enjoyed The Man Who Fell to Earth.
I remember being put off by how extreme Roeg went with his style in that one, but have liked everything else I've seen from him, so perhaps it's due for a rewatch.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Fri Mar 27, 2020 3:13 am

Rock wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 2:50 am
I remember being put off by how extreme Roeg went with his style in that one, but have liked everything else I've seen from him, so perhaps it's due for a rewatch.
For the most part I really liked the style (though at 2 1/2 hours it starts to be a lot). Having just watched Black Moon (and feeling like it was pretty hollow and "provocative"), this was the kind of weirdness that I was after.

I struggled the most with the character of Mary-Lou, who was so "female hysterical" and needy. She had this baby-voiced "Ohhh!" when she was upset that was hard for me to handle. Her extremes/wildness made more sense when she was drunk and it looked more like mania.

I also had to skip some of the
"medical"/torture parts
because it was too much for me.

And I'll give the film props for approaching something like equity when it came to nudity. Also, the male lead and female lead were the exact same age, huzzah!
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Fri Mar 27, 2020 5:14 pm

Death of a Cyclist - 9/10 - More international noir, this time from Spain and directed by Juan Antonio Bardem (maternal uncle of actor Javier). A couple having an affair run down a bicyclist on a lonely country road in the opening seconds of this 1955 thriller. The woman, affluent socialite Maria Jose (Lucia Bosi), is driving and she persuades the reluctant Juan (Alberto Closas) to leave the scene without rendering aid. The two are former lovers but after Juan goes off to war she marries a rich businessman. Juan is now an assistant university professor and largely dissatisfied with his life, owing his livelihood to his brother-in-law, the dean of the university. The rest of the movie deals with the aftermath of the couple’s decision to leave the scene. Maria Jose is more terrified of her illicit affair being found out and of losing her cushy lifestyle while Juan is seemingly wracked with guilt over the hit and run itself. There’s a marvelous turn by actor Carlos Casavarilla as the slimy Rafa, a hanger on and interloper both desperate to belong to the social elite circles he hovers around and resentful of their materialism. He starts a cat and mouse game with the guilty couple, dropping hints that he knows more than he is letting on and attempting to both blackmail them and coerce Maria Jose into another affair.

Bardem was an avowed Communist and was largely critical of Francisco Franco’s fascist regime and he felt this might be his last project before the authorities cracked down on him. So he inserted a fair amount of political commentary into the movie. From the post film commentary I guess Bardem was in jail when the film won an award at that year’s Cannes festival.

But even with all the underlying commentary and surreptitious denunciation of his country’s autocracy the somber yet satisfying ending still fell squarely in noir territory. I do think however that the death of the cyclist was turned into a peripheral event by both Juan and Maria Jose. Hers may have been the greater transgression because her primary concern was of losing her wealth and social standing. But even the guilt ridden Juan comes to see the death as more of a symbol of his compromised dreams and values. Good movie.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Fri Mar 27, 2020 6:33 pm

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 5:14 pm
Death of a Cyclist - 9/10 - More international noir, this time from Spain and directed by Juan Antonio Bardem (maternal uncle of actor Javier). A couple having an affair run down a bicyclist on a lonely country road in the opening seconds of this 1955 thriller. The woman, affluent socialite Maria Jose (Lucia Bosi), is driving and she persuades the reluctant Juan (Alberto Closas) to leave the scene without rendering aid.

But even with all the underlying commentary and surreptitious denunciation of his country’s autocracy the somber yet satisfying ending still fell squarely in noir territory. I do think however that the death of the cyclist was turned into a peripheral event by both Juan and Maria Jose. Hers may have been the greater transgression because her primary concern was of losing her wealth and social standing. But even the guilt ridden Juan comes to see the death as more of a symbol of his compromised dreams and values. Good movie.
As a companion to this, I would highly recommend Lucretia Martel's The Headless Woman (only streaming on Amazon, and for a rental not for free, sorry).

I think that both films have interesting things to say about how we justify harm to others in the name of self-interest.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Fri Mar 27, 2020 8:00 pm

Charlie's Angels, 2019 (D)

It's very pandery in the beginning, but that doesn't last, and it gets back to the pander at the end. It started really weak. The characters are strong, the comedy is good enough, but the action is bad and the script is awfully busy. There's nothing here that really lives up to the best parts of the Diaz, Liu and company of the early 2000s. I think Liz Banks has potential as a director, but she needs to pick a tone and stick to it, this is all over the place.

Edit: Also, way too much pop music over scenes. Like, every 2 or 3 scenes.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Fri Mar 27, 2020 9:34 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 12:28 am
While it was a bit more bleak than I was prepared for this week, I really enjoyed The Man Who Fell to Earth.
Ya know, I am a huge Bowie fan, I mean, I have still not gotten over his death and he may be my favorite musical artist of all time... yet I have never seen this film.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Fri Mar 27, 2020 9:37 pm

Charles wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 8:00 pm
Charlie's Angels, 2019 (D)

It's very pandery in the beginning, but that doesn't last, and it gets back to the pander at the end. It started really weak. The characters are strong, the comedy is good enough, but the action is bad and the script is awfully busy. There's nothing here that really lives up to the best parts of the Diaz, Liu and company of the early 2000s. I think Liz Banks has potential as a director, but she needs to pick a tone and stick to it, this is all over the place.
I am disappointed.
I have always been a fan of this property and I was hoping they would do well with this and maybe even give me a couple of decent sequels.
And I really like Elizabeth Banks (don't know why exactly, I'm just always rooting for her, ever since her role in 40YOV) so I was pulling for this film.
Mph.
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Takoma1
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Fri Mar 27, 2020 10:23 pm

Wooley wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 9:34 pm
Ya know, I am a huge Bowie fan, I mean, I have still not gotten over his death and he may be my favorite musical artist of all time... yet I have never seen this film.
I really appreciated what he brought to the film. His reactions and behavior are a really interesting interpretation of "alien".
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Fri Mar 27, 2020 10:25 pm

Wooley wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 9:37 pm
I am disappointed.
I have always been a fan of this property and I was hoping they would do well with this and maybe even give me a couple of decent sequels.
And I really like Elizabeth Banks (don't know why exactly, I'm just always rooting for her, ever since her role in 40YOV) so I was pulling for this film.
Mph.
Banks is good. I hope she keeps doing more stuff in the vein of Pitch Perfect, though she only produced the original, because this one ain't it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Death Proof » Sat Mar 28, 2020 12:46 am

Pinchcliffe Grand Prix (1975)

Had no idea what to expect with this, except that I needed it to finish a list on I Check Movies.

Turns out it's a charming stop-motion film about an inventor whose former assistant stole one of his designs for a race car, so it's up to the inventor and his anthropomorphic animal friends to build their own and win the next big race.

The set pieces and models made for this Norwegian classic are beautiful and the stop-motion pretty clean. There's definitely a few adult-oriented jokes that kids won't get, so it's fun for the whole family.

Point of interest: this is the most widely-seen Norwegian film of all time. The film was made in 3.5 years by a team of approximately 5 people.

I can't help but wonder if the race portion of the film had direct influence on the pod race segment of The Phantom Menace. Many of the shots look the same and the similar sub-plot of the villain sabotaging the hero's car bare many similarities. Considering Lucas was inspired by earlier films (The Hidden Fortress) and Grand Prix came out in 1975, I don't doubt for a moment that he saw it and either consciously or subconsciously referenced the race scenes.

Anyway, this is a fun little animated movie and worth checking out.

9/10
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sat Mar 28, 2020 12:48 am

I watched Stuart Gordon's flirting with neo-noir, drama thrillers:

King of the Ants- How the hell is this an Asylum film? Very solid and ambitious, low budget horror, neo-noir amalgamation.

Edmond- A far superior, smarter and well acted Falling Down that confronts the racism and misogyny of the angry white man stories with a dose of irony that could give you whiplash. I kind of loved this one.

Stuck- The weakest but still good. Plays out a bit like Compliance, in taking an insane real life story, meets Tarantino revisionism.

Gordon really had a vibe and ambition that I loved for his films.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by BL Sometimes » Sat Mar 28, 2020 1:21 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sat Mar 28, 2020 12:48 am
Edmond- A far superior, smarter and well acted Falling Down that confronts the racism and misogyny of the angry white man stories with a dose of irony that could give you whiplash. I kind of loved this one.
I like the comparison to Falling Down. I sort of feel like this one was a victim of being released at the wrong time. Critics seemed a little sniffy about an examination of white working-class bigotry in a post-Katrina environment where the prevailing message was that racism was a sickness of the elites, George Bush not caring about black people and all. And Mamet was in the process of losing his political marbles as well as his gifts as a playwright/filmmaker. But the text predates all that, and yet anticipates the working-class rage and chauvinism as self-interest that fueled Trumpism. And while the character of Edmond certainly falls into the category of white collar New Yorker that is a certain type of elite, you do get a sense of his misguided rage about just scraping by better than by having him rant about cheeseburgers or walking into literal Nazi havens. The final moments of the film succumb to that sort of obviousness, but with a much heavier wink to the audience.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by wichares » Sat Mar 28, 2020 2:37 am

The Way Back (2020)

Even with the unexpected critical praise, the film's promotional material doesn't promise much, and its initial act seems to follow suit with plot points of cliches after cliches being set up rapidly. But I should have trusted Gavin O'Connor with this genre (Miracle is surprisingly sturdy within its preordained plot, and Warrior is my favorite sport film). The Way Back gets more involving as it goes along, the director and Affleck's restraint investing all those cliches with such aching sensitivity as to make them feel... not exactly new, but engagingly life-sized and sincere. And even with its formula in place, the film shrewdly separates its sport film climax from its addiction drama catharsis, arranging them in a way that may seem initially surprising, but also fitting in retrospect for this tale about what it takes to self-atone and move forward. The final shot is muted for this genre, but lingeringly powerful for the implication of a necessary process beginning. 7.5/10
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Sat Mar 28, 2020 6:27 pm

The Comedy of Terrors - 8/10 - For those who haven't seen this yet it involves a shady as hell 18th century New England undertaker and his put upon, bug eyed assistant and their ineffectual attempts at keeping their business afloat. This has so many things going for it including the cast. Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, Boris Karloff, and Basil Rathbone. It's also written by Richard Matheson and directed by Jacques Tourneur. The vibe comes off as relaxed with everyone enjoying themselves, especially Rathbone who throws himself into his role with Shakespearean abandon. Price is also a hoot as the booze soaked and nefarious Waldo Trumbull. Come to think of it, Tourneur's direction must have come down to him telling everyone to have fun with it. It's an American International production so it clocks in at around 80 or so minutes.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by wichares » Sat Mar 28, 2020 6:30 pm

High Fidelity (2000) - Have strong uh-oh feeling during the early parts, as it seems like this is gonna be 500 Days of Summer if the lead is even more self-pitying and toxic. Somewhere though my feeling... doesn't exactly flip, but becomes more nuanced as the film peels back and lets us peek through all the camera addresses into glimpses of Rob's own actions (a tactic best encapsulated in the revealing scene of him imagining what Laura might have said to her friend to make the latter suddenly hate him). It miraculously ends up somewhere that doesn't lessen Laura and Rob in the conflict, with one of the most normal yet most romantic asks of all time. Along the way are great soundtrack, some pop culture hang-ups so specifically obsessive as to be relatable, and a slew of colorful supporting characters. Delighted to see the Jack Black persona burst on screen here so fully too. 8/10

(Sidenote: I know about the TV adaptation starring Zoë Kravitz going into this film, and it throws me for a big loop when Lisa Bonet appears looking exactly like her. Takes me some good minutes of wondering about Kravitz's age before I figure it out.)
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Sat Mar 28, 2020 7:08 pm

Gandahar, 1987 (A-)

Creatively and visually, top 3-ish animation movies I've seen. The animation and (french) voices and hypnotizing the whole way through. Unfortunately, though it always keeps a good portion of its artistic flair, it becomes a bit B-movie near the end.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Torgo » Sat Mar 28, 2020 7:28 pm

2019: After the Fall of New York, while highly derivative and not an entirely accurate representation of the year it depicts, is involving and entertaining enough for me to recommend. Essentially a mashup of Escape From New York and Children of Men, it features Plissk...sorry, Parsifal (Michael Sopkiw), a driver in a Twisted Metal-like sport. The minority government hires him to rescue the only fertile woman on the planet from the titular metropolis, a place that has three forms of life: radiation-mutated gang members, the corrupt majority government's soldiers and rats. What the movie lacks in originality, it makes up for in its fight scenes and ingenuity, namely the production design and costumes. I especially liked the look and feel of the majority government's New York base and the mutation makeup, which recalled...well, Total Recall's. It may also be the only movie to sincerely use the oft-quoted (and oft-misquoted) phrase "we have ways of making you talk."
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Mar 29, 2020 12:10 am

Five Corners

This is one of those movies where I read a few reviews from people who liked it and just . . . disagreed with a lot of what they said.

Are the performances (Jodie Foster, Tim Robbins, John Turturro, etc) strong? Yes. But I found very little else to like.

The plot follows a young woman named Linda (Foster) living in a New York neighborhood called Five Corners. A man who tried to rape her years earlier (Turturro) has just gotten out of jail and returned to the neighborhood. Linda goes to Harry (Robbins), the man who stopped the rape before for protection. Harry has discovered non-violence and is hesitant to get involved--planning to soon head down to the South to help with voter rights. Then there's a whole other plot (taking up easily 1/3 of the film) following two college students and the two young women they woo over two crazy nights.

My main issue with the movie was that it felt like two totally different films inelegantly combined into one. Some of the positive reviews mentioned the film's sense of humor. Well, the sequences with the college students did have some really funny parts. But watching someone almost get raped? Watching a man beat an animal to death while his attempted rape victim watches and cries? It feels like two different sensibilities that didn't mesh. There is one piece of very dark humor that got a surprised laugh out of me, but for the most part the attempts at humor didn't do much for me because of the violence/sexism/racism surrounding them.

There is a sense of place and time, but the film seems to push this too hard with frequent use of historical television broadcasts and newspaper headlines conveying the state of things.

Just . . . what a weird film. I would have much rather watched a whole film dedicated to the college students and the glue-sniffing girls they hook up with. No joke. Those scenes were a lot of fun.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Mar 29, 2020 1:49 am

Anyone seen the new Emma?

We're planning a ladies day movie afternoon (for family members in the "trust tree" only) and this is what's been suggested to watch.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Mar 29, 2020 3:18 am

Put on Faces to watch just a few minutes of it, and 130 minutes later, wow. So good.

And the final scene with his
total misinterpretation of what's been happening with her
. Simply one of the best portrayals I've seen of a couple that is truly no longer on the same frequency.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Sun Mar 29, 2020 4:56 am

The Brain That Wouldn't Die - 4/10 - This is a terrible movie. I don't think that should be open to debate. The question should be, "Is it so bad it's actually good?" And the answer is...yeah, I suppose so. It certainly is a ripe target for your very own MST3K treatment (on top of already having been skewered on the show). There are many dead or interminable stretches but they are also accompanied by some of the goofiest and most unintentionally hilarious scenes ever committed to film. The mad doctor, in his quest to find his girlfriend's severed head a suitable body, cruising the streets to a cheesy sax score. Or visiting strip clubs where the women match his requirements (voluptuous body & butter face) so exactly that he may as well have been ordering pizza. There's also a mangled lab assistant and a mystery monster behind a padlocked door. If you can get through the leaden, dialogue heavy scenes and the overall glacial pacing you'll find parts that are worthy of any bon mots you may want to hurl.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Mar 29, 2020 5:06 am

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 4:56 am
The Brain That Wouldn't Die - 4/10 - This is a terrible movie. I don't think that should be open to debate. The question should be, "Is it so bad it's actually good?" And the answer is...yeah, I suppose so.
I own (owned?) this one on one of those DVDs that comes with like 8 films on it. Some were actually decent (Dementia 13, Night Tide). This one was . . . well. I certainly wasn't bored.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Mar 29, 2020 7:40 am

The Mask of Zorro - B

Never seen before, Banderas/Zeta-Jones kill it with their charisma and energy for each other. The rest is uncommonly functional, from the script beats to Campbell's crisp blocking and comfort with shooting masters/wides. I watched it four hours ago, though, and had to remind myself I saw it before I fell asleep. I don't think it ever quite transcends. Sorta like The Mummy (1999), it's very good at doing the thing it's trying to do, and that's it.

Rossio/Elliott would borrow a lot of this script later, I think, when they made The Lone Ranger (which has its moments but not many by my count). That has a similar "buddy" pair at the center, a masked do-gooder, a combo villain team composed of a profiteer and sorta-maybe-cannibal (TLR has a heart-eater, this one pickles a head in a jar), The Woman, some gluttonous destruction in the final act involving turn of the century heavy industry.
NOTE:
The above-written is wholly and solely the perspective of DaMU and should not be taken as an effort to rile, malign, or diminish you, dummo.
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Charles
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Sun Mar 29, 2020 11:28 am

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 4:56 am
The Brain That Wouldn't Die - 4/10 - This is a terrible movie. I don't think that should be open to debate. The question should be, "Is it so bad it's actually good?" And the answer is...yeah, I suppose so. It certainly is a ripe target for your very own MST3K treatment (on top of already having been skewered on the show). There are many dead or interminable stretches but they are also accompanied by some of the goofiest and most unintentionally hilarious scenes ever committed to film. The mad doctor, in his quest to find his girlfriend's severed head a suitable body, cruising the streets to a cheesy sax score. Or visiting strip clubs where the women match his requirements (voluptuous body & butter face) so exactly that he may as well have been ordering pizza. There's also a mangled lab assistant and a mystery monster behind a padlocked door. If you can get through the leaden, dialogue heavy scenes and the overall glacial pacing you'll find parts that are worthy of any bon mots you may want to hurl.
It's certainly interesting that a movie like that got released at a time like that. I was very surprised by how sleazy it was. Not one of the good ones though.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Death Proof » Sun Mar 29, 2020 1:26 pm

wichares wrote:
Sat Mar 28, 2020 6:30 pm
High Fidelity (2000) - Have strong uh-oh feeling during the early parts, as it seems like this is gonna be 500 Days of Summer if the lead is even more self-pitying and toxic. Somewhere though my feeling... doesn't exactly flip, but becomes more nuanced as the film peels back and lets us peek through all the camera addresses into glimpses of Rob's own actions (a tactic best encapsulated in the revealing scene of him imagining what Laura might have said to her friend to make the latter suddenly hate him). It miraculously ends up somewhere that doesn't lessen Laura and Rob in the conflict, with one of the most normal yet most romantic asks of all time. Along the way are great soundtrack, some pop culture hang-ups so specifically obsessive as to be relatable, and a slew of colorful supporting characters. Delighted to see the Jack Black persona burst on screen here so fully too. 8/10

(Sidenote: I know about the TV adaptation starring Zoë Kravitz going into this film, and it throws me for a big loop when Lisa Bonet appears looking exactly like her. Takes me some good minutes of wondering about Kravitz's age before I figure it out.)
LOVE High Fidelity.

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Takoma1
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Mar 29, 2020 3:55 pm

DaMU wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 7:40 am
The Mask of Zorro - B

Never seen before, Banderas/Zeta-Jones kill it with their charisma and energy for each other. The rest is uncommonly functional, from the script beats to Campbell's crisp blocking and comfort with shooting masters/wides. I watched it four hours ago, though, and had to remind myself I saw it before I fell asleep. I don't think it ever quite transcends. Sorta like The Mummy (1999), it's very good at doing the thing it's trying to do, and that's it.
I Saw this in the theater with my family when it first came out. It was a real crowd-pleaser, but also pretty forgettable.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Torgo » Sun Mar 29, 2020 5:19 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 1:49 am
Anyone seen the new Emma?

We're planning a ladies day movie afternoon (for family members in the "trust tree" only) and this is what's been suggested to watch.
I saw it and I highly reccomend it. It's wonderfully acted and it looks beautiful as well. My wife describes it as looking like a Wes Anderson/Sofia Coppola co-production (wouldn't that be awesome) and I'd agree. Best of all, it's funny and charming; in short, what the world needs right now.

It's $19.99 to rent, but that's still lower than the cost of two movie tickets.
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Takoma1
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Mar 29, 2020 5:45 pm

Torgo wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 5:19 pm
I saw it and I highly reccomend it. It's wonderfully acted, and it looks beautiful as well. My wife describes it as looking like a Wes Anderson/Sofia Coppola co-production (wouldn't that be awesome) and I'd agree. Best of all, it's funny and charming; in short, what the world needs right now.

It's $19.99 to rent, but that's still lower than the cost of two movie tickets.
Awesome.

Yeah, it's a little pricey. But $20 for a girls' day in isn't bad.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Sun Mar 29, 2020 7:23 pm

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 4:56 am
The Brain That Wouldn't Die - 4/10 - This is a terrible movie. I don't think that should be open to debate. The question should be, "Is it so bad it's actually good?" And the answer is...yeah, I suppose so. It certainly is a ripe target for your very own MST3K treatment (on top of already having been skewered on the show). There are many dead or interminable stretches but they are also accompanied by some of the goofiest and most unintentionally hilarious scenes ever committed to film. The mad doctor, in his quest to find his girlfriend's severed head a suitable body, cruising the streets to a cheesy sax score. Or visiting strip clubs where the women match his requirements (voluptuous body & butter face) so exactly that he may as well have been ordering pizza. There's also a mangled lab assistant and a mystery monster behind a padlocked door. If you can get through the leaden, dialogue heavy scenes and the overall glacial pacing you'll find parts that are worthy of any bon mots you may want to hurl.
You are simply wrong.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Sun Mar 29, 2020 7:32 pm

Yellowbrickroad, 2010, 2nd watch (B)

A movie about a guy who wants to write a book about a group of people who set out into the wood in 1940 and disappeared. Last time, I gave it around an A, but it doesn't really hold up to that ranking. The movie is sort of a Blair Witch, but not found footage, where people become paranoid and crazy. In this movie however, you just don't buy anyone's character progression or descent into madness. The ideas are there and the movie is original, but all those elements seem to be floating around instead of being tied into a cohesive sequence. Nothing reinforces anything, all those scenes are just there to fend for themselves and to try leaving an impression, but it just doesn't happen. It's too disjointed.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sun Mar 29, 2020 7:33 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 3:18 am
Put on Faces to watch just a few minutes of it, and 130 minutes later, wow. So good.

And the final scene with his
total misinterpretation of what's been happening with her
. Simply one of the best portrayals I've seen of a couple that is truly no longer on the same frequency.
I loved it. It has the most natural acting I've seen. I am blown away that it was entirely scripted.

I keep thinking of how the husband tells the mistress "you talk too much." Such a small moment but so potent.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Mar 29, 2020 7:56 pm

Charles wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 7:32 pm
Yellowbrickroad, 2010, 2nd watch (B)

A movie about a guy who wants to write a book about a group of people who set out into the wood in 1940 and disappeared. Last time, I gave it around an A, but it doesn't really hold up to that ranking. The movie is sort of a Blair Witch, but not found footage, where people become paranoid and crazy. In this movie however, you just don't buy anyone's character progression or descent into madness. The ideas are there and the movie is original, but all those elements seem to be floating around instead of being tied into a cohesive sequence. Nothing reinforces anything, all those scenes are just there to fend for themselves and to try leaving an impression, but it just doesn't happen. It's too disjointed.
I watched this years ago and really disliked it. I can't remember specifics at this point, but I remember especially disliking the ending.
ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 7:33 pm
I loved it. It has the most natural acting I've seen. I am blown away that it was entirely scripted.

I keep thinking of how the husband tells the mistress "you talk too much." Such a small moment but so potent.
There were a lot of moments, some of them just facial expressions, that I thought were really potent. I keep thinking of the line (which I know is on the more dramatic side of things) "Come on, now. Cry. That's it. That's life, honey."

I think that I'd need a rewatch to really figure out just what each half of the couple was wanting. I'm sure there are some well-written essays out there about it, but I'd rather approach it again on my own.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sun Mar 29, 2020 8:08 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 7:56 pm

There were a lot of moments, some of them just facial expressions, that I thought were really potent. I keep thinking of the line (which I know is on the more dramatic side of things) "Come on, now. Cry. That's it. That's life, honey."

I think that I'd need a rewatch to really figure out just what each half of the couple was wanting. I'm sure there are some well-written essays out there about it, but I'd rather approach it again on my own.
I think I'll wait on it as I just felt submersed in the effect the film had on me, rather than breaking down the intricacies of their wants and desires. I think much of what I took away was just the indescribable feeling of wanting SOMETHING and not really being sure what. Acting out of impulse and desire with no real idea beyond that.

Have you watched A Woman Under the Influence? That was my favorite of my Cassavettes binge, though I loved them all.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Sun Mar 29, 2020 8:24 pm

Wooley wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 7:23 pm
You are simply wrong.
About what? That's it's a terrible movie? Or a terrible movie that is salvageable and still worth watching because it's so much fun to heckle?
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Mar 29, 2020 8:34 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 8:08 pm
I think I'll wait on it as I just felt submersed in the effect the film had on me, rather than breaking down the intricacies of their wants and desires. I think much of what I took away was just the indescribable feeling of wanting SOMETHING and not really being sure what. Acting out of impulse and desire with no real idea beyond that.

Have you watched A Woman Under the Influence? That was my favorite of my Cassavettes binge, though I loved them all.
I haven't seen A Woman Under the Influence yet.

My first watch was definitely 90% emotional and only about 10% analytical.

It made me think a bit of the part in Seconds where the main character (with a new identity) talks to his wife. She says, "I never knew what he wanted... and I don't think he ever knew. He fought so hard for what he'd been taught to want... and when he got it, he just grew more and more confused."
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sun Mar 29, 2020 8:49 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 8:34 pm
I haven't seen A Woman Under the Influence yet.

My first watch was definitely 90% emotional and only about 10% analytical.

It made me think a bit of the part in Seconds where the main character (with a new identity) talks to his wife. She says, "I never knew what he wanted... and I don't think he ever knew. He fought so hard for what he'd been taught to want... and when he got it, he just grew more and more confused."
Are you going to dive into some more Cassavettes and watch it soon? I think that Rowlands deserved all the awards for that one. It has a more overt melodrama plot but handles it with the same nuance and raw realism that's in Faces.

That's an excellent comparison. I just kept thinking of the theatricality of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf and how that dynamic of a marriage that has allowed its problems to boil over the years and manifest in all these ideosyncratic acts of self destruction and desirous impulses. I should do a really exhausting double feature of them both one day.

I also need to rewatch Seconds. Maybe I'll screen it this October if we're seeing other humans by then.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Sun Mar 29, 2020 8:57 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 5:06 am
I own (owned?) this one on one of those DVDs that comes with like 8 films on it. Some were actually decent (Dementia 13, Night Tide). This one was . . . well. I certainly wasn't bored.
Yeah, I sat/slouched there and didn't squirm all that much and only nodded off once so...I had that going for me. It's not much fun to watch alone. It's something you watch with other people and also okay to talk over. It's not like you're going to miss any crucial details.
Charles wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 11:28 am
It's certainly interesting that a movie like that got released at a time like that. I was very surprised by how sleazy it was. Not one of the good ones though
It was made in '59 but released in '62 due to some kind of legal problems. But it was definitely designed to inflame the senses and/or naughty bits.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Mar 29, 2020 8:59 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 8:49 pm
Are you going to dive into some more Cassavettes and watch it soon? I think that Rowlands deserved all the awards for that one. It has a more overt melodrama plot but handles it with the same nuance and raw realism that's in Faces.
Yes, quite a lot of his stuff is on the Criterion Channel.
That's an excellent comparison. I just kept thinking of the theatricality of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf and how that dynamic of a marriage that has allowed its problems to boil over the years and manifest in all these ideosyncratic acts of self destruction and desirous impulses. I should do a really exhausting double feature of them both one day.
Right. I mean, I'd have to rewatch to be sure, but I thought it was interesting that he's already being unfaithful before things get intense. It was her character that I wanted to pay attention to the second time around.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Stu » Sun Mar 29, 2020 9:05 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 8:34 pm
I haven't seen A Woman Under the Influence yet.
I imagine you'll absolutely hate the way it ends...

:shifty:
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Mar 29, 2020 9:12 pm

Stu wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 9:05 pm
I imagine you'll absolutely hate the way it ends...

:shifty:
In a weird way . . . way to make me want to watch it now!
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Sun Mar 29, 2020 9:15 pm

Dark Phoenix - 3/10 - It started out okay but then those opening five or so minutes passed and it turned into a spite watch. I mostly resented having to sit through it. But I persevered. I won't bother to break down the plot because I suppose most people know the Jean Grey/Dark Phoenix arc. The only value I can discern from this and stuff like X-Men: Apocalypse is a future blueprint of what not to do if they should ever attempt to try another X-Men movie. Or maybe it's just a star-crossed franchise like Fantastic Four.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Mon Mar 30, 2020 1:50 am

BL Sometimes wrote:
Sat Mar 28, 2020 1:21 am
I like the comparison to Falling Down. I sort of feel like this one was a victim of being released at the wrong time. Critics seemed a little sniffy about an examination of white working-class bigotry in a post-Katrina environment where the prevailing message was that racism was a sickness of the elites, George Bush not caring about black people and all. And Mamet was in the process of losing his political marbles as well as his gifts as a playwright/filmmaker. But the text predates all that, and yet anticipates the working-class rage and chauvinism as self-interest that fueled Trumpism. And while the character of Edmond certainly falls into the category of white collar New Yorker that is a certain type of elite, you do get a sense of his misguided rage about just scraping by better than by having him rant about cheeseburgers or walking into literal Nazi havens. The final moments of the film succumb to that sort of obviousness, but with a much heavier wink to the audience.
I was going through the contemporary reviews and a great many of them accused the film of being dated or of making a blanket claim that all left white men are secretly racist, misogynist monsters.

I’d wanted to see this for a long time but I’m glad I watched it now (the thinnest of silver linings?) because I felt gobsmacked by how prescient it felt to the rise of Trumpism.

Is Falling Down as bad I remember it being? With its angry white teen level writing and a flaccid turn of “see how he’s become THE BAD GUY?!?”
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Mon Mar 30, 2020 4:28 am

I'm watching Captain America: The Winter Soldier again, in part cuz the plague and I want things that are light and in part because a friend told me her favorite movie-star of all time is Robert Redford, and I'll be damned but will anyone else confirm that despite a seemingly simple performance, he actually added the gravitas that this movie is so famous for? I feel like Redford, with every exhale, is just breathing credibility into a movie from a genre that is not supposed to have credibility.
I totally understand that that was their intention and all, but I don't know if I ever really fully felt it before.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Mar 30, 2020 4:38 am

Wooley wrote:
Mon Mar 30, 2020 4:28 am
I'm watching Captain America: The Winter Soldier again, in part cuz the plague and I want things that are light and in part because a friend told me her favorite movie-star of all time is Robert Redford, and I'll be damned but will anyone else confirm that despite a seemingly simple performance, he actually added the gravitas that this movie is so famous for? I feel like Redford, with every exhale, is just breathing credibility into a movie from a genre that is not supposed to have credibility.
I totally understand that that was their intention and all, but I don't know if I ever really fully felt it before.
I think that Redford has great presence. (I also generally feel like Winter Soldier has the most gravitas of any of the Marvel films, but I'm aware that this isn't a universal opinion).

My favorite personal Redford anecdote was someone I knew watched a film (I think it was The Horse Whisperer) and right after said, "Man, whoever directed that movie must have had the BIGGEST CRUSH on Robert Redford. Did you see the way they shot him with the lighting and the angles?!" and someone else goes "It was directed by Robert Redford."

He's not my favorite actor, but he has that "real human" aura about him that always makes me feel like he just IS the person he's playing. It's rare for me to feel that way about an A-list actor.
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