Recently Seen

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Wooley
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Tue Jul 21, 2020 6:32 am

Watchmen is the best television I've seen in a long time.
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Patrick McGroin
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Wed Jul 22, 2020 3:03 am

Locke - 8/10 - I was really curious as to the overall budget for this (which turned out to be 2 million dollars). With the exception of the first couple of minutes the rest of the movie takes place inside a BMW SUV. Tom Hardy plays John Locke, a successful construction manager, happily married and a devoted father to two sons. The story is gradually laid out over the course of his hour and a half drive to London.
It turns out that he had a one night stand a few months back while out of town on business. He slept with a co-worker, an older lady named Bethan, who subsequently became pregnant. It's also revealed that John's past and a father who abandoned him as a child has left deep-seated and indelible scars on his psyche. Because of this he decides to make the drive to be by Bethan's side for the birth. In the process he not only abandons the biggest project of his career but confesses to his wife about his infidelity and the resulting fallout. The rest of the movie deals with the aftermath of his decision in the form of several inexorably escalating phone calls. By the time the movie winds up he has lost everything of his old life. His job and home and family. But the last shot of him as he listens to the sound of his newborn infant over the phone shows a man resigned to his circumstances. In that moment he has realized and accepted that his path has been laid out since the beginning of his own life.
It's a bravura one man performance from Hardy. I think you'd have to go back to something like Bronson to see it's equal.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Wed Jul 22, 2020 6:05 pm

Le Samouraï - 9/10 - I finally got around to watching this on my second try. The first time didn't feel right and since I felt I owed it an equitable and sober look I tried it again. I can now see it's influence on some of my favorite movies like Jarmusch's Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai or Johnnie To's Vengeance. Alain Delon plays Jef Costello, a methodical loner and professional contract killer. After his latest job leads him to get rounded up, along with dozens of others, in a police dragnet he runs into trouble with his employers.
This leads to what might be considered a predictable double cross except that it doesn't follow the conventional rules that we've become accustomed to. The ending with it's suicide-by-cop connotations was also an offbeat wrinkle that's been employed several times since.
It's readily apparent that this spare and stylish noir led the way for many others and always satisfying to get a glimpse of the provenance behind a particular genre.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Wed Jul 22, 2020 8:07 pm

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Wed Jul 22, 2020 6:05 pm
Le Samouraï - 9/10 - I finally got around to watching this on my second try. The first time didn't feel right and since I felt I owed it an equitable and sober look I tried it again. I can now see it's influence on some of my favorite movies like Jarmusch's Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai or Johnnie To's Vengeance. Alain Delon plays Jef Costello, a methodical loner and professional contract killer. After his latest job leads him to get rounded up, along with dozens of others, in a police dragnet he runs into trouble with his employers.
This leads to what might be considered a predictable double cross except that it doesn't follow the conventional rules that we've become accustomed to. The ending with it's suicide-by-cop connotations was also an offbeat wrinkle that's been employed several times since.
It's readily apparent that this spare and stylish noir led the way for many others and always satisfying to get a glimpse of the provenance behind a particular genre.
That one's an all-time favorite of mine. Glad you really liked it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:02 am

Le Samourai is among my absolute favorite movies. I don't watch it often, as I want to distill the sense of cool, but it just does everything in a way that I love. They way it influences Walter Hill, Michael Mann and Nicolas Winding Refn, 3 of my favorite filmmakers, just multiplies my admiration.

On a very similar note, I rewatched Airplane, Stir Crazy and the Naked Gun. All 3 tickled me greatly. Did y'all know Sidney Poitier directed Stir Crazy? That's... Crazy.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:26 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:02 am
Did y'all know Sidney Poitier directed Stir Crazy? That's... Crazy.
Really? I did not know that. I remember him directing Uptown Saturday Night. That's a fond memory. They tried to recapture that film's magic with Let's Do It Again and A Piece of the Action with steadily diminishing returns.
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DaMU
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:29 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:02 am
On a very similar note, I rewatched Airplane, Stir Crazy and the Naked Gun. All 3 tickled me greatly. Did y'all know Sidney Poitier directed Stir Crazy? That's... Crazy.
Haven't seen that one!

Have seen the other two, and the bit where the passengers calm down the panicking woman in increasingly abusive ways is a cinematic hall-of-fame joke to me.

Nielsen just shaking the absolute shit out of her.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Stu » Thu Jul 23, 2020 3:05 am

Image
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Thu Jul 23, 2020 4:09 am

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964) - 8/10
The Young Girls of Rochefort (1967) - 9/10

I watched both these films over the last few days. While most people tend to prefer The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, I give the edge to The Young Girls of Rochefort, even though both films impressed me quite a lot. The Umbrellas of Cherbourg is a rather beautiful and unique musical with its fantastic main score, the gorgeous color palette, the creative shot composition, and the overall design which does a fantastic job at containing the emotions of the film, thus giving it a unique feel which easily overshadows its story. Standout scenes which incorporate this the best include Genevieve's reaction to Guy leaving, her slow and steady breakdown as she waits for him, and the final scene. It's a unique musical and I really enjoyed it. Though The Young Girls of Rochefort doesn't succeed as well in these fronts, it ultimately resonated with me on a much deeper level. While its emotions aren't conveyed through the design as uniquely as those in The Umbrellas of Cherbourg are, I think those emotions operate on a more complex emotional spectrum, which I think makes it the better of the two films. Though I wasn't too impressed by it with my first viewing, when I rewatched it, I found myself more captivated by its missed opportunity themes than I was with Guy's and Genevieve's struggles in The Umbrellas of Cherbourg which weren't quite as layered and found that a couple payoffs for certain characters resonated with me in a way which the final scene of The Umbrellas of Cherbourg wasn't quite able to reach. Though I initially felt like Etienne and Bill often ran the risk of being overshadowed by the other characters in The Young Girls of Rochefort, the film incorporated them quite well into the final act and went out on a high note with them, causing this issue to be ultimately lost in the grand scheme of the film. The Umbrellas of Cherbourg also went up a bit for me when I rewatched it but not as much. While I can understand why anyone would take the opposite view, The Young Girls of Rochefort is where I stand.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by replican » Thu Jul 23, 2020 4:24 am

Blindspotting 4/5

While I don't agree with all of its politics, it's a good film. There's danger here of cynicism as a viewer because the film covers some familiar topics and settings. Well...familiar in the sense that the issues are so charged that whenever they are covered we do remember them well. It's not difficult for a film trying to portray urban west coast culture to unintentionally veer into parody.

Wonderful performances here. If this film does nothing else, it shows you how stories with a diverse cast benefit greatly from them.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Thu Jul 23, 2020 4:40 am

Rewatched Speed Racer over the last week. It is imperfect, and it is also so fantastic that I don't care (apart from a couple of the most egregious digressions into Spritle / Chim Chim stuff). I'm just overwhelmed by the movie's heart and energy and theming, with racing as an analogy for any creative pursuit, Royalton as dehumanizing corporatism*, and finding the space between where you can live in the joy of the process. I hadn't caught before that, in the closing moments of the final race, Taejo Tagokhan (the guy who uses and turncoats Speed in the middle to leverage himself against Royalton) cheers along for Speed, completely caught up in the demonstration of skill.

*: I love that the Wachowskis always focus on corporatists as the true villains. They draw a visual link in the first Matrix to suggest that Neo's pod is really just another cubicle, and the villains often congregate in empty corporate-looking buildings (he works for a company called Metacortex with a Smith-looking boss). Then you have the obvious anti-corporatism of Speed Racer and later Cloud Atlas (Hugh Grant's opportunistic capitalist enablers throughout the centuries reach their logical conclusion when, in the far future, his character is a cannibal). Jupiter Ascending might even deserve a rewatch, since the film's about a villainous Trumpian family of breathless egoists narcissists, all of them inheritors to an interstellar corporation.

(Also might be worth rewatching just to bite into Redmayne's delicious cheese.)
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Thu Jul 23, 2020 6:47 am

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Wed Jul 22, 2020 6:05 pm
Le Samouraï - 9/10 - I finally got around to watching this on my second try. The first time didn't feel right and since I felt I owed it an equitable and sober look I tried it again. I can now see it's influence on some of my favorite movies like Jarmusch's Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai or Johnnie To's Vengeance. Alain Delon plays Jef Costello, a methodical loner and professional contract killer. After his latest job leads him to get rounded up, along with dozens of others, in a police dragnet he runs into trouble with his employers.
This leads to what might be considered a predictable double cross except that it doesn't follow the conventional rules that we've become accustomed to. The ending with it's suicide-by-cop connotations was also an offbeat wrinkle that's been employed several times since.
It's readily apparent that this spare and stylish noir led the way for many others and always satisfying to get a glimpse of the provenance behind a particular genre.
Yeah, I said this in a different forum recently, this is one of the movies that unlocked "cinema" for me.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Thu Jul 23, 2020 6:47 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:02 am
On a very similar note, I rewatched Airplane, Stir Crazy and the Naked Gun. All 3 tickled me greatly. Did y'all know Sidney Poitier directed Stir Crazy? That's... Crazy.
I actually did know that. What a thing.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Thu Jul 23, 2020 6:49 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 4:09 am
The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964) - 8/10
The Young Girls of Rochefort (1967) - 9/10

I watched both these films over the last few days. While most people tend to prefer The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, I give the edge to The Young Girls of Rochefort, even though both films impressed me quite a lot. The Umbrellas of Cherbourg is a rather beautiful and unique musical with its fantastic main score, the gorgeous color palette, the creative shot composition, and the overall design which does a fantastic job at containing the emotions of the film, thus giving it a unique feel which easily overshadows its story. Standout scenes which incorporate this the best include Genevieve's reaction to Guy leaving, her slow and steady breakdown as she waits for him, and the final scene. It's a unique musical and I really enjoyed it. Though The Young Girls of Rochefort doesn't succeed as well in these fronts, it ultimately resonated with me on a much deeper level. While its emotions aren't conveyed through the design as uniquely as those in The Umbrellas of Cherbourg are, I think those emotions operate on a more complex emotional spectrum, which I think makes it the better of the two films. Though I wasn't too impressed by it with my first viewing, when I rewatched it, I found myself more captivated by its missed opportunity themes than I was with Guy's and Genevieve's struggles in The Umbrellas of Cherbourg which weren't quite as layered and found that a couple payoffs for certain characters resonated with me in a way which the final scene of The Umbrellas of Cherbourg wasn't quite able to reach. Though I initially felt like Etienne and Bill often ran the risk of being overshadowed by the other characters in The Young Girls of Rochefort, the film incorporated them quite well into the final act and went out on a high note with them, causing this issue to be ultimately lost in the grand scheme of the film. The Umbrellas of Cherbourg also went up a bit for me when I rewatched it but not as much. While I can understand why anyone would take the opposite view, The Young Girls of Rochefort is where I stand.
I'm with you, I prefer The Young Girls.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:03 am

Wooley wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 6:49 am
I'm with you, I prefer The Young Girls.
Be careful where you post that!
It is the superior Demy though.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:04 am

Yeah, Wooley. Don't you think you're a bit old to prefer young girls?
this is a joke btw luv ya wools :heart:
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:22 am

I prefer Young Girls to Umbrellas by a considerable margin, although Lola is still my favorite Demy and one of my favorite French films of that era.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by The Nameless Two » Thu Jul 23, 2020 10:56 am

There ain't no girl in her 20s who knows what she wants, all I can say. In all of my protests those cursed babywitches literally put a waking hex on me for calling them out, yeah, *two fingers, eyes, right back at you threefold*

Le Samourai is, as Wooley mentioned succinctly, a real potent key for my cinematic locks. Really, it's between that and Tarkovsky's Solaris which sharpened my sword enough to clash with the lot of RT's General Discussion. Le Samourai worked for me because I was in a big Kill Bill Vol. 1 (13) phase and had a local rental store which "imported" (read: had burnt copies) of many foreign films - particularly Japanese cinema, so that's how I cut my teeth on the likes of Lady Snowblood, Lone Wolf and Cub, Battle Royale, and several anime which was very hard to find in wake of the early internet. Le Samourai was the logical conclusion to that phase, that film understood Bushido. Then I got into westerns and their eastern connection

I think I need to expand my Akira Kurosawa knowledge. I've only seen The Seven Samurai and Ran which I both consider top shelf
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Torgo » Thu Jul 23, 2020 1:52 pm

I've been using my free Disney+ subscription to catch up on Disney movies I've never seen like Treasure Planet. I went in cold: I have not read Robert Louis Stevenson's novel or watched any of its other adaptations. With that said, I found it to be a fun and visually splendid adventure with a story that succeeds as a classic pirate tale and as one about a little guidance going a long way. Stories about young people looking for direction and a parental figure are common - off the top of my head, I thought of Good Will Hunting, The Son from the same year and this year's The King of Staten Island - and it makes sense since they're among the most moving and emotionally affecting stories. This movie made me understand why Stevenson's book has stood the test of time because the father-son relationship between Long John Silver (Brian Murray) and Jim Hawkins (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) is among the most unique and compelling I've seen. It helps that Murray does such a good job and that the half-man, half-robot character is so creatively visualized. You could say the same about rest of the movie, which combines hand-drawn and digital animation to give it a distinctive look and feel that is a far cry from the lack of imagination found in Disney's recent live-action reboots. You must also give the movie credit for subverting the sensation that everything will be alright in the end typical of animated Disney movies by having the guts to not only kill characters but make them stay dead. Despite its ambition and creativity, the movie still very much fits the Disney mold, especially in its attempts to pander to children. The eccentricities of robotic B.E.N. (Martin Short), for instance, seem engineered to make the youngest members of the audience laugh, and while such attempts in other Disney movies have also made me laugh, it wasn't long until I was reaching for the mute button. Regardless, Treasure Planet left me wowed, moved, pleasantly surprised and with more evidence that a movie that disappointed at the box office is just as likely to do these things as a hit.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by topherH » Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:14 pm

Stu wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 3:05 am
Image
I find myself thinking about this part more and more when Airplane! gets discussed.
State of Siege |Gavras, 1972| +
Deadpool |Miller, 2016| +
Z |Gavras, 1969| -
The Confession |Gavras, 1970| +
Missing |Gavras, 1982| +
The Revenant |Inarritu, 2015| +
The Hateful Eight |Tarantino, 2015| +

+ Recommended
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by topherH » Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:16 pm

Wooley wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 6:47 am
movies that unlocked "cinema" for me.
This could be a good thread / discussion to have.
State of Siege |Gavras, 1972| +
Deadpool |Miller, 2016| +
Z |Gavras, 1969| -
The Confession |Gavras, 1970| +
Missing |Gavras, 1982| +
The Revenant |Inarritu, 2015| +
The Hateful Eight |Tarantino, 2015| +

+ Recommended
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Torgo » Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:27 pm

topherH wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:16 pm
This could be a good thread / discussion to have.
...or a heck of a Baker's Dozen Game topic.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Fri Jul 24, 2020 3:51 am

Magnum Force (1973) - B/B-

A fun idea, but I don't think the film quite frees Harry of the fundamental challenge of his character's fascism, except to contrive of a new group of even worse vigilante cops (unless the film is deliberately about having Harry compromise his principles by the end). That said, I responded to the imposing way the rogue cops were sometimes portrayed and shot, to the measured pacing of the film. The film weirdly carries some touches of James Bond, in that I now am starting to recognize the "formula" of a movie about Callahann; it involves vignettes that demonstrate and redemonstrate his precise ability to kill the right people, it involves women who find him irresistible, although sex is never consummated. It also involves the heel superior who exists to be wrong (and maybe even dirty?). That last touch suggests that this film is proto-Die-Hard. Harry Callahann, emerging from the shadows of noir and mystery, charging into the future of action movies on the back of a revving motorcycle.
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Wooley
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Fri Jul 24, 2020 5:45 pm

The Nameless Two wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 10:56 am
There ain't no girl in her 20s who knows what she wants, all I can say. In all of my protests those cursed babywitches literally put a waking hex on me for calling them out, yeah, *two fingers, eyes, right back at you threefold*

Le Samourai is, as Wooley mentioned succinctly, a real potent key for my cinematic locks. Really, it's between that and Tarkovsky's Solaris which sharpened my sword enough to clash with the lot of RT's General Discussion. Le Samourai worked for me because I was in a big Kill Bill Vol. 1 (13) phase and had a local rental store which "imported" (read: had burnt copies) of many foreign films - particularly Japanese cinema, so that's how I cut my teeth on the likes of Lady Snowblood, Lone Wolf and Cub, Battle Royale, and several anime which was very hard to find in wake of the early internet. Le Samourai was the logical conclusion to that phase, that film understood Bushido. Then I got into westerns and their eastern connection

I think I need to expand my Akira Kurosawa knowledge. I've only seen The Seven Samurai and Ran which I both consider top shelf
Well, I don't like women in their 20s for their depth and maturity. I like them because their bodies are gorgeous, they still bring that spark of youth that women (and probably some men too) seem to lose as they get older, and they don't want kids yet (at least where I live).

Yeah, there's a scene in Le Samourai that made me realize that Tarantino was drawing from a world of cinema I had yet to be exposed to. But the opening scene also just made me say, "Oh... it can be this."

I've been watching more and more Kurosawa and other Japanese period films lately and it's funny how for a genre that a lot of westerners think of as kinda silly, they are uniformly good and many great. I really liked Throne Of Blood and even though Rashomon can't totally escape feeling kinda dated, if you can take it on its own terms (putting your head in the time it was made instead of today), it's highly rewarding. Probably Yojimo is next for me.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Fri Jul 24, 2020 5:46 pm

topherH wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:16 pm
This could be a good thread / discussion to have.
Well, another was The Double Life Of Veronique.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Fri Jul 24, 2020 5:54 pm

As for Kurosawa, I've seen:

Ikiru
Rashomon
Sanjuro
Throne of Blood
Yojimbo

While I had my issues with Ikiru, I enjoyed all of these films and I consider most to be great films. I started a binge of his films some time ago, but stopped after three films for some reason. I should continue again.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by The Nameless Two » Fri Jul 24, 2020 5:59 pm

Wooley wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 5:45 pm
Well, I don't like women in their 20s for their depth and maturity. I like them because their bodies are gorgeous, they still bring that spark of youth that women (and probably some men too) seem to lose as they get older, and they don't want kids yet (at least where I live).
I don't disagree as I believe that depth and maturity are relative - I've always stuck to my age group and would prefer slightly older if possible just to have that inherent respect for my elder(s). I am one of those people who thinks that people age like wine, especially our generation of beauties. I know women from high school who haven't aged a day yet are so much more interesting. It's a fine balance, and I respect healthy living which pays off in dividends in terms of beauty and maturity. Chicken nuggets and fries once a month, maaaaybe :p

Thanks for the Kurosawa beginner's guide - easy for me to lose focus and I'm highly influenced by my surroundings. Criterion Channel is overwhelming, I mean, literal hundreds of fine Japanese works - and that isn't to say the other cultures I wish to explore
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by The Nameless Two » Fri Jul 24, 2020 6:18 pm

I'm going to start out a new journey with The Samurai trilogy as that's long been an RT favorite
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Fri Jul 24, 2020 8:31 pm

The Nameless Two wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 6:18 pm
I'm going to start out a new journey with The Samurai trilogy as that's long been an RT favorite
When this last came up, I felt as though I were the sole devout defender of Inagaki's trilogy. Each entry builds excellently, it has one of the best romantic dramas in Japanese film, and the titular duels of 2&3 are among the very best.

Fun fact: This is actually Inagaki remaking his own trilogy as he's previously made the films during wartime and the originals have since been lost.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by The Nameless Two » Fri Jul 24, 2020 8:39 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 8:31 pm
Fun fact: This is actually Inagaki remaking his own trilogy as he's previously made the films during wartime and the originals have since been lost.
Wow, this made me blush, what an attractive notion. I know some directors remake their films, especially for an NA audience... but this is awesome

Hmmmmmmm
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:07 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:02 am

On a very similar note, I rewatched Airplane, Stir Crazy and the Naked Gun. All 3 tickled me greatly. Did y'all know Sidney Poitier directed Stir Crazy? That's... Crazy.
I like Stir Crazy but I've never found it terribly funny, and I think Naked Gun is funny but I have never liked it terribly much. But Airplane is the distillation of perfect comedy for me. Good jokes become better in contrast because they are surrounded by so many deliriously bad jokes, and bad jokes become funny because the whole film eventually overwhelms you with it's never ending stream of anything to make you laugh. But the real key to the film is that it looks and operates almost exactly as a real Airport film. It isn't just making jokes at the expense of this subgenre from a distance, but actually has done it's homework to basically become one. It tears down those flimsy walls from the inside instead of just cynically smirking from the sidelines like a Scary Movie.

Its the best
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:27 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:07 pm
But the real key to the film is that it looks and operates almost exactly as a real Airport film. It isn't just making jokes at the expense of this subgenre from a distance, but actually has done it's homework to basically become one. It tears down those flimsy walls from the inside instead of just cynically smirking from the sidelines like a Scary Movie.

Its the best
Have you seen Zero Hour! It's almost a surreal experience to watch. Here's the trailer.

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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:35 pm

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:27 pm
Have you seen Zero Hour! It's almost a surreal experience to watch. Here's the trailer.

No, but I would!
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Rock » Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:47 pm

The Nameless Two wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 6:18 pm
I'm going to start out a new journey with The Samurai trilogy as that's long been an RT favorite
While I am not as big a fan of the series as MKS is, I will recommend sticking through it even if the first installment doesn't do much for you. If I recall correctly, the first one does a lot in terms of laying the groundwork but the juicier bits are mostly in the other films.
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DaMU
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:52 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:07 pm
I like Stir Crazy but I've never found it terribly funny, and I think Naked Gun is funny but I have never liked it terribly much. But Airplane is the distillation of perfect comedy for me. Good jokes become better in contrast because they are surrounded by so many deliriously bad jokes, and bad jokes become funny because the whole film eventually overwhelms you with it's never ending stream of anything to make you laugh. But the real key to the film is that it looks and operates almost exactly as a real Airport film. It isn't just making jokes at the expense of this subgenre from a distance, but actually has done it's homework to basically become one. It tears down those flimsy walls from the inside instead of just cynically smirking from the sidelines like a Scary Movie.

Its the best
Speaking to how it operates exactly like one of the films it lampoons, the creative team was so goddamn smart to stack the cast with veteran dramatic character actors like Nielsen, Bridges, and Stack-- Hays and Hagerty similarly do a good job of (almost) never playing to the joke. That's something that I think gets lost in so many subsequent spoof movies. The second anyone knows it's a spoof, the comedic balance gets lost, and it turns into unfunny mugging. Underplay! You have to trust the material, because the incongruence gets the laugh, not the line itself. (Johnny is the only exception, but even then his biggest laughs come from pitting him directly against the dead-serious actors.)
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The above-written is wholly and solely the perspective of DaMU and should not be taken as an effort to rile, malign, or diminish you, dummo.
ThatDarnMKS
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Fri Jul 24, 2020 10:22 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:07 pm
I like Stir Crazy but I've never found it terribly funny, and I think Naked Gun is funny but I have never liked it terribly much. But Airplane is the distillation of perfect comedy for me. Good jokes become better in contrast because they are surrounded by so many deliriously bad jokes, and bad jokes become funny because the whole film eventually overwhelms you with it's never ending stream of anything to make you laugh. But the real key to the film is that it looks and operates almost exactly as a real Airport film. It isn't just making jokes at the expense of this subgenre from a distance, but actually has done it's homework to basically become one. It tears down those flimsy walls from the inside instead of just cynically smirking from the sidelines like a Scary Movie.

Its the best
Both Airplane and Naked Gun gave me giggle fits of comparable proportions. They're the right brand of stupid humor that, as you pointed out, rightfully understands what it's lampooning, something that gradually fades with their sequels, though I would put the 2 following NG films above Airplane 2.

I liked Stir Crazy more than I thought it was funny. Charming is more accurate. I followed that with See No Evil, Hear No Evil, which I would say is now among my favorite comedies and the superior Wilder/Prior collaboration, and the Toy, which was mind bogglingly, baffling in its ill advised, constant racism. I kept expecting them to actually address those issues but they just casually dismiss them at the end.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Fri Jul 24, 2020 10:24 pm

Rock wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:47 pm
While I am not as big a fan of the series as MKS is, I will recommend sticking through it even if the first installment doesn't do much for you. If I recall correctly, the first one does a lot in terms of laying the groundwork but the juicier bits are mostly in the other films.
Even as a big fan, I agree with this. The first film is essentially the set up for the trilogy and very little else. I would have been underwhelmed had it been a solo flick but I immediately followed it up with the sequels and they paid off.
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The Nameless Two
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by The Nameless Two » Fri Jul 24, 2020 10:35 pm

All of this Airplane and Naked Gun talk... I'm all about Top Secret!
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Torgo » Fri Jul 24, 2020 10:38 pm

Last Great Movie Seen
Have a Nice Day (Liu, 2017)
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sat Jul 25, 2020 7:03 am

Ordered a DVD for Top Secret. I always used to get this confused with Spy Hard, and while I KNOW I saw SH as a kid, I'm not sure if I ever actually watched TS.

Also, all the chanbara talk made me finally crack open my copy of Okamoto's Kill!

It's a wonderful, fun and oddly subversive and comical film that feels like Okamoto's take or Yojimbo (much of the cast is from that film and it tells a similar story to both it and Sanjuro). Nakadai of course adds his own spin on the unassuming ronin brought into the fold of intrigue and betrayal.

It's extremely fitting that Okamoto would later be tapped to direct the unofficial 3rd Yojimbo film, Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo. This could be considered his audition.
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Macrology
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Sat Jul 25, 2020 7:06 am

I recall Kill! being my favorite film in that samurai set Criterion put out ages ago. I should revisit some of those films.

In general, Okamoto is great. I'm hoping to start up my Samurai Movie Night again soon, and Sword of Doom is high on the list (along with Three Outlaw Samurai, Bloody Spear on Mt. Fuji, and Criterion's Godzilla set - granted, not chanbara, but we've opened the formula up over time).
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sat Jul 25, 2020 8:17 am

Macrology wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 7:06 am
I recall Kill! being my favorite film in that samurai set Criterion put out ages ago. I should revisit some of those films.

In general, Okamoto is great. I'm hoping to start up my Samurai Movie Night again soon, and Sword of Doom is high on the list (along with Three Outlaw Samurai, Bloody Spear on Mt. Fuji, and Criterion's Godzilla set - granted, not chanbara, but we've opened the formula up over time).
I've yet to watch Samurai Spy, but Samurai Rebellion is my favorite of the Rebel Samurai Set. I want to track down more from Kobayashi, Okamoto and Gosha soon. Might pick up an Eclipse set or two before the sale ends.

Sword of Doom (along with Harakiri) is probably my favorite non-Kurosawa chanbara and by far the most intense performance from Nakadai that I've seen. Three Outlaw Samurai is groovy too (as is its remake The Magnificent Trio). I own but haven't watched Bloody Spear at Mt. Fuji yet.

I could see myself rewatching the Godzilla films soon. I've not seen the Showa films, outside of the first, in HD before and haven't seen Son of Godzilla since childhood. I just wish my wife were interested in them at all. It would make pulling off the rewatch much easier given that I'm distancing from any friends that would want to partake.
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Rock
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Rock » Sat Jul 25, 2020 10:29 am

I remember enjoying Kill! quite a bit and being a bit underwhelmed by Samurai Rebellion, but it's been too long to go into specifics.

Re: ZAZ and Airplane!'s respect for the source material, there's an extended Enter the Dragon parody sequence in the middle of The Kentucky Fried Movie that's not particularly funny in terms of actual gags but has that same studious appreciation of its inspirations.
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Ergill
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Ergill » Sat Jul 25, 2020 4:09 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 7:03 am
Also, all the chanbara talk made me finally crack open my copy of Okamoto's Kill!

It's a wonderful, fun and oddly subversive and comical film that feels like Okamoto's take or Yojimbo (much of the cast is from that film and it tells a similar story to both it and Sanjuro). Nakadai of course adds his own spin on the unassuming ronin brought into the fold of intrigue and betrayal.
Kill! and Sanjuro were inspired by the same book. I can easily go back and forth between which one I favor. So good.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Sat Jul 25, 2020 4:32 pm

Patrick McGroin wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:27 pm
Have you seen Zero Hour! It's almost a surreal experience to watch. Here's the trailer.

Yeah, i don't think one has really fully appreciated Airplane! until one sees Zero Hour.
Me and my ex-wife saw it by accident on TCM one night probably 12-13 years ago, just cause I had left the TV on and we walked in and were like... "What the actual fuck...?!!!"

I would kinda say the same thing about Young Frankenstein and Son Of Frankenstein. I don't know if one's sense of the former is totally complete until one has seen the latter.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sat Jul 25, 2020 7:43 pm

Ergill wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 4:09 pm
Kill! and Sanjuro were inspired by the same book. I can easily go back and forth between which one I favor. So good.
Looked into this a bit. Both are based on stories but Shuguro Yamamoto, but Kill! Is based on 17 Days at Fort Mountain while Sanjuro is based on Peaceful Days. Explains why they have a ton of similarities but also some strong differences in the specifics of intrigue. Thanks for the info!
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The Nameless Two
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by The Nameless Two » Sun Jul 26, 2020 12:40 am

I can't focus on shit that I want to do so I need to watch something which I need to watch again in spirit of my endeavor. Inland Empire. My thoughts will follow afterwards, my memory holds it as the single scariest movie I have ever seen
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Sun Jul 26, 2020 3:13 am

I was rewatching Enter the Dragon when news broke that John Saxon died. Ominous timing that dampened my excitement for the rest of the viewing. Still fun but that 2020 irony of exclaiming "he's the only one of the main 3 characters that's still alive" immediately before catching the news on my feed was just too much.

Gonna have to be careful with what I watch next.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by The Nameless Two » Sun Jul 26, 2020 3:32 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Sun Jul 26, 2020 3:13 am
I was rewatching Enter the Dragon when news broke that John Saxon died. Ominous timing that dampened my excitement for the rest of the viewing. Still fun but that 2020 irony of exclaiming "he's the only one of the main 3 characters that's still alive" immediately before catching the news on my fun was just too much.

Gonna have to be careful with what I watch next.
*nods* I'm afraid of what happened to Joel Schumacher after my praise
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DaMU
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sun Jul 26, 2020 4:06 am

The Enforcer (1976) - B-

Unembarrassing threequel that strikes oil by setting Clint Eastwood against Tyne Daly's gumption-filled sidekick but never ignites all that much with its Symbionese Liberation Army riff (they make this feel a little too much like an episode in a TV procedural instead of a bespoke, exciting film). Scorpio carried more menace, and the cops in Magnum Force felt more confident and lethal. But again, that relationship with Daly (who's well-cast, plausibly naive without feeling incapable) saves the day. Supposedly Eastwood was concerned that this third film wouldn't have enough action for fans of the series. I'd argue just a day on the beat with the two of them, free of the obligatory plot, would've been just fine.
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The above-written is wholly and solely the perspective of DaMU and should not be taken as an effort to rile, malign, or diminish you, dummo.
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