Obituaries

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Popcorn Reviews
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Fri Dec 13, 2019 5:32 pm

RIP

I mainly remember him in Do the Right Thing, but he was excellent in that film.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Fri Dec 13, 2019 5:41 pm

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Re: Obituaries

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Sun Dec 15, 2019 4:25 pm

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Re: Obituaries

Post by topherH » Sat Dec 28, 2019 2:37 pm

That radio guy who told Howard Stern to fuck off in Private Parts died. He was 79.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Death Proof » Sat Dec 28, 2019 3:21 pm

topherH wrote:
Sat Dec 28, 2019 2:37 pm
That radio guy who told Howard Stern to fuck off in Private Parts died. He was 79.

Imus was a racist prick. Not sorry to see him go.
Ain't no grave gonna hold this body down
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Death Proof » Sat Dec 28, 2019 3:26 pm

Sue Lyon, 73, star of Kubrick's Lolita. She had been in failing health for several years.

Her other credits included The Night of the Iguana, Fantasy Island, and Night Gallery. Her final role was in Alligator.

She was married five times and had one daughter.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Tue Dec 31, 2019 5:17 pm

plus this flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/db742/set ... 600757436/
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Stu » Wed Jan 08, 2020 7:19 am

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crumbsroom
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Re: Obituaries

Post by crumbsroom » Wed Jan 08, 2020 2:14 pm

I see the death of Neil Innes seems to be overlooked.

Oh well...
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Captain Terror » Wed Jan 08, 2020 4:10 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Wed Jan 08, 2020 2:14 pm
I see the death of Neil Innes seems to be overlooked.

Oh well...
If you mean overlooked by the media, I've come across a couple of pieces. If you mean overlooked by Corrie, I just didn't think anyone else cared. But yeah, I've had a medley of Rutles songs stuck in my head since I heard the news.
Never got into the Bonzo Band, but I've got the Rutles film memorized.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Torgo » Wed Jan 08, 2020 4:13 pm

I too love Neil Innes' songs, particularly this one:

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Re: Obituaries

Post by Jinnistan » Wed Jan 08, 2020 5:02 pm

This Lennon parody is so good it showed up Beatle bootlegs for awhile as an unreleased demo.





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This might be his magnum opus though.


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Re: Obituaries

Post by Death Proof » Thu Jan 09, 2020 6:34 am

Writer/Actor/Director Buck Henry at the age of 89 from a heart attack.

Henry's father was a stockbroker and his mother was silent film actress Ruth Taylor.

He appeared on numerous television shows such as the New Steve Allen Show, Get Smart, Murphy Brown, Will and Grace and 30 Rock. Henry hosted Saturday Night Live ten times over its first five years, setting a record that lasted nearly a decade.

Henry also appeared in numerous films including The Graduate, Catch-22, Eating Raoul, Defending Your Life, and Grumpy Old Men. His screenwriting credits included The Graduate, Catch-22, The Owl and the Pussycat, What's Up Doc? and To Die For. He was nominated for two Oscars: the screenplay for The Graduate and best director for Heaven Can Wait.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Fri Jan 10, 2020 5:16 pm

NYT wrote:Ivan Passer, a director who joined Milos Forman and others in ushering in the filmmaking movement known as the Czech New Wave in the 1960s, then went on to direct American features, including “Born to Win,” “Cutter’s Way” and “Creator,” died on Thursday at his home in Reno, Nev. He was 86.

Rodney Sumpter, a lawyer and spokesman for Mr. Passer’s family, said the cause was chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Mr. Passer’s debut feature, “Intimate Lighting,” released in Czechoslovakia in 1965, was widely hailed as helping to establish a new level of cinema in that country, where Mr. Forman’s early success, “Loves of a Blonde,” had been released the same year.

“Intimate Lighting” was a sparse, elegantly told tale of a cellist from Prague who visits a country town for a concert and reunites with an old friend. The film drew acclaim when it played at the New York Film Festival in 1966 and again when it was given a theatrical release in the United States in 1969.

“It is one of those very special movies that does not so much reveal new secrets each time you see it as confirm a justness and good humor that was never hidden,” Roger Greenspun wrote in The New York Times.

Early that same year, Mr. Passer had left his homeland for good, the Soviet-led invasion of 1968 having squelched the liberalization and artistic flowering of Czechoslovakia earlier in the decade.

In 1971, two years after he had emigrated to the United States, he directed his second feature, a New York story with American actors. It was “Born to Win,” a comic drama about a middle-aged drug addict played by George Segal. Critics didn’t like Mr. Passer’s attempt to wring comedy out of drug addiction.

After two more comedies — “Law and Disorder” (1974) and “Silver Bears” (1977) — he had one of his biggest successes in 1981 with “Cutter’s Way,” a dark mystery that starred John Heard and Jeff Bridges.

“‘Cutter’s Way’ grabs you by the throat and pulls you, kicking and screaming, into an America gone mad,” Michael Blowen wrote in his review in The Boston Globe.

The movie, Mr. Blowen wrote, showed Mr. Passer’s ability to imbue even seemingly throwaway scenes with meaning.

“Passer, obviously not satisfied with an outstanding thriller laced with superb performances, digs even deeper into the material,” Mr. Blowen wrote. “In one simple sequence featuring a parade, the Czechoslovakian-born Passer presents a spare view of the American class system. Each decorative float is reserved for one race, religion, nationality or class. There are smiling Mexicans, Indians, blacks and whites — each in their separate, but equal, spaces. America, he implies, is a country where the melting pot is a myth and where integration is impossible.”

Mr. Passer was born on July 10, 1933, in Prague. He and Mr. Forman were students together at the King George boarding school in Podebrady, and again at the Film and Television School of the Academy of the Performing Arts in Prague (although Mr. Passer did not graduate).

He was an assistant director on Mr. Forman’s “Black Peter” in 1964 as well as on “Loves of a Blonde,” for which he was also one of several writers. He was also a writer of another Forman film, “The Firemen’s Ball,” released in 1967. For a time he taught film at the University of Southern California.

If Mr. Passer never achieved the fame of his friend Mr. Forman, a two-time Oscar winner who died in 2018, it was in part because of his laid-back approach to his profession.

“I never wanted to direct,” he told The Boston Globe in 1985. “I didn’t like the hustle. I didn’t like the idea that I was being judged all the time. I would like to be totally invisible.”

Mr. Passer was sometimes frustrated with the processes of Hollywood, especially the tendency of producers to interfere in filmmaking.

“Because they have money, they think they know how to do it,” he told The Globe. “Then they lose all their money, and they blame everyone else.”

One particularly vexing moment came in the early 1980s, when, after the success of “Cutter’s Way,” Mr. Passer planned to make a movie about the later years of Bat Masterson, the gunfighter turned journalist. James Cagney, then in his 80s, was set to star. The film’s backers, though, thought Cagney was too old.

“Finally, the people who were ready to finance it said to me, ‘We’ll do it with Bob Duvall,’” Mr. Passer told The Globe. “I said: ‘You want me to fire James Cagney? You must be out of your mind.’”

The project fell through. Mr. Passer, though, would eventually work with Mr. Duvall. In 1992, in one of his most acclaimed television projects, he directed “Stalin,” an HBO movie about the Soviet leader, with Mr. Duvall in the title role. The film won four Emmy Awards, including outstanding movie made for television.

Mr. Passer’s other films included the comedy “Creator” (1985), with Peter O’Toole and Mariel Hemingway, and the romance “Haunted Summer” (1988), with Eric Stoltz and Laura Dern.

Mr. Passer’s first marriage, to Eva Limanova, ended in divorce. He is survived by his wife, Anne Frances Passer, and a son from his first marriage, Ivan Max Passer.

Mr. Passer shot “Stalin” in Moscow at the very moment when the Soviet Union was collapsing. On the last day of shooting, Dec. 21, 1991, the actors and crew broke out champagne after filming a scene that involved a dinner for Soviet leaders hosted by Stalin at his dacha. Just then, someone interrupted the production team’s wrap party with word that an agreement signed that day had effectively dissolved the Soviet Union.

“I always wanted to see the end of that regime,” Mr. Passer told The San Francisco Chronicle in 1992, adding, “and in this crowd, I saw Stalin, Khrushchev, Molotov and Voroshilov with glasses of champagne. I thought, ‘I’m making this up!’”
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Torgo » Fri Jan 10, 2020 5:26 pm

R.I.P. Loves of a Blonde and Firemen's Ball are classics.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Fri Jan 10, 2020 5:50 pm

Torgo wrote:
Fri Jan 10, 2020 5:26 pm
R.I.P. Loves of a Blonde and Firemen's Ball are classics.
here is Passer's account of his friendship with Forman if you are interested
https://www.latimes.com/la-me-col1-milo ... story.html
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Re: Obituaries

Post by undinum » Fri Jan 10, 2020 5:58 pm

Still think about Cutter's Way all the time. One of the best-acted movies of the '80s (Lisa Eichhorn should have been a star) and one of the best ever on alcoholism.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Jan 10, 2020 9:51 pm

Neil Peart
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Jinnistan » Sat Jan 11, 2020 12:29 am

crumbsroom wrote:
Fri Jan 10, 2020 9:51 pm
Neil Peart
In a cruel way, I'm kinda glad that I don't have to hear another "greatest drummer alive" spiel.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Stu » Sat Jan 11, 2020 8:02 am

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Re: Obituaries

Post by The Nameless Two » Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:01 pm

Jinnistan wrote:
Sat Jan 11, 2020 12:29 am
In a cruel way, I'm kinda glad that I don't have to hear another "greatest drummer alive" spiel.
Hopefully you are cursed with "greatest drummer ever" spiels for the remainder of your eternity, dickhead
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Re: Obituaries

Post by The Nameless Two » Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:02 pm

Like, who the fuck posts that the day of a RIP? The fuck's wrong with you?
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Thief » Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:02 pm

I know there aren't a lot of Rush fans here, but Rush is arguably my favorite band so this... hit close to home. It really caught me off guard 😢
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Torgo » Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:09 pm

R.I.P. Incredibly grateful that I got to see them live three times. I love when he threw one of his drumsticks in the air and caught it in the middle of "Closer of the Heart." I bet he caught it every single time.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by undinum » Sat Jan 11, 2020 4:42 pm

The Nameless One wrote:
Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:02 pm
Like, who the fuck posts that the day of a RIP? The fuck's wrong with you?
Oh no. How ever will you resume your grief?
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Re: Obituaries

Post by The Nameless Two » Sun Jan 12, 2020 3:46 pm

undinum wrote:
Sat Jan 11, 2020 4:42 pm
Oh no. How ever will you resume your grief?
Who the fuck are you, cunt? Go jump in a fire, none of us will grieve for you
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Re: Obituaries

Post by The Nameless Two » Sun Jan 12, 2020 3:50 pm

Seriously, what the fuck are people's problems? What compels you to post this shit, especially to someone you don't even know? Fuck you, Undinum, go fuck yourself with a tetanus encrusted rod
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Re: Obituaries

Post by The Nameless Two » Sun Jan 12, 2020 3:55 pm

How will I ever resume my grief!?? Fuck you so fucking hard you wretched scab off a pitbull's ass. Who the fuck are you?
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Torgo » Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:01 pm

Don't get mad, get even, and by that, I mean act blasé as hell in this thread when Terrence Malick dies.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by The Nameless Two » Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:03 pm

Torgo wrote:
Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:01 pm
Don't get mad, get even, and by that, I mean act blasé as hell in this thread when Terrence Malick dies.
Man, I can't, because I'm a real human being with real emotions apparently and I can't keep them tucked in. Why are people acting like assholes on the day of a death? Like, I get that grief is subjective but that should be the first thing people consider before opening their mouths, like, yeah, this means a lot to me
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Re: Obituaries

Post by The Nameless Two » Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:07 pm

I can just take solace in the fact that people like Undinum and Janson will be forgotten the moment they die, and likely far before then
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Re: Obituaries

Post by undinum » Sun Jan 12, 2020 5:07 pm

I know it's no tetanus-spreading sodomy, but my basement flooded last night if that helps.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Jinnistan » Sun Jan 12, 2020 7:46 pm

It's a good thing that Peart appreciated sardonic gallows humor. It was one of the kindest back-handed insults I could compose.

We should try to be smarter than the average dead person.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by The Nameless Two » Mon Jan 13, 2020 1:23 pm

Jinnistan wrote:
Sun Jan 12, 2020 7:46 pm
It's a good thing that Peart appreciated sardonic gallows humor. It was one of the kindest back-handed insults I could compose.

We should try to be smarter than the average dead person.
WHAT THE FUCK do you know about Neil Peart you fucking poseur? What, you read some fucking article on an internet and all of a sudden you are the authority? Have you ever picked up sticks in your life? Do you have ANY fucking idea? Go fuck yourself, Janson, you are a pissant. SHUT THE FUCK UP
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Re: Obituaries

Post by The Nameless Two » Mon Jan 13, 2020 1:27 pm

Seriously, Janson, who actually do you think you are? To me, specifically. You come into our thread and call me "kid", get a fucking life you loser, get the fuck out of my presence forever you fucking clown.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by The Nameless Two » Mon Jan 13, 2020 1:53 pm

"We should try to be smarter than the average dead person." Who is "we"? You speak for yourself and only yourself you pompous prick. Pray tell me what accounts for your personal intelligence. Oh, you are good at writing words on an internet? So is everyone on the fucking planet, you aren't special
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Jinnistan » Mon Jan 13, 2020 8:25 pm

I stand corrected. What I meant is that "we" should all try to be more overtly abusive in our posts. Mere ironic humor has no place on the internet today.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by topherH » Mon Jan 13, 2020 9:52 pm

The Nameless One wrote:
Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:07 pm
Undinum and Janson
Who?
State of Siege |Gavras, 1972| +
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Z |Gavras, 1969| -
The Confession |Gavras, 1970| +
Missing |Gavras, 1982| +
The Revenant |Inarritu, 2015| +
The Hateful Eight |Tarantino, 2015| +

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Re: Obituaries

Post by The Nameless Two » Tue Jan 14, 2020 2:24 pm

Jinnistan wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 8:25 pm
I stand corrected. What I meant is that "we" should all try to be more overtly abusive in our posts. Mere ironic humor has no place on the internet today.
Hahahahahaha, you played the "abuse" card. Okay, let's take a step back here, the initiating post in this started with "In a cruel way", and a definition of "abuse" is "treat with cruelty or violence". So, excuse me abuser, you are now stating that you were being "ironic" after the fact as if to cover your lily white ass? No wonder "irony" died a decade ago if all it's being used for is remediation for one's personal fallacy.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Jinnistan » Tue Jan 14, 2020 3:54 pm

You thought about this all night long, didn't you?
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Re: Obituaries

Post by The Nameless Two » Wed Jan 15, 2020 5:33 pm

Jinnistan wrote:
Tue Jan 14, 2020 3:54 pm
You thought about this all night long, didn't you?
So your strategy after baring your ass for all to see is to insult my intelligence? You actually think I have a hard time with this? You are my food, bitch, and I eat when I want
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Jinnistan » Wed Jan 15, 2020 10:36 pm

Fine. You win. Eat my ass, if you must.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by The Nameless Two » Thu Jan 16, 2020 2:15 pm

Jinnistan wrote:
Wed Jan 15, 2020 10:36 pm
Fine. You win. Eat my ass, if you must.
Aren't you in your 50s? Like, okay, boomer
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Macrology » Sat Jan 18, 2020 7:35 pm

Well I'm late to the game but very sad to hear that Ivan Passer died. Cutter's Way is remarkable, and Intimate Lighting is a work of sublime simplicity and one of the greatest films of the Czechoslovak New Wave (or any of the new wave movements, for that matter). Not to mention his excellent collaborations with Forman.

I need to see more of his American work. He had a truly unique sensibility.
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Wed Jan 22, 2020 1:41 pm

NYT wrote:Terry Jones, who earned a spot in comedic lore as a member of the British troupe Monty Python and also had success as a director, screenwriter and author, died Tuesday. He was 77.

His death was confirmed by his ex-wife, Alison Telfer. Mr. Jones announced in 2016 that he had primary progressive aphasia, a neurological disease that impairs the ability to communicate.

Mr. Jones, four other Britons — Michael Palin, Eric Idle, John Cleese and Graham Chapman — and an American, Terry Gilliam, formed Monty Python in 1969. Their television sketch show, “Monty Python’s Flying Circus,” became a phenomenon, first in Britain and then in the United States when it was rebroadcast there in the mid-1970s.

The show worked a surreal brand of humor that was markedly different from most television fare. It led to “And Now for Something Completely Different,” a 1971 movie that was essentially a collection of skits from the TV show, and then several other feature films.

Mr. Jones and Mr. Gilliam jointly directed the first film after “Something Completely Different,” “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” (1975), and teamed up again on “Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life” (1983). Mr. Jones was the sole director of “Monty Python’s Life of Brian” (1979), the most successful financially. He also directed his own projects.

And he was an author, both of scholarly fare like “Chaucer’s Knight” (1980), an alternative view of a character from “The Canterbury Tales,” and of books for children. The Boston Globe once called him “a warped Renaissance man.”

He was a Renaissance man of sorts on “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” as well. The many characters he played included an organist who tended not to wear clothes, a fellow known as the Amazing Mystico who could build buildings by hypnosis, and an assortment of middle-aged women.

“Cross-dressing seems to be a longstanding Python tradition,” Filip Vukcevic wrote on the media site IGN in 2018.

The popularity of the show soon made “pythonesque” an entry in the Oxford English Dictionary.

“The one thing we all agreed on, our chief aim, was to be totally unpredictable and never to repeat ourselves,” Mr. Jones deadpanned to The New York Times in 2009, when the group had a rare reunion at the Ziegfeld Theater in New York. “We wanted to be unquantifiable. That ‘pythonesque’ is now an adjective in the O.E.D. means we failed utterly.”

Terence Graham Parry Jones was born in Colwyn Bay, North Wales, on Feb. 1, 1942, “right bang slap in the middle of World War II,” as he put it in “The Pythons Autobiography,” a 2003 book by the troupe with Bob McCabe. His father, Alick, was a banker by profession but was in the Royal Air Force at the time and stationed in Scotland.

“I suppose they must have been guarding the grouse,” he wrote, “although he used to say later that they were testing out this newfangled stuff called RADAR. He came and saw me when I was a week old, and was immediately posted to India. I would be 4 before he saw me again.”

When he was 5 the family moved to Claygate, in the London suburbs. A favorite among the radio offerings he listened to was “The Goon Show,” a comedy program that often veered into offbeat territory and had a cast that included Peter Sellers.

“It was the surreality of the imagery and the speed of the comedy that I loved,” he wrote in the “Pythons” book, “the way they broke up the conventions of radio and played with the very nature of the medium.”

That, of course, was what Monty Python did with television, but Mr. Jones’s aspirations were yet to crystallize. He did think early on that it would be nice to be an actor, but Royal Grammar School, Guildford, which he attended, was not a place to encourage such things.

“The nearest we got to drama lessons was in divinity classes,” he wrote, “when the headmaster would advise us that all actors were homosexuals and you could tell because they wore green suede shoes.”

He was accepted at Oxford and agreed to attend. He almost changed his mind when Cambridge, which had put him on a waiting list, also accepted him, but he stuck with Oxford despite being intrigued by Cambridge’s poetry program. That was a good decision, he later reckoned; otherwise “I wouldn’t have met either Mike Palin or Geoffrey Chaucer — and without those two meetings the rest of my life would have been quite different.”

He joined the university’s Experimental Theater Club, known as E.T.C., spurning the more organized Oxford University Drama Society. He was also a decent scholar, something that he tapped later, but in “The Pythons” he recalled a moment in the library when, parsing some literary criticism, he realized that comedy and performing would take precedence.

“I suddenly thought, ‘Why am I getting so emotionally outraged by what someone else has written about what someone else has written about what someone else originally wrote?’” he recalled. “‘I’d rather do the original writing.’”

In 1963 he performed in and helped write his first revue, “Loitering With Intent” (“because it was done in a tent,” he explained). Mr. Palin, a fellow Oxford student, contributed material to that show. Both also worked on “Hang Down Your Head and Die,” an E.T.C. show about capital punishment that, after its premiere at the university in 1963, went on to a six-week run at the Comedy Theater in the West End in 1964.

The two also contributed to the 1964 edition of a show called “The Oxford Revue,” which was noticed by David Frost, who soon offered both Mr. Jones and Mr. Palin jobs writing for “The Frost Report,” a television sketch show that had its premiere in 1966 on the BBC. Mr. Chapman and Mr. Idle were also on the writing staff, and Mr. Cleese was in the cast.

The next year Mr. Jones, Mr. Idle and Mr. Palin collaborated again on “Do Not Adjust Your Set,” a children’s TV show full of comedic sketches that foreshadowed the Python style. Mr. Gilliam eventually contributed some animation.

Though that show was aimed at children, it had a number of adult fans, including Mr. Cleese and Mr. Chapman.

“It was our treat on a Thursday afternoon,” Mr. Cleese said in “The Pythons.” “We would finish early and watch that because it was the funniest thing on television. I said to Graham, ‘Why don’t we ring the guys and see if they want to do a show with us?’”

And that, in 1969, was how “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” came about.

The name, though, was almost “Owl Stretching Time” or “A Horse, a Spoon and a Basin.” Those were among numerous names bandied about for weeks, until time ran out and the troupe and the BBC, which was to broadcast the show, had to agree on something and finally did.

“I went back home and told my brother, We’ve got a title for the show, we’re going to call it ‘Monty Python’s Flying Circus,’” Mr. Jones later recalled. “And he said, ‘It’ll never catch on.’”

The series, which made its debut in October 1969, consisted of absurdist sketches that often ignored the established rules of comedy — the Pythons eschewed the punch line — yet somehow spoke to the rampant illogic of life and society. A man writes a joke so funny that he dies laughing and it becomes a top-secret weapon of war. A game show host (played by Mr. Jones) gives contestants 15 seconds to summarize Proust’s seven-volume “In Search of Lost Time.”

Mr. Gilliam’s animations punctuated the proceedings. The show seemed simultaneously subversive, brainy and silly, though its creators tended to play down how much deep thought went into it.

“We didn’t know what we were doing, and insisted on doing it,” Mr. Idle wrote in “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life: A Sortabiography” (2018).

There were camps and alliances within the Pythons. Mr. Jones generally wrote with Mr. Palin. He was said not to get along with Mr. Cleese, although he shrugged off such claims.

“I only threw a chair at John once,” he told Vice in 2008. In a different interview his recollection was “John Cleese only threw a chair at me once.”

In any case, the hit show led to Python movies and a directing career for Mr. Jones. “Life of Brian” was especially well received. Vincent Canby, reviewing in The Times, said it “succeeds in sending up not only movies like ‘The Greatest Story Ever Told’ and ‘King of Kings,’ but also a lot of the false piety attached to the source material.”

He called it “the foulest-spoken biblical epic ever made, as well as the best-humored.” Some, though, were not amused; the film was banned in many places (Glasgow lifted its prohibition only in 2009) and prompted protests in many others.

Mr. Jones’s directing credits outside of the Pythons included “Personal Services” (1987), based on the story of a real-life madam, and “Erik the Viking” (1989), a Norse yarn he also wrote that starred Tim Robbins as the title character. That movie was somewhat related to a children’s book Mr. Jones had published in 1983, “The Saga of Erik the Viking,” illustrated by Michael Foreman — one of several children’s books by the two.

After he received a diagnosis of bowel cancer in 2006, Mr. Jones applied his skills to humorous educational videos about health issues.

Mr. Jones married Alison Telfer in 1970; they separated around 2005 and later divorced. In 2012 Mr. Jones married Anna Soderstrom.

She survives him, as do their daughter, Siri, and two children from his first marriage, Bill and Sally Jones.

In an interview on the CBC show “George Stroumboulopoulos Tonight” several years ago, Mr. Jones expressed some surprise at the longevity of Monty Python, whose “Holy Grail” Mr. Idle turned into a hit Broadway musical, “Spamalot,” in 2005 and whose legacy has been perpetuated in various DVD releases.

“If you had said to us when we were doing the TV shows, ‘We’ll be still talking about this in 40 years’ time,’” he said, “I would have thought you were loco.”
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Torgo
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Torgo » Wed Jan 22, 2020 1:41 pm

Last Great Movie Seen
Palm Springs (Barbakow, 2020)
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crumbsroom
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Re: Obituaries

Post by crumbsroom » Wed Jan 22, 2020 2:49 pm

Torgo wrote:
Wed Jan 22, 2020 1:41 pm
R.I.P. Terry Jones.
:(
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Oxnard Montalvo
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Wed Jan 22, 2020 3:47 pm

is Ripping Yarns worth a look? I'm afraid I am not familiar with much of Jones's work outside of MPFC
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crumbsroom
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Re: Obituaries

Post by crumbsroom » Wed Jan 22, 2020 4:42 pm

Oxnard Montalvo wrote:
Wed Jan 22, 2020 3:47 pm
is Ripping Yarns worth a look? I'm afraid I am not familiar with much of Jones's work outside of MPFC
I know I watched a few of them a few years ago and thought they were decent enough, but they didn't really form a strong impression on me.
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Patrick McGroin
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Re: Obituaries

Post by Patrick McGroin » Wed Jan 22, 2020 4:46 pm

R.I.P Mr. Jones. I enjoyed Ripping Yarns. At only nine 30 minute (give or take) episodes spread out over two seasons it's easy to binge. And Palin makes for an appealing protagonist.
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