Maiden's Voyage

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Shieldmaiden
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Wed Oct 30, 2019 6:22 pm

Macrology wrote:You might also like Kill Bill for its sheer aesthetic audacity.
And, as if we needed more proof that Macrology knows what I like, I really enjoyed Kill Bill (Volumes 1 and 2). Such a satisfying story through and around its roller-coaster trappings! Somehow, I'd kept myself spoiler free all these years. I mean, I knew the characters' names and I'd seen a scene or two, but it had plenty of shocks still in store and, best of all, the ending was a complete surprise. I loved it, no reservations.
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Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Shieldmaiden » Wed Oct 30, 2019 6:47 pm

I’m kind of proud of my horror list this year. I watched 23 horror (and horror-adjacent) films in October –- from 8 countries and 10 decades –- and had a lot of fun. Several of these have been on my ‘list’ for years, but I threw a few in there on the spur of the moment after reading comments on Corrie. So, now, I'll turn the experience into a top 10 countdown, ending (hopefully) on Halloween night.


Image

Honorable mention: Messiah of Evil

I think the story behind this film is that it was made for about $5, haha. Yet, it somehow manages to be creepy and memorable and stylish. The elements of grief and odd obsession tie in perfectly. All in all, quite an accomplishment!


And, if anyone is interested, here's what I watched that didn’t place:
The Black Cat (1934)
The Carrier
Cat People (1942)
Cat People (1982)
Creepshow
Curtains
The Dead Don’t Die
Dreamscape
From Beyond
High Spirits
Vampire Circus
We Have Always Lived in the Castle
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Macrology » Wed Oct 30, 2019 8:48 pm

I'm glad to hear that my Maiden's Taste Compass is still well calibrated!

Also, there are some pretty solid films in the "didn't place" horror list, so I'm curious to see what did!

(Incidentally, the 1982 remake of Cat People is my roommate's all-time favorite film. But he is a man of highly idiosyncratic tastes.)
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Wed Oct 30, 2019 9:29 pm

Macrology wrote:Also, there are some pretty solid films in the "didn't place" horror list, so I'm curious to see what did!
Oh, for sure! But my tastes are pretty idiosyncratic, too, haha.

Hey, have you seen We Have Always Lived in the Castle yet? It's very faithful to the book, and I loved Alexandra Daddario in it. But maybe it relied a little too hard on people not knowing what was going on for its creepy vibe?
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Macrology » Wed Oct 30, 2019 10:36 pm

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Wed Oct 30, 2019 9:29 pm
Oh, for sure! But my tastes are pretty idiosyncratic, too, haha.

Hey, have you seen We Have Always Lived in the Castle yet? It's very faithful to the book, and I loved Alexandra Daddario in it. But maybe it relied a little too hard on people not knowing what was going on for its creepy vibe?
I haven't yet, but I'll probably make my way around to it at some point. The blinkered subjectivity of the narration is so intrinsic to what makes that book work, any film adaptation seems doomed to a paltry success at best.
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Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Shieldmaiden » Wed Oct 30, 2019 11:08 pm

Here's why I had to say "horror-adjacent." Neither one of these is horror, though the Cronenberg is close, I guess.

Image

10. Spider

This is such a carefully wrought piece of art! From the song of the opening credits to the tragic end, we inhabit Spider's mind. And, while it's not easy to be there, it's well worth it. I've seen critics complain about a lack of emotion or poignancy. Surely that's meant to be in your head, after! If I didn't feel the emotional impact of his illness after I'd be embarrassed to admit it.




Image

9. The Wind (1928)

I read one review that claimed that this year's The Wind was based on the same book as the Lillian Gish film, and there are certainly some similarities, so it could be. But here the monsters and madness are only hinted at. I'm glad I saw it, though; it's been on my to-see list forever. Gish is so good in this. And the effects are visceral -- more than I thought a film without sound could be!
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Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Oct 31, 2019 3:24 am

Image

8. Horrors of Malformed Men

This one's not as beautiful as Blind Woman's Curse, but it's still visually amazing. It starts out with an A Page of Madness scene in an insane asylum, moves to the circus, and then to a colony run by a mad scientist, where things really get interesting. The ridiculous melodrama, disgusting experiments, and maniacal dancing are highly entertaining, if not full of logic.



Image

7. Bell Book and Candle

OK, yes, this is a romantic comedy. But it's about witches, with a healthy dose of magic-y mournful nostalgia, so I had to include it. There's a lot to like here. Stewart and Novak made this right after Vertigo, so there's some nice built-in chemistry. The community of witches and warlocks has a lived-in Bohemian silliness that's easy to accept. And Jack Lemmon is charming as a goofy warlock-wannabe. This is the last one on the list that's not horror, I promise!
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Re: Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Wooley » Thu Oct 31, 2019 7:13 am

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Wed Oct 30, 2019 6:47 pm
I’m kind of proud of my horror list this year. I watched 23 horror (and horror-adjacent) films in October –- from 8 countries and 10 decades –- and had a lot of fun. Several of these have been on my ‘list’ for years, but I threw a few in there on the spur of the moment after reading comments on Corrie. So, now, I'll turn the experience into a top 10 countdown, ending (hopefully) on Halloween night.

First up, an honorable mention:

Image

Messiah of Evil

I think the story behind this film is that it was made for about $5, haha. Yet, it somehow manages to be creepy and memorable and stylish. The elements of grief and odd obsession tie in perfectly. All in all, quite an accomplishment!


And, if anyone is interested, here's what I watched that didn’t place:
The Black Cat (1934)
The Carrier
Cat People (1942)
Cat People (1982)
Creep Show
Curtains
The Dead Don’t Die
Dreamscape
From Beyond
High Spirits
Vampire Circus
We Have Always Lived in the Castle
Hey, man, good for you, that is the way to fuckin' do it.
Also, yeah, Messiah Of Evil, I learned last year or the year before, is pretty cool.
That said, I'm not sure how I feel about Cat People '42, Creepshow, and Vampire Circus not even placing.

Edit: Although, now that I'm seeing the things that did make the Top 10, maybe I can understand a bit.
Your appreciation for Bell, Book, and Candle is noted.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Wooley » Thu Oct 31, 2019 7:15 am

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Wed Oct 30, 2019 9:29 pm

Hey, have you seen We Have Always Lived in the Castle yet? It's very faithful to the book, and I loved Alexandra Daddario in it. But maybe it relied a little too hard on people not knowing what was going on for its creepy vibe?
Oh, I'm glad to hear that, cause I did really like the book.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Oct 31, 2019 2:13 pm

Wooley wrote:That said, I'm not sure how I feel about Cat People '42, Creepshow, and Vampire Circus not even placing.

Edit: Although, now that I'm seeing the things that did make the Top 10, maybe I can understand a bit.
Your appreciation for Bell, Book, and Candle is noted.
Haha. Yeah, I'm not a huge horror fan, and my tastes are weird. I'm still trying to make up for many years of avoiding horror altogether!

My all-time favorites:

Inland Empire
Santa Sangre
Cemetery Man
Strange Circus
Suspiria (1977)
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Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Oct 31, 2019 5:56 pm

Image

6. The Lighthouse

I'm having trouble writing about this one. I went in expecting a dark fantasy, with eerie ambiguity and artful madness. I did not expect it to be so earthy, like Hard to Be a God, but... Canadian, haha. It's definitely a crazy, claustrophobic, unique experience. And Dafoe deserves an Oscar for that five-minute curse alone. Amazing!



Image

5. Scanners

This may sound strange, but what I love about this one is the drab ordinariness of the corporate halls and office drones, the humdrum life into which the extraordinary fits like just one more egg in the carton. By drab, I definitely don't mean the set design. The architecture, the colorful mall, and especially the artist's studio (and works) are all great! But the way simple recordings and mainframe commands and, haha, facial expressions convey the science fiction make it feel quotidian and very, very possible.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Captain Terror » Thu Oct 31, 2019 6:21 pm

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Thu Oct 31, 2019 5:56 pm
6. The Lighthouse


I'm having trouble writing about this one. I went in expecting a dark fantasy, with eerie ambiguity and artful madness. I did not expect it to be so earthy, like Hard to Be a God, but... Canadian, haha. It's definitely a crazy, claustrophobic, unique experience. And Dafoe deserves an Oscar for that five-minute curse alone. Amazing!
Funny that you would use the word "earthy"
because it was really hard for me to watch Dafoe getting shovelfuls of earth thrown in his face. Even after all the gore I've subjected myself to that really got to me for some reason. I was like "are they actually burying Willem Dafoe?" :)
But yeah, it was not the movie I was expecting (and hoping for, if I'm being honest) but I think it was much better for it.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Oct 31, 2019 6:35 pm

Captain Terror wrote:Funny that you would use the word "earthy"
Ha, yes. That was definitely on my mind. One of the few times I've had to sit there trying to figure out how they were doing it, because it was really uncomfortable.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Wooley » Thu Oct 31, 2019 6:36 pm

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Thu Oct 31, 2019 5:56 pm

5. Scanners

Image

This may sound strange, but what I love about this one is the drab ordinariness of the corporate halls and office drones, the humdrum life into which the extraordinary fits like just one more egg in the carton. By drab, I definitely don't mean the set design. The architecture, the colorful mall, and especially the artist's studio (and works) are all great! But the way simple recordings and mainframe commands and, haha, facial expressions convey the science fiction make it feel quotidian and very, very possible.
Hmpf. Not to bring too much negativity, but I think Scanners might be Cronenberg's worst film. I don't think the story's as good as its promise by any stretch and the lead performance is so awful it's like I can't pay attention to anything else. Cool effects, though. Of course, everybody loves the "suck your brain dry" line and the exploding head.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Oct 31, 2019 6:41 pm

Oh, wow. Is this a commonly held opinion around here? I know I'm out of step with horror fans, but I really liked it, lead performance and all!
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Oct 31, 2019 8:19 pm

Image

4. Demon (2015)

This is a great-looking, very creepy story of possession, with a lot of cultural texture and historic meat to chew on. Pay close attention to the conversations, even the wedding speeches, to know what's going on. It reminds me of 2013's Ida, also from Poland, but I found that one rather heavy handed. This one gets the same points across more effectively.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Captain Terror » Thu Oct 31, 2019 8:28 pm

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Thu Oct 31, 2019 6:41 pm
Oh, wow. Is this a commonly held opinion around here? I know I'm out of step with horror fans, but I really liked it, lead performance and all!
I'm a fan of Scanners, but yes, this seems to be pretty common (around here anyway). I haven't gotten into any arguments about it or anything, but it's been made clear that I'm in the minority. The Criterion Collection agrees with me though, so I feel pretty good about it. :)
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Re: Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Captain Terror » Thu Oct 31, 2019 8:29 pm

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Thu Oct 31, 2019 6:35 pm
Ha, yes. That was definitely on my mind. One of the few times I've had to sit there trying to figure out how they were doing it, because it was really uncomfortable.
Yes, I convinced myself
that they used Oreo crumbs or something just to put my mind at ease. He was definitely swallowing that stuff whatever it was.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Oct 31, 2019 8:35 pm

Captain Terror wrote: Yes, I convinced myself
that they used Oreo crumbs or something just to put my mind at ease. He was definitely swallowing that stuff whatever it was.
Ha! I thought:
brownie mix.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Macrology » Thu Oct 31, 2019 8:57 pm

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Thu Oct 31, 2019 8:19 pm
Image

4. Demon (2015)

This is a great-looking, very creepy story of possession, with a lot of cultural texture and historic meat to chew on. Pay close attention to the conversations, even the wedding speeches, to know what's going on. It reminds me of 2013's Ida, also from Poland, but I found that one rather heavy handed. This one gets the same points across more effectively.
I've had this one bookmarked for ages. I guess I should get around to it!

I saw The Lighthouse the other night. Based on his first film, I expected something very different, but I was startled by how funny it was. It's very all over the place and I'm not sure it adds up to much, but its humor and ample aesthetic charms buoy it up.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Jinnistan » Thu Oct 31, 2019 9:50 pm

I'm only concerned about the '42 Cat People not making the list. Such a perfectly purring invocation.

#10 - Spider left me so cold. I'm sure it was intentional. I need to revisit.

#9 - One of the more beautifiul surprises of silent cinema. Sjostrom needs to get slapped more often.

#8 - I've also seen these Ishii films this year, and I personally prefer Malformed to Curse, but both are so good.

#7 - Charming, but I wouldn't quite rank it so high.

#6 - The pain of my darkness.... (I will see this soon, by god)

#5 - Good idea, great cranial damage, master Ironside presence, and I agree on the calculatted drabness.

#4 - One of my favorite discoveries of the past year.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Slentert » Thu Oct 31, 2019 10:26 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Thu Oct 31, 2019 8:28 pm
I'm a fan of Scanners, but yes, this seems to be pretty common (around here anyway). I haven't gotten into any arguments about it or anything, but it's been made clear that I'm in the minority. The Criterion Collection agrees with me though, so I feel pretty good about it. :)
Scorsese loves it as well.

I have not seen it, for that matter.
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Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Oct 31, 2019 11:08 pm

Image

3. The Wind (2018)

This one stands out for me as the only movie on this list that actually scared me. The other movies were creepy or disturbing or thought-provoking, but this one was truly frightening -- with terrifying jump scares and a pure fear-of-the-monster that had my teeth on edge for hours after. I'm sure this is partly craft, but it's also topic. The combination of the anxieties of pregnancy, isolation, and superstition really got to me!
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Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:29 am

Image

2. See You in Hell, My Darling

Despite having seen two other movies by Nikolaidis (Morning Patrol and Singapore Sling), I had no idea what to expect from this one. And how could I? Its absolutely unique. It’s story has been cut up into ribbons and presented to us as a collage –- a collage of love and hate and fear, that somehow makes the former friendship of these two women so vivid I might have lived it myself! Days later, it still feels as real as my own memories, its sensual details lingering in my fingertips and taste buds. I know that sounds kind of crazy, but I can’t help it!
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Nov 01, 2019 3:19 am

Jinnistan wrote:#5 - Good idea, great cranial damage, master Ironside presence, and I agree on the calculatted drabness.
You can be in the club with Captain Terror and me! :)

Jinnistan wrote:I'm only concerned about the '42 Cat People not making the list. Such a perfectly purring invocation.
I liked it fine. Maybe I should see it again...

Macrology wrote:I've had this one bookmarked for ages. I guess I should get around to it!
Definitely! I love just attending the wedding. Then there's all this other great stuff.
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Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Nov 01, 2019 3:20 am

Image Image
Image Image

1. Viy (1967)

Viy is a perfect movie. Of course, part of that is impeccable source material, a Gogol adaptation of a Ukrainian folk tale. But more important is the way it looks: the warm lighting, the stylization, and the crazy-good effects. (The monsters could be Harryhausen or Henson. They're timeless.) Nothing is overwrought or overlong; just a simple story, perfectly told.

And that's it! Thanks for reading.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Wooley » Fri Nov 01, 2019 4:04 am

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Fri Nov 01, 2019 3:20 am
Image Image
Image Image

1. Viy (1967)

Viy is a perfect movie. Of course, part of that is impeccable source material, a Gogol adaptation of a Ukrainian folk tale. But more important is the way it looks: the warm lighting, the stylization, and the crazy-good effects. (The monsters could be Harryhausen or Henson. They're timeless.) Nothing is overwrought or overlong; just a simple story, perfectly told.

And that's it! Thanks for reading.
Man, I know this sounds crazy, but Viy somehow slipped under my radar for decades and it was just this year that I was like, "hmm... maybe that's a thing I should watch", but I didn't reach it even though my interest in it really spiked hard at the end of the month. It is hard at the end to squeeze things in when you're trying to maximize the actual Halloween experience at that point.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Captain Terror » Fri Nov 01, 2019 4:26 am

Wooley wrote:
Fri Nov 01, 2019 4:04 am
Man, I know this sounds crazy, but Viy somehow slipped under my radar for decades and it was just this year that I was like, "hmm... maybe that's a thing I should watch", but I didn't reach it even though my interest in it really spiked hard at the end of the month. It is hard at the end to squeeze things in when you're trying to maximize the actual Halloween experience at that point.
Do it! The last 10 minutes or so is just non-stop monster goodness.
And if you subscribe to Shudder, their print is way nicer than the one I watched the first time.
Be a rebel and watch it in November! :)
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Re: Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Rock » Fri Nov 01, 2019 4:33 am

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Thu Oct 31, 2019 11:08 pm
Image

3. The Wind (2018)

This one stands out for me as the only movie on this list that actually scared me. The other movies were creepy or disturbing or thought-provoking, but this one was truly frightening -- with terrifying jump scares and a pure fear-of-the-monster that had my teeth on edge for hours after. I'm sure this is partly craft, but it's also topic. The combination of the anxieties of pregnancy, isolation, and superstition really got to me!
Yeah, dug this one a lot when I saw it at TIFF last year, glad somebody else dug it too.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Nov 01, 2019 4:34 am

Captain Terror wrote:Be a rebel and watch it in November! :)
That's what I was going to say! I might watch Mad Love tomorrow. :)
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Re: Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Nov 01, 2019 4:37 am

Rock wrote:
Fri Nov 01, 2019 4:33 am
Yeah, dug this one a lot when I saw it at TIFF last year, glad somebody else dug it too.
Yes! I'd anticipated it for so long, and it did not disappoint.


And here's the whole list, for easy reference:

1. Viy (1967)
2. See You in Hell, My Darling
3. The Wind (2018)
4. Demon (2015)
5. Scanners
6. The Lighthouse
7. Bell Book and Candle
8. Horrors of Malformed Men
9. The Wind (1928)
10. Spider

Honorable mention: Messiah of Evil
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Fri Nov 01, 2019 4:41 am

Darn it. I haven't seen any of these. However, some of these titles look interesting, and I'll definitely keep an eye out for them.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Wooley » Fri Nov 01, 2019 4:41 am

Captain Terror wrote:
Fri Nov 01, 2019 4:26 am
Do it! The last 10 minutes or so is just non-stop monster goodness.
And if you subscribe to Shudder, their print is way nicer than the one I watched the first time.
Be a rebel and watch it in November! :)
Nope.
The idea that there's another good one out there that could pump up next year's Horrorthon?! It must be saved. I mean, honestly I'm kinda mad I watched Valerie And Her Week Of Wonders, which is more a Horror/Halloween movie than a lot of things I saw this month and was fucking awesome, in September instead of October.
I already have two marching orders for next year: give Prom Night another chance and watch Viy!
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Captain Terror » Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:09 pm

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Fri Nov 01, 2019 4:34 am
I might watch Mad Love tomorrow. :)
Excellent! You've said that you're not a horror person, so let's remember that this is a lurid pre-code B-movie just to keep your expectations in check. But I can't imagine anyone finding it boring and it's barely over an hour long.
And still, I think it's a good example of the German influence on American films, and the lead female role is remarkable for its time. But I won't go into any of that unless you watch it. When the subject of Mad Love comes up I have to restrain myself from talking too much. :D
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Wooley » Fri Nov 01, 2019 4:35 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:09 pm
Excellent! You've said that you're not a horror person, so let's remember that this is a lurid pre-code B-movie just to keep your expectations in check. But I can't imagine anyone finding it boring and it's barely over an hour long.
And still, I think it's a good example of the German influence on American films, and the lead female role is remarkable for its time. But I won't go into any of that unless you watch it. When the subject of Mad Love comes up I have to restrain myself from talking too much. :D
Yeah, there's a frame I really wanted to post (but since I can't screen-cap things that are streaming anymore I wasn't able to) where Lorre's head is perfectly framed in one of those parallelogram-windows that came right out of German Expressionism and we saw so much of in Das Kabinet Des Dr. Kaligari and Nosferatu and so many others.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Captain Terror » Fri Nov 01, 2019 8:00 pm

Wooley wrote:
Fri Nov 01, 2019 4:35 pm
Yeah, there's a frame I really wanted to post (but since I can't screen-cap things that are streaming anymore I wasn't able to) where Lorre's head is perfectly framed in one of those parallelogram-windows that came right out of German Expressionism and we saw so much of in Das Kabinet Des Dr. Kaligari and Nosferatu and so many others.
Right, and the interior of Lorre's home is full of weird angles and shadows. And there's the shot of the housekeeper where we only see her shadow on the wall, a la Nosferatu. Even the fist seems like a German thing to me.
Of course, Freund was cinematographer on Metropolis, The Last Laugh and The Golem among others, so maybe this isn't a case of Germany influencing American films so much as just....Germans making films in America.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Slentert » Fri Nov 01, 2019 10:40 pm

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Fri Nov 01, 2019 3:20 am
Image Image
Image Image

1. Viy (1967)

Viy is a perfect movie. Of course, part of that is impeccable source material, a Gogol adaptation of a Ukrainian folk tale. But more important is the way it looks: the warm lighting, the stylization, and the crazy-good effects. (The monsters could be Harryhausen or Henson. They're timeless.) Nothing is overwrought or overlong; just a simple story, perfectly told.

And that's it! Thanks for reading.
I literally just listened to a podcast that is (partially) about this. Immediately grabbed my attention. How did you see this one?
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Nov 01, 2019 11:14 pm

Viy is fantastic.

As for Scanners, I think it is one of the weaker Cronenberg's from his early body horror days (it has nothing on Brood, Shivers, Videodrome). And so I generally undervalue it, even though I've watched it probably more than any other of his films (it was a childhood favorite, so nostalgia). But I think everything you say about it is pretty on the money on what is good about it. And a lot is good about it.

Except for Stephen Lack. While his terrible performance does mesh well with the sleepwalky tone of the entire film, it is still a terrible performance nevertheless.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Takoma1 » Sat Nov 02, 2019 12:31 am

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Thu Oct 31, 2019 8:19 pm
Image

4. Demon (2015)

This is a great-looking, very creepy story of possession, with a lot of cultural texture and historic meat to chew on. Pay close attention to the conversations, even the wedding speeches, to know what's going on. It reminds me of 2013's Ida, also from Poland, but I found that one rather heavy handed. This one gets the same points across more effectively.
I think that this is a hugely underseen film. I get that at times it hew more toward drama than horror, but I think that it builds in a really powerful way and has disturbing and interesting moments from the very beginning. I thought it was neat to see a story where a
male character was possessed by a female spirit and it's not campy or tinged with homophobia.
I was so dismayed to learn that the man who directed it died of suicide shortly after the film's release. I would have loved to see more of his work.

It also gets major points for an excellent cover.

Image
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:06 am

Captain Terror wrote:
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:09 pm
Excellent! You've said that you're not a horror person, so let's remember that this is a lurid pre-code B-movie just to keep your expectations in check. But I can't imagine anyone finding it boring and it's barely over an hour long.
Consider me warned. I'll watch it in the next couple days. :)

crumbsroom wrote:
Fri Nov 01, 2019 11:14 pm
Except for Stephen Lack. While his terrible performance does mesh well with the sleepwalky tone of the entire film, it is still a terrible performance nevertheless.
Huh. I thought his main job was to look odd, and he did that very well, haha.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:12 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 12:31 am
I was so dismayed to learn that the man who directed it died of suicide shortly after the film's release. I would have loved to see more of his work.
Oh, no! I'm so sorry to hear that. He did such a great job with this film.

I thought it was neat to see a story where a
male character was possessed by a female spirit and it's not campy or tinged with homophobia.
Yes! The actor was really excellent. Such a physical role!
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Takoma1 » Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:27 am

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:12 am
Oh, no! I'm so sorry to hear that. He did such a great job with this film.
Yes, it was only his third film. Such a loss.

Yes! The actor was really excellent. Such a physical role!
I pop onto his IMDb page every so often, but he hasn't been up to anything quite as interesting looking in the last few years.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage: Horror countdown

Post by Jinnistan » Mon Nov 04, 2019 1:27 am

Slentert wrote:
Fri Nov 01, 2019 10:40 pm
I literally just listened to a podcast that is (partially) about this. Immediately grabbed my attention. How did you see this one?
There's a nice looking subtitled version on Youtube (depending on your language preference).


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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Jinnistan » Mon Nov 04, 2019 1:37 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 12:31 am
I was so dismayed to learn that the man who directed it died of suicide shortly after the film's release. I would have loved to see more of his work.
His suicide may have been precipitated by the film's controversy on release. The subject matter of Polish complicity in the Holocaust has been so incendiary that Poland has tried to ban publicly acknowledging the fact. This context of the film
pertaining to mass Jewish graves
directly stokes that flame. But I don't really know the specifics of the director's death, except the financial failure of the film, at least partially due to its controversey, weighed heavily on him.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Nov 04, 2019 1:48 am

Jinnistan wrote:
Mon Nov 04, 2019 1:37 am
His suicide may have been precipitated by the film's controversy on release. The subject matter of Polish complicity in the Holocaust has been so incendiary that Poland has tried to ban publicly acknowledging the fact. This context of the film
pertaining to mass Jewish graves
directly stokes that flame. But I don't really know the specifics of the director's death, except the financial failure of the film, at least partially due to its controversey, weighed heavily on him.
That and I read that there was a concerted effort to downvote the film on sites like IMDb.

Whether it was the film's (relative) lack of success or just mental illness/depression or some toxic combination of the two, it's a real loss.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Macrology » Fri Nov 15, 2019 10:11 am

I watched Demon tonight. I may have more thoughts later, but for now, some initial impressions.

I like how the film employs some very conventional horror tropes in the first half and descends into less tangible and digestible horror in its second half. The last act in particular is masterful, as the sustained action of the deteriorating wedding reception frays into a tangle of emotionally and historically freighted loose ends. (I didn't necessarily need the Shining-esque visual cue, but that's a trifling criticism.)

In general, the film digs into some very rich cultural substrate, from Jewish folklore to Stanisław Wyspiański's play The Wedding (one of the defining works of Polish literature), to excavate the bizarre spectacle of collective guilt, which appropriately manifests as a bacchanalia of forced revelry plagued by confusion and denial. The persistent strain of off-kilter humor really seals the dark absurdity of the scenario; I especially liked the doctor playing Chopin on the keyboard, only to have a wedding guest shout, "Play something Polish!"

Having just visited Poland, I was struck by the proliferation of memorials in its cities - more than I've seen anywhere else. It's a country that is terribly conscious of its past, and very actively conscious (all of these memorials were covered in flowers and wreaths). Yet while they acknowledge the toll exacted upon the Polish Jews, I didn't discern any effort to reckon with Polish complicity. As Jinn noted, that's a sore point for many Poles and an on-going debate - although it's worth noting, there is a resurgent interest in Jewish culture, with the opening of new Jewish museums and the popularity of Krakow's old Jewish quarter, Kazimierz. Films like this and Ida are also a sign of that trend. (Some reviews I read mention a 2012 film called Aftermath, which I haven't seen.)

Personally, I'm reminded of two documentaries.
One, the Marcel Łoziński documentary Witnesses, is about the massacre of 42 Jewish Holocaust survivors by their Polish neighbors in 1946. (Unfortunately, I can't find a subtitled copy online.)
The other, which left an even deeper impression, is his son Pawel Lozinski's documentary Birthplace, where a Jewish author who escaped from Nazi occupied Poland as a child returns to find out what happened to his father. It is a far more stark and personal film, and it has a visceral immediacy to it that you rarely come across in films about this topic. Or any topic, for that matter.

I found a copy of it Youtube; you can add English subtitles with the CC button:

Ma`crol´o`gy
n. 1. Long and tedious talk without much substance; superfluity of words.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Takoma1 » Fri Nov 15, 2019 9:54 pm

Macrology wrote:
Fri Nov 15, 2019 10:11 am
I watched Demon tonight. I may have more thoughts later, but for now, some initial impressions.

I like how the film employs some very conventional horror tropes in the first half and descends into less tangible and digestible horror in its second half. The last act in particular is masterful, as the sustained action of the deteriorating wedding reception frays into a tangle of emotionally and historically freighted loose ends. (I didn't necessarily need the Shining-esque visual cue, but that's a trifling criticism.)

In general, the film digs into some very rich cultural substrate, from Jewish folklore to Stanisław Wyspiański's play The Wedding (one of the defining works of Polish literature), to excavate the bizarre spectacle of collective guilt, which appropriately manifests as a bacchanalia of forced revelry plagued by confusion and denial. The persistent strain of off-kilter humor really seals the dark absurdity of the scenario; I especially liked the doctor playing Chopin on the keyboard, only to have a wedding guest shout, "Play something Polish!"
I'm glad you liked it. I recommend it as often as possible.

Every now and then I wish that certain films came with literature to give cultural context, and this was one of those cases. While I feel like I understood the film in broad strokes, I felt like there was a lot that I was missing.
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