The Video Game Thread

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Torgo
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Torgo » Thu Apr 09, 2020 1:05 am

I'm playing Deus Ex, which probably my favorite game all time, for the umpteenth time to stay sane while quarantined. The part about the pandemic and the government withholding supplies is oddly prescient.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Wooley » Thu Apr 09, 2020 3:11 am

Torgo wrote:
Thu Apr 09, 2020 1:05 am
I'm playing Deus Ex, which probably my favorite game all time, for the umpteenth time to stay sane while quarantined. The part about the pandemic and the government withholding supplies is oddly prescient.
Ha! That's cool. I've only played Mankind Divided, which was fun if not great.
I've been thinking some about art/media that I've consumed that reminds me of our current situation and the one that sticks with me because it's almost vague in its relation but also right on the fucking nose is the novel 'Salem's Lot.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Thu Apr 09, 2020 3:46 am

Torgo wrote:
Thu Apr 09, 2020 1:05 am
I'm playing Deus Ex, which probably my favorite game all time, for the umpteenth time to stay sane while quarantined. The part about the pandemic and the government withholding supplies is oddly prescient.
I'm in the middle of it as well. While it took me some time to get used to a couple controls, after I adjusted to them, I found it to be as great as any game I've ever played. There's so many ways to play through the individual missions and I'm sure I'll continue to find new ways to play it with future playthroughs. Looking forward to playing it again over the summer.

On a side note, if you have it on Steam, do you know how to increase the brightness? For some reason, the option to adjust it isn't working for me and apparently a couple other people noticed a similar thing.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Torgo » Thu Apr 09, 2020 1:27 pm

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Thu Apr 09, 2020 3:46 am
I'm in the middle of it as well. While it took me some time to get used to a couple controls, after I adjusted to them, I found it to be as great as any game I've ever played. There's so many ways to play through the individual missions and I'm sure I'll continue to find new ways to play it with future playthroughs. Looking forward to playing it again over the summer.

On a side note, if you have it on Steam, do you know how to increase the brightness? For some reason, the option to adjust it isn't working for me and apparently a couple other people noticed a similar thing.
Glad you like it! The freedom of choice the game gives you and the way it respects your intelligence are probably why I keep coming back. I love how you can play as a gun-blazing maniac or as someone who uses stealth, finds secret paths and only uses non-lethal weapons (tranquilizer darts, the baton, the cattle prod, etc.) The game's creator, Warren Spector, claims you can finish the game without attacking anyone, but I'm not sure if that is possible.

I've had the same problem with brightness. I went to Settings -> Display -> Brightness and went to the highest setting, but it doesn't seem to make much of a difference. You have the vision enhancement you trigger with F12, but I don't think you're supposed to use it all the time! I found this Steam discussion about the issue, but I haven't tried the solution yet.

The main issue I've had is slowness. If you're having the same problem, go to this Steam discussion and open the Deus Ex Modern Setup guide. I've only played a little bit after following the instructions, but it seems to work.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Torgo » Thu Apr 09, 2020 1:35 pm

Wooley wrote:
Thu Apr 09, 2020 3:11 am
Ha! That's cool. I've only played Mankind Divided, which was fun if not great.
I've been thinking some about art/media that I've consumed that reminds me of our current situation and the one that sticks with me because it's almost vague in its relation but also right on the fucking nose is the novel 'Salem's Lot.
Salem's Lot? That's crazy, I just bought that book and plan on reading it when I finish my current book! I got it simply because I like Stephen King, vampires and season 2 of Castle Rock. I had no idea it has any similarities to do with the current state of the world.
You should definitely check out the original game, especially since you're an FPS guy. It's only 7 bucks on GOG and Steam.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Wooley » Thu Apr 09, 2020 3:18 pm

Torgo wrote:
Thu Apr 09, 2020 1:35 pm
Salem's Lot? That's crazy, I just bought that book and plan on reading it when I finish my current book! I got it simply because I like Stephen King, vampires and season 2 of Castle Rock. I had no idea it has any similarities to do with the current state of the world.
You should definitely check out the original game, especially since you're an FPS guy. It's only 7 bucks on GOG and Steam.
Well, I will not tell you what the big similarity is, because that would be a huge spoiler for what makes the book kinda transcend in the end, especially written in the mid-70s, but you'll know it when it's over.
Wait, a 'Salem's Lot game? Is it still playable?
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Torgo » Thu Apr 09, 2020 4:17 pm

Uh, I was discussing this game. Honest!

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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Thu Apr 09, 2020 4:37 pm

Torgo wrote:
Thu Apr 09, 2020 1:27 pm
Glad you like it! The freedom of choice the game gives you and the way it respects your intelligence are probably why I keep coming back. I love how you can play as a gun-blazing maniac or as someone who uses stealth, finds secret paths and only uses non-lethal weapons (tranquilizer darts, the baton, the cattle prod, etc.) The game's creator, Warren Spector, claims you can finish the game without attacking anyone, but I'm not sure if that is possible.

I've had the same problem with brightness. I went to Settings -> Display -> Brightness and went to the highest setting, but it doesn't seem to make much of a difference. You have the vision enhancement you trigger with F12, but I don't think you're supposed to use it all the time! I found this Steam discussion about the issue, but I haven't tried the solution yet.

The main issue I've had is slowness. If you're having the same problem, go to this Steam discussion and open the Deus Ex Modern Setup guide. I've only played a little bit after following the instructions, but it seems to work.
I didn't have an issue with slowness, but the brightness fix worked. Thanks.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Deschain13 » Thu Apr 09, 2020 7:34 pm

Beat Resident Evil 3 remake twice in a row.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Stu » Fri Apr 10, 2020 6:33 am

Deschain13 wrote:
Thu Apr 09, 2020 7:34 pm
Beat Resident Evil 3 remake twice in a row.
What'd you think of it? Better/worse than the original, or neither?
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Deschain13 » Fri Apr 10, 2020 3:05 pm

Stu wrote:
Fri Apr 10, 2020 6:33 am
What'd you think of it? Better/worse than the original, or neither?
It’s funny, the way the original 2 and 3 are compared is pretty similar to how the remakes compare. It’s shorter, faster paced and less horror. It’s more of a ride. The original 3 feels like it had more to it than this one and Nemesis was more of a threat. But this game is so easy to pick up and play I feel like I’m gonna run through it a few more times before I get sick of it.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by DaMU » Sat Apr 11, 2020 3:32 pm

The nostalgia gaming continues in the age of the covid.

Super Return of the Jedi (SNES, 1994) - Technical qualities still hold up as an example of pushing what 16-bit can do. The Death Star II run, the hero sprite animation, the Williams score (as much of it as the chip can handle). Nice touch: the ability to choose between heroes, with each having their strengths and weaknesses (Luke needs to be close to enemies but can force heal; Han has distance advantages with his laser and grenades). But the actual gameplay is shockingly poor. The designers laid out the platforms and the enemies with no grasp of level design / player reward. Just double-hop double-hop double-hop until the end-stage boss. There's also none of the weight or friction you get with good platformers. Disappointing return.

Yoshi's Island (SNES, 1995) - Maybe I'm so bummed by SRotJ because this game is just as good and probably better than it was back in '95. Every jump height, every puzzle, every distribution of enemies is handled with care and attention. More variety in the music would be nice, and the Baby Mario whine is still too much by half, but those are the only complaints.

Also played a lot of games for about ten minutes and thought, "Oh yeah, I remember this," having a good feeling, and turning them off. The first two Ninja Turtles games for NES, Tony Hawk 3 for PSX, Donkey Kong Land for GB, Aladdin for Genesis. Bart vs. The Space Mutants on NES is fucking awful; when I was a kid, I thought I was a bad player, but nope, the game blows.

Funnily, even with all these video games on my CPU, I don't feel like a gamer anymore, since this has comprised maybe three or four hours of my time in the last week, max.
NOTE:
The above-written is wholly and solely the perspective of DaMU and should not be taken as an effort to rile, malign, or diminish you, dummo.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Kenji » Sun Apr 12, 2020 4:56 am

So, this last summer I went to Galloping Ghost Arcade in Brookfield, Illinois. I believe that it holds the record for most arcade games at 700+. It was... overwhelming to say the least. I think I spent half my time there just wandering around, not sure what to play. I think part of the magic of going to a new arcade is not knowing what to expect, whereas Galloping Ghost has just about every arcade game I could possibly think of.

Image

Still, it was a neat experience. I spent the most time in the golden age section. Speaking of which, here's some write-ups for my top 10 golden age arcade games.

Worth mentioning: Missile Command, Defender. Need to spend more time with those two.

10.

Qix

Qix is a game that won't leave me. It's harsh and shrill sounds pierce my brain, especially the weird, unrelenting static noise of the Qix itself. It strikes a very different tone than many of the other colorful and cheery games on this list. Similar to the classic freeware game Jezzball, the goal of Qix is to claim parts of the playing field as your own by drawing lines. It's not about destroying your enemy but rather gleefully trapping them in any way you can. Since I’m not very good at trapping anything, I spend much of my time nervously eyeing the Qix and hoping that I make it to the other side. The Qix is the most wild and unpredictable enemy on this list, its sudden movements mocking me everywhere I go.

9.

Berzerk

I didn’t get that much out of Berzerk at first. How much time do I want to spend with a slower, far less eye-catching version Robotron 2084? It was only when I played it at Galloping Ghost Arcade with my dad did I start to understand its appeal. The robots chattering and talking shit about the player adds quite a bit to the experience. I especially like it when they call you a chicken or tell you on the High Score screen that they sense a quarter in your pocket. Berserk is often thought of as an early horror game thanks to the smiley faced demon known as Evil Otto who chases the player if they dawdle too much, but the chatter keeps things lighthearted. Although the game is indeed slow compared to Robotron, it still requires quick thinking and godly reflexes to get very far. As is the case with many of the games on this list, I’m absolutely shit at it.

8.

Pooyan

Pooyan is just so adorable. You play as a mama pig trying to save her babies from a vicious pack of wolves. In order to stop them, she has to pop their balloons with a bow and arrow that I assume she made herself. She can also pick up a Heavy Shot at the top of her pulley system that can be thrown at an arc in order to take out multiple wolves with one shot. There’s an element of strategy where you have to decide whether or not to risk going for the Heavy Shot, and you usually have a split second to make this decision. Pooyan has perhaps the easiest beginning of any game on this list, so its fairly high difficulty sneaks up on you. And even though I called this the cutest game on the list, it does have the most uncomfortable sound in any of these games: the howl of the wolves as they add one more member to their rank at the top. It’s a nice little touch that adds to the growing pressure.

7.

Joust

The NES version of Joust was actually the final game that my family bought for the system. We purchased it at a video rental store for a cheap price. Looking back, I’m surprised that it held our attention as well as it did. This had to have been well into the 16-bit era, and we were sitting there playing an NES port of a golden age arcade game that has awkward and slippery controls. Maybe I was captivated by how different it was compared to all of the maze games and shooters that I associated with the golden age. I also loved the names of your foes: Bounder, Hunter, and Shadow Lord. The pterodactyl that darts across the screen when you spend too much time on a stage reminds me of Evil Otto from Berzerk, but the pterodactyl is cooler because it poses more of a threat (at least early on). The most quietly intense part of the game is when I’m standing in the middle of a swarm of enemies, too afraid to make my next move.

6.

Gyruss

Gyruss is best described as your classic arcade shoot ‘em up in tube form. It’s a nice unique spin on a genre that was ubiquitous back in the day. It has some of the best music of the entire era; it’s hard to believe that it’s coming out of a game from 1983. I like how this game gives off the illusion of traveling through space at light speed with its fast paced action that never lets up and a journey that sees you flying from plane to planet. The NES version Gyruss is actually quite different and is more of sequel than a straight port. It’s also a good game but doesn’t match the speed and smooth action of the arcade version.

5.

Time Pilot

The joy of the open skies. The freedom to maneuver your aircraft wherever you want. The surprisingly gentle sound of your aircraft firing its guns. Time Pilot is the most relaxing game on this list, if ever a golden age arcade game could be called relaxing. There are many moments when I’m just flying off into the unknown until I’m ready for more, and then I decide to turn ninety degrees and slam right into an oncoming plane or bullet. I almost never see my many, many deaths coming until it’s too late. If there’s any game on this list that lulls you into a false sense of security before blindsiding you, it’s Time Pilot. The most calming game on this list always ends so violently, so unexpectedly.

4.

Ms. Pac-Man

I wrote that Time Pilot is the most relaxing game on this list, but Ms. Pac-Man is a close second. It helps that I can actually get somewhere in it. I’m always fluctuating between feelings of panic and relief when playing these classic arcade games, but that feeling of relief always lasts a bit longer in Ms. Pac-Man. There are moments when I know that I’m in the clear, however brief they may be. This feeling never seems to dissipate even as I get to the harder levels, which isn’t something I can say for many of the others games on this list. Then there are those moments when a ghost seems to grant mercy on me and heads in the opposite direction of what makes sense. I’m not sure why this happens. How one tricks a ghost is mostly a mystery to me, but I can still feel it when it happens. I could look up a video on YouTube where someone explains step by step how to trick them, but I think I’ll refrain and keep the mystery alive.

3.

Robotron 2084


In the previous entry, I wrote about how Ms. Pac-Man has these moments of calm when I feel relatively safe for a few brief seconds. That does not happen in Robotron. It is not a game that allows me to feel safe. Ever. Even when every foe is charging at me in the same direction and not on all sides, that feeling of being overwhelmed doesn’t go away. There has to be a stray projectile coming my way that I neglected. I’m just delaying the inevitable. This is the most hectic game on the list by far, and this manic intensity even extends to the explosive screen transition between levels. I think the furthest I’ve gotten is the level that introduces the colorful tank enemies, but it’s always just a quick glimpse before I’m back at the title screen for another go. Hopefully one day I’ll beat the tanks and catch a glimpse of the other side.

2.

BurgerTime

BurgerTime came very close to taking the top spot. I love that they came up with such a goofy concept – making burgers by stepping on them – and just went with it. It’s a maze game of sorts, but it one-ups even the greatness that is Ms. Pac-Man in three keys ways. One, it gives you more opportunities to dispatch your foes. You can send a burger ingredient down on top of them, drop an ingredient to a lower level while they’re standing on it, or stun them temporarily by spraying them with pepper. The Power Pellets in Ms. Pac-Man are certainly useful to the player in getting out of a jam, but I like that I can use the pepper wherever I want (assuming I have some). The pepper appearing onscreen only for a few seconds also adds a nice little risk/reward element. Another way that BurgerTime is better than Ms. Pac-Man is that it has more varied levels. The mazes in Ms. Pac-Man do change but not enough to drastically alter the playing field. By contrast, each board in BurgerTime is fairly different, especially in how much room they give you to outplay your foes. Lastly, the enemies of BurgerTime have just a little more personality. I adore the simple but iconic design of Blinky, Pinky, Inky, and Sue, but the wiggling hot dogs, prancing eggs, and somersaulting pickles have more character. I especially love it when they all start marching together in a big food hive mind out to murder me.

1.

Galaga

Ever since I first played it at a small arcade many, many years ago, I’ve thought that Galaga was something special. There are just so many things to love about it: the oddly hopeful little jingle playing against the starry expanse when you start up a game; the colorful insectoids swirling around at ever increasing speeds; the different noises that enemies make when they are killed, which I only just noticed recently; the Challenging stages that offer a nice little breather and offer a way to test out your accuracy without the fear of death; the act of wiping out numerous alien foes before they can even take their place at the top of the screen; the disappointment felt when your last ship explodes and then… silence. The perfect arcade shooter. The best game of the golden age.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Wooley » Sun Apr 12, 2020 8:42 am

Kenji wrote:
Sun Apr 12, 2020 4:56 am


Image


9.

Berzerk

I didn’t get that much out of Berzerk at first. How much time do I want to spend with a slower, far less eye-catching version Robotron 2084? It was only when I played it at Galloping Ghost Arcade with my dad did I start to understand its appeal. The robots chattering and talking shit about the player adds quite a bit to the experience. I especially like it when they call you a chicken or tell you on the High Score screen that they sense a quarter in your pocket. Berserk is often thought of as an early horror game thanks to the smiley faced demon known as Evil Otto who chases the player if they dawdle too much, but the chatter keeps things lighthearted. Although the game is indeed slow compared to Robotron, it still requires quick thinking and godly reflexes to get very far. As is the case with many of the games on this list, I’m absolutely shit at it.
I would list Berzerk among my favorite games Of All Time.

I also used to enjoy Time Pilot a good bit.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Stu » Wed Apr 15, 2020 7:34 am

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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Wooley » Wed Apr 15, 2020 7:16 pm

An interesting read.
I have no dog in this fight, really, as there aren't that many older games that I loved that have been remade, but it's a conversation for sure.
I have certainly been very happy with the re-masters that I have played and look forward to more.
For example, I went back and replayed Infamous II not that long ago and, after some work of getting used to the older mechanics and graphics, I was able to thoroughly enjoy it. This was not so for the original, as I really wanted to play Infamous but for me it was just unplayable or not worth the effort due to the technology gap between now and then. Sad because I really loved that game. If someone would remaster it, I would be very happy.
The line would seem to be somewhere in the 2009-2011 range right now for me. For example, Arkham Asylum felt like it could be a brand-new game to me just a few months ago. But Amnesia: The Dark Descent, the following year, was just too dated in every way for me to appreciate.
Meanwhile, the PS4 remaster of The Last Of Us was a real pleasure and just what the doctor ordered (up until the game isn't, for me).
I am very happy to have an older game cleaned and sharpened up for me. Would I be as happy with a remake of a beloved favorite like Bioshock or Dishonored? Maybe not.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Wed Apr 15, 2020 8:31 pm

Speaking as someone who didn't care much about video games up until a couple years ago, I'd be happy to see a bunch of classic games remade so I could get a chance to play them. I don't own any old gaming consoles, and it's unlikely I'll be able to get any in the future. So, if remaking them would give me a chance to play them, I see no reason to complain.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Wed Apr 15, 2020 8:32 pm

Wooley wrote:
Wed Apr 15, 2020 7:16 pm
For example, Arkham Asylum felt like it could be a brand-new game to me just a few months ago.
Did you play Arkham City? I think it's slightly better.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Wooley » Wed Apr 15, 2020 8:53 pm

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Wed Apr 15, 2020 8:32 pm
Did you play Arkham City? I think it's slightly better.
I've played both. Me, I like Asylum a LOT better. But I know there are differing views on the subject.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Wed Apr 15, 2020 9:12 pm

Wooley wrote:
Wed Apr 15, 2020 8:53 pm
I've played both. Me, I like Asylum a LOT better. But I know there are differing views on the subject.
I think I'd give the edge to City since the story is slightly better, the locations for the various chapters are much more interesting (I'd have some difficulty thinking of locations in Asylum which stood out), and since there's more variety in the boss fights in terms of how to beat them as, in the original game, most of them could be beaten in a similar way by throwing a Batarang at them and moving out of the way as they charge you. Both are great though.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Wooley » Wed Apr 15, 2020 10:13 pm

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Wed Apr 15, 2020 9:12 pm
I think I'd give the edge to City since the story is slightly better, the locations for the various chapters are much more interesting (I'd have some difficulty thinking of locations in Asylum which stood out), and since there's more variety in the boss fights in terms of how to beat them as, in the original game, most of them could be beaten in a similar way by throwing a Batarang at them and moving out of the way as they charge you. Both are great though.
So, I'm gonna surprise you, I guess, and say that I would say the exact opposite of everything you've said.
I thought the story was better in Asylum. It was so much about Batman as a detective, trapped in a place without all his toys and tricks (to begin with), seemingly totally at the mercy of his greatest adversary and searching for clues, exploring, stealthing, and of course, the introduction of the most famous combat-system in recent console history, in order to figure out just what The Joker's game was and how to stop it. All these major villains played an important role and even some minor ones were hidden in Easter Eggs all through the game.
I definitely think the locations are better in Asylum, in fact, I think Asylum had one of the best "worlds" I've ever played in. Each building on the campus was its own world with its own personality and in most cases had many different unique areas to explore and get through. Even after I finished Asylum I spent a long time running around finishing any leftover Riddler puzzles just so I could keep re-exploring that amazing place. In fact, if we were doing a list of the best "worlds" in the history of games, I would submit Arkham Asylum needs to be on that list. Conversely, I honestly can't remember any of the locations in Arkham City.
The boss fights may have been better in City, I don't know, I actually don't really care for boss-fights that much as I think they stall good games. But I would also say that City had the luxury of being the sequel and building on the mechanics of Asylum while Asylum was inventing all of this.
Ultimately, I'm not gonna lie to you, I thought City was a flabbier, more bloated, more-complicated-than-necessary sequel to a truly great game. When I recently replayed Arkham Asylum, ten years after I first played it, I was blown away. I called friends and said, "You've gotta replay this, you won't believe how well it holds up." And yet, I had no desire to replay City. In fact, I never played any more of the Arkham games because I figured that, like City, it would just be more bloat added to something that had been great. And if what I hear about the Batmobile stuff in one of the later ones was true, I was totally right.
But, again, I get that tastes are different.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Thu Apr 16, 2020 12:18 am

Wooley wrote:
Wed Apr 15, 2020 10:13 pm
So, I'm gonna surprise you, I guess, and say that I would say the exact opposite of everything you've said.
I thought the story was better in Asylum. It was so much about Batman as a detective, trapped in a place without all his toys and tricks (to begin with), seemingly totally at the mercy of his greatest adversary and searching for clues, exploring, stealthing, and of course, the introduction of the most famous combat-system in recent console history, in order to figure out just what The Joker's game was and how to stop it. All these major villains played an important role and even some minor ones were hidden in Easter Eggs all through the game.
I definitely think the locations are better in Asylum, in fact, I think Asylum had one of the best "worlds" I've ever played in. Each building on the campus was its own world with its own personality and in most cases had many different unique areas to explore and get through. Even after I finished Asylum I spent a long time running around finishing any leftover Riddler puzzles just so I could keep re-exploring that amazing place. In fact, if we were doing a list of the best "worlds" in the history of games, I would submit Arkham Asylum needs to be on that list. Conversely, I honestly can't remember any of the locations in Arkham City.
The boss fights may have been better in City, I don't know, I actually don't really care for boss-fights that much as I think they stall good games. But I would also say that City had the luxury of being the sequel and building on the mechanics of Asylum while Asylum was inventing all of this.
Ultimately, I'm not gonna lie to you, I thought City was a flabbier, more bloated, more-complicated-than-necessary sequel to a truly great game. When I recently replayed Arkham Asylum, ten years after I first played it, I was blown away. I called friends and said, "You've gotta replay this, you won't believe how well it holds up." And yet, I had no desire to replay City. In fact, I never played any more of the Arkham games because I figured that, like City, it would just be more bloat added to something that had been great. And if what I hear about the Batmobile stuff in one of the later ones was true, I was totally right.
But, again, I get that tastes are different.
Though I felt the opposite, I respect your opinion. If I were to summarize my thoughts on the two games though, I'd say that Asylum does the leg work in inventing the mechanics while City perfects upon whatever minor issues there were with them. I definitely found its story to be more interesting with a far stronger emotional payoff for certain characters throughout the game, in the final act, and the ending, one which I didn't feel with Asylum. As for the locations, I suppose it just comes down a matter of taste, but I found the environments in City to feel slightly more lived-in in terms of their design with a few standout locations, stuff I didn't feel with the first game. Like you, I also don't care for boss fights and I've both given up and almost gave up on a few games due to not being able to get past them, but I think the ones in City had just the right balance in terms of difficulty and excitement that they didn't take me out of the game, even when broke the flow of it such as the Mr. Freeze fight which was a blast to play through. I didn't mind the detour in that game as much as I did in Asylum. I haven't played the sequels as well. I heard they decline in quality past City, so I'll probably just stick with these two.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Deschain13 » Thu Apr 16, 2020 2:15 am

I think I prefer Asylum because I like Batman trapped in a smaller space. City is still so great though.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Wooley » Thu Apr 16, 2020 3:16 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 12:18 am
Though I felt the opposite, I respect your opinion. If I were to summarize my thoughts on the two games though, I'd say that Asylum does the leg work in inventing the mechanics while City perfects upon whatever minor issues there were with them. I definitely found its story to be more interesting with a far stronger emotional payoff for certain characters throughout the game, in the final act, and the ending, one which I didn't feel with Asylum. As for the locations, I suppose it just comes down a matter of taste, but I found the environments in City to feel slightly more lived-in in terms of their design with a few standout locations, stuff I didn't feel with the first game. Like you, I also don't care for boss fights and I've both given up and almost gave up on a few games due to not being able to get past them, but I think the ones in City had just the right balance in terms of difficulty and excitement that they didn't take me out of the game, even when broke the flow of it such as the Mr. Freeze fight which was a blast to play through. I didn't mind the detour in that game as much as I did in Asylum. I haven't played the sequels as well. I heard they decline in quality past City, so I'll probably just stick with these two.
I'll telly ya one thing about City that drove me absolutely out of my mind: the fucking remote-controlled Batarang. Fuck that fucking thing and how much it made me want to destroy my Playstation.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Wooley » Thu Apr 16, 2020 3:18 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 12:18 am
Though I felt the opposite, I respect your opinion. If I were to summarize my thoughts on the two games though, I'd say that Asylum does the leg work in inventing the mechanics while City perfects upon whatever minor issues there were with them. I definitely found its story to be more interesting with a far stronger emotional payoff for certain characters throughout the game, in the final act, and the ending, one which I didn't feel with Asylum. As for the locations, I suppose it just comes down a matter of taste, but I found the environments in City to feel slightly more lived-in in terms of their design with a few standout locations, stuff I didn't feel with the first game. Like you, I also don't care for boss fights and I've both given up and almost gave up on a few games due to not being able to get past them, but I think the ones in City had just the right balance in terms of difficulty and excitement that they didn't take me out of the game, even when broke the flow of it such as the Mr. Freeze fight which was a blast to play through. I didn't mind the detour in that game as much as I did in Asylum. I haven't played the sequels as well. I heard they decline in quality past City, so I'll probably just stick with these two.
And, to be clear, there was a lot I did like about Arkham City, really. I just felt that Asylum was a perfect game. (Even if it had flaws, it got so much extra-credit in other ways, it ended up with a score over 100/100 for me.)
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Thu Apr 16, 2020 3:23 am

Yeah, the remote controlled batarang kinda sucked. Also, I could've done without the catwoman stages.

As for Asylum, despite what I said, I still really like it on the whole and I'd say it's a really great game. I just thought City was slightly better. It's cool if you guys think otherwise though.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Wooley » Thu Apr 16, 2020 3:32 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 3:23 am
Yeah, the remote controlled batarang kinda sucked. Also, I could've done without the catwoman stages.

As for Asylum, despite what I said, I still really like it on the whole and I'd say it's a really great game. I just thought City was slightly better. It's cool if you guys think otherwise though.
Yeah, I think a lot of it is just what you like. I loved the trapped, contained scenario and the weird buildings and grounds of an old asylum that had also been sort of grudgingly turned into a maximum-security penitentiary (and by grudgingly, I mean it felt like the old Asylum didn't want to be modernized and wasn't going to allow it without a fight).
There was a bit of almost-horror to it and a feeling of perpetual night.
Anyway, good discussion.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Sun Apr 26, 2020 7:35 pm

Anybody played Gravity Bone and Thirty Flights of Loving? I wasn't sure what I'd think of them, but I kinda love them, especially Thirty Flights. Despite being around 10 minutes each, they both provided one of the most evocative video game narratives I've ever experienced. When replaying Thirty Flights, I also picked up on a number of details which I didn't notice the first time around which increased my love for the game. I'll have to listen to the developer's commentary next time I play it.

Speaking of walking simulators (I really hate that term), I found out that Journey is being released on Steam this summer. I heard it's really great, so I might check it out.

Still speaking of walking simulators, what do you guys think of the argument that games like The Stanley Parable, The Beginner's Guide, Gone Home, Dear Esther, etc. aren't actually games since they don't offer challenges for the player? I constantly see people arguing over definitions in discussions over these kinds of games, but they really don't do much for me. Regardless of whether you find them challenging or not, you still play them on Steam, Xbox, Play Station, Wii, etc. They often involve you walking, turning, pushing buttons, and interacting with various environments. Another issue I have with this argument is that the word "game" isn't easily defined. Many definitions have been made throughout the years, many of which being many years before video games were even around. A lot of them didn't even include challenges as much as they involved interacting with the material, which applies for the games I listed up above and many more like them.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Kenji » Tue May 05, 2020 2:06 am

Outside of the type of gamer who's still clinging to the Gamergate dream, I'm pretty sure almost everyone is comfortable with calling "walking simulators" video games.

-------

Downwell is pretty great. A simple idea executed flawlessly. My only problem is that it's a bit too short. I almost never complain that a game is too short -they're usually too long- but four zones is pretty brief. I don't know if I needed another zone after the fourth one but different "courses" a la Mario Kart would have been really cool.

My top 10 platformers:

1. Ninja Gaiden
2. Revenge of Shinobi
3. Journey to Silius
4. Sonic the Hedgehog
5. Batman (NES)
6. Rondo of Blood
7. Downwell
8. Ghouls N Ghosts
9. Khimera: Destroy All Monster Girls
10. Specter of Torment


Ninja Gaiden is a lock for #1 and Revenge of Shinobi is pretty comfortably my #2, but the rest could switch around depending on my mood.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Deschain13 » Tue May 05, 2020 2:25 am

Kenji if you like the ninja platformers have you tried The Messenger? I beat it for the first time a week or so ago and it’s excellent.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Macrology » Tue May 05, 2020 3:31 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Sun Apr 26, 2020 7:35 pm
Anybody played Gravity Bone and Thirty Flights of Loving? I wasn't sure what I'd think of them, but I kinda love them, especially Thirty Flights. Despite being around 10 minutes each, they both provided one of the most evocative video game narratives I've ever experienced. When replaying Thirty Flights, I also picked up on a number of details which I didn't notice the first time around which increased my love for the game. I'll have to listen to the developer's commentary next time I play it.

Speaking of walking simulators (I really hate that term), I found out that Journey is being released on Steam this summer. I heard it's really great, so I might check it out.

Still speaking of walking simulators, what do you guys think of the argument that games like The Stanley Parable, The Beginner's Guide, Gone Home, Dear Esther, etc. aren't actually games since they don't offer challenges for the player? I constantly see people arguing over definitions in discussions over these kinds of games, but they really don't do much for me. Regardless of whether you find them challenging or not, you still play them on Steam, Xbox, Play Station, Wii, etc. They often involve you walking, turning, pushing buttons, and interacting with various environments. Another issue I have with this argument is that the word "game" isn't easily defined. Many definitions have been made throughout the years, many of which being many years before video games were even around. A lot of them didn't even include challenges as much as they involved interacting with the material, which applies for the games I listed up above and many more like them.
Gravity Bone and Thirty Flights of Loving are both delightful and fascinating. And Journey is a magical, sensory experience. I've only played all the way through once, but I had one companion the whole time, and it was just perfect.

I think dismissing "walking simulators" is pretty facile, but not entirely wrongheaded. They do something that only games really allow for (namely, moving at your own pace and exploring according to your whim), and they tell better stories than 90% of the games out there, but it's definitely true that they don't really make an effort to fully utilize the possibilities available to them. For me, Braid remains the consummate "arthouse" game, if there is such a thing: something that truly plugs into the essence of the medium and creates something evocative and singular from that essence. Walking simulators are basically narrative efforts with some very barebones interactivity.
Kentucky Route Zero (another key arthouse game) strikes me as somewhere in-between: a primarily narrative experience, but very much couched in a specific type of gameplay. Braid taps into the essence of the platformer, KRZ taps into the essence of text-based adventure games.
Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Tue May 05, 2020 3:04 pm

Kenji wrote:
Tue May 05, 2020 2:06 am
Outside of the type of gamer who's still clinging to the Gamergate dream, I'm pretty sure almost everyone is comfortable with calling "walking simulators" video games.
In my experiences, people are pretty split on this question. Whenever I look through discussions on these kinds of games, I usually see at least a couple people discussing it.
Macrology wrote:
Tue May 05, 2020 3:31 am
I think dismissing "walking simulators" is pretty facile, but not entirely wrongheaded. They do something that only games really allow for (namely, moving at your own pace and exploring according to your whim), and they tell better stories than 90% of the games out there, but it's definitely true that they don't really make an effort to fully utilize the possibilities available to them. For me, Braid remains the consummate "arthouse" game, if there is such a thing: something that truly plugs into the essence of the medium and creates something evocative and singular from that essence. Walking simulators are basically narrative efforts with some very barebones interactivity.
Kentucky Route Zero (another key arthouse game) strikes me as somewhere in-between: a primarily narrative experience, but very much couched in a specific type of gameplay. Braid taps into the essence of the platformer, KRZ taps into the essence of text-based adventure games.
I haven't heard of Braid or KRZ, but I'll keep an eye out for them.

I feel like interactivity can be criteria for deciding whether they're games or not though. While it's true that some definitions of the word "game" contain words like "skill" or "challenge" or requiring for them to utilize certain features available to them which many of these games aren't interested in achieving, many older definitions didn't contain these words as requirements, nor did they require for them to utilize a certain amount of possibilities available to them concerning their design. Interactivity is typically all that's included in them. Walking around an environment or clicking on items is minimal interactivity, but it's still technically an interaction.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Macrology » Tue May 05, 2020 7:10 pm

Oh, I'm not debating whether or not they're games. They simply are. What else would they be?
But it is worth discussing their value as games. By that, I mean how necessary is it that this story be told in this medium? The closest equivalent I can think of is the criticism thrown at certain films: filmed theater. That isn't to say filmed theater can't be good, or that it isn't cinema, but it typically doesn't engage as richly with the medium it's working within.
In that sense, one might call walking simulators interactive graphic novels - or something of the sort. They can certainly be good, but their narrative tactics are so straightforward and so familiar they can feel stodgy, and while they employ some interactivity, they make little effort to plumb the depths of the medium.

I say judge them for what they are - compelling, visually immersive short stories that let you set your own pace. But I also try to be mindful of their limits and all the formal territory they leave unexplored.

Also, Braid and KRZ absolutely demand everyone's attention. And that reminds me, I still haven't played the last act of KRZ. . .
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Tue May 05, 2020 7:47 pm

I think I may have misinterpreted you then. Sorry about that.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Bandy Greensacks » Tue May 05, 2020 7:50 pm

Walking simulators are video games, visual novels are video games, FMV games are video games, choose your own adventures in YouTube videos are video games, Mahjong on Windows 10 is a video game

Literally anything can be a video game, as long as it features a bit of interaction from the user
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Stu » Thu May 14, 2020 12:58 am

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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Ergill » Thu May 14, 2020 2:38 am

Bandy Greensacks wrote:
Tue May 05, 2020 7:50 pm
Walking simulators are video games, visual novels are video games, FMV games are video games, choose your own adventures in YouTube videos are video games, Mahjong on Windows 10 is a video game

Literally anything can be a video game, as long as it features a bit of interaction from the user
Your body?

*stern look*
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by takeshi » Thu May 21, 2020 6:04 pm

I won a SNES classic on ebay and decided to hack it and use it as a port for all my 8-bit and 16-bit Nintendo games. Really enjoying going through Gameboy games I either owned as a kid or seem way more interesting to me now as an adult.

Image

Kirby's Pinball Land is a fun and basic portable pinball game that's super cute and the 3 boards have tons of little details to discover. There are boss battles with Whispy Woods and the like that require some strategy otherwise you'll quickly be thrown back to the main boards.

Image

The Sword of Hope is an interesting little RPG. The map layout is confusing at first and the mechanics are a bit off due to how primitive it is (a gameboy RPG from 1989!), but it's a lot of fun and I was impressed with how much of a sense of the world is constructed.
"your review shows me only that you dont understand anything about movies and that you are a untalented wanna bee filmmaker with no balls and no understanding what POSTAL is. you dont see courage because you are nothing. and no go to your mum and fuck her …because she cooks for you now since 30 years ..so she deserves it." — Uwe Boll

letterboxd
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Wooley » Fri May 22, 2020 2:11 am

Image
Image
Finished Control.
Good stuff. Imaginative, holds together pretty well, good gameplay. And the neat thing about it, it's actually a low-end AAA, but it has a real indie vibe to it (at least to me) that I really enjoyed. Also, the story plays with some pretty neat ideas and flirts with clever things.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Wooley » Sat May 23, 2020 11:41 pm

Well, I was really enjoying the Resident Evil 2 remake and then... Mr.X.
I turned it off after a while and I don't think I'm going back. Bummer.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Smoke Bomb » Sun May 24, 2020 12:06 am

Wooley wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 11:41 pm
Well, I was really enjoying the Resident Evil 2 remake and then... Mr.X.
I turned it off after a while and I don't think I'm going back. Bummer.
Finished my platinum trophy last week!
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Wooley » Sun May 24, 2020 12:28 am

Smoke Bomb wrote:
Sun May 24, 2020 12:06 am
Finished my platinum trophy last week!
What's "platinum trophy"?
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Smoke Bomb » Sun May 24, 2020 12:48 am

Wooley wrote:
Sun May 24, 2020 12:28 am
What's "platinum trophy"?
Getting every achievement on PS4
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Wooley » Sun May 24, 2020 12:49 am

Smoke Bomb wrote:
Sun May 24, 2020 12:48 am
Getting every achievement on PS4
You shot all the little raccoons?
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Smoke Bomb » Sun May 24, 2020 1:15 am

Wooley wrote:
Sun May 24, 2020 12:49 am
You shot all the little raccoons?
All of ‘Em!
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Kenji » Sun May 24, 2020 1:19 am

Deschain13 wrote:
Tue May 05, 2020 2:25 am
Kenji if you like the ninja platformers have you tried The Messenger? I beat it for the first time a week or so ago and it’s excellent.
It was on my radar until I saw that it turns into a Metroidvania, and then it sort of fell off my radar. I tend not to like Metroidvanias. I'll probably end up playing it eventually.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Smoke Bomb » Sun May 24, 2020 1:21 am

Kenji wrote:
Sun May 24, 2020 1:19 am
It was on my radar until I saw that it turns into a Metroidvania, and then it sort of fell off my radar. I tend not to like Metroidvanias. I'll probably end up playing it eventually.
It’s “Metroidvania” elements are fairly tame. They just turn the levels you’ve been through into a connected map for end game quests. It’s a drag for a little bit, but there’s one point that sucked me back in.
Highly recommended.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Sun May 24, 2020 1:43 am



Just found out about this. So excited for it.
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Re: The Video Game Thread

Post by Wooley » Sun May 24, 2020 4:01 am

Smoke Bomb wrote:
Sun May 24, 2020 1:15 am
All of ‘Em!
I figured I needed to save my bullets. Which turned out to be true once Mr. X came around.
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