Ian's Log

Discuss anything you want.
Post Reply
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Fri Jan 02, 2015 5:02 pm

!!!
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: Ian's Log

Post by JediMoonShyne » Fri Jan 02, 2015 5:58 pm

Don't ignore me, Ian.
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Fri Jan 02, 2015 6:01 pm

JediMoonShyne wrote:Don't ignore me, Ian.
Image
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: Ian's Log

Post by JediMoonShyne » Fri Jan 02, 2015 6:15 pm

THEO :heart:
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Tue Jan 06, 2015 4:19 am

Image

Children's Party (1938) Joseph Cornell - 9/10
Cotillion (1938) Joseph Cornell - 9/10
The Midnight Party (1938) Joseph Cornell - 9/10

This is a brilliant trilogy of films. They shimmer with glee while still remaining enigmatic and distant.

Image

Prostokąt dynamiczny (1971) Józef Robakowski - 7.5/10
Videopieśni (1992) Józef Robakowski - 8/10
1, 2, 3, 4… (1993) Józef Robakowski - 7/10
Gnuśna linia (1992) Józef Robakowski - 8/10
Impulsatory (2000) Józef Robakowski - 7.5/10
Kąty energetyczne (1975-2004) Józef Robakowski - 9/10
Taniec z drzewami (1985) Józef Robakowski - 6.5/10
Samochody, samochody! (1985) Józef Robakowski - 6.5/10
Chodż do mnie (1989) Józef Robakowski - 6.5/10
Ojej! Boli mnie noga (1990) Józef Robakowski - 6.5/10
Byłem chłopcem w Nowym Jorku (1989) Józef Robakowski - 6.5/10
Jadziu, odbierz telefon… (1992) Józef Robakowski - 7/10
Testament Józefa (1992) Józef Robakowski - 7.5/10
Jestem elektryczny (1996-2005) Józef Robakowski - 6.5/10
Mechaniczny operator (2003) Józef Robakowski - 7/10
"Party" z Lutosławskim (1987) Józef Robakowski - 6/10
Kapela moskwa i moje oko. Zapis energetyczny (1985) Józef Robakowski - 5.5/10

At their worst Robakowski's films are still interesting, if not in action than at least in theory, but at their best they're able to create entire worlds out of almost nothing but shape and form. Structural film in its purest state and it's a remarkable thing. I want to look further into his purely abstract works because I think he's one of those directors who works best with a total removal from the human world.

Image

NYC (1976) Jeff Scher - 7.5/10
Reasons to Be Glad (1980) Jeff Scher - 8.5/10
Area Striata (1985) Jeff Scher - 7/10
Milk of Amnesia (1992) Jeff Scher - 9/10
Trigger Happy (1997) Jeff Scher - 7.5/10
Garden of Regrets (1994) Jeff Scher - 9/10
Yours (1997) Jeff Scher - 7/10
Postcards from Warren (1998) Jeff Scher - 6.5/10
Turkish Traffic (1998) Jeff Scher - 8/10
Ann Arbor Film Festival (1998) Jeff Scher - 7/10
Bang Bang (1998) Jeff Scher - 8.5/10
Sid (1998) Jeff Scher - 6.5/10
L'eau Life (2007) Jeff Scher - 8/10
Paper View (2007) Jeff Scher - 7/10
Lost and Found (2004) Jeff Scher - 7/10
You Won't Remember This (2002) Jeff Scher - 7/10
Grand Central (1999) Jeff Scher - 6.5/10
White Out (2007) Jeff Scher - 7.510
Tulips (2008) Jeff Scher - 8/10
Train of Thought (2002) Jeff Scher - 6.5/10
All the Wrong Reasons (2008) Jeff Scher - 8/10

One of my best recent discoveries in animation. Totally exhilarating pieces that I can't possibly see someone not enjoying.

Image

Just for the Fun of It (1983) Dean Snider - 7/10
Love at Home (1983) Dean Snider - 6/10
The Soft White Underbelly (1982) Dean Snider - 6/10
Hey! (1981) Dean Snider - 7/10
Ish & Vinny (1982) Dean Snider - 7/10
Blotcher Film (1981) Dean Snider - 7/10
Zebo (1982) Dean Snider - 6.5/10
Yes-Ta-Day (1981) Dean Snider - 8.5/10
What Goes On (1983) Dean Snider - 6/10
Make 'Em or Brake 'Em (1983) Dean Snider - 6.5/10
No Nothing Woman (1984) Dean Snider - 7/10
Three Variations (1982) Dean Snider - 7/10
Cloud Nine (1983) Dean Snider - 8/10
A Field Guide to Western Birds (1981) Dean Snider - 7.5/10
We See (1981) Dean Snider - 7.5/10
Motel L (1981) Dean Snider - 8.5/10
Bored Members (1981) Dean Snider - 8.5/10
Eat... Shit... (1980) Dean Snider - 7.5/10
A Little Poem for Wednesday (1982) Dean Snider - 8/10
Preferred Piece (1982) Dean Snider - 6.5/10
Brown Eyed Girl (1983) Dean Snider - 7/10
Destroy All Intellectuals (1980) Dean Snider - 6/10
The Intellectuals Fight Back (1980) Dean Snider - 6/10
Rock Falls/Mud Slides (1982) Dean Snider - 8/10
Owh! That Was My Penis You Stepped On! (1982) Dean Snider - 7.5/10
Souvenirs (1982) Dean Snider - 8.5/10
Stink (1984) Dean Snider - 7.5/10
I Remember Love (1980) Dean Snider - 8/10
Where's Betty? (1982) Dean Snider - 7/10
I'll See Ya Partner (1984) Dean Snider - 7/10
1984 (1984) Dean Snider - 8/10
You Can See (1981) Dean Snider - 8/10
Little Feet (1980) Dean Snider - 6.5/10
Without You (1980) Dean Snider - 7.5/10
Desiring Men (1981) Dean Snider - 7/10
The Triumph of Man (1983) Dean Snider - 7/10
Tin Cans Are My Favorite Treat (1979) Dean Snider - 6.5/10
My Little Baby (1986) Dean Snider - 7/10
Friends Along the Way (1990) Dean Snider - 8/10
La Mar (1987) Dean Snider - 7.5/10
Crummy Little Life (1985) Dean Snider - 7/10
The Reel Thing Tingles (1986) Dean Snider - 8/10
Return to Infancy (1986) Dean Snider - 7/10
Fuckin' Hawaii (1985) Dean Snider - 8/10
I'm Beginning To See The Light (1987) Dean Snider - 8/10
All About Eggs (1991) Dean Snider - 7.5/10
A Very Unfortunate Story (1987) Dean Snider - 7/10
The Night Could Last Forever (1985) Dean Snider - 7/10

A ton of fun pieces of no wave cinema. Some of the longer ones ran a bit long but the vast majority of them are less than three minutes so they're like little pieces of candy.

Image

Såsom i en spegel (1961) Ingmar Bergman - 7/10 (Through a Glass Darkly)

Mixed on da Bergsta though I am, I think this trilogy has some definite merit and cool stuff going on. I should revisit Winter Light. But on first impression what I’m most moved by here is the attention paid to images. The film has that stagey artificiality, but it doesn’t get in the way of some rather beautiful expressionistic images being created.

Image

Tystnaden (1963) Ingmar Bergman - 8/10 (The Silence)

Best Bergman. This is just a fantastic movie, and a lot of that is due to its atmosphere and pacing, which is unlike any other of his I’ve seen. The empty, deathly silent (duh), and eerie progression of this brings to mind all kinds of people like Sokurov that I ordinarily would never think about w/r/t Bergman. And for as “weird” as Persona is, I see the origins of David Lynch more in this film than any other Bergman, at least Eraserhead for sure. Very sterile and cold and so beautiful because of it. For a director lauded for psychological terror, this surpasses everything else I've seen in terms of really entrenching itself in uneasiness. If all of his movies were like this I’d be a Bergman fanboi with the lot of them I swear.

Image

Final Flesh (2009) Vernon Chatman - 7/10

I dunno if anyone here watches Xavier: Renegade Angel but this is a film by the creator of that. Well, kind of. Chatman submitted a bunch of ideas to amateur porn sites that act out submitted scripts and assembled the results for this movie. And the scenes are, well, exactly what you'd expect him to write. The cheap and absolutely bizarre nature of it really makes most other films described as "nightmarish" or "like a fever dream" seem tame by comparison.

Image

P'tit Quinquin (2014) Bruno Dumont - 8.5/10

A bizarre new direction for Dumont, but one that has enough of his talents to be a great film. A humorous movie from him certainly sounds strange, but like you’d expect it’s humorous only through a sheen of bleakness. Having accepted that the Dumont of today is a rather different beast than the Dumont who made L’Humanité and Flandres (outside of his trademark cinematography), I can definitely see that this is a work of a certain unique brilliance. Its sense of humor almost reminds me of someone like Roy Andersson, just sapped of the surreality and left with nothing but a sense of the tragicomedy that pervades everyday existence. Only it’s less deadened by banality and more imbued with naïveté. Really cool stuff all around, if very removed from Dumont’s other works.
User avatar
MadMan
Posts: 10644
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:56 pm
Location: RT FOREVER
Contact:

Re: Ian's Log

Post by MadMan » Tue Jan 06, 2015 7:33 am

Damn that's a lot of movies.
This Is My Blog. There Are Many Like It But This One Is Mine
Shitty Film Thread
Follow Me On Twitter If You Aren't Doing So Already
The MadMan Reserved 31 Seats
"I think its time we discuss your, uh....philosophy of drug use as it relates to artistic endeavor." -Naked Lunch (1991)
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Tue Jan 06, 2015 2:27 pm

They're mostly <10 min. shorts though. A lot of the Dean Snider ones especially are like 2 minutes on average.
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: Ian's Log

Post by JediMoonShyne » Tue Jan 06, 2015 2:48 pm

Perfect to watch on the toilet!

(Hence the title of the thread?)
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Sun Jan 11, 2015 8:53 pm

Image

Gribiche (1926) Jacques Feyder - 7/10

This is a pretty cool film. A lot more light than the grandiosity of a lot of these other Albatros/Russian émigré productions but it’s quite good all the same.

Image

Les Nouveaux Messieurs (1928) Jacques Feyder - 8/10

An immense step further from Gribiche in pretty much every way. The opening montage with the ballet students is one of the most impressive I’ve seen in a silent in quite some time. Not only are the montages way more advanced, the cinematography is more exquisite, the scenes more imbued with varied emotions, and the girls are way cuter too. Just as good as second-tier L’Herbier, I may even see it as his top-tier equivalent in time.

Image

La Belle et la Bête (1946) Jean Cocteau - 8/10 (Beauty and the Beast)

Cliche choice but this is probably my favorite Cocteau. His mise-en-scène is on another level here, way above Orpheus, and it really suits the subject matter perfectly. Tons of glimmering lights dressing up castles and all kinds of enchanting tableaus that truly bring the man’s work to another level. The images here in general are just amongst the best I’ve ever seen from Cocteau, and I feel he really has a mature understanding of constructing images in a cinematographic sense.

Image

Seppuku (1962) Masaki Kobayashi - 7.5/10 (Harakiri)

One of da classix. I’m not a huge Kobayashi person (though I haven’t seen too many) but this is a great film. Love that early Edo period scenery because I am a HUGE Rinpa school dorkus. Kobayashi remains a bit generic for me in comparison to some other Japanese directors of his era but it works really well for this super-classicist film. I should revisit Kwaidan because I think that could work well for a classicist Japanese gothic horror by the same logic. But yeah, good stuff. The final battle scene here is certainly a thing of legend, can’t deny it.

Image

(1963) Federico Fellini - 7/10

I’m not as beguiled by this as a lot of other people yet but there’s a lot to appreciate. Also Barbara Steele lift ya skirt.

Image

Route One/USA (1989) Robert Kramer - 8/10

Not much to say other than it’s a big collection of interesting people and scenarios. Looking forward to more Kramer.
User avatar
wigwam
Posts: 2084
Joined: Tue Jun 11, 2013 1:03 pm

Re: Ian's Log

Post by wigwam » Mon Jan 12, 2015 1:30 am

Yeah 8 1/2 isn't as good as its hype, but Beauty and the Beast is and more!
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Wed Jan 14, 2015 3:12 am

Yeah back to 500px. I liked the OBNOXIOUS HUGENESS but I'm too OCD to not have a uniform width.

Image

L’Inferno (1911) Adolfo Padovan & Francesco Bertolini - 8/10

Anyone who knows me very well certainly knows one thing about me, and that is that I love Dante. All of his work, all of his writings, and his very essence has become a vital point of importance to me, and I think about him on a nearly daily basis. I love most of the classical epic poets, though I wouldn’t call myself an expert on them as I only have meager experience. But as much as Homer, Virgil, Ovid, and Milton mean to me, something about Dante strikes me to my core in a way none of these others quite do. So naturally attempts to visualize it are of immediate interest to me. One thing I am often a curmudgeon about is all the insistence on the Inferno at the expense of the next two parts. It is somewhat unavoidable as this section has probably the most immediate and striking images, however it is only the beginning of a work where wholeness is the key element. Dante’s invocation of hell exists to give way to heaven. However, given that Dante’s ascension is a journey utterly beyond human conception and envisioning, I can cut slack at reluctance to engage with it visually. But enough of my sperging over my true love Dante, this film is pretty baller.

Even disregarding it from its source material, this would be an excellent film for its magnificent landscapes and magical effects-work. But luckily I believe this film visualizes Dante in a way that is gorgeous and utterly appropriate. While there is something central to The Divine Comedy as a poem that a film could never capture, a poet so engaged with the movements and expressions of everyday humans seems like the perfect subject matter to attempt to capture on film. And it’s lovely to see. This really is a film with an extraordinary sense of pacing, narrative, and even framing of imagery for its time. I could easily believe this was from the early 20s. How appropriate that it adapts Dante, who essentially invented the “new” kind of epic poem in the same way that these early Italian 10s films define cinematic advancement. Also absolutely make sure you see this with the Tangerine Dream score. I don’t know how I’d envision the Inferno sounding but it’s probably one of the best interpretations I’ve heard.

Image

Rashômon (1950) Akira Kurosawa - 7/10

I wouldn’t call this my favorite Kuro, but it’s obviously a film with a lot of importance. Can’t help but love that downpour + dilapidated temple setting either!

Image

Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? (1957) Frank Tashlin - 9/10

Commonly regarded as Tashlin’s masterpiece and I wouldn’t argue with that a bit. The opening to this has some of the most incredible experimentation in Hollywood comedy. Tashlin’s cartoonish insanity in full swing on a level very rarely equalled. There’s beautiful satire about advertising which subtly pisses all over coporate society in a wonderful way, but it’s still non-obtrusive enough that the viewer can choose to simply bask in the hilarious setpieces and incredible framing. Absolutely stunning.

Image

La anam (1957) Salah Abu Seif - 6.5/10

FATEN HAMAMA IS A QT W/ A FAT AZZ. Anyway, really interesting stuff. Total worship of Douglas Sirk and American melodrama in general from Egypt’s golden period of cinema. It’s so surreal when you fall into a 50s melodrama that might as well be in America and then see some pyramids in the backgrounds. Fun stuff if nothing particularly exquisite.

Image

Le testament d'Orphée, ou ne me demandez pas pourquoi! (1960) Jean Cocteau - 8/10 (Testament of Orpheus)

For one thing, this has an amazing cast. Jean-Pierre Léaud, Jean Marais (!), Pablo Picasso (!!!)… However, independent of that I'm still impressed. It really makes me want to revisit Orpheus and The Blood of a Poet because I don't remember being blown away by them but this is definitely something special. Even before the dreaminess begins, the beautiful, holy artifice of this film is much more dramatic and defined than the previous films. I love this because it seems like a much more direct engagement of what it means to create and be an artist, and more specifically what it means to be the artist Jean Cocteau. And that's what I think makes his films so special. As the opening to this one says, he uses cinema to let us all dream together.

Image

Sweetie (1989) Jane Campion - 5.5/10

This has a lot going for it that I appreciated but ultimately I think it doesn’t live up to its potential by the end, as it just seems to run out of steam and lose its distinctive touches. I do really love the sense of space and time in this film, which constantly unfolds like a memory though in a patient way giving prenty of room for long slow pans and all that good stuff. Like a darker proto-Wes Anderson. The best moments of this are when Campion indulges in some Jarman-esque moments of experimentation/non-narrative. I wish she would have done more of that, or at least kept her style a bit more definitive near the end. That said it’s still a good enough film, just one I think could have been even better.

Image

Nazo no kanojo X (2012) - 7.5/10 (Mysterious Girlfriend X)
13 episodes

I was a bit unsure what to think about this series at first and the drool aspect is pretty weird and takes a bit to get used to, but it’s a touching and interesting show about what it means to discover one’s sexuality and romantic spirit. Good stuff overall.
User avatar
roujin
Posts: 2736
Joined: Sun Nov 20, 2011 9:57 pm

Re: Ian's Log

Post by roujin » Wed Jan 14, 2015 3:25 am

really liked mysterious girlfriend x, too.

*drools*
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: Ian's Log

Post by JediMoonShyne » Wed Jan 14, 2015 6:43 am

Only the most eclectic thread on the forum, this one.
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
Beau
Posts: 6196
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 8:00 pm

Re: Ian's Log

Post by Beau » Wed Jan 14, 2015 7:30 am

JediMoonShyne wrote:Perfect to watch on the toilet!

(Hence the title of the thread?)
On... a tablet?
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Wed Jan 14, 2015 8:21 am

JediMoonShyne wrote:Only the most eclectic thread on the forum, this one.
Really? D'aw thanks.

Reminds me that I've been thinking about bringing book reviews into this log too but I need to get in the habit of posting more in the Literature thread so I'm thinking I might pass.
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: Ian's Log

Post by JediMoonShyne » Sat Jan 17, 2015 5:40 pm

Yes, do it!
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Tue Jan 20, 2015 11:22 pm

Image

Stream Line (1976) Chris Welsby - 8.5/10
Park Film (1972-1973) Chris Welsby - 6.5/10
Windmill 3 (1976) Chris Welsby - 7/10
Seven Days (1974) Chris Welsby - 8/10
Wind Vane (1972) Chris Welsby - 7.5/10
Sky Light (1988) Chris Welsby - 8.5/10
Drift (1994) Chris Welsby - 8.5/10
River Yar (1971-1972) Chris Welsby - 9/10

Welsby's films focus on one thing above all others: Water. Indeed, there is very little more fascinating to him than the way water contorts and moves across landscapes large and small. I love how dedicated he is to something so vague yet specific. One could extrapolate it to the environment, including the wind and air, but water seems to supersede the others. It is beautiful.

Image

Gycklarnas afton (1953) Ingmar Bergman - 7/10 (Sawdust and Tinsel)

I think this is a pretty cool Bergman because it has a lot of quiet moments for dat scenery and atmosphere to develop, which is something I think his best films usually have in common. I’m certainly very fond of the setting. Harriet Andersson also has quite the impressive cleavage. Ingmar u fkkn perv. This film isn’t as deeply psychologically probing as a lot of his best films, but the absolutely tragic and pessimistic progression of it is quite something indeed.

Image

Fanny och Alexander (1982) Ingmar Bergman - 8/10 (Fanny and Alexander)

Yeah probably the second-best Berg after The Silence. Sometimes it becomes a little stodgy but overall it doesn’t detract much and the whole thing is pretty great. I was particularly impressed by that opening montage for the third episode, that was really CINEMATIK on a level I haven’t seen from Bergman yet. But the whole film is full of cool shyt.

Image

Ruggles of Red Gap (1935) Leo McCarey - 8.5/10

Wow, I’d heard of this but wasn’t expecting it to astound me this much at all. It takes a rather simplistic-sounding fish out of water setup and transcends it to make one of the funniest looks at history and culture around. A “comedy of manners” in absolutely the truest sense, but with a relentless sense of that distinctly American, down-home humaneness and just a general understanding of people that elevates it to other levels. When Ruggles says he can’t sit with superiors and Egbert says “Superiors nothin’, you’re as good as I am and I’m as good as you are, ain’t I?”, that about sums it all up. I guess there’s quite a bit of patriotic American chest pounding in this movie but it all feels so sincere and loving that I can’t help but adore it.

Image

Nora inu (1949) Akira Kurosawa - 7/10 (Stray Dog)

A pretty cool moment in Kuro’s career, if not quite in the upper echelon of his best films. I like this because it seems to be a pivotal film for him, where he retains the gritty and bleak, obviously noir-influenced landscape of Drunken Angel but begins to use it for a more action-driven, somewhat more conventional story such as the kind he’ll develop in works like High and Low, although in my opinion this still isn’t quite on the same level of mastery and emotional wealth as that one. That said, for a transitional work it’s very fun. I like it quite a bit.

Image

Herostratus (1967) Don Levy - 7/10

Fits comfortably in with O Lucky Man! and to a lesser degree A Clockwork Orange in its rebellious bizarreness seeped in UK counterculture, but this seems more free-form than either of those two. I love the uncomfortable awkwardness of every scene in this film. Every scene feels like the actors are being pushed to their limits, as if they’re acting with very little to direct them and just confused and ready to stop recording, but in a GOOD WAY that somehow feels totally natural to the world of the film. It’s really weird. I wouldn’t say this is a totally perfect film, but it’s fascinating stuff with a few sections which are undoubtedly incredible and I think its influence has snuck into films secretly more than we realize.

Image

Chinmoku (1971) Masahiro Shinoda - 8/10 (Silence)

This is a wonderful film and one I’ve been waiting to see for so long. Not quite as great as Himiko but god it comes close. It doesn’t hurt that I absolutely get a hard on for Japanese history and this particular tragic part of history is one that is worthy of being talked about more than it is. The imagery here is tied to nature in that specially Japanese, Shintô-influenced way, which is an interesting parallel for a story about the oppression of Christian missionaries.

It is quite beautiful cinematography, but beautiful in a very sorrowful way. All the images bleed with an unspoken, subconscious tragedy thousands of years old. That’s what makes this so interesting. Even though it’s a film all about rivalries between Christians and Buddhists, the aesthetics have an aching sense of beauty that seems inspired both by the mystical powers of nature and life in nature typical to Shintô-inspired Buddhism and by the narratives of captivity and steadfast faith in the face of death that characterize Christianity. I guess the latter could apply to Buddhism too, but this film definitely has something about it that captures the feeling of Christian scripture in a very different way, seeming more physical than the mystical and otherwise conceptual nature of Buddhist theology.

I might be reading too much into it, but it almost seems like this film (in addition to just being a beautiful evocation of history and a famous piece of Japanese literature) seeks to both recognize and atone for the cruel behavior of the past but put it behind to unite what is great and noble about Japan and the west because of this dual nature. Ehhh… that’s probably a stretch but this is certainly a very brilliant work. I think because of he didn’t necessarily stick to as consistent of a style as his contemporaries and because he seems more conservatively classicist on the surface, Shinoda is often left out of the ATG cool kids’ table but he really should be recognized as a worthy figure.

Image

Police (1985) Maurice Pialat - 8/10

A particularly gruff work of Pialat’s. And a particularly good one as well. It’s somewhat unorthodox for his films because while it’s about people and the worlds of complex emotion in any encounter and situation between them, the exterior elements of the police procedural story give this film more of a framework to create these encounters and feelings within. The most obvious comparison is The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (even the Masters of Cinema description can’t avoid making it). What I’d say is the biggest difference is the way Pialat has a sense of reservedness that makes his characters seem more icy and somewhat enigmatic. What else can you expect from a continental European steeped in Bresson I suppose? But much like Cassavetes, it’s very much a film where the actions in the film that progress the plot are wholly resultant, or at least wholly concurrent with, what goes on the heads of the characters rather than the other way around. And like anything written by Breillat, there’s at least a bit of interesting exploration of the meanings of lust and sex. However, it’s very subtle and quiet in doing so.

Image

Die Unerzogenen (2007) Pia Marais - 7.5/10 (The Unpolished)

A worthwhile specimen which, despite how it looks, differentiates itself from the Berliner Schule scene it seems to be lumped in. It's a lot more bleak than those films, though not extreme in that regard. The camera is shaky and grainy parts in addition to the still and removed style of that scene. Cassavetes is probably the most obvious comparison point, at least to start, because it's difficult to avoid him with this kind of thing. Pialat is another one, although this seems a bit more sapped of the warmth in his work. In comparison to those types, Marais also differentiates things by focusing on a pocket of society seeped in poverty and rural locations, a far cry from the yuppies we see in most of these films. I feel like the pacing is rather different too. It's full of empty, silent moments but I feel like the thoughts of the characters are a bit more directly driven, even if they have the same depth as any film by those two. It's more like a German Pixote than anything. I notice I kind of completely avoided discussing this film without comparing it to another film which is rather unfair, but it's a really good movie either way w/e.

Image

Na Vida Jovem (2012) Pedro Costa - 9/10 (Sweet Exorcist)

Getting me super fucking wet for Horse Money. UGHGIUHRGEHGRIHUERGIPUHERPGUHEPURGPOUH.
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: Ian's Log

Post by JediMoonShyne » Wed Jan 21, 2015 8:22 pm

jade_vine wrote:Die Unerzogenen (2007) Pia Marais - 7.5/10 (The Unpolished)
Scribbled something about this one here; shares some thematic similarities with Petzold's The State I Am In, though you're right in that it tends to break away from the Berlin School as we know it. Most of those films are about structure and routine (such German concepts, right?) whereas this is a lot more bleak, as you say, with little to no stability involved - traits of poverty, which is something the other films are yet to address. I can see some Pialat here, too: particularly L'Enfance Nue...
jade_vine wrote:I notice I kind of completely avoided discussing this film without comparing it to another film which is rather unfair, but it's a really good movie either way w/e.
I do this all the time. :D
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
Shieldmaiden
Posts: 7598
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 2:19 pm

Re: Ian's Log

Post by Shieldmaiden » Wed Jan 21, 2015 9:13 pm

jade_vine wrote:Såsom i en spegel (1961) Ingmar Bergman - 7/10 (Through a Glass Darkly)
Tystnaden (1963) Ingmar Bergman - 8/10 (The Silence)
Gycklarnas afton (1953) Ingmar Bergman - 7/10 (Sawdust and Tinsel)
We seem pretty well-aligned on Bergman, since these are my favorites. Guess I really need to see Fanny and Alexander.
User avatar
Eminence Grise
Posts: 982
Joined: Fri Feb 26, 2010 9:11 pm

Re: Ian's Log

Post by Eminence Grise » Fri Jan 23, 2015 9:43 am

Which version of F&A did you see? Television, I hope.

Loving the log. :up:
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Sat Jan 24, 2015 6:15 am

Eminence Grise wrote:Which version of F&A did you see? Television, I hope.

Loving the log. :up:
Naturally. Luv u 2 bruh.
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Mon Jan 26, 2015 4:04 am

Image

Rebecca (1940) Alfred Hitchcock - 7/10

One of the best Hitchcocks, no doubt, and not just for the chance we have to perv all over Fontaine. I can see why it isn't one of his most popular by people expecting the cr33pz and suspenze though, at least at first, because it certainly takes a lot of time to develop slowly. But what a finale it all builds to. Very solid stuff.

Image

Il vangelo secondo Matteo (1964) Pier Paolo Pasolini - 9/10 (The Gospel According to St. Matthew)

Beguiling, hypnotic, gorgeous, and, most importantly for a film about Jesus, utterly human.

Image

Edipo re (1967) Pier Paolo Pasolini - 8.5/10 (Oedipus Rex)

This is weird stuff, on a purely aesthetic and narrative level. Some of the hypnotic surveys of the landscape here almost seem like precursors to Fata Morgana. The more entrenched he became in this sort of enigmatic fairy tale style, the stronger, more mystical overall his films became for me. That isn't to denigrate his other work, I just really love the way he plays with time and narrative so much in films like this and Teorema. I really adore it.

Image

Medea (1969) Pier Paolo Pasolini - 8.5/10

More totally radical and fascinating historical landscapes from Pasolini. The shaky camerawork combined with rather radical editing pushes this one only further into fascinating realms that I still have trouble comparing other films to. I imagine Straub and Huillet found a lot interesting in these films, even if they formally went in a very different direction.

Image

Death and Transfiguration (1961) Jim Davis - 8.5/10
Light Reflections (1952) Jim Davis - 8/10
Landscape (1950) Jim Davis - 6.5/10
Fathomless (1964) Jim Davis - 9/10
Pennsylvania/Chicago/Illinois (1957-1959) Jim Davis - 6/10
Sea Rhythms (1971) Jim Davis - 8.5/10

Barring the third and fifth which are decent but otherwise unexceptional works with photographed imagery, these are spectacular and mystical light plays. If you want to track down Brakhage's greatest influences, Davis absolutely can't be ignored. However, Davis's conception of cinematic time and movement is very different, slightly more "traditional" simply in terms of the way movement occurs but certainly still excellent.

Image

Caravaggio (1986) Derek Jarman - 8/10

Ohhhh yeah. I've liked most of what I've seen by Jarman but this is on another level. Of course I adore Caravaggio, but in truth, while this film engages with his talent for luscious and subtly erotic scenes, it's more of a framework for Jarman's true poeticisms to come through. And how they do!

Image

Wittgenstein (1993) Derek Jarman - 8/10

Very very fucking bizarre, but luckily it all seems to hang together. Again, Jarman picks an intriguing historical man and uses his life and situations as a framework for a lot of his own fears, desires, humor, etc. It's very goofy, even more than Caravaggio, which I understand some will probably find grating, but I believe Jarman uses this to create something very personal and moving if you can become used to his style.
User avatar
MrCarmady
Posts: 4749
Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2010 1:29 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by MrCarmady » Mon Jan 26, 2015 11:03 pm

Rebecca isn't even a top 10 Hitchcock, and I've only seen about 20. I should watch some Jarman and some Pasolini, though.
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Mon Feb 02, 2015 8:10 am

Image

Frontier Marshal (1939) Allan Dwan - 8/10

This is a great western. Some really wonderful work with shadows makes the exteriors here always look very grim, even if they’re in broad daylight. Very lean and genre-adherent but extraordinarily solid.

Image

Point Blank (1967) John Boorman - 8.5/10

Some of the most incredible cinematography of American genre cinema in the 60s, maybe even ever. But it’s not even just the cinematography (which would be enough to make this a great movie), the editing and scene setup is blatantly post-New Wave in its slick, cool, and elliptical style. I also can’t help but adore these swanky 60s-era households with all their bodhisattva statues, Japanese curtains, Roman tablets, and other random art historical pieces of detritus. Studying art history, it’s always the first thing I notice in films from this time. Thoroughly modern, sumptuous, and just fun.

Image

Out of the Blue (1980) Dennis Hopper - 9/10

Linda Manz’s voice is as recognizable and awkwardly endearing as always, and her performance in this film is really something else. It might just be her pinnacle, only Gummo might still be above it. But make no mistake, this film surrounding her is just as wonderful. Let’s just say it’s exactly the kind of film I’d expect from Hopper. Weird that this is a Canadian production because in some ways this feels like one of the most American movies I’ve ever seen. There’s a thick sense of sadness to this, but a very cool sense of detachment that distinguishes it from simple misery. Such is a very typical feeling of this new-era Americana and this does it about as well as any other film.

Image

Soultaker (1990) Michael Rissi - 5/10

Skip it. It has potential to be a good shlocky horror piece but becomes really boring about halfway through.
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Fri Feb 20, 2015 11:03 pm

Image

All That Heaven Allows (1955) Douglas Sirk - 9/10

One of Sirk's utter masterpieces, and shame on me that I hadn't seen it sooner. One of his most rooted in melodramatic iconography, but in doing so it becomes an absolutely fascinating look at life and the tragic nature of love in 50s America, and more broadly in life itself. What I think makes this so fantastic is that while it's very melodramatic and full of big emotions, it's handled with a remarkable delicacy, even by Sirk's standards. Even outside of all that, the painterly quality of the colors and framing here makes the film more than a visual masterpiece. What I really love about this movie is how much truly deep stuff it reveals about gender, class, conformity, even race, and all that other lefty shit while being so subtle and tactful about it that it never becomes obnoxious. We can all learn from that.

Image

Das Rätsel der roten Orchidee (1962) Helmut Ashley - 5.5/10

My first Krimi flick so I’m unfamiliar with the genre’s hallmarks or style but this was a bit unimpressive. A great early Kinski role and some charming qualities to the roughly-put-together nature of the film provide it with a degree of worth but it’s nothing I’d go out of my way to see.

Image

The Adjuster (1991) Atom Egoyan - 7.5/10

Utterly unsure what to make of this, but it’s quite fascinating and has a choking atmosphere I haven’t seen quite somewhere else. Something like Lynch crossed with Roy Andersson.

Image

Kape neuwareu (2009) Jung Sung-il - 8.5/10 (Café Noir)

A monolithic work. When you look at modern South Korean cinema it has an annoying tendency toward generic sentimentality and melodrama. Not to suggest that these are inherently bad things at all, but I've always wanted to see more variety. However, this makes a lot more sense when you consider how rocky of a history Korean cinema has had, and on a grander scale the absolute pounding that Korea has received throughout history. But now that SK is becoming such a superpower in the world, at least in terms of media, I'm excited to see what the pushback in unorthodox, rebellious aesthetics will be in the alternative film scene, much like we've been seeing in Thailand and the Philippines. This shows a lot of great promise, being unafraid to tackle everyday life in its least "dramatic" moments and dwell in silences and uncomfortable empty spaces as well as joyous times.

Image

The Passing (2011) Roberto Minervini - 7.5/10

It certainly seems strange at the outset for an Italian to make a film in rural Texas, and even more so for him to seem so intimately connected to the landscape. But I'm very pleased with this and look forward to seeing the rest of the trilogy.

Image

Low Tide (2012) Roberto Minervini - 7.5/10

More mature and consistent, I believe, than The Passage. One sees an even more developed sense of time and space. What I mentioned about landscape and the human actors engaged with it in that film is improved here. There's definitely more of a Gummo vibe to this one, being about youth in poverty and finding the natural beauty in it. When you have them riding bikes a lot it certainly draws Gummo to mind! But Minervini has a very different sense of poetry. More rooted in naturalism, surely, but also one that more of a removed and objective eye. It seems like he has a sense more rooted in nature and the organic than one of myth and memory like Korine.


EVERYTHING I SAW AT THE 38TH PORTLAND INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL:

Image

The Duke of Burgundy (2014) Peter Strickland - 6/10

Das hot.

Image

Phoenix (2014) Christian Petzold - 6.5/10

I have to admit that I was sleepy for a lot of this so my experience was less than ideal, but it seemed alright.

Image

Rocks in My Pockets (2014) Signe Baumane - 6.5/10

Didn't even intend to see this, I actually got the time of another movie wrong and this ended up being there instead so I said why not. It's cute.

Image

R100 (2013) Matsumoto Hiroshi - 6.5/10

Some lethally goofy-ass shit. Parts were annoying but overall it was pretty funny. Helps if you have a weakness for "wacky" Japanese shit.

Image

Maidan (2014) Sergei Loznitsa - 8.5/10

I was really unsure what this would be like since I haven't been keeping up with Loznitsa since Revue, but this is still very typical of him. He's gone back to his documentary roots, but created something really beautiful out of it. As usual, he observes the action with a removed, static, highly formalized style of filming. But for such a removed style there's a surprisingly intimate connection to the body of Ukraine in this film, even if it's a film of constant imagery of crowds and throngs of people opposed to individuality. His style also becomes rather fascinating when it's paired with some occasionally quite violent footage. The static removal subverts our typical expectation of the gonzo, handheld on-the-street work and makes the whole action look rather strange and alien by shifting our perspective in this way (there is one notable exception where he has to pick up his tripod and move it because the protestors start throwing Molotovs at the journalists and filmmakers!).

Image

Stop the Pounding Heart (2013) Roberto Minervini - 8.5/10

By far the best of Minervini's trilogy, and I don't think it's just my experience of it in the theatre making me think so. While the first two films of his are very very good works, I always got the impression that he had a great style but had to kind of search for a subject interesting enough to match it, with mixed results. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely approve of directors making films solely for the point of expressing an interesting style, but I think this had a lot more inspiration. A lot of this also is due to the absolute grace and beauty of Sara. She far outshines the other main subjects of his films as far as a presence to illuminate the film goes. The style of this is also fantastic. Perhaps it's just the subject matter, but I was reminded of Silent Light with the Tarkovsky-esque elements removed, more in line with early Reygadas given the connection to the rough and messy parts of life. But it's more lyrical than something like Japón, so it's caught in an interesting place. I think he really captures the Texan landscape better than ever, and given the skill of his previous works at this, that says a lot. It's most interesting when he works with these two families, both examples of rural Texan lifestyle that ring extraordinarily true. The way he counterplays one pious, almost Puritan family with a more down-to-earth and worldly group of ranch hands is absolutely fascinating. The way he seems so in tune and connected to the portrayal of these lifestyles and the sense of nature created within suggests that Minervini has either spent a great deal of time in rural Texas or that he is extraordinarily talented at sensing and capturing the mood of a specific milieu. I'd guess it's a bit of both.

Image

Cavalo Dinheiro (2014) Pedro Costa - 9.5+/10 (Horse Money)

No words… yet.
User avatar
roujin
Posts: 2736
Joined: Sun Nov 20, 2011 9:57 pm

Re: Ian's Log

Post by roujin » Sat Feb 21, 2015 12:47 am

wacky japanese is literally all i enjoy anymore.

i can't believe i haven't seen any of matsumoto's work...
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: Ian's Log

Post by JediMoonShyne » Sat Feb 21, 2015 5:16 pm

jade_vine wrote:More mature and consistent, I believe, than The Passage. One sees an even more developed sense of time and space. What I mentioned about landscape and the human actors engaged with it in that film is improved here. There's definitely more of a Gummo vibe to this one, being about youth in poverty and finding the natural beauty in it. When you have them riding bikes a lot it certainly draws Gummo to mind! But Minervini has a very different sense of poetry. More rooted in naturalism, surely, but also one that more of a removed and objective eye. It seems like he has a sense more rooted in nature and the organic than one of myth and memory like Korine.
Oh, I do like this Gummo comparison, especially in the scenes where you see the kid cross the highway or whatever. Korine always seems to shoot from the POV of a kid, though where the adults are almost lopped off at the neck and not worth considering, let alone interacting with. There's a dynamic between the young character in The Passage and the adults around him, with Minervini clearly suggesting that their trashy ways are having a fatal effect on his potential and the kind of person that he will be when he grows up. Almost in the same way that Andersson portrays his adults in A Swedish Love Story: nothing but aged bodies riddled with flaws and prejudices and disorders. With the children as pure and graceful in comparison, not yet corrupted by the ills of society.
jade_vine wrote:Stop the Pounding Heart (2013) Roberto Minervini - 8.5/10

By far the best of Minervini's trilogy, and I don't think it's just my experience of it in the theatre making me think so. While the first two films of his are very very good works, I always got the impression that he had a great style but had to kind of search for a subject interesting enough to match it, with mixed results. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely approve of directors making films solely for the point of expressing an interesting style, but I think this had a lot more inspiration. A lot of this also is due to the absolute grace and beauty of Sara. She far outshines the other main subjects of his films as far as a presence to illuminate the film goes. The style of this is also fantastic. Perhaps it's just the subject matter, but I was reminded of Silent Light with the Tarkovsky-esque elements removed, more in line with early Reygadas given the connection to the rough and messy parts of life. But it's more lyrical than something like Japón, so it's caught in an interesting place. I think he really captures the Texan landscape better than ever, and given the skill of his previous works at this, that says a lot. It's most interesting when he works with these two families, both examples of rural Texan lifestyle that ring extraordinarily true. The way he counterplays one pious, almost Puritan family with a more down-to-earth and worldly group of ranch hands is absolutely fascinating. The way he seems so in tune and connected to the portrayal of these lifestyles and the sense of nature created within suggests that Minervini has either spent a great deal of time in rural Texas or that he is extraordinarily talented at sensing and capturing the mood of a specific milieu. I'd guess it's a bit of both.
So glad you prefer this one! For me, it almost seems like a culmination of the other films, with perhaps a more mature approach and better grasp of the material. I, too, was reminded of Reygadas and Silent Light in particular, though it might just be the country attire and blonde plaits. There is a very similar sense of tradition and order, though: Sara is already slave to routine, despite her tender age, and you almost wonder whether she isn't just as important to the running of the farm as her elders. There does seem to be a very close bond between Minervini and these families he worked with, though I remember reading somewhere that he lived with them for a period of time which would perhaps explain the level of intimacy we see. And while he clearly isn't afraid to put lines in their mouths, as non-actors, I think perhaps the most impressive feature of the film is this breaking of that fourth wall: the sudden move away from fiction towards documentary, with people addressing the camera and such.
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Wed Mar 04, 2015 3:06 am

Oh my, it's been a while since I've posted here, hasn't it? As you'll be able to tell by these watches I've been on the james/stack tip.

Image

Dezertir (1933) Vsevolod Pudovkin - 9/10 (The Deserter)

Wonderful stuff. The storyline is laughably propagandist, even for these kinds of films, but of course that doesn’t matter because this truly is a great film. Pudovkin really proves himself to have followed the example of figures like Dovzhenko and Eisenstein more fully here as he truly uses the powers of montage and time to create a well-rounded atmosphere for a society. Like all the greatest of these films there’s a lot of emphasis on strikes and collective power and Pudovkin is remarkable at using a wealth of images via montage to augment this vision of each member of society part of a collective power and a collective power within each member of society. His strength between Mother and this has increased by a ton and I’m so interested to see the other works between them.

Image

Little Big Horn (1951) Charles Marquis Warren - 8/10

A really fantastic classical western, but at the same time one that is somewhat unique for its early time. It’s an early example of an on-the-road story, for the most part not about the battle of Little Big Horn itself but about a group of cavalrymen on their way to warn Custer, with some interpersonal drama mixed in. And that’s what’s most interesting about it, the way it focuses on these men and their journey more than a lot of action (appropriate if you’re trying to create a western hero mythos because, after all, this is an event where the American army got their asses beat). It moves rather slowly and surely, making sure to give characters room to breathe with each other. The way it takes a really masculine genre and uses the framework to examine the way people relate to each other is pretty great. Reminds me a bit of what Fuller does in a film like Fixed Bayonets! actually. It’s all about community rather than some heroic figure of a lone gunman. And it works really well.

Image

La horripilante bestia humana (1969) René Cardona - 4.5/10 (Night of the Bloody Apes)

Lol dis shit right here. This some really silly stuff. It’s about some sexy Mexican lady wrestlers intercut with a guy whose heart is replaced by an ape’s, making him turn into some spoopy ape man monster (sadly he’s kind of lame on that front as they only really made up his face). It’s lame. The best part of it is the really g0ry medical footage of an authentic heart transplant.

Image

Il seme dell’uomo (1969) Marco Ferreri - 8.5/10 (The Seed of Man)

If there’s one person you’d want to be alone with in a post-apocalyptic world it’s certainly Wiazemsky (trying hard not to steal James's classic "I'd like to give her MY seed of man" line from his TLC review of this). This is a fantastic film too, makes me interested to see what Ferreri has done. Society seems to keep recreating itself, with our new Adam and Eve roaming this bizarre landscape of lost military monuments and other remnants of society. This desperate, isolated environment makes all shades of life seem surreal, which aids it well when Ferreri’s filmmaking is inherently quite strange.

Image

Kureopatora (1970) Osamu Tezuka & Eiichi Yamamoto - 7/10 (Cleopatra)

Pretty fun stuff, with a particularly weird opening scene that blends 2D and 3D animation. Otherwise this is pure classik Peanuts-influenced animu. You can really tell this is the guy who’d later direct Belladonna of Sadness since there’s a similar sense of time and use of cool abstracted moments, even though it’s a lot more explicitly cartoony and playful, which detracts a bit from the overall effectiveness I think. Also has lots of saucy b00biez and azz which is a plus. And lots of fun art historical references.

Image

The Go-Between (1970) Joseph Losey - 8/10

The Servant was pretty good but this is really what I’m talking about. Losey as usual transforms wealthy domiciles into dreamy landscapes. Losey’s expert capturing of childhood reverie and the crushing nature of love elevate this above other English dramas of a similar style.

Image

A New Leaf (1971) Elaine May - 9/10

An even better film than Mikey and Nicky. Very funny and very heartwarming, but that by no means is to say there isn’t a lot of deep sadness within the story that develops. Elaine May’s character is unbelievably cute and charming. Shit, there’s a lot to say about this and I don’t know if I can do it all justice. All I know is that this is as poignant a look at the crooked nature of love, attraction, and not just social but human dynamics of interaction as I’ve ever seen. Plus, it’s really funny.

Image

LA Plays Itself (1972) Fred Halsted - 8.5/10.

The scuzzy, realist, misanthropic West Coast companion to Pink Narcissus? Something like that. Certainly this is a film with a much more pronounced sense of isolation and loneliness, even if it in fact has more actors and “encounters” than Bidgood’s. Like someone like Kuchar, Halsted gets a lot of mileage out of kitschy pastiche, but in a way that reveals a very profound sense of alienation at the core of it. Kitsch imposed on the male, sleazeball equivalent of Chantal Akerman.

Image

Shao Lin da peng da shi (1980) Liu Chia-liang - 8.5/10 (Return to the 36th Chamber)

What can I say? It’s not quite as great as the original (a hard feat for anyone), but it’s a suitable sequel. Way goofier (the fake teeth on that one dude!), but not in an annoying way. Liu’s framing and work with a moving, roaming camera and fighting choreography is stellar as usual.

Image

La casa de las mujeres perdidas (1983) Jesús Franco - 8/10

One of my first excursions into the really obscure depths of Franco’s career. But it’s really an underrated one. Romay plays a girl named Desdemona who lives alone on an island with her father, mother, and retarded sister. Desdemona lives in a state of ennui and in order to alleviate it tries to arouse and come on to her father, but their relationship is eventually interrupted by a young man joining the island’s population. Romay, while the blonde wig from this period continues to be somewhat unbecoming, is sexy on a thousand levels in this film, to no one’s surprise. But like the best of Franco’s films he transforms the domestic setting here into some kind of hedonistic purgatory, full of psychotic lust and its double-edged sword of side effects.
User avatar
wigwam
Posts: 2084
Joined: Tue Jun 11, 2013 1:03 pm

Re: Ian's Log

Post by wigwam » Wed Mar 04, 2015 3:32 am

yay Ferreri, need to see GoBetween already, didnt know there was an LA Plays Itself that's funny

best film log as always :salute:
User avatar
roujin
Posts: 2736
Joined: Sun Nov 20, 2011 9:57 pm

Re: Ian's Log

Post by roujin » Wed Mar 04, 2015 3:35 am

i love gay porn
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: Ian's Log

Post by JediMoonShyne » Wed Mar 04, 2015 9:02 am

jade_vine wrote:desperate, isolated environment
jade_vine wrote:sense of isolation and loneliness
Hi, there.
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
snapper
Posts: 12232
Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2012 12:11 pm
Location: NZ

Re: Ian's Log

Post by snapper » Wed Mar 04, 2015 9:43 am

love this thread but could maybe put some of ur posts in spoiler tags because the pictures mean htis page always takes like 45 seconds to load and it gives me anxiety
Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


TWEET1 | TWEET2 | FACE | BOXD | TUMBL1 | TUMBL2
User avatar
Pinhead
Posts: 321
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 4:30 pm

Re: Ian's Log

Post by Pinhead » Wed Mar 04, 2015 10:21 am

what if you open it right before you have to go pee then you'll never experience the wait, get some perspective, pal, we'd all be clicking ourself a hand cramp on all these damn spoilers just for 45 seconds of your time
User avatar
Pinhead
Posts: 321
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 4:30 pm

Re: Ian's Log

Post by Pinhead » Wed Mar 04, 2015 10:23 am

is that your first ferreri? he was one of the last and best TLC motm
User avatar
Perverted Hermit
Posts: 372
Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2011 4:17 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by Perverted Hermit » Wed Mar 04, 2015 10:55 am

where the fuck do you live where it takes 45s to load this shitty page? come on
User avatar
snapper
Posts: 12232
Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2012 12:11 pm
Location: NZ

Re: Ian's Log

Post by snapper » Thu Mar 05, 2015 10:49 am

Pinhead wrote:what if you open it right before you have to go pee then you'll never experience the wait, get some perspective, pal, we'd all be clicking ourself a hand cramp on all these damn spoilers just for 45 seconds of your time
please respect the hand cramps i get from constantly having to click the scrollbar to the bottom of the page until all ur caps load x
Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


TWEET1 | TWEET2 | FACE | BOXD | TUMBL1 | TUMBL2
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Thu Mar 05, 2015 4:00 pm

JediMoonShyne wrote: Hi, there.
Lol way to point out my repetitive writing. But yeah check 'em.
roujin wrote:i love gay porn
LA Plays Itself is one o' da best at it. And has huge coxxx.
User avatar
Beau
Posts: 6196
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 8:00 pm

Re: Ian's Log

Post by Beau » Thu Mar 05, 2015 4:26 pm

Guys, guys, not so long ago we called the Internet to let us use it. I would write sentences down on my keyboard and then wait for the words to appear on screen. Whether the page takes a minute to load or is littered with spoiler boxes, we are living in the future.
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Fri Mar 06, 2015 4:22 am

Gonna have to side with Pinhead on this one for now, but I'll give it more thought. We'll also be moving to a new page any second now which means faster l0adtimez.

And yeah it was my first Ferreri. But not my last! I guess Dillinger Is Dead is the most obvious next choice but any input is more than welcome.


Movies on hold for 5-7 days though, my computer's in the shop being repaired (all files are safe though). This will give me an excuse to stop procrastinating some important research papers though.
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: Ian's Log

Post by JediMoonShyne » Fri Mar 06, 2015 8:23 am

jade_vine wrote:Lol way to point out my repetitive writing. But yeah check 'em.
Done, done.
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
snapper
Posts: 12232
Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2012 12:11 pm
Location: NZ

Re: Ian's Log

Post by snapper » Fri Mar 06, 2015 11:30 am

dil dead good
Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


TWEET1 | TWEET2 | FACE | BOXD | TUMBL1 | TUMBL2
User avatar
Pinhead
Posts: 321
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 4:30 pm

Re: Ian's Log

Post by Pinhead » Fri Mar 06, 2015 5:35 pm

jade_vine wrote:any inpu
Considering how I conceive your interests I think Le Banquet might be an essential ferreri for you, La dernière femme's one of the three I'd select as favourite ferreri (seed and dillinger being the other two), can't do anything wrong with just watching any of them even the "lesser" ones are great fun
User avatar
wigwam
Posts: 2084
Joined: Tue Jun 11, 2013 1:03 pm

Re: Ian's Log

Post by wigwam » Fri Mar 06, 2015 5:49 pm

Bye Bye Monkey!!!!!!!
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: Ian's Log

Post by JediMoonShyne » Sat Mar 07, 2015 10:02 am

jade_vine wrote:LA Plays Itself (1972) Fred Halsted - 8.5/10.
Overriding thoughts during this:

That music is nice; I bet these guys don't use deodorant.
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Tue Mar 17, 2015 12:48 am

Image

You Only Live Once (1937) Fritz Lang - 7.5/10

I planned to make a stupid YOLO joke when I first got interested in this a few years ago but the fad’s already passé. But seriously, this is a remarkably touching film with a sense of rough outcast love comparable to Ray in They Live by Night. It also has some surprisingly stellar cinematography. American Lang looks good thus far!

Image

The Man from Planet X (1951) Edgar G. Ulmer - 7.5/10

Certainly one of the better examples of 50s sci-fi B-movies. Very lean but with some interesting plays at ethical quandary certainly on the level of your average episode of The Twilight Zone. Plus the setting is fantastic and gives this a lot more to enjoy in terms of atmosphere other than the cool spooky costume. Apparently it was only shot in six days, and while this is somewhat reflected in its small and simple nature, it by no means shows it as being amateurish. I’m a fan.

Image

La maldición de la Llorona (1963) Rafael Baledón - 6.5/10 (The Curse of the Crying Woman)

Atmospherically this certainly has a lot going for it. There’s something a bit uniquely scary in a really ghostly way about this removed Mexican area. Like a gothic Manos almost (just talking setting here). Much of the story is standard and a lot of the characters are goofy as hell, but there’s a lot going for it just in terms of imagery, especially the old eyeless lady who has some extremely impressive make up work. Interesting if not earth shattering overall. It’s hard to go wrong with such a classic figure. The fantasy sequence here in negative is by far the best part of the film.

Image

Marnie (1964) Alfred Hitchcock - 7.5/10

I remember James on TLC saying that this film is where you can see the influence Hitchcock had on David Lynch most explicitly, and I absolutely agree. Much like his films, this works rather impressively at developing a sort of seediness and uncomfortability that acts as sort of a mockery or subversion of the very peachy clean setting it creates. I can get hyped about the amount of psychosexual power plays that everyone talks about being in Hitch’s films in this one perhaps more than any other (sans maybe Vertigo). Clearly it also has one of the closest links to psychoanalysis in his career. Both of these elements certainly make it one of his most accomplished films in his particular style.

Image

Kyûba no koibito (1969) Kazuo Kuroki - 8/10 (Cuban Lover)

Kuroki is as extraordinarily talented at cinematography here as in the other work of his I’ve seen. This film is full of beautiful black and white contrasts and a camera that veers eloquently between jitters and slow pans. It’s interesting that he uses Cuba as a setting since in the 60s there would have been some leftover ill will in both countries about American military influence. But while politics is a strong element in this film, in the end it’s about cross-cultural love and the fleeting, confusing nature of it. Anything sociopolitical is wrapped up in a bunch of lyrical scenes of romance to the point where they become indistinguishable. This sense of internationalism in Japanese cinema in the 60s is a very interesting phenomenon, especially here because it’s more rare to see this trend carry over into films about emigrants from Japan than those arriving in the country or just espousing ideals. Plus Cuban girls tend to be god tier in looks so it’s a wonderful place to set this.

Image

Let's Scare Jessica to Death (1971) John D. Hancock - 6/10

This film’s greatest strength is probably its imagery, which is a nice example of classic creepiness distinct to 70s Americana. But sadly the pacing of the storyline, acting, etc. seems very flat and way too obvious in the “psychological” part of the horror. It looks nice enough to instill a degree of enjoyable atmosphere despite the rest of the film being a bit slight. It’s not too cheesy, too inept, too silly, any of that stuff; it’s just too thin. Oh, and it has shitty music. That is one definite flaw.

Image

Pesnaya lesnya. Mavka (1981) Yuri Ilyenko - 8/10 (A Story of the Forest: Mavka)

USSR block fairy tale cinema really is some of the most magical stuff around, isn’t it? But when I say magical I mean that it also has a very real dark undertone. Like all the best of its kind this one has a great attention to images of nature that are both luscious and rugged. Ilyenko’s framing and use of subtle camera movements is very mature here.

Image

Han jia (2010) Li Hongqi - 9/10 (Winter Vacation)

I’ve been putting this off a while just because I wanted to give it my full attention, and while today may have not been ideal I’m so glad I finally mustered up the courage. The story of the film is practically nil: a group of teenagers on their last day of winter vacation hang out at one of their houses and do nothing but kill time in an existential daze. Li, as in his previous film, is perfect at capturing the oddities in the midst of very normal or mundane settings. That sounds generic, but it’s absolutely not. His sense of time is somehow very different from the other “contemplative” directors, where things feel extraordinarily purgatorial. There really is no better word for it, everyone seems empty and hopeless against the overall flow of life. But Li doesn’t protray this with a totally dreadful seriousness. He is very comparable to someone like Roy Andersson who takes life in its bleakest moments and uses it to find a very surreal sense of humor. Perhaps the most noteworthy scene of this is where the parents of the household watch none other than Li’s previous film Routine Holiday on their TV, utterly strengthening how absurd and empty their existence seems. This space is really quite magical, and lets Li exist in this wonderful place that stays within the realm of modern Chinese contemplation while having something inexplicably otherworldly to his style. This keeps him engaged in the mundane while keeping him from completely entering the realm of realism. This one drifts more toward realism since it has less particularly strange happenings or bits of dialogue, but the strange and illogical nature of human interaction still permeates it thoroughly.

Image

Jiao you (2013) Tsai Ming-liang - 9.5/10 (Stray Dogs)

Tsai’s style has in some ways changed tremendously, but in all the important ways it has remained very much the same, those being a very close attention to the human body, the emotions in its gestures (even its stillest ones), and the connection to the world around it. I’d say this film is even more radical than many of his others in how nearly it approaches a kind of Benning-esque series of landscapes with elements that coincidentally happen to be human, even while there’s still a story permeating it all. It’s really touching to see Lee Kang-sheng move from the role of lone drifter to father. He looks extraordinarily older, even in comparison to, say, Visage, but dat third nipple gives his identity away as usual!
User avatar
snapper
Posts: 12232
Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2012 12:11 pm
Location: NZ

Re: Ian's Log

Post by snapper » Tue Mar 17, 2015 2:58 am

Don't know how you can fault the acting in LSJTD - Zohra Lampert gives one of the better performances I've ever seen. Love that one.
Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


TWEET1 | TWEET2 | FACE | BOXD | TUMBL1 | TUMBL2
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: Ian's Log

Post by JediMoonShyne » Tue Mar 17, 2015 8:39 am

jade_vine wrote:The Man from Planet X (1951) Edgar G. Ulmer - 7.5/10

Certainly one of the better examples of 50s sci-fi B-movies. Very lean but with some interesting plays at ethical quandary certainly on the level of your average episode of The Twilight Zone. Plus the setting is fantastic and gives this a lot more to enjoy in terms of atmosphere other than the cool spooky costume. Apparently it was only shot in six days, and while this is somewhat reflected in its small and simple nature, it by no means shows it as being amateurish. I’m a fan.
Aww, this one's fun. Setting is a bit part of that, as you say.
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Wed Mar 18, 2015 12:29 am

snapper wrote:Don't know how you can fault the acting in LSJTD - Zohra Lampert gives one of the better performances I've ever seen. Love that one.
She was pretty good. In her case I was referring more to the delivery of the "voices in her head" which I thought were delivered a bit awkwardly.
User avatar
snapper
Posts: 12232
Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2012 12:11 pm
Location: NZ

Re: Ian's Log

Post by snapper » Wed Mar 18, 2015 5:21 am

aye. Mariclare Costello is also great in that film/
Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


TWEET1 | TWEET2 | FACE | BOXD | TUMBL1 | TUMBL2
User avatar
jade_vine
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:25 am

Re: Ian's Log

Post by jade_vine » Sun Mar 22, 2015 9:24 am

Image

Anjô-ke no butôkai (1947) Yoshimura Kôzaburô - 8/10 (The Ball at the Anjo House)

I think this seems a bit too steeped in staginess without as much of a penchant for image (don’t get me wrong, it still looks very nice) to reach the very heights of Naruse or Ozu’s best, but it’s an interesting look into the Western-obsessed upper classes of occupation-era Japan and more importantly just a very very good film.

Image

Berlino - Appuntamento per le spie (1965) Vittorio Sala - 5.5/10 (Spy In Your Eye)

It is what it is. A generic Eurospy piece with the occasional above-average setup scene.

Image

Alice in Wonderland: An X-Rated Musical Fantasy (1976) Bud Townsend - 7/10

This truly is charming. For a porno, it’s astonishingly cute and even innocent for lack of a better word.

Image

Zombi 2 (1979) Lucio Fulci - 8.5/10 (Zombie)

I’ve been putting off watching the Fulci flicks I haven’t seen because I don’t want my viewings his career to be over... Luckily, there are still a lot left, but this is one of the last famous ones I hadn’t checked out. It’s impressive how there’s a lot of his distinctive touches even this early on. The opening montage of the boat in NYC harbor is definitely a standout moment in the wordless building of mood. And even this early on, his use of goriness is excellent. It seems a bit too imitative of Romero to be as great as his best works (you think?), but a lot of the sense of incoherence and hazy other-worldliness is starting to occur here in a primitive form.

Image

Il mondo di Yor (1983) Antonio Margheriti - 7/10 (Yor, the Hunter from the Future)

Has its dull moments, but overall this is a bunch of fun and typifies cheap Italian genre cinema at its silliest and most exuberant. Cavemancore 4eva. I remember Jake Aesthete saying that the opening of this could be a Pasolini movie if it wasn’t for the amazing theme song and that was a nail on the fucking head.

Image

Finders Keepers (1984) Richard Lester - 3/10

I keep hoping I’ll find something legitimately funny, intentionally or not, by downloading random CG hijinx comedies from the 70s or 80s. This is because I am an idiot who really should know better by now. This one is slightly better than average, but still. At least it moves fast enough to not get that boring, even if it pretty much sucks.
Post Reply