A noob's journey through cinema

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Oxnard Montalvo
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Tue Jun 25, 2019 1:39 pm

Slentert wrote:
Fri Jun 21, 2019 10:36 pm
Well, that's as good a reason as any.
Also, I hope you realize I was just joking and not wishing actual harm upon you. We don't know each other in person but I quite like you, and appreciate that you're always trying to make this forum a pleasant environment for everyone.
:up: no prob

also I'm hoping Ferrara is still doing that movie with Nicolas Cage. Indiewire says the movie is in production but nothing about The Cage.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Tue Jun 25, 2019 9:35 pm

Shooting the Mafia (2019)

An Irish documentary about veteran, Italian photojournalist Letizia Battaglia, who began a lifelong battle against the mafia that poisoned and corrupted her home country, all illustrated by her own photographs and clips of old Italian movies. Or so it starts out, later it develops more into a depiction of the mafia warfare unfolding in front of her lens, and the nostalgia-inducing movie clips are replaced with more impersonal news reels.

Shooting the Mafia was interesting but also a bit slight. Maybe 90 minutes wasn’t enough for such a vast subject matter, spanning several decades. Letizia Battaglia is a fascinating woman, and seeing her photographs projected on a giant screen is the highlight of this documentary, but when we leave her story and her very personal account of the historical events, the entire thing gets too formal, only scratching the surface of what happened. Concentrates too much on the bigger picture, while Letizia's story felt so intimate, giving us a sense of what it was actually like living in that country at that exact moment. Therefore, the movie loses its entire sense of personality and becomes something that would play on Discovery Channel on two in the afternoon. We end up with more admiration for the interviewee rather than gaining actual insight.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:54 pm

Sorry for not really keeping this thread updated. I have a hard time writing about several titles I saw at the festival since my feelings about most of them seem to be pretty neutral. Not bad, not good, just right in the middle. Therefore I shall not review every movie individually, as I originally planted, but I will instead highlight certain films that I do find the words for.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Sun Jun 30, 2019 1:46 pm

Zombi Child (2019)



Several critics compared Zombi Child to I Walked with a Zombie, a horror classic from 1943 produced by the legendary Val Lewton. That is one of my favorite movies of all time, so understandably, such a comparison got my hopes really high. But in reality, the only thing they have in common is that they’re both old-fashioned, pre-Romero zombie stories, rooted in race, voodoo and colonialism.

The movie opens in Haiti, 1962, where a man, considered dead at the time but we later learned he was still alive, is buried, but eventually brought back to the living world, only to work as a slave on the sugarcane fields. 55 years in later, a young woman from Haitian descent named Mélissa (Wislanda Louimat) joins the prestigious Légion d’Honneur boarding school in France. She quickly befriends a couple of young rich girls, who have their own literary sorority club, which is just an excuse to sneak out of their dorms and secretly drink liquor by candlelight. Her gateway into this clique is Fanny (Louis Labeque), who is completely transfixed by a brief romance she had last summer, like only a teenager with little experience in that department can. When Mélissa slowly starts opening up about her family’s history, Fanny’s dream world gets shattered and leaves her disillusioned, while the movie occasionally cuts back to enslaved ‘zombi’, whose fate is intertwined with that of our main protagonists, in a way that will come to no surprise of anyone who has seen more than 5 movies in their life.

The main attraction of this movie is that it’s the new offspring by notorious French director Bertrand Bonello (Nocturama, Saint Laurent), though I have not seen any of his prior work. He vaguely wrestles with concepts like class and race in this movie, in ways that feel almost uninspired, like in a rather flagrant moment for example, somewhere in the opening 20 minutes, where an unassuming teacher explains the entire theme of the movie during his lecture. The political implications here only seem to exist in the abstract. Sometimes the movie feels very much like a middle-aged man’s impersonation of what he thinks teenage girls nowadays are like (like one of them giving an entire presentation about Rihanna for their English class) but that is not to say those are completely unbelievable. Like whenever one of the teenagers is alone or has to wait for more than a second, they immediately pick up their phone, which I as a teenager myself can confirm is incredibly accurate. There is a restlessness with this current generation that is slowly taking over people in their thirties and forties as well, where everything has to go quicker, more efficient and as painless as possible. At one point, when talking about how zombies used to be far slower in movies, a character proclaims “Everything is faster nowadays, zombies too”.

But this casual attempt at humor, a brief glimpse of levity, gives the movie a sense of personality that it is often lacking. Zombi Child is a slow, very restrained film, which is mostly focused on character moments, while at the same time keeping the viewer at a distance. These last few years we’ve had several arthouse pictures, mostly coming out of the department of world cinema, that casually flirted with the horror genre (like Personal Shopper or Raw, both 2016 movies that I loved by the way) but never actually became one of them. Zombi Child seems to take the same route as those movies, safely dipping its toe into the water, until in the finale, it abruptly decides to properly dive in... and then just end all of a sudden, like there is a reel or two missing.
Bonello’s latest might not be a particularly great movies, nor one that should be allowed to be mentioned along a legit classic like I Walked With a Zombie, but it definitely left me thinking, and gave me material to write about.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Mon Jul 15, 2019 9:23 pm

I saw some groovy movies on the big screen the last few days. Some quick write-ups:

Footlight Parade (1933) Feels more like a screwball comedy rather than a musical for most of its running time, but than it goes all out in the finale. I've heard so many people talk about that swimming pool number before but nothing could prepare me for watching the actual thing. Has to be seen to be believed. It's almost a shame that you still have another musical sequence after that. I mean, don't get me wrong, it is great to see James Cagney take the stage, but it can't beat that master sequence that came prior. This was my first James Cagney movie and you totally understand why this man was such a huge star. Such a powerful presence, for such a rather short guy.
You know you've got a great musical if people are humming the songs when they leave the theater.

After Hours (1985) A rewatch, but the first time on the big screen. Such a sad, hilarious, electric rollercoaster of a movie. Starring Griffin Dunne as the Nice Guy™, who leaves his natural habit and tries to hook up with a girl in Soho, but once things become weirder and weirder, his good manners quickly go out of the window. One of the best "bad night" movies ever made.
You can clearly see how the entire cast and crew got so jacked up while filming it, the energy almost jumps out of the screen.

Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid (1973) A fantastic symphony consisting out of great scenes, one after the other. At the start, you think this will be a movie about the sympathetic, free spirited Billy The Kid (Kris Kristofferson) getting unfairly murdered by the "sell-out", Pat Garrett (James Coburn), but it quickly becomes clear neither these guys are worthy of our sympathy. Where most westerns feature some kind of "code of honor", here people just get shot in the back like it is no big deal. Garrett and The Kid might not want to kill each other, but they sure don't have a problem with letting everyone around them die because of their stubbornness.

Prime Cut (1972) It has some good scenes, but it is also kind of a dissapointment, like a lot of it felt clunky and not really thought through. Which is sad, because I really was prepared to love this. Could make for an interesting remake, but than again, are there really any movie stars out there who could compete with Lee Marvin? Michael Shannon perhaps, but that's a big maybe.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Wooley » Tue Jul 16, 2019 11:08 am

Slentert wrote:
Mon Jul 15, 2019 9:23 pm


After Hours (1985) A rewatch, but the first time on the big screen. Such a sad, hilarious, electric rollercoaster of a movie. Starring Griffin Dunne as the Nice Guy™, who leaves his natural habit and tries to hook up with a girl in Soho, but once things become weirder and weirder, his good manners quickly go out of the window. One of the best "bad night" movies ever made.
You can clearly see how the entire cast and crew got so jacked up while filming it, the energy almost jumps out of the screen.
I love this movie, it is actually my favorite Scorsese, but also just one of my favorite movies.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Tue Jul 16, 2019 12:39 pm

Wooley wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 11:08 am
I love this movie, it is actually my favorite Scorsese, but also just one of my favorite movies.
It is probably my second favorite Scorsese, after Taxi Driver. It is so fucking good.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Mon Jul 22, 2019 2:03 pm

Edit: removed because far too personal
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Mon Jul 22, 2019 2:58 pm

Slentert wrote:
Mon Jul 22, 2019 2:03 pm
It is all becoming too much for me and there doesn't seem to be a way out of it.
what would need to happen before you could live on your own? I assume you'd need a decent job first if you don't have one already.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Mon Jul 22, 2019 5:27 pm

Edit: removed because far too personal.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Jinnistan » Tue Jul 23, 2019 1:15 am

Slent, you need to look into university options. You've got the head and the hands. I wish you the best of luck.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Takoma1 » Tue Jul 23, 2019 2:09 am

Slentert wrote:
Mon Jul 22, 2019 5:27 pm
Edit: removed because far too personal.
So I only arrived after the edit, so I don't know exactly what's up. But you're articulate, curious, and intelligent. I have confidence that you will find your way through whatever's getting you down. And there are plenty of people who've navigated their late teens/early 20s who would be more than happy to give you advice via PM if you don't want to share publicly.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Tue Jul 23, 2019 2:30 am

I sincerely wish you the best of luck with this. I recommend seeking out a counselor for help if possible.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Tue Jul 23, 2019 7:56 am

Jinnistan wrote:
Tue Jul 23, 2019 1:15 am
Slent, you need to look into university options. You've got the head and the hands. I wish you the best of luck.
I actually just applied for film school and will be taking an admission test at the end of August.
The problem is that I'm homeschooled and I still have a few exams to go before I can finish high school. I have only three courses left (French, German and math) but sadly you can't take exams during summer. I hope we can arrange something with the school that I can already start there before having finished all my courses. I know other people have done the same.

And thank you Jinnistan.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Tue Jul 23, 2019 8:02 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Tue Jul 23, 2019 2:09 am
So I only arrived after the edit, so I don't know exactly what's up. But you're articulate, curious, and intelligent. I have confidence that you will find your way through whatever's getting you down. And there are plenty of people who've navigated their late teens/early 20s who would be more than happy to give you advice via PM if you don't want to share publicly.
Thank you so much, Takoma. I hope that if I can go to college next semester, I'll finally get out of the unlivable situation I am in now. I'm currently at my grandparents' place, so that will give me some peace for the coming days.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Tue Jul 23, 2019 8:03 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Tue Jul 23, 2019 2:30 am
I sincerely wish you the best of luck with this. I recommend seeking out a counselor for help if possible.
I might. Thank you.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Thief » Tue Jul 23, 2019 12:59 pm

I didn't read what's going on, but I agree with what everybody has said here. Wish you the best, Slent.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Sun Aug 25, 2019 2:57 pm

Day of Anger (1967)


"Your last lesson Scotty: when you start killing you can't stop it."


A small-town kid that nobody believes in teams up with an experienced, older man that teaches him the ways of a profession that the vast majority wrongfully considers to be outdated. You could almost say this is the Spaghetti Western equivalent of A New Hope, though Day of Anger obviously came out a decade before the space opera classic and this kind of set-up has been used for centuries in countless myths and stories, and for a good reason, because done well, they can be extremely entertaining.

Lee Van Cleef plays the Obi-Wan type mentor figure in this scenario (though he is closer to Ra's Al Ghul in Batman Begins if we're being honest) against Giuliano Gemma's Luke like protegé. As is the problem with most Van Cleef spaghetti westerns where his co-star isn't Clint Eastwood, the rest of the cast pales in comparison to him (see also Death Rides A Horse, another movie I just saw recently that might be even better than this one). Van Cleef is so menacing, both calculated and unpredictable. Whenever he raises his nostrils just a little, you know people are going to die. But in this one he manages to combine that with a certain sense of kindness and perhaps even merciful, though you are never certain of how long that will last. It is a perfect mixture of his wise, fatherly Colonel Mortimer from For a Few Dollars More and the ruthless, greedy Angel Eyes from The Good, The Bad and the Ugly.

You also have an amazing duel scene between Van Cleef and a hired assassin, staged as a classic, medieval game of joust, only this version is played with a rifle instead of a lance. The sequence ends as suddenly as it appeared, but it adds a nice extra flavor to an already delicious dish of spaghetti.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Sun Sep 01, 2019 8:22 pm

Sonatine (1993)

A gentle movie about nihilism.

I love Takeshi Kitano's performance in this. A man so dead inside, he just spends his time waiting for his body to catch up with his soul. Nothing matters, revenge merely seems like a form of courtesy. You might just try and have some fun in the meantime, no?
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Tue Sep 03, 2019 6:31 pm

For people who were wondering how it is going with me right now: it looks promising. I'm getting a job, it seems like I'm getting my own place (my mother kicked me out, my father doesn't want to take care of me, but they're both willing to help out with the rent) and if everything goes well, I might start college in February. So I still have some time left to finish my last courses of high school and sort my life out. It will be a big change to live on my own, but hey, I can't stay with my grandparents forever.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Tue Sep 03, 2019 7:37 pm

I'm glad that things are starting to look up for you. I wish you the best of luck with this change.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Thief » Tue Sep 03, 2019 7:58 pm

Slentert wrote:
Tue Sep 03, 2019 6:31 pm
For people who were wondering how it is going with me right now: it looks promising. I'm getting a job, it seems like I'm getting my own place (my mother kicked me out, my father doesn't want to take care of me, but they're both willing to help out with the rent) and if everything goes well, I might start college in February. So I still have some time left to finish my last courses of high school and sort my life out. It will be a big change to live on my own, but hey, I can't stay with my grandparents forever.
I'm happy for you. I'm sure living on your own will be a learning, but liberating, experience for you. It's not easy, but I'm sure you'll make it.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Tue Sep 03, 2019 8:36 pm

Thanks, both of you.
Living on my own will be a big change, but I'm pretty sure I'll be able to handle it. And I'm also really looking forward to go to college, something I wasn't even sure would still be possible for a while.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Wooley » Tue Sep 03, 2019 8:43 pm

Slentert wrote:
Tue Sep 03, 2019 6:31 pm
For people who were wondering how it is going with me right now: it looks promising. I'm getting a job, it seems like I'm getting my own place (my mother kicked me out, my father doesn't want to take care of me, but they're both willing to help out with the rent) and if everything goes well, I might start college in February. So I still have some time left to finish my last courses of high school and sort my life out. It will be a big change to live on my own, but hey, I can't stay with my grandparents forever.
That sounds really positive, man, probably a little scary but a really, really good step. I wish you the best, man.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Tue Sep 03, 2019 8:57 pm

Wooley wrote:
Tue Sep 03, 2019 8:43 pm
That sounds really positive, man, probably a little scary but a really, really good step. I wish you the best, man.
Thanks, man.
I hope that once I get my life back on the rails I'll be able to spend more energy into my creative endeavors, and make some more meatier contributions to this forum.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Wed Sep 04, 2019 10:08 am

Caliber 9 (1972, dir. Fernando Di Leo)


Caliber 9 tells the story of Ugo Piazzi (Gastone Moschin, who feels like the lovechild of Jason Statham and Dean Norris), an ex-mobster who just got released out of prison. Everyone, gangsters and police alike, are certain he is in the possession of 300,000 dollars that he supposedly stole from his former employer, a crime syndicate boss named Mikado. He himself persists he has nothing to do with it.

The real star of this movie though is Mario Adorf as Rocco Musco, who has the acting abilities of Jon Polito, only with the dopey handsome looks of someone like Bruce Campbell. He is such a schmuck while at the same time still have a threatening presence because he is stupid and violent enough to fuck everything up for everyone around.

The movie itself, while a lot of fun, is often hindered by plotpoints and ideas that are brought up but never really fleshed. Ugo's girlfriend, night club dancer Nelly (Barbara Bouchet) brings a certain tenderness to the film, showing us a different side from Ugo than what we had seen before, but then kinda disappears from the film until the very end. But even more distracting is the storyline between the two police inspectors, the right-wing Commissioner played by Frank Wolff, who has a notable fixation with our protagonist, and the new-to-town, left-wing progressive Mercuri (played by Luigi Pistilli, an actor who every fan of spaghetti westerns will know) who seemingly only exists to act as a mouthpiece for the director (or at least I assume so) and then is send away without having the opportunity to make some real contributions to the plot. Which is sad because his existence promised a really interesting alternate direction for the course of the story, that is kind of left abandoned for something more traditional.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Jinnistan » Wed Sep 04, 2019 10:50 pm

Dammit. Caliber 9 just got dropped from Prime!

I can't watch all these films fast enough!
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Rock » Thu Sep 05, 2019 12:23 am

I like that one (especially its soundtrack), but my favourite Di Leo I've seen would have to be The Italian Connection. It has peak Mario Adorf, all blustery, sweaty lowlife energy.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Thu Sep 05, 2019 7:06 am

Rock wrote:
Thu Sep 05, 2019 12:23 am
I like that one (especially its soundtrack), but my favourite Di Leo I've seen would have to be The Italian Connection. It has peak Mario Adorf, all blustery, sweaty lowlife energy.
Yeah, I forgot to mention the soundtrack. I've been wanting to watch The Italian Connection for a while now.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Thu Sep 05, 2019 8:06 am

The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956, dir. Alfred Hitchcock)


Occasionally I can have a problem with the way Hitchcock portrays romance in his movies. They can be really interesting if there is some darked edge to them, like in Vertigo or Rebecca, but when they're supposed to be healthy, they can be quite unbelievable or even boring. Rear Window is an otherwise perfect thriller that is sadly centered around a dull relationship drama between the unnaturally beautiful Grace Kelly and the 21-years older James Stewart, who is constantly complaining that she is 'not adventurous enough' for him, while the audience is sitting there thinking "dude, that is fucking Grace Kelly, who are you to refuse her".

The Man Who Knew Too Much shows me another variation of the Hitchcock romance I wasn't yet familiar with: the married couple. James Stewart and Doris Day (this time "only" 14 years younger than her supposed husband) feel like an actual couple that has been together for a very long time, knows each other inside out, and have enough annoyances about each other to spoil many dinner dates. They have their own way of communicating, have a shared responsibility (their son) and they manage to become a better version of themselves as a pair. Which is why the movie becomes notably less interesting whenever they split up. Stewart and Day are so charming together, a doctor and singer forced by circumstances to become Nick and Nora for a second, they are the main appeal of this otherwise kind of middle-of-the-road Hitchcock vehicle.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Thief » Thu Sep 05, 2019 12:40 pm

Slentert wrote:
Thu Sep 05, 2019 8:06 am
The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956, dir. Alfred Hitchcock)


Occasionally I can have a problem with the way Hitchcock portrays romance in his movies. They can be really interesting if there is some darked edge to them, like in Vertigo or Rebecca, but when they're supposed to be healthy, they can be quite unbelievable or even boring. Rear Window is an otherwise perfect thriller that is sadly centered around a dull relationship drama between the unnaturally beautiful Grace Kelly and the 21-years older James Stewart, who is constantly complaining that she is 'not adventurous enough' for him, while the audience is sitting there thinking "dude, that is fucking Grace Kelly, who are you to refuse her".

The Man Who Knew Too Much shows me another variation of the Hitchcock romance I wasn't yet familiar with: the married couple. James Stewart and Doris Day (this time "only" 14 years younger than her supposed husband) feel like an actual couple that has been together for a very long time, knows each other inside out, and have enough annoyances about each other to spoil many dinner dates. They have their own way of communicating, have a shared responsibility (their son) and they manage to become a better version of themselves as a pair. Which is why the movie becomes notably less interesting whenever they split up. Stewart and Day are so charming together, a doctor and singer forced by circumstances to become Nick and Nora for a second, they are the main appeal of this otherwise kind of middle-of-the-road Hitchcock vehicle.
Have you seen the original? I haven't seen the remake, but enjoyed the original's pace, and Peter Lorre is always a treat.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Thu Sep 05, 2019 9:17 pm

I haven't yet, but it is on my to-watch list.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Thu Sep 05, 2019 9:25 pm

Full Contact (1992)


This is pretty much the movie I wanted Cobra (1986) to be. Fever dream violence in a sticky, neon-lit Bangkok. Starts out with a guy lighting his cigarette with his thumb and the movie only becomes weirder from there. There is also a really cute dog.

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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Rock » Fri Sep 06, 2019 2:30 am

Full Contact feels like Hong Kong's take on an American action movie. I enjoyed it, but also found it a little...impersonal?
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Fri Sep 06, 2019 6:55 pm

Opening Night (1977, dir. John Cassavetes)


Slow, mature but grand drama about an actress struggling with getting older and the play that she's currently in which reflects that. Gena Rowlands as Myrtle is outstanding, a woman who has filtered herself through so many different characters she has no real sense of who she actually is anymore. Whenever she goes on stage, the line between reality and fiction starts to blur, and the outcome is something completely different every time. A fantastic ode to the profession of acting and the art of theater.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Wed Sep 18, 2019 7:19 pm

CHRISTMAS EVIL (1980) is far more well made than you would suspect from a low-budget killer Santa flick.

The movie is about a toy factory worker named Harry who, after witnessing his dad screwing his mom in a Santa outfit as a little kid, is left traumatized and now, as an adult, believes he himself is Santa Claus. He even spies on all the little children in his neighborhood to figure which ones deserve to be put on the "naughty" list. After being repeatedly picked on by his fellow co-workers, Harry slowly starts losing his grip on reality during the holy days of Christmas, bringing both joy and murder to the neighborhood.

Not exactly the silly, gimmick-y slasher flick you'd expect it to be with that title and synopsis, Christmas Evil can best be described as a character study, which weirdly works in the movie's favor, making the entire thing a very memorable experience. The director is clearly not just planning on making a quick buck by appealing to both the Halloween and the Christmas season audience, but the entire film feels rather oddly personal and earnest, like it is something he needed to get out of his system. He even convinced the cinematographer of Last Year at Marienbad, of all things, to shoot it.

I wouldn't call it some hidden masterpiece of weirdo cinema, like my prior review might seem to imply, but if you keep your expectations in check, it's a rough, fascinating gem.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Sat Sep 21, 2019 8:39 am

Harold and Maude (1971, dir. Hal Ashby)

I imagine, before Wes Anderson starts production on a new film, he sits down, watches this movie, then looks into the mirror and whispers to himself "this is what I aspire to".

It is basically the ending of Boogie Nights but without the prosthetic penis.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Sat Sep 21, 2019 8:39 am

It is also one of my absolute favorite movies and this rewatch only cemented that.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Jinnistan » Sat Sep 21, 2019 9:14 am

Is the phallus the hearse or the banjo?
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Sat Sep 21, 2019 2:56 pm

Yeah, HaM is a great film and also one of my favorite comedies.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Thu Oct 24, 2019 9:50 pm

Watched Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans on the big screen, which was an amazing experience. Formally speaking, it feels like the mic drop of the Silent Era, in the sense that it is the ultimate showcase of what movies can do. If you will forgive me a little hyperbole, they could've just stopped making movies after 1927 and it would be okay. I'm glad they went ahead and still continued, but it wasn't necessary.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Wooley » Fri Oct 25, 2019 6:43 am

Slentert wrote:
Thu Oct 24, 2019 9:50 pm
Watched Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans on the big screen, which was an amazing experience. Formally speaking, it feels like the mic drop of the Silent Era, in the sense that it is the ultimate showcase of what movies can do. If you will forgive me a little hyperbole, they could've just stopped making movies after 1927 and it would be okay. I'm glad they went ahead and still continued, but it wasn't necessary.
I'll buy that. The first part at least. It's been a while since I've seen it, but that sounds about right.
I'm enjoying silent films more and more these days but I don't know that I'm ready to give up all films after 1927.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Fri Oct 25, 2019 6:55 am

Wait for Passion of Joan of Arc and Man With a Movie Camera to be released. Then they can stop making films.

I haven't seen Sunrise yet. Should probably do so soon.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Fri Oct 25, 2019 6:58 am

And Un Chien Andalou for that matter.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Fri Oct 25, 2019 9:40 am

Wooley wrote:
Fri Oct 25, 2019 6:43 am
I'll buy that. The first part at least. It's been a while since I've seen it, but that sounds about right.
I'm enjoying silent films more and more these days but I don't know that I'm ready to give up all films after 1927.
Like I said, it's a hyperbole, I wouldn't want to give up all films after 1927 either, what I meant is that Sunrise is a showcase for a medium at the height of its power, a prime example of visual storytelling. If someone would ask me what it is that movies are able to that you can't do in other media, I would show them Sunrise.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Fri Oct 25, 2019 9:41 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Fri Oct 25, 2019 6:55 am
Wait for Passion of Joan of Arc and Man With a Movie Camera to be released. Then they can stop making films.

I haven't seen Sunrise yet. Should probably do so soon.
I'm probably seeing Man With a Movie Camera on the big screen somewhere next month, so I'll get back to you about that!
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Fri Oct 25, 2019 2:41 pm

Slentert wrote:
Fri Oct 25, 2019 9:41 am
I'm probably seeing Man With a Movie Camera on the big screen somewhere next month, so I'll get back to you about that!
:up:
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Fri Oct 25, 2019 11:13 pm

Next week I'll be having some friends over for an old-fashioned movie night (if everything works out alright, teenagers are a pain in the ass when it comes to planning)
My friends aren't movie buffs, they like movies, especially when it's Marvel or Disney Animation, but they trust my taste enough that they let me choose. My main goal with these movie nights (we watched Gremlins, The Grand Budapest Hotel and Train to Busan on prior occasions) is to show my friends a movie that they might like but wouldn't normally watch out of their own, and that are preferably fun to watch with a crowd. Since it's almost Halloween I thought about playing Spider-Baby, The Addams Family Values or perhaps even Night of the Comet. There is also a part of me that wants to show them The Good, The Bad and the Ugly, The Big Lebowski or Miracle Mile, movies I love and will possibly play well with a bigger audience. Or do I just throw them into the deep and say fuck it, we're watching Eyes Wide Shut?

What do y'all think?
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Takoma1 » Fri Oct 25, 2019 11:47 pm

I think that Spider Baby is a great choice. It has such a sense of humor about itself.
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Re: A noob's journey through cinema

Post by Slentert » Fri Oct 25, 2019 11:55 pm

Personally I'm also leaning towards Spider-Baby, the only thing that is holding me back is that several of the people attending will have never seen a black-and-white movie before, and might be a bit apprehensive of that. And of course some will refuse to watch it just because of its title alone.
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