Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by JediMoonShyne » Sun Jan 29, 2012 8:34 am

Trip wrote: You watched it? When?
I mean, it sounds like something I'd like.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Trip » Sun Jan 29, 2012 8:35 am

JediMoonShyne wrote: I mean, it sounds like something I'd like.
Haha, maybe.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Derninan » Sun Jan 29, 2012 8:57 am

I love preciousness. I did not love Precious, because it wasn't precious at all. It was shitty.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by ribbon » Sun Jan 29, 2012 12:43 pm

GIMMMS all the yellow!
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Trip » Sun Jan 29, 2012 12:46 pm

ribbon wrote:GIMMMS all the yellow!
I'm not convinced you'll love it, or even like it, but am curious to know.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by ribbon » Sun Jan 29, 2012 12:48 pm

Huh, seems like my deal. But we'll see, once I can get my hands on it.
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Re: Yellow (2006)

Post by bubba » Sun Jan 29, 2012 2:23 pm

Trip wrote: The difference is the singing was recorded on camera rather than prerecorded and mimed, so one can forgive
the frequently out-of-key wavering though it's admittedly unpleasant at times.
It took a little while for me to get used to the general mediocrity of the singing. I accepted it as a consequence of the budget but, yeah, unpleasant is probably the right word (especially for that first song). Still, I'm glad you enjoyed the film. I really do hope this all leads to it getting some of the attention it deserves.
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Re: Yellow (2006)

Post by Trip » Sun Jan 29, 2012 2:27 pm

bubba wrote: It took a little while for me to get used to the general mediocrity of the singing. I accepted it as a consequence of the budget but, yeah, unpleasant is probably the right word (especially for that first song). Still, I'm glad you enjoyed the film. I really do hope this all leads to it getting some of the attention it deserves.
Hey man. :)

Nico Izambard is particularly hard to tolerate, oy vey. Otherwise he's well-cast.

The bit players kinda steal the thing, though. Like the droll big lady with glasses and the old man at the library, and the adorable gay guy.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by MrCarmady » Sun Jan 29, 2012 2:32 pm

Trip wrote: Yep, Damsels in Distress contains some of that apparently. Where the fuck is it already?
Yeah, it does, and it's as delightful as you'd expect. [/filmfestivalsmugness]
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Re: Yellow (2006)

Post by bubba » Sun Jan 29, 2012 2:34 pm

Trip wrote: Hey man. :)

Nico Izambard is particularly hard to tolerate, oy vey. Otherwise he's well-cast.

The bit players kinda steal the thing, though. Like the droll big lady with glasses and the old man at the library, and the adorable gay guy.
Oh yeah, he's easily the worst singer of the group.
I think my favorite bit player was the guy with the accordion at the party. I loved that entire sequence.
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Re: Yellow (2006)

Post by Trip » Sun Jan 29, 2012 2:38 pm

bubba wrote:
Oh yeah, he's easily the worst singer of the group.
I think my favorite bit player was the guy with the accordion at the party. I loved that entire sequence.
Haha, yeah. Good sequence, the girls on the roof.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by MrCarmady » Sun Jan 29, 2012 2:56 pm

I added Balabanov to my "Unseen Directors" list, and then remembered that I've seen Zhmurki, which even as a 12-year-old I was able to discern as a bad Tarantino imitation. Brat is of course huge in Russia, but somehow I never saw that one.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sun Jan 29, 2012 8:03 pm

I bumped Yellow all the way to the top of my queue based on "guy with accordion." :)
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by JediMoonShyne » Mon Jan 30, 2012 8:57 am

Trip wrote: I'm not convinced you'll love it, or even like it, but am curious to know.
Curious... yellow?
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Trip » Mon Jan 30, 2012 9:06 am

JediMoonShyne wrote: Curious... yellow?
ha
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by JediMoonShyne » Mon Jan 30, 2012 9:23 am

Trip wrote: ha
Speaking of Yellow, I have The Yellow Sea to watch. Worth it?
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Trip » Mon Jan 30, 2012 9:27 am

JediMoonShyne wrote: Speaking of Yellow, I have The Yellow Sea to watch. Worth it?
Still haven't watched it! It's around in HD now, so. I've heard good things.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Feb 02, 2012 1:45 am

Shieldmaiden wrote:I bumped Yellow all the way to the top of my queue...
So, apparently three movies named Yellow came out in 2006. And this one is not available on Netflix. :(
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Trip » Thu Feb 02, 2012 1:46 am

Yes, I thought it was strange that you had queued it but I forgot to say something.

It's only on KG.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Feb 02, 2012 1:48 am

I just need to learn to read. :P
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by bubba » Thu Feb 02, 2012 3:26 am

Shieldmaiden wrote:So, apparently three movies named Yellow came out in 2006. And this one is not available on Netflix. :(
Yeah, that was all really confusing when I first watched it, especially when I tried to find the IMDB page for the short paper I had to write.
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The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (1933)

Post by Trip » Thu Feb 02, 2012 6:17 am

  • (reposted from the FFC)

    Image

    Testament did not give me as much pleasure as Spione or M; it has not the more campy
    Feuilladian delights of the former (which I'm sure The Gambler does), nor the pressure-cooker
    pulse and unceasing formal ingenuity of the latter. Before you object, the film does share a
    good deal with Feuillade's serials, and it does contain several moments of striking cinema. Like
    Fantomas' or Les Vampires' pulpy adventures of enigmatic crime lords and their many henchmen,
    Testament's world is significantly a modern one in which crims exploit abstract bureaucracy,
    utilise phones, records, speakers, and cars as tools of (remote) control -of spaces,
    subordinates, enemies, one's identities -and where their motives are anarchistic and capitalistic
    in nature. They depart at tone: The silent films are decidedly French in their playhouse self-
    reflexiveness, with actors deliciously externalising their thoughts and intentions in looks to the
    camera not unlike children's theatre, whereas Lang's classical epistemology here hides such
    things until the "right" moments, suggesting with hints and cuts, and implicates the viewer in
    the action and atmosphere, the latter of which is comparably disquieting. It would be a mistake
    to mark it "serious", if only for its enjoyable characters on both sides of the law, but it makes
    for a more typical (or if you will: realistic) experience overall.

    As for the more arresting moments: every time Mabuse's double-exposure apparition appears,
    the rhythmic machinery noise clenching the opening scene, the later inspired use of sound
    (diegetically and formally) involving a public assassination, the apartment standoff Hitchcock
    surely borrowed for his first Man Who Knew Too Much, and the car chase climax's
    aestheticisation of light and wind through the trees. Lang's editing is as constructive as his
    sound design; the film is practically about scene transitions. Granted they are universally cold,
    abrupt cuts made bewildering for occuring immediately on top of or proceeding dialogue. A
    bomb ticking sound matches the cracking of an egg with a spoon (sound to sound), a
    newspaper headline about a jewelry theft cuts to the loot itself in close-up (image to image),
    Lohmann's literal attempt to untie the string around what could very well be the script for The
    Gambler
    becomes figurative in his secretary's telling off the cleaner not to tidy his office until he
    has "untied all the knots" of the case (image to dialogue), and so forth. Not exactly the most
    intellectual, ideological montage, but the small meaning each cut carries makes for an articulate
    and fluid patterning whereby the viewer makes the associations.

    Lang allegedly claimed his film was allegorically about the rise of the Nazis any chance he got,
    but I find this somewhat problematic in its particulars. Granted Mabuse pens his ideologically
    poisonous "empire of crime" treatise in prison not unlike Hitler years before, and his surrogate
    early on frenziedly delivers a lecture with a dictatorial voice and hand gesturing, but their mad
    motive for pure anarchy strikes me as something the Nazis would have stomped out in the
    name of violent order, in fact the reason for the party's popularity. Hitler blamed Jewish bankers
    for the economic collapse in recent years, which is apparently what Mabuse, the villain, had
    achieved in The Gambler. This tale of brainwashed criminality works more successfully to my
    mind as a not-so-specific parable for the modern world's apocalyptic death wish, a real noir
    concept, where the supernatural element becomes terribly real. But this isn't a terrifying film,
    it's a pulpy entertainment confidently realised for the early sound era, not my favourite Lang
    though a meritable one.

    Image Image

    Image
    +1 [ 93/100 ]
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by ribbon » Thu Feb 02, 2012 6:19 am

Happy this is still going.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Trip » Thu Feb 02, 2012 6:21 am

ribbon wrote:Happy this is still going.
Did you see my Yellow review? I'm sure we talked about it somewhere...
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by ribbon » Thu Feb 02, 2012 6:22 am

Trip wrote: Did you see my Yellow review? I'm sure we talked about it somewhere...
Haha, yeah, I think it was in this thread, actually.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Trip » Thu Feb 02, 2012 6:23 am

Oh, I looked but couldn't see the posts COZAVCHANGEALWAYS.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by ribbon » Thu Feb 02, 2012 6:23 am

ON THIS PAGE
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by ribbon » Thu Feb 02, 2012 6:23 am

oh shhhhhh
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Autumn Leaves (1956) + others

Post by Trip » Fri Apr 20, 2012 7:38 am

  • This is unfortunately kinda spoilery:

    Image

    Here is a film that proves straight melodrama isn't inherently textureless and vacuous. I'd even
    say it compliments the proceedings: Joan Crawford's middle-aged wallflower takes a huge leap
    of faith opening her heart to the man who ultimately invites the hysteria, so every lurid beat
    of the story and every shadow streaked across her desperate face is a punishment we regret
    life has handed her, simultaneously undeserved and inevitable. It's not at all the egregious
    dark comedy of Fassbinder's Martha, though it does share the notion of psychosexual hangups
    as the driving force of the relationships; granted Joan here is no masochist, indeed her
    devotion is positive (as is the film, ultimately). What's fascinating about this movie is the way it
    morphs over time: At first she's her own enemy, then he is her enemy (even before there are
    worrying signs the dread of a Les Bonnes Femmes resolution hangs over their romance), then
    his father and wife are their enemies as it threatens to turn noir, and finally his illness and
    treatment is! Even if you'd rather dismiss the melodrama, the execution is too strong to ignore.
    Notice Crawford's eyes avoid landing on the surprise first wife's photo for as long as possible
    as to not confirm the unbearable truth, and when she almost drops the content of her lap as
    she stands dazed immediately after. Aldrich's direction is consummate: the camera is always
    where it absolutely must be, light and shadow intensify mood and theatrics, a suspense set
    piece is edited to perfection. There's even a nice bit of foreshadowing in which a composition
    places Joan's typewriter conspicuously in between the lovers during an argument; needless to
    say the machine comes into play scenes later.

    Image Image

    At different points I'd also watched the following:

    Gueule d'amour contains some sharp classical filmmaking, and a poetic shot here and there of
    roving shadow or light, but I found this dramatically wanting up until about the last 10 minutes
    when it finally kicked into gear.

    I had read Françoise Sagan's Bonjour Tristesse immediately prior to Preminger's adaptation,
    which I must say paled in comparison. The brilliantly elucidated train of thought and outward
    expression -unceasingly neurotic analysis, nuanced manipulation, bracing self-made melancholy
    and guilt -of the novel could never be realised on screen. So we leave Cécile's head and a
    critical distance is introduced, most memorably in the humanising of the servants at the beach
    house in sly mocking of the bourgeois main characters Sagan's narcissism never allowed for.
    Apart from the ridiculous casting of David Niven as the father, I can't imagine a much better
    adaptation, yet I was underwhelmed.

    I'm having difficulty recalling what I admired about Ulmer's The Black Cat, apart from the
    bizarre modern mansion and possibly a war-related allegory to go along with it.

    I had turned off The Ladies Man the first time as Lewis' man-child wailing almost murdered me,
    before it even got to the main appeal -that epic dollhouse set. I've since seen dozens of films
    with and by Lewis and can tolerate him, even enjoy him, as a performer. But he really shines
    when it comes to visual economy, segments of modernist play (the opening chain-reaction
    gag, that bizarre white room sequence), and the general reliance on termite comedy rendering
    plot almost entirely useless. The Tashlinesque jokes hit better than Lewis' protracted faux pas
    awkwardness, but that's kinda the point.

    Image Image
    Image
    +5 [ 91/100 ]
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Derninan » Fri Apr 20, 2012 7:43 am

Yaaaaaaaayyyyyy

Bonjour Tristesse is getting a theatrical release here in about a week; I've never seen it, so I'll probably go, though your words aren't too encouraging.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Trip » Fri Apr 20, 2012 7:47 am

Derninan wrote:Yaaaaaaaayyyyyy

Bonjour Tristesse is getting a theatrical release here in about a week; I've never seen it, so I'll probably go, though your words aren't too encouraging.
A few people here love it. Blake, at least. Rouge, too?

Read the book.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by JediMoonShyne » Fri Apr 20, 2012 7:48 am

Shit, this thread is back.
:heart:
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Derninan » Fri Apr 20, 2012 7:52 am

I thought you were anti-reading? Or, didn't like doing it, or something.

I really should read the book. Maybe I will, but only after the film, as it seems if I do the reverse, I'm destined for disappointment.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Trip » Fri Apr 20, 2012 7:56 am

Fuck reading. Fuck it dead.

It's the shortest novel ever.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Derninan » Fri Apr 20, 2012 7:58 am

:D
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by B-Side » Fri Apr 20, 2012 9:02 am

The Black Cat is real good. Not Ulmer's best, though. Either Detour or Bluebeard have that honor. Watch those.

I downloaded Autumn Leaves some months ago and never watched it. Love Joan Crawford.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Trip » Fri Apr 20, 2012 9:39 am

I saw Detour 235234626 years ago dude.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by B-Side » Fri Apr 20, 2012 9:43 am

Trip wrote:I saw Detour 235234626 years ago dude.
Then watch Bluebeard! And The Strange Woman. But mostly Bluebeard.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Trip » Fri Apr 20, 2012 9:45 am

Um, hell no.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by B-Side » Fri Apr 20, 2012 9:46 am

Trip wrote:Um, hell no.
ohok
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Philosophe rouge » Fri Apr 20, 2012 9:13 pm

really want Autumn Leaves now
Everything around me is evaporating. My whole life, my memories, my imagination and its contents, my personality - it's all evaporating. I continuously feel that I was someone else, that I felt something else, that I thought something else. What I'm attending here is a show with another set. And the show I'm attending is myself. Fernando Pessoa

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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Apr 20, 2012 9:34 pm

Mehlodrama. Just kidding, you make it sound good. I'm glad this thread is back!
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La France (2007)

Post by Trip » Sun Apr 29, 2012 8:11 am

  • Image

    I have very little to say about this movie but thought it could use the exposure. It's a gorgeous
    little film, old-fashioned at heart but quite modern aesthetically. Bozon's extraordinary
    precision in framing and editing aligns with the Bressonian likes of Dumont and Kaurismäki
    particularly. The icy blues and greens of the austere French countryside evoke the former
    (perhaps it's inescapable) and the arrangement of figures and their studious actions in largely
    static set-ups better resemble the latter. It's actually Kaurismäkian in other ways as well, not
    so deadpan but every bit as gentle in tone and humanist in nature, and the surreal sequences
    of the soldiers performing songs from the perspective of a blind girl reflect the Finnish
    filmmaker's inclination for rock band interludes. This bit of whimsy seems to have irritated many
    viewers, but for me the songs poetically expose the life-affirming pacifism of these deserters,
    as revealed by the recounted story of Philippe they are an attempt to keep themselves from
    being hollowed out by war as he was. Perhaps their meaning isn't so pointed, and as in classic
    Hollywood films like River of No Return their pleasantness is reason enough for their inclusion.
    I'm intrigued by the Lieutenant's estimation that tag-along Camille's quest to find her husband
    is synonymous with seeking death, the meaning of which eludes me as much as the star
    constellation of the closing image. Intermediate film stock gives night scenes a glowing clarity.

    Image Image

    Image
    +1 [ 4/50 ]
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Derninan » Sun Apr 29, 2012 8:44 am

When I make my first feature film, hopefully within the next three years, I think people will call it Bressonian, and it will be appropriate.

Sorry, I think I was dreaming, but that sounds good.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Trip » Sun Apr 29, 2012 8:46 am

I think people will call it total shit they wouldn't wish upon their worst enemies.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Derninan » Sun Apr 29, 2012 8:48 am

There goes our continued professional relationship!
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by B-Side » Sun Apr 29, 2012 10:39 am

I like this thread. Did I say that already? I'm saying it again.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by charulata » Sun Apr 29, 2012 1:39 pm

Verite loves that one. I wasn't as taken with it although it wasn't the songs that bothered me. You reminded of another dance clip I want to post on that other thread. So thanks :).
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Trip » Sun Apr 29, 2012 1:40 pm

Yeah, well, Verite > charuwhatever.
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Re: Trip's Reward-Imbued Peregrination

Post by Fist » Sun Apr 29, 2012 3:09 pm

trip inspires me with his words and superior thread-design
I Watch Films, But...
In a word, I think that, far from favoring directors’ formal inventiveness, widescreen, instead, stifles it. It is, I’m more and more persuaded, if not the only, at least the main culprit for the expressive poverty of the image today. - Eric Rohmer
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