Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by crumbsroom » Thu Sep 10, 2020 6:50 pm

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LES VAMPIRES
For seven hours we will circle the criminal enterprise known as The Vampires. Villainous characters are disposed of and replaced so quickly that the spiralling never loses step. There are bat ballets. Assassins in leotards climbing up and down buildings. Many will be shot in cold blood. Decapitated heads will be found hidden in secret compartments. You can do a lot of plot convoluting over seven hours with no script and director Feuilllade is fine letting his plot curdle into clumps of gothic images, all packaged in the same carton, but each lump somewhat separate from the other. Each their own tiny universe of criminality.

Still, as a whole, this somehow manages to be a strangely static film. This is a feat considering how many fiendish plots are conceived, plotted and sometimes thrwarted over its runtime. The fatal flaw will be all of the connective tissue linking the set pieces. Bogged down with endless minutes of watching people sit in chairs, exposition dumps will prove to be even more agonizing in the silent era. Cinematically flat and dull, these stretches will take a lot of steam out of the film. But because of the violent and anarcic plotting that weaves between these moments, they ultimately can be endured.

*shrugs*

*closes computer and proceeds to sit in chair*
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Rock » Thu Sep 10, 2020 7:22 pm

I have not seen Les Vampires, but I did enjoy the somewhat related Irma Vep quite a bit. How much of that is due to actual film quality and how much of that is due to Maggie Cheung in a leather catsuit is up for debate.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Captain Terror » Thu Sep 10, 2020 7:26 pm

Les Vampires should be right up my alley but that runtime has always intimidated me. One day I'll give it a go.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Wooley » Thu Sep 10, 2020 7:56 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Thu Sep 10, 2020 7:26 pm
Les Vampires should be right up my alley but that runtime has always intimidated me. One day I'll give it a go.
Well, according to the Wikipedias, it is seven "serialized episodes" so maybe you just watch one or two a night for a week?
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by crumbsroom » Thu Sep 10, 2020 8:53 pm

Wooley wrote:
Thu Sep 10, 2020 7:56 pm
Well, according to the Wikipedias, it is seven "serialized episodes" so maybe you just watch one or two a night for a week?
It's ten episodes that vary pretty widely in length. None more than an hour though.

I watched it over the course of six or seven nights.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Macrology » Fri Sep 11, 2020 4:46 am

Les Vampires is definitely best watched as individual episodes over a period of time.

As for the static interludes between the outlandish action, those scenes are essential to what makes Les Vampires so fascinating - it's certainly why the Surrealists took to it so avidly. Feuillade depicts a very typical early 20th century bourgeois French milieu, and against this banal and staid backdrop, he insinuates this incongruous current of absurd crime plots, vampy cat burglars, and shadowy underworld menace. If Les Vampires was committed solely to its unlikely crime premise, it would just be another zany romp; it's the marked contrast between the two modes of reality that make the experience so uncanny and memorable. That's what drew the attention of Surrealists like Magritte and Bunuel. The abundance of location shooting - bizarre events happening in quotidian locales - only heightens the phenomenon.

That said, of the three Feuillade serials I've seen (this, Judex, and Fantômas), my favorite is Fantômas.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Sep 11, 2020 11:15 am

Macrology wrote:
Fri Sep 11, 2020 4:46 am
Les Vampires is definitely best watched as individual episodes over a period of time.

As for the static interludes between the outlandish action, those scenes are essential to what makes Les Vampires so fascinating - it's certainly why the Surrealists took to it so avidly. Feuillade depicts a very typical early 20th century bourgeois French milieu, and against this banal and staid backdrop, he insinuates this incongruous current of absurd crime plots, vampy cat burglars, and shadowy underworld menace. If Les Vampires was committed solely to its unlikely crime premise, it would just be another zany romp; it's the marked contrast between the two modes of reality that make the experience so uncanny and memorable. That's what drew the attention of Surrealists like Magritte and Bunuel. The abundance of location shooting - bizarre events happening in quotidian locales - only heightens the phenomenon.

That said, of the three Feuillade serials I've seen (this, Judex, and Fantômas), my favorite is Fantômas.
I initially had written something about the balance these more realistic scenes offer the set pieces but erased it.since I had entangled these thoughts with a bunch of other incomprehensible nonsense.

I had read about the influence this film had on the Surrealists and while I hadn't thought how the simpler scenes would have appealed to them, it makes sense. The basis of any good surrealism roots itself in an understandable or relatable reality and having wall to wall scenes of absurd plotting would have undercut that. Even if that may have been what these particular eyes would have preferred. I can struggle with how primitive some of these extremely early films can be, so at such a length as this, I had begun to grow restless with them by the final hour, which I had difficulty focusing on properly. At that point I just kinda wanted to get it done and under my belt. I have has this sitting around for at least ten years taunting me, and after a couple of false starts, it was important to finish it
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Captain Terror » Fri Sep 11, 2020 1:07 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Fri Sep 11, 2020 11:15 am
I can struggle with how primitive some of these extremely early films can be
This has also been a deterrent for me. I've dipped my toe in a few times and found it about as stagey as you'd expect from 1915, with little in the way of interesting cinematography. If I'm wrong about that I'll move it up a few notches on my to-see list.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Sep 11, 2020 3:48 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Fri Sep 11, 2020 1:07 pm
This has also been a deterrent for me. I've dipped my toe in a few times and found it about as stagey as you'd expect from 1915, with little in the way of interesting cinematography. If I'm wrong about that I'll move it up a few notches on my to-see list.
I would say that even the more narratively baroque elements are still very much shot simply, as if just observing the action. There are very few close ups that I can recall, standard editing that cuts from scene to scene. No montage to speak of at this point. Breaking this up though is a lot of atypical location shooting for the time, and a moral bleakness that feels almost shocking, considering what one might expect from a film this old.

It is far from the most cinematic of silent films. It also becomes quite repetitious (which, in many ways, works due to its neverending dream like structure). Most of the films qualities are touched on by Macrology's post. I didn't personally love it, but I'm also not super in tune with the silent era (probably seen no more than 50 of them in total) so those more acclimatized than me may find the duller stretches not nearly as dull. I'm still glad I watched it, and mostly enjoyed it. It's actually an easy watch if you just tackle one episode a day. Unlike many marathon films, it definitely would not benefit from being taken all in one big gulp.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Macrology » Fri Sep 11, 2020 6:07 pm

Yeah, the shooting style is very typical of the period, at least at first blush. It can feel pedestrian to modern audiences, especially set beside the more jarringly dynamic montage the Soviets introduced several years later. But many critics laud Feuillade as a master of the long take and deep focus staging, a lineage to later include Renoir, Welles, Antonioni, Angelopoulos, Tarr, and the more recent wave of slow cinema in East Asia. He didn't advance the grammar of cinema, but he refined the existing grammar to an unusually high degree.

Bordwell has written in-depth about this, including this essay and the first section of Figures Traced in Light, his book about cinematic staging. (Even if 20 pages is a bit much for you, it's worth reading the first page of that essay to get a sense of his argument.)

Rosenbaum is another champion. This article, as the note at the beginning indicates, is a little out of date, but it helps contextualize Feuillade and highlights his unique value (best read if you've seen it already, since there are spoilers). Granted, if you didn't take to the film, I'm not sure his enthusiasm is likely to convince you, but it's a nice summary of Feuillade's merits. His focus is less technical than Bordwell's, more trained on Feuillade's premodernist sensibility and poetics, noting the influence on Lang and Hitchcock. This segment taps into the point I made in my previous post:
Such confusion is always purposeful in Les vampires, where nothing is ever quite what it seems. Shot largely in the streets of Paris and its suburbs, in dingy shacks and basements, and in ornate Belle Epoque interiors, the film revels in the familiar and the everyday, only to explode with unexpected eruptions that transform this peaceful world into a charged universe of unlimited evil and corruption. As critic Annette Michelson has suggestively described this process, “Haussmann’s pre-1914 Paris, the city of massive stone structures, of quiet avenues and squares, is suddenly revealed as everywhere dangerous, the scene and subject of secret designs. The trap-door, secret compartment, false tunnel, false bottom, false ceiling, form an architectural complex with the architectural structure of a middle-class culture. The perpetually recurring ritual of identification and self-justification is the presentation of the visiting card; it is, as well, the signal, the formal prelude to the fateful encounter, the swindle, hold-up, abduction or murder.”
I would also argue that Feuillade's shooting style - static, prolonged takes in carefully staged space - is fundamental to the peculiar effects of his cinema. If you have two characters talking in a room and cut to the villain plotting nearby, it's almost like they inhabit two different worlds; if you watch the characters talk, see them leave the room, and watch the villain emerge from the curtains in their absence, that has an altogether more seamless and unsettling effect. It creates a continuity that makes the sudden shift in atmosphere all the more compelling.

I'm not even sure if I'm trying to convince anyone to like Feuillade - I just want to explain why I do. Feuillade is an acquired taste that requires a very particular sensibility, and a thoroughgoing familiarity with silent era aesthetics certainly doesn't hurt. But it falls sharply within my own peculiarities of taste, and I really like this idea that he's an origin point for an alternative strain of cinematic aesthetics, a fusion of Méliès and the Lumière brothers, applying a fantasist's whims to a documentarian's reality.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by crumbsroom » Sat Sep 12, 2020 2:58 pm

Macrology wrote:
Fri Sep 11, 2020 6:07 pm
Yeah, the shooting style is very typical of the period, at least at first blush. It can feel pedestrian to modern audiences, especially set beside the more jarringly dynamic montage the Soviets introduced several years later. But many critics laud Feuillade as a master of the long take and deep focus staging, a lineage to later include Renoir, Welles, Antonioni, Angelopoulos, Tarr, and the more recent wave of slow cinema in East Asia. He didn't advance the grammar of cinema, but he refined the existing grammar to an unusually high degree.

Bordwell has written in-depth about this, including this essay and the first section of Figures Traced in Light, his book about cinematic staging. (Even if 20 pages is a bit much for you, it's worth reading the first page of that essay to get a sense of his argument.)

Rosenbaum is another champion. This article, as the note at the beginning indicates, is a little out of date, but it helps contextualize Feuillade and highlights his unique value (best read if you've seen it already, since there are spoilers). Granted, if you didn't take to the film, I'm not sure his enthusiasm is likely to convince you, but it's a nice summary of Feuillade's merits. His focus is less technical than Bordwell's, more trained on Feuillade's premodernist sensibility and poetics, noting the influence on Lang and Hitchcock. This segment taps into the point I made in my previous post:



I would also argue that Feuillade's shooting style - static, prolonged takes in carefully staged space - is fundamental to the peculiar effects of his cinema. If you have two characters talking in a room and cut to the villain plotting nearby, it's almost like they inhabit two different worlds; if you watch the characters talk, see them leave the room, and watch the villain emerge from the curtains in their absence, that has an altogether more seamless and unsettling effect. It creates a continuity that makes the sudden shift in atmosphere all the more compelling.

I'm not even sure if I'm trying to convince anyone to like Feuillade - I just want to explain why I do. Feuillade is an acquired taste that requires a very particular sensibility, and a thoroughgoing familiarity with silent era aesthetics certainly doesn't hurt. But it falls sharply within my own peculiarities of taste, and I really like this idea that he's an origin point for an alternative strain of cinematic aesthetics, a fusion of Méliès and the Lumière brothers, applying a fantasist's whims to a documentarian's reality.
Ah, lots of interesting perspectives here. I can look back on Feuillades approach a little differently now. I like having these things put in context and have my attention drawn to details I wouldn't otherwise have noticed (use of staging, deep focus)

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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by crumbsroom » Tue Sep 15, 2020 8:53 pm

I watched some movie called Liverpool. It wasn't about the Beatles, I think was South American and it was what we will call leisurely paced. I remember thinking it was all right, but memories are fuzzy. If I hadn't found the discarded disc behind my TV I wouldn't know I owned it, let alone watched it.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Sep 18, 2020 1:12 pm

Frank, The Strangeness, Blood Splattered Bride, List of Adrien Messenger and The Greasy Strangler. It's amazing the things I can accomplish when I really put my mind to it and don't get out of bed.

Well, I admittedly did get up for some Mexican food, so not in bed allll day. But taco shaped vitamin supplements quickly become a requirement in order to accomplish the sort of things l did yesterday.

#salsastainedpajamas
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Captain Terror » Fri Sep 18, 2020 2:38 pm

I loved Frank, but at the time I was completely unaware that it was based on an actual person. Had I known that it might have colored my opinion.
But going into it blind, I thought it was great.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Sep 18, 2020 2:57 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Fri Sep 18, 2020 2:38 pm
I loved Frank, but at the time I was completely unaware that it was based on an actual person. Had I known that it might have colored my opinion.
But going into it blind, I thought it was great.
Frank is mostly good. I'm highly suspicious of movies that portray mad geniuses because I start finding myself trying to decide for myself if the character is reaallllly that much of a genius. Which is a stupid thing to do, and not at all genius like.

All five of those movies are actually good, each with their own special reservations.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Captain Terror » Fri Sep 18, 2020 2:58 pm

Was that your first encounter with the Greasy Strangler? Can't remember if you watched it back when the rest of us did.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Sep 18, 2020 3:02 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Fri Sep 18, 2020 2:58 pm
Was that your first encounter with the Greasy Strangler? Can't remember if you watched it back when the rest of us did.
I've seen it a few times. Once you get past how painfully unpleasant it is to watch and listen to and ingest into your system like some grease logged sausage, it's mostly brilliant.

The film created a completely unique cinematic world. I, of course hate that world, but you can't look away from it. It's so meticulous in its ugliness and stupidity, appreciation eventually follows
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Captain Terror » Fri Sep 18, 2020 3:34 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Fri Sep 18, 2020 3:02 pm
I've seen it a few times. Once you get past how painfully unpleasant it is to watch and listen to and ingest into your system like some grease logged sausage, it's mostly brilliant.

The film created a completely unique cinematic world. I, of course hate that world, but you can't look away from it. It's so meticulous in its ugliness and stupidity, appreciation eventually follows
Yes. I recently watched his follow-up, An Evening With Beverly Luff Lin, and although I mostly enjoyed it I think it suffered from having recognizable actors in it. I like Jemaine Clement, Aubrey Plaza, etc, but their presence meant that the film didn't feel as insular as Strangler. Felt like I was watching Plaza pretending to be odd, whereas Strangler legitimately felt like its own world.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Sep 18, 2020 9:25 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Fri Sep 18, 2020 3:34 pm
Yes. I recently watched his follow-up, An Evening With Beverly Luff Lin, and although I mostly enjoyed it I think it suffered from having recognizable actors in it. I like Jemaine Clement, Aubrey Plaza, etc, but their presence meant that the film didn't feel as insular as Strangler. Felt like I was watching Plaza pretending to be odd, whereas Strangler legitimately felt like its own world.
Trying too hard to be odd was my first viewing issue with Strangler. I really usually hate deliberately and cheaply eccentric things. When they are aggressively weird as this one it can quickly put me off.

But only after further reflection, I realized it is the fearless commitment to the Strangler world that makes it work, from the writing to the directing to the performances. This saves it, regardless how hateable it otherwise is. Kinda like early Waters films, trying so hard to annoy and offend, but really caring about how it annoys and offends. It offends uniquely.

I guess it is the sheer fact that no one on screen blinks, no one back peddles, as they dare to go so deeper and deeper into this rabbit hole they create for themselves. This is what was admirable to me. To barrel forward with this noxious horrible weird premise.

Beautiful. Also really funny. And somewhat terrifying

So what you say about the new film makes me trepiditious
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Sep 18, 2020 9:41 pm

Oh, and as a personal side note, that Kensington market sandwich place didn't survive, Rock.

RIP they had some good sandwiches
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Rock » Fri Sep 18, 2020 10:36 pm

*pours a Mexican coke on the curb*
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Captain Terror » Sat Sep 19, 2020 12:23 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Fri Sep 18, 2020 9:25 pm
Trying too hard to be odd was my first viewing issue with Strangler. I really usually hate deliberately and cheaply eccentric things. When they are aggressively weird as this one it can quickly put me off.

But only after further reflection, I realized it is the fearless commitment to the Strangler world that makes it work, from the writing to the directing to the performances. This saves it, regardless how hateable it otherwise is. Kinda like early Waters films, trying so hard to annoy and offend, but really caring about how it annoys and offends. It offends uniquely.

I guess it is the sheer fact that no one on screen blinks, no one back peddles, as they dare to go so deeper and deeper into this rabbit hole they create for themselves. This is what was admirable to me. To barrel forward with this noxious horrible weird premise.

Beautiful. Also really funny. And somewhat terrifying

So what you say about the new film makes me trepiditious
This was my exact reaction. Flat-out disliked it the first time, seemed too much like that "aren't we weird" Adult Swim-type thing that I don't always vibe with. Two days later I couldn't get it out of my mind and found myself re-watching scenes and decided it was actually brilliant the whole time.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by crumbsroom » Mon Sep 21, 2020 4:51 pm

Turns out Parasite is a hype proof movie for me. Everyone built it up and it managed to be better than I expected. Also a rare example for me of a film that I would have thought great simply on a narrative level, but when executed with such a sense of style that is both restrained and opulent, realistic and other worldly, it is kind of an undeniable piece of work.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Wooley » Mon Sep 21, 2020 5:06 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Mon Sep 21, 2020 4:51 pm
Turns out Parasite is a hype proof movie for me. Everyone built it up and it managed to be better than I expected. Also a rare example for me of a film that I would have thought great simply on a narrative level, but when executed with such a sense of style that is both restrained and opulent, realistic and other worldly, it is kind of an undeniable piece of work.
I think you just summed up my feelings on the film exactly as I would.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Mon Sep 21, 2020 5:31 pm

Parasite is up there with my favorite films of the decade. So much could've gone wrong with it, but everything is held together so well that it makes for a pretty breathtaking experience on the whole.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Macrology » Mon Sep 21, 2020 6:48 pm

It's a little surprising to me that the film achieved the popularity and recognition that it did - it takes so many risks and treads such a fine line. Genre fusion and plot twists with radical variations in tone are Bong Joon-Ho's bread and butter, you just don't expect it to sit well with a mass audience. But I'm certainly glad it tapped into whatever current or zeitgeist it tapped into. It deserves every ounce of praise it's gotten. It's an immaculate and daring film - a rare combination.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by crumbsroom » Mon Sep 21, 2020 9:36 pm

Macrology wrote:
Mon Sep 21, 2020 6:48 pm
It's a little surprising to me that the film achieved the popularity and recognition that it did - it takes so many risks and treads such a fine line. Genre fusion and plot twists with radical variations in tone are Bong Joon-Ho's bread and butter, you just don't expect it to sit well with a mass audience. But I'm certainly glad it tapped into whatever current or zeitgeist it tapped into. It deserves every ounce of praise it's gotten. It's an immaculate and daring film - a rare combination.
I said something very similar to my ex who I just came from.visiting. Somehow it got a guy like my father, who sniffs at the notion of watching foreign films, wanting to watch it, and eventually watch it twice.

As great as I think it is, if I had seen it at an opening night, it wouldn't even occur to me that it would resonate with anyone beyond Joon Ho fans. But here we all are, all the better for it.

The rare film that shows there is a desire out there for something different. Of course, no one will be listening, and audiences will soon be deposited back on their treadmill for a dose of whatever studio hive minds come up with to placate what they think this exact desire is
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by crumbsroom » Mon Sep 21, 2020 10:44 pm

So Netflix cancelled Dark Crystal.

Netflix is so garbage I had to have Netflix to realize how garbage they really are
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Wooley » Tue Sep 22, 2020 1:37 am

crumbsroom wrote:
Mon Sep 21, 2020 10:44 pm
So Netflix cancelled Dark Crystal.

Netflix is so garbage I had to have Netflix to realize how garbage they really are
Motherfucker!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


I think everybody's just gotta accept, going forward, that all Netflix shows are one season.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Torgo » Tue Sep 22, 2020 1:52 am

Well, at least Netflix still has...wait, what do they have now? With this, Altered Carbon also getting cancelled and Mindhunter also likely being over, I'm starting to wonder why I keep paying for it.
I mean, there's Stranger Things, but my taste for '80s nostalgia has waned.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Wooley » Tue Sep 22, 2020 2:51 am

Torgo wrote:
Tue Sep 22, 2020 1:52 am
Well, at least Netflix still has...wait, what do they have now? With this, Altered Carbon also getting cancelled and Mindhunter also likely being over, I'm starting to wonder why I keep paying for it.
I mean, there's Stranger Things, but my taste for '80s nostalgia has waned.
Stranger Things' days are numbered to0. Apparently the formula is all for new subscribers so only new shows that can lead to new subscribers are worth anything to them.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by crumbsroom » Tue Sep 22, 2020 1:38 pm

Wooley wrote:
Tue Sep 22, 2020 2:51 am
Stranger Things' days are numbered to0. Apparently the formula is all for new subscribers so only new shows that can lead to new subscribers are worth anything to them.
This has never made much sense as a business model to me. They have by now built a reputation for dumping popular shows, so why would anyone subscribe to see a show that they are going to inevitably bail on?

They are a total junk company and my hope everyone eventually cancels them. They've entirely given up on supplying any decent films beyond a small handful, almost completely neglect anything made before 2010, and their only saving grace the past few years has been their serialized shows, which they are completely Craven at gutting mid production.

I guess there is the occasional serialized documentaries, which is so far keeping me tentatively on board. But man do I despise their attitude towards content. It's openly contemptuous of their audience in the worst possible way
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Captain Terror » Tue Sep 22, 2020 1:48 pm

A few months ago I began keeping a scrap of paper on my couch so I could jot down which service I was watching that particular night. The goal is to tally them all at the end of the month to determine whether I'm watching everything that I've subscribed to.

More often than not I find myself at the end of the month with no Netflix having been logged, so I scramble during the final week to find $10 worth of stuff to watch just to justify it. If I ever decide to downgrade, Netflix is the most expendable. If they spent all their money on licensing catalog titles, it would be my favorite thing ever. I never needed them to make their own stuff.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by kgaard. » Tue Sep 22, 2020 8:34 pm

They did at least stick with Bojack to the end, maybe algorithms love fucked-up horse people.
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Tue Sep 22, 2020 8:57 pm

kgaard. wrote:
Tue Sep 22, 2020 8:34 pm
They did at least stick with Bojack to the end, maybe algorithms love fucked-up horse people.
I was recently observing that this was the only Netflix show that felt like it got a full, competent run. Everything else was cancelled early or ran into the ground.

Terrible track record.
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Slentert
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Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

Post by Slentert » Tue Sep 22, 2020 9:30 pm

Honestly, if I had to pay for my Netflix account I don't think I would find it worth the money, but I'll use it as long as I am allowed to leech off my aunt's account like the parasite that I am.
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