Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

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charulata
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by charulata » Tue Apr 08, 2014 9:12 pm

woo! my fav out of tiff probs. what else you seeing?
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Tue Apr 08, 2014 9:20 pm

charulata wrote:woo! my fav out of tiff probs. what else you seeing?
So far, I've seen Tsai's Stray Dogs; a few shorts by Stan Brakhage, the best of which was The Act of Seeing With One's Own Eyes, which I made a note to catch because of Das's praise for it here; Anderson's Los Angeles Plays Itself, which I had seen already but wanted to show my girlfriend, who really dug it; The Naked Room, a surprisingly good Mexican documentary which my girlfriend and I decided to see after hilariously going to the wrong movie theater to watch Our Sunhi; and The Raid 2.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by charulata » Tue Apr 08, 2014 9:23 pm

that's a great fest so far. That Tsai was pretty much my other contender for best of tiff. What did you think?
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by charulata » Tue Apr 08, 2014 9:23 pm

also, clue us into any argentine films we should be paying attention to... so we can be the cool kids that talk about it before everyone else and such!
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Colonel Kurz » Tue Apr 08, 2014 9:24 pm

Norte was my favorite at the IFFR earlier this year. How's The Raid 2?
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Tue Apr 08, 2014 9:39 pm

charulata wrote:that's a great fest so far. That Tsai was pretty much my other contender for best of tiff. What did you think?
I really liked it. Not too keen on those last two takes, but I understand where they're coming from. Tsai wants to leave cinema behind for museum galleries, and having two people stand in front of a painting for twenty minutes is about as clear a statement in that direction as I can imagine. I've read those long takes are meant to produce a hypnotic effect, but I wasn't feeling it. Seems to me the prevailing result, outside of utter boredom, is an undeniable physical presence. These two characters are there, standing on the precipice before their dissolution: as a couple, as parents, as people with hopes and dreams. A two-dimensional image - not only painted on a wall, but composed in such a way that the represented natural landscape is flattened, parallel lines demarcating a river from its rocky shore and the wilderness beyond - becomes a window into another reality, an escape from their miserable lives. Like the movie screen in Goodbye Dragon Inn, about to be torn down along with the cinema it inhabits. Here, the painting is in an abandoned building. The characters find another chance for escape, they open a window through a temporary embrace, but nothing comes of it. Like the painting, it's a false hope in a broken home. This is the pay-off after ten or eleven minutes of stillness.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Tue Apr 08, 2014 9:47 pm

Colonel Kurz wrote:Norte was my favorite at the IFFR earlier this year. How's The Raid 2?
It's beautifully shot and paced. I've read complaints about the plot, which I find hilarious. I thought it was perfectly adequate. It's supposed to be a scaffold to give the action an emotional anchor. And it works. That said, I did find the movie's obsession with broken bones and blood a bit unnerving. It takes pleasure in human disfigurement. What I like about action movies is when the action becomes abstracted into a dance, bodies moving through space. There's always violence, but the emphasis is not necessarily on the actual wounds being inflicted. Here, there's some dancing, and a lot of hurting. A counterargument might pose: well, isn't it better that the film doesn't sugarcoat the violence, showing you the actual broken bones and blood? I guess. Or I guess not. It's still fake violence anyways, and it's not like this is a serious exploration of how violence affects people. It's an action movie with hundreds of mindless baddies. So, in the end, it's just focusing on the least interesting part of fake violence. The simulated impacts, the representation of broken bones, and so on.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Epistemophobia » Tue Apr 08, 2014 10:00 pm

Beau wrote:What I like about action movies is when the action becomes abstracted into a dance, bodies moving through space.
Pfft. I wanted more blood.

Action movies are so gentle.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Trip » Wed Apr 09, 2014 2:41 am

That climactic fight is intensely intricate. And intensely violent. I don't know if I'd describe it as like a dance, but it's at least choreographed--unlike your standard blockbuster fight.

Found The Raid 2 a bit of a chore really, until it picked up in those final scenes. The car stuff is the highlight.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by LEAVES » Wed Apr 09, 2014 7:13 am

Beau wrote:What I like about action movies is when the action becomes abstracted into a dance, bodies moving through space.
Do you watch more action movies or more ballet movies? I WATCH MORE BALLET MOVIES. Put your eyeballs where the tutus are, Beau. It's better than watching sweaty men beat each other bloody, I swear.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Thu Apr 10, 2014 12:43 am

LEAVES wrote:Do you watch more action movies or more ballet movies? I WATCH MORE BALLET MOVIES. Put your eyeballs where the tutus are, Beau. It's better than watching sweaty men beat each other bloody, I swear.
The only ballet movies I've seen are The Black Swan and The Red Shoes. Since you're such a connoisseur, I'm sure you'll have recommendations in this area (?).
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Izzy Black » Thu Apr 10, 2014 12:46 am

Beau wrote:The Black Swan and The Red Shoes
:up: :up:

I love ballet and movies about them. A good place to start is The Dancer (Feuer, 1994) and Altman's The Company if you haven't seen them already.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Thu Apr 10, 2014 12:51 am

Trip wrote:That climactic fight is intensely intricate. And intensely violent. I don't know if I'd describe it as like a dance, but it's at least choreographed--unlike your standard blockbuster fight.

Found The Raid 2 a bit of a chore really, until it picked up in those final scenes. The car stuff is the highlight.
The final scenes are better because the bad guys have some personality. In videogame terms, they're bosses. Well, sub-bosses and then a final boss. To be more precise, the bad guys our hero runs into during the final scenes are villains we've seen before. We know how they fight and what weapons they use. They have a definable style. So there's some kind of very basic drama there. Our hero isn't just beating random henchmen, but ruthless killers. It's not only a brawl between characters, but also between styles. The confrontations are longer and the choreography more intricate and intense. That duel in the kitchen is the best scene in the movie. My audience broke into spontaneous applause when it ended. (Nevertheless, Kill Bill did all of the above better, including the Crazy Young Asian Woman With Eccentric Weapon.)
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Thu Apr 10, 2014 12:54 am

Izzy Black wrote: :up: :up:

I love ballet and movies about them. A good place to start is The Dancer (Feuer, 1994) and Altman's The Company if you haven't seen them already.
Thanks. I was vaguely aware of the Altman. Didn't know about the Feuer. How's the Wiseman doc? Seen it?
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Izzy Black » Thu Apr 10, 2014 1:40 am

I saw it at the rec of LEAVES, it's good.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by LEAVES » Thu Apr 10, 2014 6:37 am

We talked about ballet films a bit here. Too much classical ballet in films, though. And, like, pre-1910's classical, not even the fun Nijinsky stuff or any later modern variants. You get a bit of a smorgasbord in most of the documentaries about troupes, but it's just never enough!
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by snapper » Thu Apr 10, 2014 7:16 am

Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by LEAVES » Thu Apr 10, 2014 7:21 am

Oh, but, most importantly, BUNHEADS, Beau, BUNHEADS.

snapper, there are no screenshots on KG, therefore it doesn't exist. So no.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Fri Apr 11, 2014 2:57 pm

Watched a bizarre Walter Hill movie called Streets of Fire on a whim. It's a BAFICI retrospective. Basically, a 1950s nostalgia pic filtered through Blade Runner and 80s squalor. The characters are archetypal in the extreme. One fun thing about it, though, is that the so-called hero is far more destructive than the supposed villain. Seriously. Spoilers ahead, etc. But the strangeness of it must be described. The villain, played by a really young Willem Dafoe, kidnaps Diane Lane, who is my everything, in the first scene. That's in bad taste, no doubt about it. Bad Willem, bad! And that's about the last bad thing he does. Oh, he threatens to rape her later on. Which is bad, too. But he doesn't. Nor does he beat her up or anything. Just ties her to a bed. Meanwhile, the "hero" comes in guns a' blazing, shooting up Dafoe's gang, possibly killing dozens of young men innocently playing with their bikes next to an abandoned factory converted into an 80s nightclub, then he sets fire to everything, rescues Diane Lane, runs into a police roadblack, sets fire to the police cars, and then, while escaping the city on a train, he feels he must go back to confront Willem Dafoe, and to prevent Diane Lane from stopping him, he punches her unconscious. Really. Just socks her in the face, which is more than poor little Willem ever did. Incidentally, Willem promises to go after the "hero," but all he does is set up a very formal duel, with a police officer as mediator, and then just kind of waits for the "hero" to show up. Oh, he threatens to destroy the community too, but he doesn't. Like he almost never does anything evil at all during the movie. The "hero," though. He's an asshole.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Trip » Sat Apr 12, 2014 4:17 am

yep
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by undinum » Sun Apr 13, 2014 3:21 pm

RE: Ballet, Maddin's amazing Dracula: Pages from a Virgin's Diary is an adaptation of the Royal Winnipeg company's own adaptation, and it might be his best movie.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Izzy Black » Sun Apr 13, 2014 3:32 pm

Brilliant use of Mahler's 1st too, which isn't a ballet itself.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Fri Apr 18, 2014 10:03 pm

I'm traveling through Europe with just my cell phone, so I can't do the cool picture link thing, but I wrote about Streets of Fire, Stray Dogs, Only Lovers Left Alive, and Norte the End of History for Slant's The House Next Door: http://www.slantmagazine.com/house/2013 ... of-history.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Izzy Black » Fri Apr 18, 2014 11:40 pm

Beau wrote:I'm traveling through Europe with just my cell phone, so I can't do the cool picture link thing, but I wrote about Streets of Fire, Stray Dogs, Only Lovers Left Alive, and Norte the End of History for Slant's The House Next Door: http://www.slantmagazine.com/house/2013 ... of-history.
awesome Beau, great read
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Wed Jun 11, 2014 5:17 pm

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More for Slant's The House Next Door. This time, a look at the Wang Bing exhibit at the Pompidou Center in Paris.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Wed Jun 11, 2014 5:23 pm

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And for Sound on Sight, a brief look at why Ocarina of Time changed everything for me, videogame-wise.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by JediMoonShyne » Wed Jun 11, 2014 8:35 pm

You were in Paris?
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Wed Jun 11, 2014 9:29 pm

JediMoonShyne wrote:You were in Paris?
Yes! We took pictures, even, and posted them on Facebook. I couldn't pass up the Wang Bing exhibit, though, and stayed there for a few hours. Not that I knew there was a Wang Bing exhibit. I found it serendipitously and decided to stick around.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Wed Jun 11, 2014 9:30 pm

I also bought a copy of Cahiers at the Pompidou, which I am currently using to remind myself that I don't know French.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by JediMoonShyne » Wed Jun 11, 2014 9:36 pm

Aw. We were geographically closer!

What else did you see, anything interesting?
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Wed Jun 11, 2014 10:04 pm

JediMoonShyne wrote:Aw. We were geographically closer!

What else did you see, anything interesting?
We saw as much as we could. We also went to Barcelona, Berlin, and Prague. We had a run-in with aggressive subway ticket inspectors in Prague, basically because we never figured out he was a ticket inspector until we went back to our hotel. Had we correctly identified him, we would have simply showed him our validated tickets. But instead what we saw was this bulky man suddenly screaming at us in Czech and grabbing us by the arm. We just pushed him out of the way and ran, while a tall local held the inspector in place and motioned for us to escape. We thought the inspector was just crazy or antisocial. The fact that his "badge" was a little tiny medallion didn't help. Outside of that, Prague was really pretty, although like Colonel Kurz warned me through PM, it's like an outdoor museum. Where are the Czechs? It's like a drinking game in which you have no chance of getting drunk. And not for lack of beer, obviously. Unless you're in a bar or restaurant, where the waiters, one assumes, are actually Czech, and the beer is plentiful. Cheap city, though. Paris is expensive as hell, but it's Paris. Almost too much to do. We went to most of the usual places. I tried not to take the typical, tourist, kitschy pictures, but couldn't resist in front of the Eiffel Tower and Shakespeare and Company. Found a better English-language bookstore, though: Abbey Bookshop. Oh, how the euros flew. Barcelona was unexpectedly awesome. Unexpectedly because I didn't know much about it, outside of Gaudi. And even with Gaudi, I didn't know he designed a whole damn park for Mr. Guell. That was fun. And Berlin's still the hip city I went to a few years ago. Except with less snow, thankfully.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Izzy Black » Wed Jun 11, 2014 10:15 pm

:D
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Stu » Wed Jun 11, 2014 10:27 pm

Yay Ocarina Of Time write-up!
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Colonel Kurz » Thu Jul 03, 2014 12:23 pm

Barcelona :heart:
Beau wrote:Outside of that, Prague was really pretty, although like Colonel Kurz warned me through PM, it's like an outdoor museum. Where are the Czechs? It's like a drinking game in which you have no chance of getting drunk. And not for lack of beer, obviously. Unless you're in a bar or restaurant, where the waiters, one assumes, are actually Czech, and the beer is plentiful. Cheap city, though.
They're in the outer neighborhoods! I saw a few going about ordinary, daily lives once when venturing outside of the center. Don't remember on earth why I went out there though or whether I considered it worth my trouble.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by JediMoonShyne » Thu Jul 03, 2014 8:02 pm

Beau wrote:Oh, how the euros flew.
Oh hey, I somehow missed this!

And yeah, that does tend to happen in Paris. London, too! It certainly sounds as though you covered some ground, though. We spent a week in Paris recently and didn't get close to seeing everything we wanted to see, let alone everything the city has to offer. But then, that did involve one day in Disneyland (you think Paris is expensive) and a small child seemingly intent on disrupting any and all tourism. Whereabouts was this bookshop you found? We went to the former, but the crowds kept us at bay. Is it bad that I remember it as That One Scene in Before Sunset rather than Shakespeare & Company? Did you get to the Ménagerie du Jardin des Plantes, but any chance? That might have been the favourite thing we visited, since Emily loved it, too. Such history! Second-oldest zoo in the world, I believe, behind London. Tickets on buses/trains around Europe can be a real pain. It would be cool to have the option of some general pass to cover a bunch of countries, meaning that you can just invest and then relax, safe in the knowledge you won't have to sit in a line or - worse yet - get badgered by some self-important ass of a ticket collector. Rome is funny, since you can jump on buses and trains (not the metro, though) without even purchasing or swiping a ticket, and won't see a collector 90% of the time. Yet, they will typically pop up to surprise ticket-less tourists in the summer with a €50 fine. I have a few American friends that have managed to get caught out, but ignored the fine and went home and heard nothing more. Such a messed up, hilariously flawed system!
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Colonel Kurz » Thu Jul 03, 2014 10:43 pm

It used to be real easy to use the subway or tram for free in Amsterdam, but they've clamped down on that stuff since they went electric (with passes rather than tickets).

Anybody ever went to the Action Cinema in Paris?
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Sun Jul 06, 2014 3:00 pm

JediMoonShyne wrote: Oh hey, I somehow missed this!

And yeah, that does tend to happen in Paris. London, too! It certainly sounds as though you covered some ground, though. We spent a week in Paris recently and didn't get close to seeing everything we wanted to see, let alone everything the city has to offer. But then, that did involve one day in Disneyland (you think Paris is expensive) and a small child seemingly intent on disrupting any and all tourism. Whereabouts was this bookshop you found? We went to the former, but the crowds kept us at bay. Is it bad that I remember it as That One Scene in Before Sunset rather than Shakespeare & Company? Did you get to the Ménagerie du Jardin des Plantes, but any chance? That might have been the favourite thing we visited, since Emily loved it, too. Such history! Second-oldest zoo in the world, I believe, behind London. Tickets on buses/trains around Europe can be a real pain. It would be cool to have the option of some general pass to cover a bunch of countries, meaning that you can just invest and then relax, safe in the knowledge you won't have to sit in a line or - worse yet - get badgered by some self-important ass of a ticket collector. Rome is funny, since you can jump on buses and trains (not the metro, though) without even purchasing or swiping a ticket, and won't see a collector 90% of the time. Yet, they will typically pop up to surprise ticket-less tourists in the summer with a €50 fine. I have a few American friends that have managed to get caught out, but ignored the fine and went home and heard nothing more. Such a messed up, hilariously flawed system!
No, it's not bad that you know it from Before Sunset. That was my girl's case, too. I also heard about it from Gone Home. The videogame, yeah. It's one of the "obvious" Parisian places the protagonist visits on her European journey. It wasn't so crowded when we went, although there was a group snapping pictures outside. They were in it for the Facebook, though, so they didn't go in to check out actual books. Of course, the place does get cramped, but it doesn't need many patrons for that. It's rather small. Abbey Bookshop is also in the Latin Quarter, but it's more inconspicuous, a doorway tucked into a small alley. I loved it, though, because it's more of a bookish cave. Also, the Canadian owner is around to serve you coffee in little plastic cups while you peruse offers, which I appreciated, not only because I was tired from a day sightseeing, but also because it must have been extraordinarily difficult to both fill up and then carry a little cup with coffee in it across that littered shop to where I was hunched checking titles on spines. He did the same for the girl, too.
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Sun Jul 06, 2014 3:18 pm

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Otherness is the inevitable theme of films dealing with extraterrestrials. They are the ultimate foreigners, organisms who inhabit planets unlike our own. The problem for artists who tackle such stories is how to portray this Otherness. A common recourse is to humanize it, as in everything from The Day the Earth Stood Still to Star Wars. Another solution, however, is to accept what Fredric Jameson terms the “unknowability thesis,” which he ascribes to Stanislaw Lem. As the latter wrote in his novel Solaris: “Where there are no men, there cannot be motives accessible to men.” The truly alien, then, recedes into the shadows or the margins. It can hardly be portrayed if it cannot be grasped by the imagination, so it becomes a vague intangible presence, as in Tarkovsky’s Stalker, or a sheer force of malignancy and death, as in the two examples we will be covering, 1979’s Alien and the little-known 1958 B-movie that likely served as inspiration for Ridley Scott’s classic, It! The Terror from Beyond Space, by Edward L. Cahn. The unknowable, which is impossible to penetrate, becomes a mirror. The animal threats in Alien and Beyond Space, one a so-called Xenomorph and the other a Martian, reflect how humans react when faced with the inexplicable. Failing to find anything human in the monster, some humans might discover a monster within themselves.
(...)
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Tue Jul 15, 2014 7:47 pm

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Heard of Pussy Riot? Cool, now learn about their predecessors, Voina. A brief overview I wrote for New Heroes and Pioneers, a culture website by a Scandinavian book publisher that hires underemployed Argentine journalists (among others, of course).
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Thu Sep 11, 2014 4:17 pm

MEGA POST OF STUFF I WROTE RECENTLY, MADE LESS MEGA BY MY PICTURE-LINK THING
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argentine directors, argentine recommendations, argentine, argentine, argentine
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paraguay, paraguay, movie nobody's heard of, some of you might like it, it's about the effects of technology on people, cell phones and cameras and new media, and i swear i saw brightside's name in graffiti somewhere
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gattaca and people turning into ones and zeroes, very depressing but maybe not really in the end
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i tried to make sense of sisters and i think i made it make less sense but de palma's cool and splitscreen and multiple identities and whatever, you know
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JediMoonShyne
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by JediMoonShyne » Sun Apr 12, 2015 10:36 am

Trip wrote:Thank you for reminding me to watch A Pervert’s Guide to Cinema!
Late, but I watched all three parts of this last night.

Easily as fun as TSOF, (again) if you can get past the voice thing...
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Shieldmaiden
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Apr 16, 2015 4:11 am

Beau wrote:Image
Nice. I love that one so much!
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Beau
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Thu Apr 16, 2015 4:39 am

Yes, great movie. As someone said on Twitter, in reply to my article, "life is only an illusion mate. The truth is not even out there." Indeed (?)
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Shieldmaiden
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sun Apr 19, 2015 1:09 am

Haha? What happened to Andrew Niccol, anyway? So much promise...
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Beau
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Mon Apr 20, 2015 4:49 am

Shieldmaiden wrote:Haha? What happened to Andrew Niccol, anyway? So much promise...
I... actually haven't seen any of his other movies. I've heard some positive remarks about Lord of War and somewhat fewer appreciative nods in the direction of Simone... and that's it.
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JediMoonShyne
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by JediMoonShyne » Mon Apr 20, 2015 4:54 am

In Time is great, just sayin'...
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Beau
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Mon Apr 20, 2015 1:09 pm

JediMoonShyne wrote:In Time is great, just sayin'...
Is it? I mean, I'm down for Amanda Seyfried pretending to be Anna Karina in Alphaville, but... If this is a real recommendation, I'll keep it in mind.
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JediMoonShyne
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by JediMoonShyne » Mon Apr 20, 2015 1:20 pm

Amanda Seyfriend pretending to be anyone is good enough for me!

Besides, Deakins: http://corrierino.com/forum/viewtopic.p ... 93#p954193
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Colonel Kurz
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Colonel Kurz » Tue May 26, 2015 4:33 pm

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Beau
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Re: Beau's Spirited Shenanigans

Post by Beau » Wed May 27, 2015 5:47 am

Is that your way of implying that I can't even update my own thread? Because that would be accurate.
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