Recently Seen

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Wooley
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Fri May 22, 2020 2:20 am

crumbsroom wrote:
Thu May 21, 2020 12:54 pm
I don't have the faintest interest in basketball, and this movie is all basketball all the time, and it's fantastic.

I was sad it was only ten hours long. I wanted more. I can only imagine the depths of despair those in Chicago felt when it all came to and end in real time.
That's interesting. There is almost no way on Earth I could care less about this subject and I have less than zero interest in watching it, but your perspective gives me pause.
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Wooley
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Fri May 22, 2020 2:29 am

Holy shit, is The Living Daylights awful.
I remembered it being below-par for the franchise but fuck.
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Ergill
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Ergill » Fri May 22, 2020 2:36 am

Wooley wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 2:29 am
Holy shit, is The Living Daylights awful.
I remembered it being below-par for the franchise but fuck.
Man, at the start of the quarantine, I was rolling through the Bonds from the start since I hadn't seen most of them. Just playing in the background while I work. I've momentarily stopped after Moonraker. Can't say I'm a fan.

When I hosted a trivia, one of my rounds was on inappropriate moments in Bond films, so I came out with something. Not a favorite round for people, but I loved it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Fri May 22, 2020 2:36 am

Wooley: Indeed. I just wanted to defy the connotation that "straight man" usually implies (the serious, normal person for the comedic force to bounce off of). He definitely fulfills the same narrative needs as the straight man but he's so much goofier and funnier than one would likely suspect.

Rock- When is the last time you saw it? I thought it was pretty great the first time a decade or so ago but now seeing it with a lot more Peckinpah under my belt, and a greater understanding of the man himself, I now think it's a contender for his masterpiece.

Ergill- I don't see it as a comment on horror movies but on the very specific sub genre of horror. If he's arguing that horror shouldn't be made, then I would adamantly disagree. I don't think the film itself argued that even if Haneke has stated as much. I think it's a far more convincing argument that horror is often severely emotionally underdeveloped and shies away from the "true horror" of the situation. If Haneke disagrees, well, I like my reading of his film more. New Criticism and whatnot.

I agree they're better films. I just never find cause to get vested in discourse about them. I guess Benny's Video comes closest.
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Wooley
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Fri May 22, 2020 2:43 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 2:36 am
Wooley: Indeed. I just wanted to defy the connotation that "straight man" usually implies (the serious, normal person for the comedic force to bounce off of). He definitely fulfills the same narrative needs as the straight man but he's so much goofier and funnier than one would likely suspect.
I understood and agree, I just wanted to clarify what I meant.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Rock » Fri May 22, 2020 2:48 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 2:36 am
Rock- When is the last time you saw it? I thought it was pretty great the first time a decade or so ago but now seeing it with a lot more Peckinpah under my belt, and a greater understanding of the man himself, I now think it's a contender for his masterpiece.
Probably been close to ten years since I last saw it. I remember being caught off guard by how grindhousey it felt (at least compared to The Wild Bunch) but still really enjoying it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Fri May 22, 2020 2:53 am

Wools- Is this where we Predator handshake?

Rock- It is certainly more grindhouse-y. I think much of that has to do with how the cinematography is entirely on sticks, which inherently gives it a more stripped down aesthetic. Add to it that virtually everyone in it behaves monstrously to exploitative degrees and one could easily see this being an AIP production. However, I think it also may be Peckinpah at his most singularly artistic and stripping his style down to a Kitano level or simplicity and by gosh, the thing just hits like a shovel to the head in it's third act.
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Ergill
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Ergill » Fri May 22, 2020 2:59 am

I've never vibed with Alfredo Garcia. Granted I'm so-so on Peckinpah, but I assumed I might like it better since it was basically him allowed to go nuts and it starred Warren Oates [KY dap]. Why not?
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Fri May 22, 2020 3:38 am

Talk about coincidence. I watched Tesis for the first time tonight, and I legitimately thought, "Wow, that discusses violence in media to much better effect than Funny Games; thank God that movie hasn't come up in Corrie for a couple of years."
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The above-written is wholly and solely the perspective of DaMU and should not be taken as an effort to rile, malign, or diminish you, dummo.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Fri May 22, 2020 3:45 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 2:53 am
Wools- Is this where we Predator handshake?
Seems as good a time as any.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Takoma1 » Fri May 22, 2020 3:50 am

DaMU wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 3:38 am
Talk about coincidence. I watched Tesis for the first time tonight, and I legitimately thought, "Wow, that discusses violence in media to much better effect than Funny Games; thank God that movie hasn't come up in Corrie for a couple of years."
Did you just think it, or did you whisper it three times into a darkened bathroom mirror?
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Fri May 22, 2020 4:08 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 3:50 am
Did you just think it, or did you whisper it three times into a darkened bathroom mirror?
...

...oh, God.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Fri May 22, 2020 5:07 am

Rewatched Dead Man. The Criterion transfer is achingly gorgeous and the movie itself was every bit as great as I'd remembered (Jarmusch's best?)

One thing I'd forgotten is how damn funny the first 2/3rds are. It's funnier than Jarmusch's more overt comedies, from what I've seen.

May have to put my Western binge on a momentary pause to watch my copies Down By Law and Mystery Train.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Fri May 22, 2020 5:16 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 5:07 am
(Jarmusch's best?)
I've only seen it once a long time ago. Whereas I have watched Down By Law a half dozen times, with it growing in love with each viewing.

But,um, yeah, maybe.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Fri May 22, 2020 5:25 am

Dead Man is one of my all-time favorites. . . . Alfredo Garcia is also quite good. (Come to think of it, there are some striking if unexpected parallels between them.)

Watched Cairo Station last night. Perhaps my first Egyptian films, and another of the films I noted down after reading up on Godard's The Image Book.
It's a really great film that weaves deftly between genres and styles: from neorealism to film noir, social drama to psychosexual thriller, with a touch of Hollywood melodrama throughout.

It also contains one of the most startling shots I've ever seen, when a boy is nearly run over by a train. I think I know how they did it, but only after watching the shot a dozen times - it's so seamless.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Fri May 22, 2020 5:27 am

crumbsroom wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 5:16 am
I've only seen it once a long time ago. Whereas I have watched Down By Law a half dozen times, with it growing in love with each viewing.

But,um, yeah, maybe.
I might fuck around and pop on DBL in a second. I haven't seen enough Jarmusch. A tentative ranking would look like so:

Dead Man
Ghost Dog
Only Lovers Left Alive
Coffee and Cigarettes
Dead Don't Die
Stranger Than Paradise (needs a rewatch as well)

I own Broken Flowers, Mystery Train and DBL. But I'm on a western binge, man... Don't wanna shift to a new obsession just yet... But maybe...

I implore you to rewatch Dead Man though. I think it might be perfect.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Fri May 22, 2020 6:01 am

Macrology wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 5:25 am
Cairo Station
Yes!
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Fri May 22, 2020 6:10 am

Macrology wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 5:25 am
Dead Man is one of my all-time favorites. . . . Alfredo Garcia is also quite good. (Come to think of it, there are some striking if unexpected parallels between them.)
They certainly made a fine pairing. I hadn't thought about the narrative parallels, include some "risen from the dead" symbolism throughout. I think it's interesting that both of them seemingly have diametrically opposed views on determinism yet they manifest almost identically, in increasingly more violent encounters that gradually take everything from the protagonists.

Bennie and William are about as far apart as protagonists can get as well.

Someone could do a fine video essay comparing the two.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Ganesh » Fri May 22, 2020 9:42 pm

replican wrote:
Wed May 20, 2020 12:50 am
As with most television I was in no hurry to watch it, was going to play catch up later. But I'm regretting because now everyone is talking about and I'm like, haven't seen it yet.

Definitely looking forward to it. It looks like it did a great job of capturing that 90s zeitgeist.
Yes it certainly did capture the zeitgeist. There has been a fair amount of criticism leveled at the series for being compromised, in the sense that Michael Jordan had ultimate veto power over what showed up in the final product. Ken Burns notably took this point of view. And now several players are coming forward and disputing things that were said and aren't happy about their portrayal, including Scottie Pippen and Horace Grant.

I understand these criticisms. But coming in with a bias as a Bulls fan and Michael Jordan superfan, all I can say is in terms of entertainment value, they absolutely maxed out on this. It simply couldn't be more enjoyable if you want to absorb all things MJ and relive that great era of NBA basketball. I had been looking forward to this for a few years and it exceeded even my loftiest expectations.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sat May 23, 2020 2:12 am

I don't think we've done an adequate job expressing how great and atypical for Peckinpah the Ballad of Cable Hogue is. What a wonderful little western.
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Jinnistan
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Jinnistan » Sat May 23, 2020 2:32 am

Cable Hogue is a Peckinpah that I have not connected with. Nothing bad about it, but it doesn't have the bite that Wild Bunch or PG&BtK have.

I will whole-heartedly praise Alfredo Garcia, as well as the Muhlenberg Matador himself Warren Oates. I think that it's the climax to what can be called (and I'm calling it) a trilogy (with Straw Dogs and The Getaway) about the dissolution of masculine mythology in post-western modern times.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Jinnistan » Sat May 23, 2020 2:39 am

Jarmusch ranking?

Dead Man
Down By Law
Mystery Train
Stranger Than Paradise
Ghost Dog
Night On Earth
Limits of Control
Broken Flowers
Paterson
Only Lovers Left Alive
Coffee & Cigarettes
Dead Don't Die

Hm, don't believe I've seen Permanant Vacation

Despite rankings, I think they're all, at least, very good.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sat May 23, 2020 3:00 am

Jinnistan wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 2:32 am
Cable Hogue is a Peckinpah that I have not connected with. Nothing bad about it, but it doesn't have the bite that Wild Bunch or PG&BtK have.

I will whole-heartedly praise Alfredo Garcia, as well as the Muhlenberg Matador himself Warren Oates. I think that it's the climax to what can be called (and I'm calling it) a trilogy (with Straw Dogs and The Getaway) about the dissolution of masculine mythology in post-western modern times.
I think it's lack of bite is particularly what makes it so striking within his filmography. It's him making his most optimistic film only for that film to tank his career and it fuels the rampant nihilism and misanthropy that would fuel the rest of his work.

I agree that it's not his best film but it certainly belongs among them if only for Robard's wonderful, film carrying performance.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by replican » Sat May 23, 2020 3:00 am

Old Jarmusch:
Mystery Train
Stranger Than Paradise

New:
Broken Flowers
Paterson
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wichares
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by wichares » Sat May 23, 2020 3:44 am

Wendy and Lucy (2008)

Slightly prefer Old Joy over this, which surprises myself a bit initially, since based on loglines it seems I would have a tougher time with the former in term of interest. But that one just finds Kelly Reichardt's understated style in an uncommonly rigorous workout, so the repression of its titular emotion gets under my skin and lingers deeper. Doesn't mean that Wendy and Lucy's more straightforward narrative doesn't benefit from that style as well though (even if some plottier aspects don't make it as fitting as that one), with a great Michelle Williams turn, some unsentimental but affecting shadings in the way people on the margin can be grinded down, and a killer, eyes-well-up-instantly final scene. 7.5/10

Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020)

That outstanding titular scene is the film in a single concentrated-dose nutshell: director Eliza Hittman's fly-on-the-wall realism, which at first glance seems distant, reveals an immensely tender heart by never wavering away from her character; it infers (rather than tells) in viewers understanding and empathy about these situations. Hittman trusts in gestures in between silence to convey a lived-in experience, especially in this film a female viewpoint of accumulated everyday transgressions. In the two actresses here, she manages to find the great performances for just that, with Sidney Flanigan and Talia Ryder managing to tell a lifetime of friendship mostly through being in the presence of each other quietly. 8/10
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by replican » Sat May 23, 2020 4:13 am

wichares wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 3:44 am
Wendy and Lucy (2008)

Slightly prefer Old Joy over this, which surprises myself a bit initially, since based on loglines it seems I would have a tougher time with the former in term of interest. But that one just finds Kelly Reichardt's understated style in an uncommonly rigorous workout, so the repression of its titular emotion gets under my skin and lingers deeper. Doesn't mean that Wendy and Lucy's more straightforward narrative doesn't benefit from that style as well though (even if some plottier aspects don't make it as fitting as that one), with a great Michelle Williams turn, some unsentimental but affecting shadings in the way people on the margin can be grinded down, and a killer, eyes-well-up-instantly final scene. 7.5/10
Reichadt is my favorite current auteur. Absolutely adore her style. One of those filmmakers whose worlds I feel enveloped by...captures real on film maaaan.

It's been a while since I've seen both the films you mention, I keep them for special occasions. W&L is definitely more straightforward. More urgent too in the timeliness sense. Old Joy is more timeless then. The themes requiring a lot more digging. Similar to Certain Women. I didn't take to Certain Women at first. Which really bugged me. Like REALLY bugged me because Reichardt can do no wrong in my book. But the more I thought about it, read some reviews of it, the more I grew to appreciate it. Some light bulbs went off. Especially with the Michelle Williams segment. That whole dynamic, with the family and Williams's demeanor....it's so deep (yea I know) that it just went over my head on initial viewing. The Kirsten Stewart segment had me perplexed about how I'm supposed to react to her. Or how much credit I'm willing to give that character...she's either deserving of a lot of pity or kind of just like the rest of em and leave it that.

W&L will probably always rank up high for me based on the relatable feels but I don't think it's Reichardt's most thought provoking works.

Can't wait for First Cow to be out. Soooo looking forward to Reichardt's exploration of that world.
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Macrology
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Sat May 23, 2020 4:31 am

Jinnistan wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 2:39 am
Jarmusch ranking?

Dead Man
Down By Law
Mystery Train
Stranger Than Paradise
Ghost Dog
Night On Earth
Limits of Control
Broken Flowers
Paterson
Only Lovers Left Alive
Coffee & Cigarettes
Dead Don't Die

Hm, don't believe I've seen Permanant Vacation

Despite rankings, I think they're all, at least, very good.
My ranking would look a lot like this, though Down By Law and Mystery Train would have just about equal footing. I might also rate Dead Don't Die a little higher because I really dig its central conceit.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Sat May 23, 2020 4:40 am

The Devil Bat - 6/10 - This is a 1940 minor horror outing with Bela Lugosi. He plays scientist Dr. Paul Carruthers who has a real hard-on for his employers. He is resentful because their cosmetics company made their fortune based on one of his creations even though he opted for a quick payout instead of investing in the company. He runs a current through regular sized bats and turns them into gigantic specimens then concocts a cologne of sorts that attracts and incites the giant bats. He then starts killing off members of the two families that own the company. At 68 minutes it's over before you know it. And with Lugosi committed to his role it's not all that bad.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by wichares » Sat May 23, 2020 4:41 am

replican wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 4:13 am
Reichadt is my favorite current auteur. Absolutely adore her style. One of those filmmakers whose worlds I feel enveloped by...captures real on film maaaan.

It's been a while since I've seen both the films you mention, I keep them for special occasions. W&L is definitely more straightforward. More urgent too in the timeliness sense. Old Joy is more timeless then. The themes requiring a lot more digging. Similar to Certain Women. I didn't take to Certain Women at first. Which really bugged me. Like REALLY bugged me because Reichardt can do no wrong in my book. But the more I thought about it, read some reviews of it, the more I grew to appreciate it. Some light bulbs went off. Especially with the Michelle Williams segment. That whole dynamic, with the family and Williams's demeanor....it's so deep (yea I know) that it just went over my head on initial viewing. The Kirsten Stewart segment had me perplexed about how I'm supposed to react to her. Or how much credit I'm willing to give that character...she's either deserving of a lot of pity or kind of just like the rest of em and leave it that.

W&L will probably always rank up high for me based on the relatable feels but I don't think it's Reichardt's most thought provoking works.

Can't wait for First Cow to be out. Soooo looking forward to Reichardt's exploration of that world.
I only have Meek's Cutoff left unseen out of her filmography (until First Cow comes out, and also Ode if that finally becomes available), and it's acclaimed from critics I follow in a way that may potentially shoot ahead in my ranking. But before then my favorite so far of hers is Certain Women, which as you said shares some beguiling story sensibility with Old Joy especially in the Michelle Williams story. However, the last Kirsten Stewart/Lily Gladstone story is maybe one of her simplest/most straightforward, yet I also think it's the best thing she's ever done.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by replican » Sat May 23, 2020 4:51 am

wichares wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 4:41 am
I only have Meek's Cutoff left unseen out of her filmography (until First Cow comes out, and also Ode if that finally becomes available), and it's acclaimed from critics I follow in a way that may potentially shoot ahead in my ranking. But before then my favorite so far of hers is Certain Women, which as you said shares some beguiling story sensibility with Old Joy especially in the Michelle Williams story. However, the last Kirsten Stewart/Lily Gladstone story is maybe one of her simplest/most straightforward, yet I also think it's the best thing she's ever done.
Who are we to feel sorry for more, Stewart or Gladstone?
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Jinnistan » Sat May 23, 2020 8:10 am

Macrology wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 4:31 am
My ranking would look a lot like this, though Down By Law and Mystery Train would have just about equal footing. I might also rate Dead Don't Die a little higher because I really dig its central conceit.
Yeah, I get it. Those last five are pretty exchangeable. I like them all, but I can boggle the results.

I thought my high ranking of Limits of Control would be the most controversial, but I stand beside it,
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Stu » Sat May 23, 2020 9:48 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Thu May 21, 2020 7:28 am
It’s not under-using him in that he’s used poorly. It’s that unlike Moonlight, Black Panther will not be a simple one and done film. It’s going to have sequels and feed into the greater universe and they used an actor of his caliber for ultimately 2 scenes.
Well, he also narrated the opening scene, so that counts as at least half-credit towards his screentime total. Anyway, I can't agree that he wasn't utilized well in the film, as, relatively small screentime or not, he still played a pivotal role as the father of Killmonger, AKA the guy who's basically the film's other star, and his dad's absence is basically that character's entire motivation (something that is emphasized by the sparse but highly strategic use of Brown in the film), so you pretty have to cast an actor of his caliber to play it, or else that aspect of the villain's characterization falls much flatter than it should. While I also would've loved to have seen Brown get some more screentime in Panther and its upcoming sequels, the screentime that he did get in the film was more than sufficient to make the impact it needed for me, so this is not a "Rene Russo in the Thors"-level of wasting at all, as far as I'm concerned.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sat May 23, 2020 9:50 am

Your entire defense could be applied to Russo’s use in The Dark World, yo.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Torgo » Sat May 23, 2020 4:47 pm

Code of Silence is a pretty good cop thriller about a no-nonsense sergeant and karate expert - Chuck Norris plays him, after all - who gets caught in the middle of a gang rivalry. He's pretty much a one-man army in this fight, and while this is because Norris is the star and this what we want to see, there's a meaningful reason: he became a pariah in his department after snitching on a co-worker. While this subplot is there to show what kind of person the sergeant is, it's also there to parallel this unwritten code of silence in police departments with the Mafia's omerta. This probably all sounds familiar, and while it is, director Andrew Davis elevates the material in the same way he elevated Under Siege and The Fugitive. In addition to adding grit, humanity, quality comic relief (mostly thanks to Dennis Farina, a friend of Norris who is always coming up with ridiculous alternatives to police work), Davis wisely emphasizes Norris's screen presence and martial arts talents over his limited acting ability like he did with Seagal. Not to mention, like Davis did in The Fugitive, he makes Chicago seem less like a setting and more like a supporting player. It's definitely no masterpiece: there are plot holes here and there, most notably one involving a phone call. Also, while the movie treats lone female co-star Molly Hagan, who plays a gangster's daughter, relatively well, she's still more of a plot device than a character. Even so, it still amounts to a very entertaining action movie that proves that withholding evidence makes evil persist regardless of whether cops or criminals do it. By the way, Norris is not completely alone in his fight: he's aided by a robot who would make Robocop's ED-209 tremble.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sat May 23, 2020 4:58 pm

Phew. For a second there, I thought you weren’t going to mention that within that gritty crime drama, Norris buddy cops a robot. That’s the main thing to remember about that one.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Torgo » Sat May 23, 2020 5:01 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 4:58 pm
Phew. For a second there, I thought you weren’t going to mention that within that gritty crime drama, Norris buddy cops a robot. That’s the main thing to remember about that one.
Like Vanessa Williams, I saved the best for last.
Oh yeah, I tried to work in that Ralph "Merry Christmas, ya filthy animal" Foody is in it, but I couldn't find a way. Shame on me.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sat May 23, 2020 5:56 pm

Torgo wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 5:01 pm
Like Vanessa Williams, I saved the best for last.
Oh yeah, I tried to work in that Ralph "Merry Christmas, ya filthy animal" Foody is in it, but I couldn't find a way. Shame on me.
And who could forget the great Henry "Plastic Surgery Recreation of Chevy Chase" Silva as the villain!
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Torgo » Sat May 23, 2020 6:05 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 5:56 pm
And who could forget the great Henry "Plastic Surgery Recreation of Chevy Chase" Silva as the villain!
Haha, yes! And I though Robert Z'Dar's face looked like a catcher's mitt.

It's odd how how similarly named Norris's supposedly best movies are (Code of Silence and Silent Rage, which I oughta watch next). Maybe it's a reference to his minimal dialogue.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sat May 23, 2020 6:29 pm

Torgo wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 6:05 pm
Haha, yes! And I though Robert Z'Dar's face looked like a catcher's mitt.

It's odd how how similarly named Norris's supposedly best movies are (Code of Silence and Silent Rage, which I oughta watch next). Maybe it's a reference to his minimal dialogue.
Robert Z'Dar is actually at his most handsome in the Maniac Cop franchise.

Silent Rage is among the best Norris films. It's basically him vs. Michael Myers (and probably would've been among the better Halloween sequels if you ask me, not that that's a high bar).
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Torgo
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Torgo » Sat May 23, 2020 6:37 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 6:29 pm
Robert Z'Dar is actually at his most handsome in the Maniac Cop franchise.
Indeed. This reminder and you putting the third entry in your list of the '90s best horror films is just the motivation I need to finish that trilogy. The prospect of him finding love is intriguing.
Last Great Movie Seen
Dragonslayer (Robbins, 1981)
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Charles
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Charles » Sat May 23, 2020 6:42 pm

Body Snatchers, 1993 (B-)

Not the best Body Snatcher movie, but not a horrible movie. Not that there aren't many bad elements in it. The movie feels oddly casual, and everyone seems to severely underact, and I'm not sure if that's a stylistic choice. There's good body horror to compensate for that, but nothing too prevalent. The movie does a few things different from the others, which I appreciate as well. It's still below the 50's version, which I'd put above the 70's version, but above The Invasion, which just didn't have a ton to offer.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sat May 23, 2020 6:50 pm

Torgo wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 6:37 pm
Indeed. This reminder and you putting the third entry in your list of the '90s best horror films is just the motivation I need to finish that trilogy. The prospect of him finding love is intriguing.
I think the whole franchise is great. It's not nearly as good as MC2 (perhaps the crown jewel of DTV horror) but it has some crazy good horror action and seems like Lustig was really gunning for a Verhoeven vibe (while he was actually filmmaking as he left the project before completion). On the blue underground release, there's a GREAT making of that really captures the development hell it went through and its perhaps even more interesting than the film. It's a beautiful, fun mess and with that production, that's a miracle.
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MrCarmady
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by MrCarmady » Sat May 23, 2020 9:27 pm

The Living Daylights is great, it just suffers from not having a proper villain, but Dalton's performance is one of the series' best and he has actual chemistry with the Bond girl which is rare.
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Captain Terror
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Captain Terror » Sat May 23, 2020 9:33 pm

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 4:40 am
The Devil Bat - 6/10 - This is a 1940 minor horror outing with Bela Lugosi. He plays scientist Dr. Paul Carruthers who has a real hard-on for his employers. He is resentful because their cosmetics company made their fortune based on one of his creations even though he opted for a quick payout instead of investing in the company. He runs a current through regular sized bats and turns them into gigantic specimens then concocts a cologne of sorts that attracts and incites the giant bats. He then starts killing off members of the two families that own the company. At 68 minutes it's over before you know it. And with Lugosi committed to his role it's not all that bad.
Lots of fun. My favorite bit is Lugosi's farewell to his future victims.

"Good night, doctor!"
"Good.....BYE, John...."
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MrCarmady
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by MrCarmady » Sat May 23, 2020 9:47 pm

I'm planning to watch Dead Man myself in the next few days, but I'm a big Jarmusch fan.

Ranking would go something like this:

Stranger than Paradise
Only Lovers Left Alive
Down By Law
Ghost Dog
Paterson
Night on Earth
Mystery Train
Coffee and Cigarettes
Gimme Danger

They're all good to great but I just don't care about The Stooges that much while the episodic ones are more uneven by nature, the highlights of those (the Japanese couple in Mystery Train, Tom Waits and Iggy Pop in Coffee and Cigarettes, Winona Ryder and Gena Rowlands in Night on Earth) would be way up there.
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Patrick McGroin
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Sat May 23, 2020 9:48 pm

The Naked City - 7.5/10 - I think this 1948 police procedural's reputation is due more to it being a progenitor than it would be the sum of it's parts. From Akira Kurosawa's Stray Dog or High and Low to TV's Law & Order you can plainly see it's influence. There's also a surprising amount of humor in it. Barry Fitzgerald is obviously cast against type as Homicide Lt. Dan Muldoon but by the end he's won you over. And it makes great use of it's NYC locales with so many shots of teeming streets that the crowds of people eventually become supporting characters of sorts. There are a handful of scenes where the obviously unknowing mobs try and join in on the action. It's also shot documentary style at times with the resulting sound mix kind of muddy. Despite all these idiosyncrasies it manages to work and when the murder investigation finally segues into a manhunt the film wraps up in tense and riveting fashion.
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MrCarmady
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by MrCarmady » Sat May 23, 2020 9:52 pm

Funny, I clicked on Macrology's link above to his review of the latest Jarmusch back in December and the first review directly below it is Torgo reviewing The Naked City as well, what are the chances? I haven't seen it but Dassin's Night and the City might be my favourite noir film of all time.
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Patrick McGroin
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Sat May 23, 2020 9:57 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 9:33 pm
Lots of fun. My favorite bit is Lugosi's farewell to his future victims.

"Good night, doctor!"
"Good.....BYE, John...."
:D I know right? You would think it would give at least some of them pause. And then his specific instruction to be sure and rub some of the "cologne" on their necks after all the previous victims have had their jugulars torn out. They certainly were an accommodating bunch. I still found it enjoyable.
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topherH
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by topherH » Sat May 23, 2020 10:04 pm

The Empire Strikes Back-9/10

Had this on as background noise for work the past few nights. Is Luke v Vader the greatest showdown in cinematic history? Maybe?
State of Siege |Gavras, 1972| +
Deadpool |Miller, 2016| +
Z |Gavras, 1969| -
The Confession |Gavras, 1970| +
Missing |Gavras, 1982| +
The Revenant |Inarritu, 2015| +
The Hateful Eight |Tarantino, 2015| +

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topherH
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by topherH » Sat May 23, 2020 10:09 pm

Wooley wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 2:29 am
Holy shit, is The Living Daylights awful.
I remembered it being below-par for the franchise but fuck.
I had it ranked in the bottom 5 when I went through Bond last November. I'd say it's just outside the really bad ones, not unwatchable, but not above mediocre. License to Kill is worse which surprised me.
State of Siege |Gavras, 1972| +
Deadpool |Miller, 2016| +
Z |Gavras, 1969| -
The Confession |Gavras, 1970| +
Missing |Gavras, 1982| +
The Revenant |Inarritu, 2015| +
The Hateful Eight |Tarantino, 2015| +

+ Recommended
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