ribbon says so

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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Wed Oct 16, 2013 5:06 pm

Haven't seen Farewell to Arms yet but love the others, espesh the silents. Soooo many greats left though - excited to hear what you think of Secrets. From what I can tell, it isn't received very well but I love it.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by dreiser » Thu Oct 17, 2013 1:45 am

7th Heaven is the best Borzage I've seen.
"I hate the dark, the sharks liars. And the stems of cherry..."

Like Someone in Love (Kiarostami, 2012) 4/10
Killing Them Softly (Dominik, 2012) 2/10
The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (Pal/Levin, 1962) 6/10
The Dark Past (Mate', 1948) 7/10
New Rose Hotel (Ferrara, 1998) 3/10
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Thu Oct 17, 2013 2:44 am

I'd be hard pressed to pick a favorite. So I'm going to wait to watch them all before doing so. Haven't seen a single I've been underwhelmed with thus far though - he's likely my favorite filmmaker (at least currently - that tends to fluctuate fairly often).
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by roujin » Thu Oct 17, 2013 2:54 am

!
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Thu Oct 17, 2013 3:02 am

<3!
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by dreiser » Thu Oct 17, 2013 8:26 am

ribbon wrote:... he's likely my favorite filmmaker (at least currently - that tends to fluctuate fairly often).
Katie from RT would love you.
"I hate the dark, the sharks liars. And the stems of cherry..."

Like Someone in Love (Kiarostami, 2012) 4/10
Killing Them Softly (Dominik, 2012) 2/10
The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (Pal/Levin, 1962) 6/10
The Dark Past (Mate', 1948) 7/10
New Rose Hotel (Ferrara, 1998) 3/10
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by B-Side » Thu Oct 17, 2013 10:32 am

dreiser wrote:Katie from RT would love you.
Everything - A+
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by dreiser » Thu Oct 17, 2013 11:00 am

B-Side wrote:
Everything - A+
She does rate everything high it seems. I just enjoy her knowledge of classic Hollywood.
"I hate the dark, the sharks liars. And the stems of cherry..."

Like Someone in Love (Kiarostami, 2012) 4/10
Killing Them Softly (Dominik, 2012) 2/10
The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (Pal/Levin, 1962) 6/10
The Dark Past (Mate', 1948) 7/10
New Rose Hotel (Ferrara, 1998) 3/10
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by B-Side » Thu Oct 17, 2013 11:27 am

I was teasing, of course. She seemed nice. I envy her enjoying so many films to the extent that she seemed to.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:13 pm

dreiser wrote:
Katie from RT would love you.
who could blame her
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by B-Side » Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:15 pm

i could

and would
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:26 pm

yeah but you're you lol sucks to suck i guess
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by B-Side » Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:31 pm

fuck
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Sun Oct 20, 2013 12:19 am

recent borzages

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The Mortal Storm
There's always an intrinsic naive simplicity running through the veins of any Borzage film but rather than one which hides its eyes from the world & ascertains idealism as truth, it's a sort of virtue that is steadfast to its very core, one which surmounts oppression because it is sincerely inestimable & human. It's widely acknowledged that both Borzage & his protagonists are insensibly optimistic, that the world is romanticized through his lens - while that may be true, it's also widely unacknowledged that there will be despair & anguish because of these very ideals. This film is a nearly perfect example of who Borzage is as a filmmaker. His desires, his truths, his courage, his fears, & his heartaches. & I'm now kicking myself for not being absolutely astounded by its brilliance when I first watched it, because the more it settles, the more deeply it resonates, & that last walk through the house at the end of the film is as solemn, sentimental, & beautiful as Borzage gets.

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Young America
Clear to see Borzage's influence on Japanese cinema in this one. The delinquents' lifestyles are so reminiscent to I Was Born, But... though the protagonist here is separated by his innocence in the unquestioning audience's eye & the film is separated by its deliberate tone. It's a darling little film with a dramatic & sometimes exaggerated slope but the optimism (mainly through Doris Kenyon, an obvious Borzage surrogate & other "good fairies" such as the judge, the grandmother of the young boy's friend, & oddly the boy himself) & faith in mankind which the film carries easily gets you through.

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No Greater Glory
As much as I adore the silence of Borzage's silents & films that came shortly thereafter, this film wouldn't be nearly as remarkable or moving as it is with even a hint of subtlety. His mind is grasped firmly around childhood thinking here, & his acknowledgement that children will say word for word, line for line what is on their minds plays beautifully when you pair it with honor, even if that honor is established through a pretend war-game of what is essentially capture the flag.
As children tend to fluctuate, as does the tone of the film - but in such an effortless way that you hardly notice until the film fades to black & you're sprung back into a more developed frame of mind. For instance, the protagonist Nemescek here has spurts of joy, fear, cowardice, absurdity, & courage, & we follow him head on through these inconsistencies. In one notable scene where our protagonist Nemescek & his troop are on a mission to steal the flag from the opposing side (the Red Shirts), Nemescek is ordered to go to the greenhouse pool & hide where he ludicrously puts a lily leaf on top of his head for 'guaranteed' camouflage. The camera then reveals a frog directly in front of him on another lily pad & the first cut to Nemescek's horrified expression is exaggerated & comical. The frog grows closer, the croaks become louder, & the cut back to Nemescek confesses the boy's legitimate terror in his obvious attempt not to scream. Yet he abstains from moving until the Red Shirts cease their search. Subtlety is out the window, & the scene's significance is clear - but it's a staggering exploit of tone, nonsensical childhood fears submitting themselves to the films most genuine example of bravery.
With such precision in regards to tone & articulating genuine emotion, the icing is that there's not a single inelegant frame. Not one movement, not one deviation of the camera doesn't cater thorough aesthetic delight.

screencaps:
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Big City
The first 10-15 minutes are so darling I nearly had to turn it off because omgpreciousstop<3. Really, Spencer Tracy & Luise Rainer have fantastic chemistry throughout that hardly even belongs in a film which has such potential to be so bleak. It seems very much like some of the silly flirtations between the two as well as other seemingly misplaced whimsical moments are even just slightly influenced by Capra & MGM's affinity for screwball comedies. Yet even when the film's direction seems to be losing in a game of tug of war with the film's production, Borzage manages to shine through in those moments that only he could handle - emotionally & visually. dat lamp & city-through-the-window lighting.

screencaps: here

Image
Secrets
This is a strange & fascinating film, an experimental structural venture in which Borzage toys with the barriers between silent & sound filmmaking by delving into three separate genres. The camera work here is magnificent, not at all dissimilar to his silent films, & Mary Pickford as the lead is an interesting choice - if I recall correctly this was during her marital problems with Douglas Fairbanks (too lazy to look into it though) & if so her response to the titled 'secrets' seems quite the statement. That aside, though, it's intriguing to see her take on a talking role with far more cultivation than her previous silents & is surprisingly rather endearing to see her habitual 'silent reaction shots' so misplaced in a sound film. But when she shines, she radiates. One scene in particular is possibly one of the most heart wrenching moments in a Borzage film & her reticent performance matched with the devastating static photography & euphonic gunfire echoing throughout the film's surroundings is absolutely agonizing in its artistry. Truly a remarkable, visually hypnotizing film which I wish more people would see & admire for the two exceptional talents working together on a turf neither have yet to fully cognize & making something so singular out of their own pursuits of understanding.

screencaps: here

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Lazybones
A small scale but handsomely crafted little film - firmly structured with a nearly heart stirring tenderness of feeling. Each performance is organic, delicate, & subdued. The title character with his instinctive propriety & defining listlessness graduates quietly from adolescent inclination to a still amiable but dispirited middle age with such graceful ambiguity to his development that the film around him is more evocative of Japanese cinema than Hollywood. The clever & playful presentation of the title cards lend visual wit with which scenes are joined together & a light quality to a film that could easily have otherwise been overly theatrical. One of Borzage's dearest, most deeply felt films & of equal importance, one of his most beautiful.

screencaps:
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Desire
Lubitsch positively dominates the film's style, & considering he & Borzage are two of Hollywood's finest filmmakers you'll hear no complaints from me! The whole film is wrapped around opposites attracting, lies, scandal, sexual innuendo to the point where there's hardly a trace of the director's presence. Such a joy, so irresistibly funny, & wink at the pre-code films of the past. Brilliant stuff. Wish there was more to say that hasn't already been said of Lubitsch, but alas.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Sun Oct 20, 2013 12:20 am

I got a little lazy near the end, so my apologies.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by Das » Sun Oct 20, 2013 1:06 am

Clear to see Borzage's influence on Japanese cinema in this one.
Is it, though? That the two films share a lot of similarities seem to stem from something else, perhaps cultural trends of the era, or popular fiction but I have doubts that they influenced each other directly. At that point in time, American and European culture was quite rare for the time, certainly not something that permeated the mainstream of Japanese culture - as it was met more with resistance to preserve 'Japan's culture' As far as I know, American cinema was still a rarity in Japan in the 1930s - there was a lot of resistance to American culture until after the second world war and the technological/industrial boom of the 50s/60s/70s, and Ozu had made two films in a similar structure to I was Born But.. before with I Graduated But.. and I Flunked But.. as well.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Sun Oct 20, 2013 1:11 am

Well then I guess it isn't huh.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by Das » Sun Oct 20, 2013 1:16 am

I put a question mark in there for a reason, laaaaaaady.

I mean, it's certainly not unheard of, just something of an oddity. A lot of upper class Japanese citizens did engage with western entertainment, I'd be curious if Ozu was aware of people like Borzage. Dazai referenced Western literature and art in the thirties, for example.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Sun Oct 20, 2013 1:25 am

I've no hard evidence of that statement at the moment since I'm not at my computer but recall while reading into Borzage & his work that he in fact was an influence on Ozu specifically, as was Sternberg & Lubitsch, if memory serves. Think Fist mentioned it once as well, & considering Ozu is one of his most admired filmmakers I'd be inclined to believe it - especially since watching so much of Borzage's work recently & noticing very distinct similarities not only in that film but others as well, most notably silents. Although even if this is all inaccurate & I'm remembering improperly (which I'm not denying is a possibility), I could edit the statement to read that his films have a very unmistakable resemblance to classic Japanese cinema, at least to my eye.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by snapper » Sun Oct 20, 2013 1:29 am

I see a LOT of Borzage in Kinoshita's visual style. Maybe not in his narratives
Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


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Re: ribbon says so

Post by Trip » Sun Oct 20, 2013 2:14 am

fuck this
Please TRIP and Die
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Sun Oct 20, 2013 2:16 am

oh true, yeah
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by Trip » Sun Oct 20, 2013 2:30 am

nawbutsrs that was a good read
dunno what to choose!
Please TRIP and Die
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Sun Oct 20, 2013 2:31 am

:D thnx. sucks to get back into the swing of writing again - reading it over just now was a drag. which do you have? or none yet?
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by Trip » Sun Oct 20, 2013 2:34 am

Already seen TMS and Lazybones. I think I have Desire. And I mean Lubitsch, so...
The rest I don't have but I have different ones.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by Philosophe rouge » Sun Oct 20, 2013 2:41 am

I love Lazybones
Everything around me is evaporating. My whole life, my memories, my imagination and its contents, my personality - it's all evaporating. I continuously feel that I was someone else, that I felt something else, that I thought something else. What I'm attending here is a show with another set. And the show I'm attending is myself. Fernando Pessoa

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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Sun Oct 20, 2013 2:46 am

Trip wrote:Already seen TMS and Lazybones. I think I have Desire. And I mean Lubitsch, so...
The rest I don't have but I have different ones.
Oh I meant in general :P. But yeah Lubitsch, man.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by roujin » Sun Oct 20, 2013 2:57 am

i haven't seen four of those lol me
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by B-Side » Sun Oct 20, 2013 11:06 am

Lazybones and Lucky Star both have fantastic photography. Few things compete with that classic film haloing glow. Those pastoral scenes feel like they may have influenced Ford, or maybe Ford was doing it first -- I wouldn't know since I still haven't seen any silent Ford for whatever reason.

I downloaded No Greater Glory a while back and never watched it. It's disappeared into the ether. Same with The Mortal Storm. I'll never get them back.

Srsly though, No Greater Glory looks delicious and sounds amazing. Need.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Sun Oct 20, 2013 3:22 pm

No Greater Glory (& others) was shot by Joseph August who did lots of Ford films as well as Hawks, so the connection fits.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by Gort » Sun Oct 20, 2013 6:45 pm

ribbon wrote:I got a little lazy near the end, so my apologies.
Hmm. When I get lazy my write-ups get too long. :shifty:
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Sun Oct 20, 2013 7:45 pm

Gort wrote: Hmm. When I get lazy my write-ups get too long. :shifty:
:D mine just get awful. then again they also are when i'm not lazy but I TRY OK
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by B-Side » Mon Oct 21, 2013 9:27 am

ribbon wrote:No Greater Glory (& others) was shot by Joseph August who did lots of Ford films as well as Hawks, so the connection fits.
I was talking about the look of the silents, and he didn't shoot either Lazybones or Lucky Star.

Turns out there is a connection, though. George Schneiderman. Shot several Ford silents, as well as Lazybones. Of the Ford sound work I've seen, he shot Pilgrimage, Judge Priest and Steamboat 'Round the Bend. All three happen to share Lazybones' pastoral beauty.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Mon Oct 21, 2013 3:15 pm

Oh yeah you did say silents huh? Hard to read posts I don't care about etc :D.

But someone tell me what to watch tonight.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by wigwam » Mon Oct 21, 2013 8:21 pm

The Big Country
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by roujin » Mon Oct 21, 2013 9:35 pm

the gang's all here
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Tue Oct 22, 2013 12:44 am

hirtho wrote:The Big Country
Seen. Like.
roujin wrote:the gang's all here
Yay, okay! Plans changed for tonight but this will be my next.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by Verite » Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:15 am

Das wrote:I'd be curious if Ozu was aware of people like Borzage.
Ozu referenced 7th Heaven in Days of Youth. Not only the 7th Heaven poster but the lines in the 3m25s to 3m31s segment are references to lines in 7th Heaven. Clips:


Das wrote:As far as I know, American cinema was still a rarity in Japan in the 1930s
I don't have any statistics about screenings but Japanese studios & filmmakers of that era saw and studied Hollywood pics. Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano's Nippon Modern, Bordwell's Ozu book (and other pieces), stuff by Catherine Russell and Keiko McDonald, etc. have info about that stuff. Must be, like, at least 10 years since I looked through Kyoko Hirano's Mr. Smith Goes to Tokyo: Japanese Cinema Under the American Occupation, 1945-1952 but I think there's stuff about American film in Japan in that era sprinkled throughout the book.
ribbon wrote:I've no hard evidence of that statement at the moment since I'm not at my computer but recall while reading into Borzage & his work that he in fact was an influence on Ozu specifically, as was Sternberg & Lubitsch, if memory serves.
Ozu was a huge fan of Chaplin and Lloyd as well.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by snapper » Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:23 am

There was a LOT more American cinema in Japan than there was Japanese cinema in America in the 30s. I think it was pretty common to go out to an American film as a family outing
Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


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Re: ribbon says so

Post by Shieldmaiden » Tue Oct 22, 2013 12:37 pm

Das wrote:As far as I know, American cinema was still a rarity in Japan in the 1930s - there was a lot of resistance to American culture until after the second world war and the technological/industrial boom of the 50s/60s/70s
I'm sure this was true of some aspects of culture, but western dress had already taken hold, and then you had baseball and Hollywood movie stars. Attitudes about women's role in society were beginning to change, too. Do you remember Our Neighbor, Miss Yae?
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by B-Side » Tue Oct 22, 2013 12:57 pm

Shieldmaiden wrote:... and then you had baseball and Hollywood movie stars.
To be clear, baseball had taken hold in Japan long before Hollywood existed. Baseball was introduced in the 1860s. You might be talking about the penetration of western society as a whole before the 1930s and Hollywood, though, in which case ignore me. :P
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by Shieldmaiden » Tue Oct 22, 2013 1:07 pm

Yeah, I'm just talking about the state of society in the 30s, not when the various pieces took hold. But, I didn't know that about baseball; I guess it wouldn't really count as western influence at that point.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Wed Mar 11, 2015 12:53 pm

Read through this a bit this morning, missed having opinions. Maybe by the end of the week I'll post some write-ups on a few/bunch of favorites from my month of unemployment.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by Colonel Kurz » Wed Mar 11, 2015 1:08 pm

:fresh:
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by Trip » Wed Mar 11, 2015 1:33 pm

Trip wrote:fuck this
Please TRIP and Die
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by JediMoonShyne » Wed Mar 11, 2015 1:46 pm

Still actin' like we ain't lost her to the Man.
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Wed Mar 11, 2015 3:04 pm

yeah we'll see. really all i wanted was trip's acceptance but alas. :(
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by JediMoonShyne » Wed Mar 11, 2015 5:21 pm

At least he posts in your thread. :(
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by ribbon » Wed Mar 11, 2015 6:39 pm

ban him
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Re: ribbon says so

Post by Mean Old Bastard Ed » Wed Mar 11, 2015 10:47 pm

Employment is to movie watching as to what rain is to baseball games.
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