A noob's journey through cinema

Discuss anything you want.
Post Reply
User avatar
Rock
Posts: 1617
Joined: Wed Aug 21, 2013 12:48 am
Location: From beyond the moon

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Rock » Sat Aug 04, 2018 1:21 am

Takoma1 wrote:
See, something that I thought was really well done in the film is that the climax builds quickly only from the point of view of the children. From my point of view, police or DSS intervention was an inevitability and it begins at the halfway point of the film: the mother is
taking sexy selfies and posting online; then the managers of her hotel know that the is working as a prostitute out of the hotel (something we already saw someone get kicked out for); then she scams someone who doesn't contact the police but it's only a matter of time; etc
.

From the point of view of the daughter
it is sudden, but I think that she also realizes that this is the end of her childhood with her mother. Things are not going to be okay, and she can sense that. Whether the ending is a literal running away, or if it's just a fantasy, it's an act of desperation that fits with how a child would act when her world has come crashing down. In that moment, for that child, there is no way forward except escape/retreat into fantasy.

This is what it's like a lot of the time when there is DSS intervention: for the kid it is both a climax and an anti-climax. Often, nothing is actually resolved, it's just a shift to a different kind of stress.
I'm not sure this has changed my mind (I might be too literally explaining a gut feeling on my part), but I appreciate this angle.
I think that what you're experiencing as an underwhelming narrative and stylistic choice is working for me because I feel like the "clumsiness" and abruptness of the film itself matches the emotional headspace of the main character.
I'm not sure this has changed my mind (I might be too literally explaining a gut feeling on my part), but I appreciate this angle.
"We're outgunned and undermanned. But you know somethin'? We're gonna win. You know why? Superior attitude. Superior state of mind." - Mason Storm
____
Blog!
User avatar
Takoma1
Posts: 1922
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:51 pm

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Takoma1 » Sat Aug 04, 2018 1:50 am

Rock wrote:
I'm not sure this has changed my mind (I might be too literally explaining a gut feeling on my part), but I appreciate this angle.
I've seen students go through similar (though not identical situations). In one example, a student's father was arrested for running a meth lab out of the family's basement. In another, a student's father was arrested for drug use (related to PTSD from time in the military). In both cases I had seen the parents and/or some concerning behaviors (not enough to report to child services, but things that made me worried and pay extra attention to those children). I was not surprised by these arrests, but they really took a toll on the kids.

One of the most heartbreaking things to me about the film is the fact that the main character
doesn't see it coming. She doesn't realize that the mom spending all out is a sort of last meal. Much like the earlier sequence with the pervert, the kids don't realize something that is apparent to an outside adult observer.
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Sat Nov 10, 2018 9:15 pm

The Searchers
Watched this on 35mm at the Cinematek in Brussels. The screening was introduced by the famous Argentinian filmmaker Lisandro Alonso. He talked about how, when he released his movie Jauja (2014), many critics mentioned that it was clearly influenced by The Searchers (1956). But in fact, Alonso had never seen John Ford's classic western. So when a few years later the Belgian Cinematek gave him carte blanche to show 10 movies he wanted to share with other people, he chose The Searchers to, as he said so himself, see it for the first time.

I don't know if he ended up enjoying the film, but at least I did.
User avatar
Oxnard Montalvo
Posts: 1352
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2017 4:27 am

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Sat Nov 10, 2018 9:35 pm

I think The Searchers deserves its spot in the canon and is undoubtedly one of the top Fords... I'm still a little bit iffy on it. maybe I just respect it more than seeing it as a movie I am eager to return to again and again. or that its DNA has been so spread out in movies about loners and quests for revenge and American racism and fractured families and whatnot that it is hard to approach with fresh eyes. which is true of a lot of classics.

speaking of which, has anyone here seen Two Rode Together? it has a Searchers-ish premise but a lot less romance and passion (e.g. main character searches for hostage for money not revenge, we see the problems of re-introducing the hostages into society, cinematography isn't as pretty, etc).
User avatar
Rock
Posts: 1617
Joined: Wed Aug 21, 2013 12:48 am
Location: From beyond the moon

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Rock » Sun Nov 11, 2018 4:15 am

Oxnard Montalvo wrote:speaking of which, has anyone here seen Two Rode Together? it has a Searchers-ish premise but a lot less romance and passion (e.g. main character searches for hostage for money not revenge, we see the problems of re-introducing the hostages into society, cinematography isn't as pretty, etc).
I enjoyed it when I saw it a few years ago, but don't remember it well enough to add much.
"We're outgunned and undermanned. But you know somethin'? We're gonna win. You know why? Superior attitude. Superior state of mind." - Mason Storm
____
Blog!
User avatar
wigwam
Posts: 2084
Joined: Tue Jun 11, 2013 1:03 pm

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by wigwam » Sun Nov 11, 2018 5:05 am

Two Rode Together embodies an exhaustion thats really sad, I love it
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Mon Nov 12, 2018 7:45 pm

Rewatched this because of a discussion earlier in ShieldMaiden's thread.

The Night of the Hunter (1955)

A creepy fairy tale soaked in the purest black and white. Moments of what seems like perfect innocence, almost cloying beauty, soon turn into something dark and off-kilter. Mitchum is basically playing Wile E. Coyote in this.

4,5/5
User avatar
Wooley
Posts: 2185
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:25 am

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Wooley » Mon Nov 12, 2018 7:54 pm

Slentert wrote:Rewatched this because of a discussion earlier in ShieldMaiden's thread.

The Night of the Hunter (1955)

A creepy fairy tale soaked in the purest black and white. Moments of what seems like perfect innocence, almost cloying beauty, soon turn into something dark and off-kilter. Mitchum is basically playing Wile E. Coyote in this.

4,5/5
Yup, that's a great one.
User avatar
Jinnistan
Posts: 2439
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 5:47 pm

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Jinnistan » Tue Nov 13, 2018 3:22 am

Harry Powell is the role that Dennis Hopper was born to play, but never never could achieve.
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Tue Nov 13, 2018 2:39 pm

Another rewatch.

In A Lonely Place (1950)
Nicholas Ray delivers a masterful, uncompromising film noir that can be peeled like an onion each time you revisit it. This also contains my favorite line ever in cinema history.
4,5/5
User avatar
Wooley
Posts: 2185
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:25 am

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Wooley » Tue Nov 13, 2018 4:38 pm

Slentert wrote:Another rewatch.

In A Lonely Place (1950)
Nicholas Ray delivers a masterful, uncompromising film noir that can be peeled like an onion each time you revisit it. This also contains my favorite line ever in cinema history.
4,5/5
Added.
User avatar
Popcorn Reviews
Posts: 1322
Joined: Tue Apr 18, 2017 7:22 pm
Location: Michigan

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Wed Nov 14, 2018 6:36 pm

Slentert wrote:Another rewatch.

In A Lonely Place (1950)
Nicholas Ray delivers a masterful, uncompromising film noir that can be peeled like an onion each time you revisit it. This also contains my favorite line ever in cinema history.
4,5/5
Really great.
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Thu Nov 15, 2018 1:58 pm

Carnival of Sinners (1943)

This is the first Maurice Tourneur film I have ever seen. I did see several from his son Jacques.
Carnival of Sinners, also known as The Hand of the Devil, is a creepy, kinda noirish tale of a painter who makes a bargain for riches and success before thinking of the consequences. It's a fun, lean old school horror film that has some serious nods to German Expressionism and it has a nice, wry sense of humor. I was also amused bu Pierre Palau's portrayal of the Devil. He plays the lord of the underworld as a calm and very polite little old man.

It's not the first time you've seen this kind of interpretation of the Faust story, but Carnival of Sinners is entertaining enough to keep your attention during its, admittedly, fairly short running time. At its best, the movie reminded me of the short horror stories I used to read as a kid. Definitely worth the digging.

3,5/5

Leave Her To Heaven (1945)

Spending the last 15 minutes of your movie in a courtroom is almost never a good idea. But if you must do it, having a young Vincent Price hamming it up as your district attorney is a good way to keep things interesting.

4/5
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Fri Nov 23, 2018 8:33 pm

Rabot (2017)

The Rabot Towers in Ghent, which are currently being torn down, are the remnants of a narrow minded social experiment from the seventies. The idea was to put all the disadvantaged people in one neighborhood and then pretend the problem never existed in the first place. But, like one of the older residents says in the opening of the film, "If you put too many birds in one aviary, they peck each other to death".

Rabot, the debut film of Christina Vandekerckhove, is one of the most devastating documentaries I've ever seen. Filmed like a Roy Andersson picture, it brutally confronts you with the hopelessness and despair of the people inhabiting these buildings. I'm not gonna lie, I started crying at the climax when you see the camera sweeping across the empty and deserted building on the tunes of Madensuyu.

I know a Belgian documentary about poverty isn't really high priority for you all, but I sincerely recommend you checking it out if you can find it anywhere. Probably my favorite movie of the year.
User avatar
Thief
Posts: 1669
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Puerto Rico
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Thief » Sat Nov 24, 2018 12:42 am

Slentert wrote:Rabot (2017)

The Rabot Towers in Ghent, which are currently being torn down, are the remnants of a narrow minded social experiment from the seventies. The idea was to put all the disadvantaged people in one neighborhood and then pretend the problem never existed in the first place. But, like one of the older residents says in the opening of the film, "If you put too many birds in one aviary, they peck each other to death".

Rabot, the debut film of Christina Vandekerckhove, is one of the most devastating documentaries I've ever seen. Filmed like a Roy Andersson picture, it brutally confronts you with the hopelessness and despair of the people inhabiting these buildings. I'm not gonna lie, I started crying at the climax when you see the camera sweeping across the empty and deserted building on the tunes of Madensuyu.

I know a Belgian documentary about poverty isn't really high priority for you all, but I sincerely recommend you checking it out if you can find it anywhere. Probably my favorite movie of the year.
Hadn't heard about it, but sounds interesting. I'll keep an eye on it.
--- UNDER CONSTRUCTION ---
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Mon Nov 26, 2018 10:05 am

You Were Never Really Here (2017)

I have been eager to rewatch this since I saw it for the first time about a year ago. This time, already knowing what was going to happen and which direction the movie would take, I was rather gushing over how everything was framed than anything else. Ramsay tells this particular kind of story well, but that doesn't change the fact that I've seen a lot of movies like this before.

I still experience the flashbacks to Joe's violent past as unnecessary. Not because they are "unoriginal", as I see many reviewers claim (that's not what the movie is aiming for) but because they don't tell us anything that Joaquin Phoenix isn't already channeling through his performance alone.

3,5/5

Cold War (2018)
Definitely the most beautiful looking movie of the year.

I'm grateful to live in a country where a Polish drama in black and white can play at the multiplex and can still attract a full house in its third week.

4/5
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Fri Nov 30, 2018 10:39 am

Benny's Video (1992)

My mom once knew a doctor. Or at least she knew his wife. One day, she told my mother and me about the latest "prank" her son had pulled. The family had a cat, and apparently the son got annoyed with the whining sounds the pet constantly made. Then, they went on a holiday for a few weeks, and when they came home, the mother could not find the cat anywhere. When the husband went back to work the following week, and opened his doctor's cabinet for the first time in weeks, he noticed a very unpleasant smell. Thinking the cat must've pissed somewhere, he went looking in all the corners of his cabinet, but to his surprise (and disgust) he found the dead cat in one of his drawers. What happened was, his little son got so fed up with the cat's whining, he glued her to the side of one of his father's drawers, almost ripping of her pelt, and than just went on a holiday, pretending nothing had happened, showing no sign of guilt or shame.

The astonishment of my mother and me did not only come from the hideousness of the son's act, but mostly from the way the doctor's wife told the story. With a smile, almost laughing it off, like her son just stole a snack from the candy jar. "Oh, he's such a little rascal" she said, not realizing she had a little Norman Bates living in her own house.

This anecdote went through my head the entire time of watching Benny's Video. And I thought about Benny's parents, in upper denial of their offspring's problems, not able to talk some sense into him or at least punish him for his deeds. And I'm aware of how this all isn't an implausible scenario, but rather very likely. And I couldn't deny the satisfaction I got when the parents get their punishment in the end, even when the actual culprit seems to get off free.
User avatar
Oxnard Montalvo
Posts: 1352
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2017 4:27 am

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Fri Nov 30, 2018 2:30 pm

I hope that if I am ever in a similar situation, I'm not too flabbergasted to say, "hey, that's messed up," with my most serious face on.
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Sat Dec 01, 2018 11:40 am

I was pretty young back than so I just didn't say anything.

The City of the Dead (1960)

Yesterday evening, I saw the 4k restoration of this movie at the Cinematek in Brussels. During the film, a lot of people were laughing, even though there is nothing campy about City of the Dead, it's actually a rather serious, very atmospheric movie. I guess a lot of people just think that everything that's old is "laughably bad", as I literally heard some people proclaim after the movie ended. This "hipsterization" of the repertory movie theater crowd, where everything suddenly becomes ironic, is a sad evolution.

And afterwards I saw the 4K restoration of Suspiria:

Suspiria (1977)

If only my own nightmares were as colorful as this movie.

I think this time Suspiria finally clicked for me. Still don't love it though. There maintains to be a certain distance between me and what is happening onscreen. An obvious reason for that is how everything is dubbed, which is distracting and takes a lot away from the performances. But I feel wrong to complain about that, since that's just as useless as complaining about the sound quality of early talkies, that's just the way it is.

But still, hearing that chilling Goblin score blasting through a theater is one of the best things that happened to me in 2018.
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Sun Dec 02, 2018 7:22 pm

Personal Shopper gave me more anxiety than any horror movie I've seen in the past years. It's a beautiful, fascinating enigma that I'll need to rewatch several times before I can make up my mind about it. There's something about this movie that keeps haunting me but I can't put my finger on it.
User avatar
Jinnistan
Posts: 2439
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 5:47 pm

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Jinnistan » Sun Dec 02, 2018 11:37 pm

Slentert wrote:Carnival of Sinners (1943)
I wish someone would issue a restored home video version of this one. At least, I've never found one.
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Fri Dec 07, 2018 9:50 pm

Night is Short, Walk on Girl (2017)

A bizarre yet uniquely endearing movie that will ultimately bring a smile to your face. Highly imaginative in a way only anime can be. Yet whenever the more conventional parts of the story interfere, the movie slows down big time (mostly noticeable in its second act).

But, even when the film sags a bit, there is always the inventive and hyper stylized animation to marvel at. Most of you don't know this about me but drawing is a major passion of mine so I will always enjoy an animated movie as long as it looks pretty. Yes, I am that superficial.
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:03 am

The Hired Hand (1971)

Peter Fonda, coming right off the success of Easy Rider, took a shot at directing his own movie. Universal gave him 1 million dollar to make whatever he wanted. The result was a hippie western, that, while not particularly psychedelic, had a specific meditative pace that was clearly informed by a diet of mushrooms and LSD. And while The Hired Hand is certainly not some hidden masterpiece, it's a really beautiful and quite hypnotic experience that I'm grateful to have had.

I'm honestly not a big fan of Peter Fonda as an actor. I never really responded to his washed up, Californian persona. To me, he lacked the presence and charisma of his father or frequent collaborators like Jack Nicholson or Dennis Hopper. But somehow, this blandness works to his benefit in The Hired Hand (as it also would almost thirty years later in Soderbergh's The Limey). His natural woodenness translates well into the stoic Harry Collings. But he's not stoic the same way Clint Eastwood's The Man with no Name is. Collings is a rather soft spoken man, who barely emotes and doesn't think too much. He seems to have no inner will nor deep longings. He has no direction in life. He says he wants to spend the rest of his life with his wife and daughter, but he doesn't really look determined and barely shows any commitment to the role of husband or father. He hardly exchanges a word with his daughter in the film, and when his wife talks about what the future might bring, his eyes wander off, not really paying attention to whatever is said. Harry Collings is a man who knows he was once born and will die one day, but has no clue what to do in the meantime.

The actual glowing heart of this movie is Warren Oates as Arch Harris, Collings best friend and co-drifter in the years he abandoned his family. Where Peter Fonda is passive and almost not reacting, Oates oozes charm and personality, selling the whole sense of camaraderie between these two all on his own. Fonda gave up part of his producing fee to bring Oates on, and that was totally worth it, considering he breaths life into an otherwise slow and almost deadly film. There is a romantic, tender scene in this movie where Oates is sitting on the porch next to Verna Bloom after a long, hot day of work and while they talk, he softly reaches out his hand to touch her ankle. It's a quiet, shockingly intimate move that shows more passion than any of the interactions between Fonda and Bloom, who play the actual married couple here.
Oates never really looked like a leading man but whenever he was in a movie you barely paid any attention to the other stars, or even, like in this case, the actual leads.

Would make a great double bill with Two- Lane Blacktop, as both are 1971 films that are about American discontent starring Warren Oates.
User avatar
crumbsroom
Posts: 1993
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 3:15 am

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by crumbsroom » Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:05 am

Slentert wrote:The Hired Hand (1971)

Peter Fonda, coming right off the success of Easy Rider, took a shot at directing his own movie. Universal gave him 1 million dollar to make whatever he wanted. The result was a hippie western, that, while not particularly psychedelic, had a specific meditative pace that was clearly informed by a diet of mushrooms and LSD. And while The Hired Hand is certainly not some hidden masterpiece, it's a really beautiful and quite hypnotic experience that I'm grateful to have had.

I'm honestly not a big fan of Peter Fonda as an actor. I never really responded to his washed up, Californian persona. To me, he lacked the presence and charisma of his father or frequent collaborators like Jack Nicholson or Dennis Hopper. But somehow, this blandness works to his benefit in The Hired Hand (as it also would almost thirty years later in Soderbergh's The Limey). His natural woodenness translates well into the stoic Harry Collings. But he's not stoic the same way Clint Eastwood's The Man with no Name is. Collings is a rather soft spoken man, who barely emotes and doesn't think too much. He seems to have no inner will nor deep longings. He has no direction in life. He says he wants to spend the rest of his life with his wife and daughter, but he doesn't really look determined and barely shows any commitment to the role of husband or father. He hardly exchanges a word with his daughter in the film, and when his wife talks about what the future might bring, his eyes wander off, not really paying attention to whatever is said. Harry Collings is a man who knows he was once born and will die one day, but has no clue what to do in the meantime.

The actual glowing heart of this movie is Warren Oates as Arch Harris, Collings best friend and co-drifter in the years he abandoned his family. Where Peter Fonda is passive and almost not reacting, Oates oozes charm and personality, selling the whole sense of camaraderie between these two all on his own. Fonda gave up part of his producing fee to bring Oates on, and that was totally worth it, considering he breaths life into an otherwise slow and almost deadly film. There is a romantic, tender scene in this movie where Oates is sitting on the porch next to Verna Bloom after a long, hot day of work and while they talk, he softly reaches out his hand to touch her ankle. It's a quiet, shockingly intimate move that shows more passion than any of the interactions between Fonda and Bloom, who play the actual married couple here.
Oates never really looked like a leading man but whenever he was in a movie you barely paid any attention to the other stars, or even, like in this case, the actual leads.

Would make a great double bill with Two- Lane Blacktop, as both are 1971 films that are about American discontent starring Warren Oates.
This sounds like something I should look out for.

Also, is it even possible to talk about Peter Fonda without the word 'bland' eventually coming up. Does anyone on earth like this guy?
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:20 am

I watched the movie in a theater myself but there seems to be a okayish print of it on youtube.
And yeah, Peter Fonda is just blandness personified.
User avatar
Shieldmaiden
Posts: 7517
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 2:19 pm

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sun Dec 09, 2018 2:35 am

crumbsroom wrote:Also, is it even possible to talk about Peter Fonda without the word 'bland' eventually coming up. Does anyone on earth like this guy?
He was pretty fun in Almereyda's Nadja. Very goofy. But, yeah, bland works for most everything else.

Slentert, I'll check that one out. Thanks!
Lazzaro felice - Cabin in the Sky - An Autumn Afternoon

Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Sono | My Bookshelf
User avatar
crumbsroom
Posts: 1993
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 3:15 am

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by crumbsroom » Sun Dec 09, 2018 2:39 am

Shieldmaiden wrote:He was pretty fun in Almereyda's Nadja. Very goofy. But, yeah, bland works for most everything else.

Slentert, I'll check that one out. Thanks!
Haven't seen that, but I legit like him in The Limey. But the talent is spread so thin over so many decades.

Maybe if I'd ever bothered with Ulee's Gold...
User avatar
Shieldmaiden
Posts: 7517
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 2:19 pm

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sun Dec 09, 2018 3:44 am

crumbsroom wrote:Maybe if I'd ever bothered with Ulee's Gold...
I can't remember much at all about Ulee's Gold, to be honest, so he might well have been bland in that. I'm going to have to see The Limey one of these days, aren't I?
Lazzaro felice - Cabin in the Sky - An Autumn Afternoon

Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Sono | My Bookshelf
User avatar
crumbsroom
Posts: 1993
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 3:15 am

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by crumbsroom » Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:57 pm

Shieldmaiden wrote:I can't remember much at all about Ulee's Gold, to be honest, so he might well have been bland in that. I going to have to see The Limey one of these days, aren't I?
Yes! The Limey is great.

Soderbergh's best film? Definitely
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Sun Dec 09, 2018 3:09 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Yes! The Limey is great.

Soderbergh's best film? Definitely
I probably agree. But I really like Sex, Lies and Videotapes too.
But yes, Shield, watch The Limey, it's f***in' fantastic.
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Mon Dec 10, 2018 11:55 am

The Christmas Chronicles (2018)
My sister made me watch this. At least it was better than Ex-Drummer.
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Wed Dec 12, 2018 9:57 pm

Widows (2018)

Genre movies are the ideal platform to talk politics. Putting these ideas in an entertaining packaging makes them easier to swallow and will get you a wider audience than a movie that is strictly about that certain issue. The 1978 movie Blue Collar is a perfect example of that.

But that doesn't mean this an easy task to pull off. It's a tricky balancing act. You should be able to say something poignant about your subject while still keeping the main story interesting and floating. And just like the widows in this movie, Steve McQueen and Gillian Flynn underestimated this job. They went with clichéd characters, half-baked ideas and ultimately the movie is not able to say anything profound about the issues it chose to tackle nor does it work as a fun heist movie.
I'm also surprised how very few people were bothered by the part where Liam Neeson and Viola Davis' son got killed. Especially considering how last year Three Billboards got (rightfully) criticized for similarly using police violence against colored people as a throwaway scene. I don't want to diminish how much this is a part of black people's everyday life in America, especially as a white person who doesn't live there himself. But I felt like Flynn and McQueen just took a topical subject and added this one scene to score some woke-points, without it affecting anything that came before or would come later in the movie, and simply not even taking the time to actually say something about this very current issue.
I'm not offended or anything but it just felt cheap.

At the end, I still liked Widows but, with all that talent behind this, it had the potential to be so much better.
User avatar
Jinnistan
Posts: 2439
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 5:47 pm

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Jinnistan » Thu Dec 13, 2018 5:04 am

Slentert wrote:I probably agree. But I really like Sex, Lies and Videotapes too.
But yes, Shield, watch The Limey, it's f***in' fantastic.
I'm an unabashed Soderbergh fan, and there's only a couple of his films (namely a couple of recent ones and a couple with casinos) that I wouldn't recommend. Part of the problem in choosing favorites is given his range of films. How does one compare Kafka and Out of Sight? And unfortunately, we can't cite The Knick as a 20 hour film, or else it would probably top everything else.

Maybe my top ten...

Sex Lies & Videotape
The Limey
The Informant!
Kafka
Che
King of the Hill
The Underneath
Solaris
Traffic
Schizopolis
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Thu Dec 13, 2018 9:57 pm

Roma (2018)

I'm very critical of how Netflix manages certain things, but as long as they fund the projects of modern masters like the Coens or Cuaron (or even dead ones likes Welles), it's hard to be completely dismissive of their output. Cause let's be honest, very few (or dare I say none) other studios would ever okayed this movie. A budget of 15 million dollars, filmed in black-and-white, a shooting schedule that exceeded 100 days, completely spoken in Spanish, no real stars (or even someone with prior acting experience in case of the lead). Roma is completely unique in the current movie climate.

Cuarón's latest feels grand while focusing on the smaller things. A woman walking down the street. Street musicians performing in the middle of a crowded road. Someone parking a car. A bunch of martial artist practicing swordplay in a desert. People racing into a burning forest hauling pails of water. A pregnant woman getting furiously raced to the hospital. All of these images haunt you in their own specific way.

Roma is the kind of personal movie every director always proclaims of wanting to make, but it happens rarely that one actually realizes this dream. This movie feels like something Cuarón has been seeing in his mind for years, decades. And now, we the audience can finally see it too.
User avatar
Oxnard Montalvo
Posts: 1352
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2017 4:27 am

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Fri Dec 14, 2018 3:29 am

it's been a year now and if it matters any, I don't think you're a noob.
User avatar
Rock
Posts: 1617
Joined: Wed Aug 21, 2013 12:48 am
Location: From beyond the moon

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Rock » Fri Dec 14, 2018 4:34 am

Haze the n000000000b! j/k

Also, I suspect Widows might not hold up well for me if I revisit it, but I like a lot of the individual pieces, particularly Elizabeth Debicki's performance.
"We're outgunned and undermanned. But you know somethin'? We're gonna win. You know why? Superior attitude. Superior state of mind." - Mason Storm
____
Blog!
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Fri Dec 14, 2018 11:23 am

Oxnard Montalvo wrote:it's been a year now and if it matters any, I don't think you're a noob.
Aw, thanks. Though I still feel like I have too many blindspots to call myself anything else.
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Fri Dec 14, 2018 11:25 am

Rock wrote:Haze the n000000000b! j/k

Also, I suspect Widows might not hold up well for me if I revisit it, but I like a lot of the individual pieces, particularly Elizabeth Debicki's performance.
I think Debicki gives by far the best performance of the entire movie, and her character was also the only one I actually cared about.
User avatar
Wooley
Posts: 2185
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:25 am

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Wooley » Fri Dec 14, 2018 3:04 pm

Slentert wrote:Widows (2018)

Genre movies are the ideal platform to talk politics. Putting these ideas in an entertaining packaging makes them easier to swallow and will get you a wider audience than a movie that is strictly about that certain issue. The 1978 movie Blue Collar is a perfect example of that.

But that doesn't mean this an easy task to pull off. It's a tricky balancing act. You should be able to say something poignant about your subject while still keeping the main story interesting and floating. And just like the widows in this movie, Steve McQueen and Gillian Flynn underestimated this job. They went with clichéd characters, half-baked ideas and ultimately the movie is not able to say anything profound about the issues it chose to tackle nor does it work as a fun heist movie.
I'm also surprised how very few people were bothered by the part where Liam Neeson and Viola Davis' son got killed. Especially considering how last year Three Billboards got (rightfully) criticized for similarly using police violence against colored people as a throwaway scene. I don't want to diminish how much this is a part of black people's everyday life in America, especially as a white person who doesn't live there himself. But I felt like Flynn and McQueen just took a topical subject and added this one scene to score some woke-points, without it affecting anything that came before or would come later in the movie, and simply not even taking the time to actually say something about this very current issue.
I'm not offended or anything but it just felt cheap.

At the end, I still liked Widows but, with all that talent behind this, it had the potential to be so much better.
This is disappointing, I had high hopes and expectations for this.
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Fri Dec 14, 2018 5:13 pm

Wooley wrote: This is disappointing, I had high hopes and expectations for this.
Most people loved this movie, I'm in the minority here so don't let me stop you from giving it a chance.
User avatar
Jinnistan
Posts: 2439
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 5:47 pm

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Jinnistan » Fri Dec 14, 2018 9:52 pm

Slentert wrote:I think Debicki gives by far the best performance of the entire movie, and her character was also the only one I actually cared about.
I think Debicki was great, but I can't say that Viola didn't earn a lot of my concern. I even cared about Farrell for awhile
before the twist, seeing him as trapped by his father's machine and prejudices, hoping that he may take a turn for redemption.
Slentert wrote:Most people loved this movie, I'm in the minority here so don't let me stop you from giving it a chance.
The script is largely trash, so it's hard for me to say that it didn't live up to its potential, but it's both disappointing due to the level of talent involved and enjoyable due to the sheer level of talent involved.

I think I agree with Rock on this one, in that I may be a lot less forgiving on future viewings.
User avatar
Thief
Posts: 1669
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Puerto Rico
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Thief » Fri Dec 14, 2018 10:19 pm

Whenever I think of talent wasted, I think of The Score (Brando, DeNiro, Norton). Is it as dull and generic as that one?
--- UNDER CONSTRUCTION ---
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Sat Dec 15, 2018 6:13 am

Thief wrote:Whenever I think of talent wasted, I think of The Score (Brando, DeNiro, Norton). Is it as dull and generic as that one?
I have not seen The Score (and have no desire to) so I can't really say.
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Sat Dec 15, 2018 9:49 am

Mean Streets (1973)

The Rosetta Stone of what would come later in Scorsese's filmography.

The most exciting thing about this movie is seeing Scorsese coming into his own as a filmmaker, though he's not quite there yet. Mean Streets is a film that oozes potential, but it's too rough, too unpolished to be considered a masterpiece. But that specific rawness is what makes it so charming in the first place.
User avatar
Oxnard Montalvo
Posts: 1352
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2017 4:27 am

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Sat Dec 15, 2018 2:37 pm

darn good movie to watch when you're young and starting to chafe against your Catholic upbringing.
User avatar
Thief
Posts: 1669
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Puerto Rico
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Thief » Sat Dec 15, 2018 3:11 pm

I haven't seen it in a long, loooong time, but I remember not being very impressed with Mean Streets. Maybe because of that unpolished nature you mention, I don't know. Been meaning to rewatch it, but haven't gotten to it.
--- UNDER CONSTRUCTION ---
User avatar
Slentert
Posts: 826
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:23 am
Location: Belgium
Contact:

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Sat Dec 15, 2018 3:17 pm

Might as well post this here too, my top 150 of favorite movies :)
User avatar
Wooley
Posts: 2185
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:25 am

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Wooley » Sat Dec 15, 2018 4:46 pm

Thief wrote:Whenever I think of talent wasted, I think of The Score (Brando, DeNiro, Norton). Is it as dull and generic as that one?
Ugh. Great example.
User avatar
crumbsroom
Posts: 1993
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 3:15 am

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by crumbsroom » Sat Dec 15, 2018 5:27 pm

Slentert wrote: it's too rough, too unpolished to be considered a masterpiece
I find this is one of the great fallacies in determining what a 'masterpiece' is, or maybe even how insufficient a pursuit it is for an artist to even bother aiming to make a masterpiece. Is it really necessary for a film to have every screw bolted down to qualify? Is perfection something that is the ultimate compliment, or an exhausting waste of the artists energy? For many in the art world of the past, Van Gogh's mutated version of perspective would have discounted him as ever being able to achieve masterpiece status. Or what about the lack of refinement in the lines of the Impressionist painters? Landscapes don't really look like that, after all.

If Mean Streets can't qualify as a 'masterpiece' due to its primitiveness and loose ends and scenes that linger a little longer than they feel they should, neither could most of Fassbinders output or any film by Cassavetes. And a canonical list of masterpieces that doesn't include these, wouldn't be worth much, as far as I'm concerned.

Of course, this doesn't mean that the first time I saw Mean Streets that I didn't think it was a shapeless piece of shit.
User avatar
crumbsroom
Posts: 1993
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 3:15 am

Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by crumbsroom » Sat Dec 15, 2018 5:27 pm

Thief wrote:Whenever I think of talent wasted, I think of The Score (Brando, DeNiro, Norton). Is it as dull and generic as that one?
A movie so empty, I almost can't believe you were able to retrieve it from your memory banks long enough to use as an example.
Post Reply