Obituaries

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Stu
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Stu » Wed Feb 06, 2019 4:57 am

I didn't hear what the cause was, but I saw on Facebook that the poster we knew as Joss Whedon apparently passed away recently, and knowing all the demons he struggled with, I can take a guess as to how it happened...

:(
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:00 am

I don't have much else to say except, yeah that sucks.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Death Proof » Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:13 am

Stu wrote:I didn't hear what the cause was, but I saw on Facebook that the poster we knew as Joss Whedon apparently passed away recently, and knowing all the demons he struggled with, I can take a guess as to how it happened...

:(

Was he on RT? If so, did he use the same name?
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Stu » Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:25 am

Death Proof wrote:

Was he on RT? If so, did he use the same name?
As far as I know and can remember, he was on RT under that username, yes.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Quite-Gone Genie » Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:25 am

Death Proof wrote:

Was he on RT? If so, did he use the same name?
Briefly under that name. Old RTers might remember him better as Uncomfortably Numb. I met him once in person when I was up in Toronto right at the beginning of 2009.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Death Proof » Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:29 am

Quite-Gone Genie wrote: Briefly under that name. Old RTers might remember him better as Uncomfortably Numb. I met him once in person when I was up in Toronto right at the beginning of 2009.

Sorry to say I don't really remember him but I'm sad for his passing. :(
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Re: Obituaries

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Re: Obituaries

Post by Torgo » Thu Feb 07, 2019 9:18 pm

R.I.P. I'll always remember Frank's tenure as the manager of the Expos in the early 2000s. You have to admire how professional and dignified he was in that role, especially for such a writeoff of a team.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Captain Oats » Fri Feb 08, 2019 2:05 pm

fuck
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Death Proof » Fri Feb 08, 2019 2:09 pm

Captain Oats wrote: fuck

aw no no no....


I know he's done much better movies, but Wolfen is one of my favorite horror movies.

"An angel on one shoulder and a devil on de odder."


So many great roles. :(
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Torgo » Fri Feb 08, 2019 3:19 pm

R.I.P. He was my favorite Poirot and my favorite Churchill (sorry, Gary).
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Captain Oats » Fri Feb 08, 2019 4:27 pm

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Re: Obituaries

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Fri Feb 08, 2019 5:28 pm

ahaha, that's great. looks like I have an excuse to rewatch Miller's Crossing.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by MadMan » Sat Feb 09, 2019 6:17 am

Awesome actor. RIP.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by John Dumbear » Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:37 am

Not the best Scrooge, just my favorite Scrooge.

RIP
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Re: Obituaries

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Re: Obituaries

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Re: Obituaries

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Sat Feb 23, 2019 2:32 pm

NYT wrote:Stanley Donen, who directed Fred Astaire dancing on the ceiling, Gene Kelly singing in the rain and a host of other sparkling moments from some of Hollywood’s greatest musicals, died on Thursday in Manhattan. He was 94.

His son, Mark Donen, confirmed the death.

Stanley Donen brought a certain charm and elegance to the silver screen in the late 1940s through the 1950s, at a time when Hollywood was soaked in glamour and the big studio movies were polished to a sheen.

“For a time, Donen epitomized Hollywood style,” Tad Friend wrote in The New Yorker in 2003. Mr. Donen, he wrote, “made the world of champagne fountains and pillbox hats look enchanting, which is much harder than it sounds.”

Mr. Donen worked with some of the most illustrious figures of his era: from Astaire and Kelly to Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn. He also worked with Leonard Bernstein, the lyricist Alan Jay Lerner and the writing team of Comden and Green, not to mention Frank Sinatra and Elizabeth Taylor.

Mr. Donen’s filmography is studded with some of Hollywood’s most loved and admired musicals. “Royal Wedding” (1951), in which Astaire defied gravity, and “Singin’ in the Rain” (1952), in which Kelly defied the weather, were just two of his crowd-pleasers.

Among many others were the Leonard Bernstein-Betty Comden-Adolph Green collaboration “On the Town” (1949) — which, like “Singin’ in the Rain,” Mr. Donen co-directed with Kelly — as well as “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers” (1954), with Jane Powell; “Funny Face” (1957), with Hepburn and Astaire; and “Damn Yankees” (1958), with Tab Hunter and Gwen Verdon.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences acknowledged his mastery by honoring Mr. Donen in 1998 with a lifetime achievement award for “a body of work marked by grace, elegance, wit and visual innovation.” Many saw the award as Hollywood’s way of making amends because Mr. Donen had never been nominated for an Oscar, much less won one.

Mr. Donen also directed thrillers like “Charade,” wild comedies like “Bedazzled” and rueful romances like “Two for the Road.” But musicals were his specialty, and his fellow director Jean-Luc Godard — though it could be said that his French New Wave films borrowed virtually nothing from Mr. Donen’s work — spoke for many when he called Mr. Donen “the master of the musical.”

He began his career in Kelly’s shadow. The two first worked together in 1940, in the original Broadway production of Rodgers and Hart’s “Pal Joey.”

Mr. Donen, who had graduated from a South Carolina high school that June at the age of 16, was a member of the chorus; Kelly was the star. They were together again the next year on Broadway in “Best Foot Forward,” Kelly as choreographer and Mr. Donen as dancer. The film critic Andrew Sarris wrote in his book “The American Cinema” that Mr. Donen was “dismissed for a time as Gene Kelly’s invisible partner.”

But there was no dismissing the quality, or the impact, of his solo directorial debut, “Royal Wedding.” With a score by Lerner (who also wrote the screenplay) and Burton Lane, it starred Astaire as an American dancer who is in London to do a show with his sister (Powell) during the same period as the wedding of Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip.

Astaire’s character falls in love with a dancer in his show, played by Sarah Churchill. One evening he comes home to his flat and, inspired by her photograph, begins to dance — first on the floor and then, in cheerful violation of the laws of physics, on the walls and ceiling.

The sequence, famous in Hollywood lore, took place in a chamber that revolved depending on where weight was applied. Astaire called it the iron lung. (Both Astaire and Lerner took credit for coming up with the idea.)

In his book “Dancing on the Ceiling: Stanley Donen and His Movies” (1996), Stephen M. Silverman wrote that the room’s draperies were made of wood and the coat that Astaire took off was sewn to the chair where he left it, which in turn was screwed to the floor. The year after making “Royal Wedding,” for MGM, Mr. Donen teamed up again with Kelly for the same studio to make “Singin’ in the Rain,” widely regarded as one of the best movie musicals ever made.

Although they shared directing tasks throughout the movie — a story of the early days of talking pictures starring Kelly, Debbie Reynolds, Donald O’Connor and Jean Hagen, with a screenplay by Comden and Green and songs from the 1920s and 1930s — there was no question who was behind the camera when a thoroughly soaked Kelly bounded ecstatically down a back-lot street in a torrential downpour singing the title song, his dancing partner an umbrella that he ultimately thrust into the hands of a grateful passer-by. The critic Roger Ebert called it “probably the most joyous musical sequence ever filmed.”

Stanley Donen was born on April 13, 1924, in Columbia, S.C., the son of Mordecai Moses Donen, the manager of a chain store that sold midrange dresses, and the former Helen Cohen. He did not much like living in the South, where he often encountered anti-Semitism. “It was sleepy, it was awful, I hated growing up there and I couldn’t wait to get out,” he is quoted as saying in Mr. Silverman’s book.

As a boy he experimented with cameras his parents gave him. “The camera was like a constant companion,” he once said. “It allowed me to withdraw into myself.”

Mr. Donen took refuge in the movies, collecting and studying silent films. Not long after seeing Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in “Flying Down to Rio” (1933), their first screen pairing, he decided that he wanted to be a tap dancer.

His father spent summers at the home office of his company, in New York City, and a young Mr. Donen would accompany him. Although his parents were not at all sure they approved of his career path, they saw to it that while in New York he attended dance school. He also went to see many Broadway musicals.

Mr. Donen moved to New York as soon as he could after spending a semester at the University of South Carolina studying psychology, a subject he had taken up to please his father. He paid $15 a week as a lodger in a couple’s apartment on West 55th Street and landed a job in “Pal Joey.”

In 1942, Mr. Donen, not yet 19, went to Hollywood, where he was hired as a $65-a-week dancer at MGM and appeared in the movie version of “Best Foot Forward” (1943), which he also helped choreograph.

In 1944, Columbia Pictures borrowed both Mr. Donen and Kelly from MGM for “Cover Girl.” Though neither man received screen credit for it, they both contributed to the film’s choreography, with Mr. Donen handling the famous “Alter Ego” scene, a double-exposure number in which Kelly appears to be dancing with himself.

Their association continued in “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” (1949), which starred Frank Sinatra and Esther Williams as well as Kelly. The director was Busby Berkeley, but Mr. Donen and Kelly staged the musical numbers and also provided the story line.

“On the Town,” the acclaimed story of three sailors (Kelly, Sinatra and Jules Munshin) on leave in New York, with music by Leonard Bernstein, was the first of three films the two men directed together. Their final collaboration was “It’s Always Fair Weather” (1955).

Mr. Donen was again on his own in 1954 when he directed “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers,” starring Powell and Howard Keel and choreographed energetically by Michael Kidd.

Cyd Charisse, who worked with Mr. Donen in “Singin’ in the Rain” and “It’s Always Fair Weather,” called him “one of the few directors I worked for who could tell you exactly what he wanted.” Gregory Peck, whom Mr. Donen directed in “Arabesque” (1966), a drama of international intrigue, praised his “terrific instinct for communicating.”

Mr. Donen shifted his focus from musicals after moving to England in 1958. He won critical praise for the romantic comedy “Indiscreet” (1958), starring Ingrid Bergman and Cary Grant; the Hitchcockian comic thriller “Charade” (1963), with Grant and Audrey Hepburn; the manic “Bedazzled” (1967), starring and written by Peter Cook and Dudley Moore; and “Two for the Road” (1967), a romantic comedy written by Frederic Raphael, which starred Hepburn and Albert Finney.

He had few artistic or financial triumphs after returning to the United States in 1975 to direct the problem-plagued Burt Reynolds-Liza Minnelli vehicle “Lucky Lady,” which failed at the box office and damaged his career. He made a modest comeback in 1978 with the parody “Movie Movie,” written by Larry Gelbart and Sheldon Keller, but never directed another movie after the indifferently received 1984 comedy “Blame It on Rio.”

He remained intermittently active into the 21st century. In 1993 he returned to Broadway to direct a theatrical version of the classic dance film “The Red Shoes.” But the production closed after five performances.

All five of Mr. Donen’s marriages — to the dancer and choreographer Jeanne Coyne, the actress Marion Marshall, Adelle Beatty, the actress Yvette Mimieux and Pamari Braden — ended in divorce. But he did not like living alone. For a time he had a cushion in his living room embroidered with the words “Eat, drink and remarry.”

The director and performer Elaine May was his companion of many years. He is survived by his sons, Mark and Joshua Donen, and a sister, Carla Davis. Another son, Peter, preceded him in death.

Mr. Donen made one of his last directorial efforts in 2002, directing Ms. May’s comedy “Adult Entertainment” off Broadway. The play tells the story of a group of pornography stars on a public-access channel who find that they have higher cultural aspirations but who know they will never achieve them, that they “won’t stop time” and “be the reward to civilization.” To Mr. Donen, such is the lot of most people in show business, or in any business.

“Here it is,” he told The New Yorker. “As an artist, I aspire to be as remarkable as Leonardo da Vinci. To be fantastic, astonishing, one of a kind. I will never get there. He’s the one who stopped time. I just did ‘Singin’ in the Rain.’ It’s pretty good, yes. It’s better than most, I know. But it still leaves you reaching up.”
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Death Proof » Sat Feb 23, 2019 2:45 pm

Morgan Woodward

(Dallas, Gunsmoke, and "The Man With No Eyes" in Cool Hand Luke
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Re: Obituaries

Post by boojiboyhowdy » Sat Feb 23, 2019 7:47 pm

Death Proof wrote:Morgan Woodward

(Dallas, Gunsmoke, and "The Man With No Eyes" in Cool Hand Luke
Great character (actor) who made a great villain. He appeared in just about every TV western you can name as well as twice on the original Star Trek plus The Killing of a Chinese Bookie. R.I.P. Mr. Woodward.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Death Proof » Sat Feb 23, 2019 8:02 pm

boojiboyhowdy wrote: Great character who made a great villain. He appeared in just about every TV western you can name as well as twice on the original Star Trek plus The Killing of a Chinese Bookie. R.I.P. Mr. Woodward.
:up:

He actually appeared as different characters in two episodes of Star Trek. One in the first season and one in the second season.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Jinnistan » Sat Feb 23, 2019 9:45 pm

Peter Tork died this week, age 77, after a long fight with cancer.

I'm a fan of the Monkees, and I won't deny that some nostalgia is involved, but I think that I can objectively say that they made some very good music and were at least comparable in quality (and I think far better) to some of their peers like The Turtles, Mamas & Papas or The Loving Spoonful (not to mention the scores of other, mercifully forgotten, teen pop from that era). Peter Tork was the multi-instrumental Monkee, with the most generous musical gifts but without the skillset or vision to be a successful songwriter or musical presence on his own. Sadly, he was someone who needed a group environment to thrive. He did, however, have his moments. His song "For Pete's Sake" (which was the end credits in many episodes of their TV show) is probably the one song that should be the one they're known for (but it was never a single). He was a poor vocalist, but his flat affect gives a certain charm to "Words", and his giggle in "Shades of Grey" manages to deflate all of its syrupy ostentatiousness. Like the Headquarters LP (the most Peter Tork of Monkee LPs), they were best when they were most modest.

Everybody loved Davy, and I'm not going hate the little prick. Peter was the dummy, the tragic fool, but he was the soul of the group. I'm going to listen to his harpsichord solo in "Girl I Knew Somewhere" in rememberance.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Captain Oats » Mon Feb 25, 2019 7:33 pm

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Re: Obituaries

Post by Torgo » Mon Feb 25, 2019 8:36 pm

Ugh, that hurts. R.I.P.
My obsession with Talk Talk's music is one of my most treasured musical obsessions. They could do no wrong.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Torgo » Fri Mar 01, 2019 8:15 pm

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Re: Obituaries

Post by John Dumbear » Fri Mar 01, 2019 9:02 pm

"Soap" was an incredibly well written satire of afternoon fare. Which featured a talented cast, Helmond was the ace (Well, her or Burt).

RIP
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Re: Obituaries

Post by boojiboyhowdy » Fri Mar 01, 2019 10:33 pm

The guy who played Rollo on Sanford and Son died too. He was 80.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Torgo » Mon Mar 04, 2019 2:59 pm

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Re: Obituaries

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Re: Obituaries

Post by Death Proof » Mon Mar 04, 2019 6:36 pm

Captain Oats wrote:

That one took me by surprise. I knew he had the stroke a few days ago, but damn. 52 is too young.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Mon Mar 04, 2019 10:28 pm

"I didn't know you knew Luke Perry."
"Pfft! Know him?! He's my worthless half-brother."
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Rumpled » Mon Mar 04, 2019 10:47 pm

Torgo wrote:R.I.P. Keith Flint, vocalist of The Prodigy
Only 49? Very sad.
:shock: :(
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Stu » Wed Mar 06, 2019 3:30 am

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Re: Obituaries

Post by Death Proof » Wed Mar 06, 2019 3:47 am


I met him once at the Monster Factory. Really pleasant, down to earth guy. Very encouraging towards the students. He lived in Glassboro, NJ, which is about 20 minutes from me.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by John Dumbear » Wed Mar 06, 2019 6:46 am

Raise your hand if you cringe when this thread pops up at the top of the page.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Death Proof » Wed Mar 06, 2019 2:37 pm

John Dumbear wrote:Raise your hand if you cringe when this thread pops up at the top of the page.


:up:


I heard Ozzy is in REALLY bad shape. He's the next one I'm expecting to go.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by John Dumbear » Wed Mar 06, 2019 8:59 pm

Death Proof wrote:


:up:


I heard Ozzy is in REALLY bad shape. He's the next one I'm expecting to go.
I last heard about him being hospitalized with a flu strain. Did something go south?
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Torgo » Fri Mar 08, 2019 5:43 pm

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Re: Obituaries

Post by John Dumbear » Fri Mar 08, 2019 7:02 pm

I only saw him in Disney's "World's Greatest Athlete".
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Perverted Hermit » Fri Mar 15, 2019 5:28 pm

The Cream Man is still alive and well.

Watch out folks.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Stu » Mon Mar 18, 2019 1:43 am

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Re: Obituaries

Post by Torgo » Mon Mar 18, 2019 1:02 pm

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Re: Obituaries

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Re: Obituaries

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Re: Obituaries

Post by Death Proof » Sun Mar 24, 2019 4:28 pm

Captain Oats wrote:

It's hard not to like at least a couple of Larry's movies. Q was always my favorite but It's Alive is also a great one.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Slentert » Sun Mar 24, 2019 10:38 pm

I never watched a Larry Cohen movie (not out of disinterest, just didn't happen yet) but I always enjoyed his presence on podcast and deeply admired his way of filmmaking. I'm glad he got the recognition he deserved in his latter years, even when he already should've gotten it while he was making these movies.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Patrick McGroin » Mon Mar 25, 2019 1:06 am

Death Proof wrote:It's hard not to like at least a couple of Larry's movies. Q was always my favorite but It's Alive is also a great one.
I always found his stuff to be at the very least interesting. God Told Me To and The Stuff were worthy of a watch. But the one Cohen movie I really want to catch is his first movie, Bone with Yaphet Kotto.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by undinum » Mon Mar 25, 2019 2:59 am

Ah shit. Dear fave for a long time. Had a lot more tools than he's usually given credit for. Perfect Strangers is something special. God Told Me To is probably the "most" Larry Cohen.

Guess I'll get around to those It's Alive commentaries.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Captain Oats » Mon Mar 25, 2019 11:58 am

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Re: Obituaries

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