Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Apex Predator » Fri Nov 29, 2019 7:15 pm

I use Letterboxd to keep track of what I watched and what I haven't. If I can get enough free time, I can continue working on catching up with that.

Andhadhun (2018)
See a film that has an 11 in the IMDB Top 250

I swear these Bollywood films are like Jimmy Fallon's Random-Meters. You spin a wheel and end up with random genres!

In this case, we have a film noir featuring a blind piano player, the daughter of a bar owner, and the wife of an ex-Bollywood star in the 1970s. She arranges his death with the help of the chief of police while the player is doing a private party for the star. Can't spoil what happens after that, but this one takes some wild turns.

The music is fairly well done, the actors are well matched to the material, there's a few laugh out loud or shocking moments. But I do feel like this had one or two twists too many. Still, I will recommend this, although calling this one of the top 250 does feel like a stretch to me. B-

The Ritual (2017)
See a film about the occult
See a horror creature about an animal or creature

I recently splurged on this RPG game called Killer Thriller. It rates its characters using Unluck (, Unwise (stupidity), and Undone (not keeping cool under pressure).

I swear a lot of this film could have been run using this game.

Anyway, there's a quartet of university graduates who go to various places to hang out and spend time together. After a robbery at a liquor store leaves one of them dead (and another one feeling guilty for choosing survival over trying to help him), they take a break.

Six months later, they go on this hike in Sweden close to the Norwegian border. After creating a shrine to their dead friend (and after one of them sprains his knee on the trail), they decide to take a shortcut through the woods.

But there's strange carvings on the trees and something appears to be out there.

There's some to like about this. This is one horror film that loads up on the spooky atmosphere. They do a good job at withholding the reveal of the creature. And the actors (led by Rafe Spall as the friend with guilt in his heart) do a good job of convincing you they've been hanging out for years. Oh, and I'm fine with the runtime being relatively short.

But boy howdy do these smart people keep making dumb decisions such as striking out on their own and sticking with the shortcut even after spooky things start to happen. There's not a lot of depth to these characters either. The ending also feels a bit shaky compared to what happened earlier in the film.

It's about 9 hours after finishing this and I'm not sure how to rank this one. I'll go with probably a C or C- for now because there's some quality there, even if the script could have used some serious tightening up.

Also, I guess I'm gonna have to keep searching for that foreign language horror film.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Apex Predator » Sun Dec 01, 2019 12:22 am

It's time to Get Out!

His Girl Friday (1940)
See a film with Black or Friday in the title.

Zippy comedy about a newspaper editor (Cary Grant) desperate not to lose his star reporter (Rosalind Russell) to an Albany insurance salesman (Ralph Bellamy). While this is going on, convicted murderer Earl Williams (John Qualen) protests his conviction and even escapes from prison.

The dialogue crackles with funny material, the chemistry between Grant and Russell is potent, and the film zips through its runtime easily (hard to believe this was the same story that Switching Channels did decades later). Ethics aren't an easy thing to find for these reporters who will do just about anything for an exclusive scoop.

I do wish Bellamy offered more of a challenge as the salesman. He seems sweet enough, even though the chemistry with Russell is pretty lukewarm in comparison.

It's worth its reputation and then some. A- or B+
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Dec 01, 2019 3:28 am

Apex Predator wrote:
Sun Dec 01, 2019 12:22 am
It's time to Get Out!

His Girl Friday (1940)

I do wish Bellamy offered more of a challenge as the salesman. He seems sweet enough, even though the chemistry with Russell is pretty lukewarm in comparison.
I don't think that he's meant to offer much of a challenge. He's the bland, safe alternative. He's a nice guy who just doesn't vibe on the same frequency as Hildy. The lack of spark is intentional--Hildy is attracted to the predictability that he represents.

I thought it was a better choice than the trope of the main female character being engaged to some total jerk who she inexplicably continues to want to be with.

Hildy's passion isn't really for either man, in my opinion, it's the thrill of the job. Walter represents a partner in crime for her passion. Likewise, Walter's passion for his work is also more important to him than being a "good husband".
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Apex Predator » Mon Dec 02, 2019 12:33 am

Sum for November:

Film with number 11 that isn't a sequel (what's left? Witchcraft?): Eleven (2019)
Film starting with a U or V:
Film with the IMDB 250 that features 11 in its ranks: Andhudan (2018)
Film from the 2000s: Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property (2003)
Palestine Film: Born in Gaza (2014)
Film about politics in general:
Film about a writer: Naples '44 (2017)
Film that features Egypt/Mummies/Pharoahs: Asterix and Cleopatra (1968)
Film about a rebellion or political plot: Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property (2003)
A Film from Poland:
Film about the Occult: Ritual (2018).
Bruce Lee Film:
Film set on Mars:
Film about Thanksgiving: Pieces of April (In progress)
Film featuring Black or Friday in its title: His Girl Friday (1940)

The sum is ten films including the previous month's The General and musical 42nd Street: The Broadway Musical

Best of November? His Girl Friday, although I'd also recommend Born in Gaza, The General, Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property and Andhadhun.

Worst? The dreary Eleven, although Naples '44 gave it a good run.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Thief » Mon Dec 02, 2019 3:08 pm

Here are my quickies for the last five films of the month...

Vampyr (1932) Visually impressive and mesmerizing, but I'm still trying to figure out some things about the narrative and the story. I might ask something about it on another post, but I'm confused by some things. Anyway, story aside, I think it's obvious that the visuals and the atmosphere here are the ones in the driver's seat, and I really, really enjoyed that aspect. I thought it was really impressive and reminded me that I should get off my butt and finally watch Passion of Joan of Arc. Grade: A-, with potential to go higher.

A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving (1973) I'm not ashamed to admit this was a throwaway choice, but I wanted to make time for other films. Anyway, I've always been a Snoopy fan so I enjoyed it. Very simple, fun, and charming. Not much more to say.

Black Christmas (1974) Effectively creepy and moody with some disturbing visuals/moments. I really liked the direction in this and how it embraced its dark tone. I might have appreciated a bit more fleshing out of some of the characters, mostly the sorority girls since only Jess, and to some extent Barb, are fleshed out. By the way, Kidder was really good in her role. Grade: B+

Midsommar (2019) Still trying to make up my mind about this one. Like Vampyr, and well Hereditary, I found it visually impressive through most of its duration. However, I have some issues with the story that seem to get bigger the more I think about it. I think there are some issues with characters motivations, the character of Pelle is a bit problematic in how he is used and "developed", and the film might be a bit overlong, but it still manages to leave an impression. Might write a bit more about it later. Grade: For now, a high B+ that could go either way as I wallow in it.

The Time That Remains (2009) Interesting semi-biographical film that starts in 1948 and moves all the way to the present, while giving us a look onto the Israel-Palestine relations. The film manages to stay below the elevated socio-political discourse, choosing to focus on how regular people are affected one way or the other by all the shifts and all the changes between the two countries. The pace might be a bit off at times, the time jumps might feel a bit abrupt, and there's a certain awkwardness to some interactions between characters, but I'd say it's worth a watch. Grade: B

Once again, finished on the nick of time!
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Thief » Mon Dec 02, 2019 3:10 pm

Final tally for October...

A film with the number 11 (Eleven, Eleventh, etc.) in its title (not a sequel): Apollo 11
A film with a title that starts with the letters U or V: Vampyr
A film from the current IMDb 250 whose ranking includes the #11 (i.e. 11, 118, 211): (see list here) Spotlight (#211)
A film from the 2000s: Zombieland
A film about politics in general: Recount
A film about a writer (Nat'l Author's Day, November 1): The Ghost Writer
A film that features mummies, pharaohs, or Egypt prominently (King Tut Day, November 4): The Mummy (1932)
A film about a rebellion or political plot (Guy Fawkes Night, November 5): V for Vendetta
A film from Poland (Independence Day, November 11): Demon
A film set in Palestine (Independence Day, November 15): The Time That Remains
A film about the occult (Occult Day, November 18): Midsommar
A film from Bruce Lee (born November 27): Enter the Dragon
A film set on Mars or featuring it prominently (Red Planet Day, November 28): Stranded
A film about Thanksgiving: A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving
A film about with the words "Black" or "Friday" in its title: Black Christmas

Freebie with the wife: El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie


Best of the month? Vampyr

Worst of the month? The Mummy (1932), and then Stranded
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Thief » Mon Dec 02, 2019 3:11 pm

I'll post the categories for December before the day is over.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Mon Dec 02, 2019 3:22 pm

I think Midsommar has actually gone down for me a bit since watching it. I had a good time with it when I first saw it and I found the final half hour or so to be great fun, but after I thought more about the realism of certain character motivations, I came to the conclusion that it wasn't quite as good as I initially thought. I think I posted this somewhere else, but I was surprised that all the characters didn't leave after the
cliff jumping
scene. After witnessing something like that, I think most people would want to get out of there right away. I also wasn't sold on the reasons the characters who ended up staying gave as to why they should still stick around. It seemed like Aster had to sacrifice a degree of realism for the story to progress the way it did.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Thief » Mon Dec 02, 2019 3:39 pm

I agree.

SPOILERS for Midsommar
The motivation of the thesis was weakly presented, particularly for Christian... and like I mentioned, the character of Pelle really needed either more fleshing out or more screentime for how important he ends up being. As for Dani, I'm still trying to make up my mind about her but on the surface, it felt like her motivations are blurred between feeling the acceptance and understanding of a community (which she does, on that "communal wailing" scene) and her feelings of disappointment and/or revenge towards Christian, which I think were poorly executed.
Again, the more I think about it and the more I write about it, the less successful I feel it was.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Wooley » Mon Dec 02, 2019 4:25 pm

Apex Predator wrote:
Sun Dec 01, 2019 12:22 am
It's time to Get Out!

His Girl Friday (1940)
See a film with Black or Friday in the title.

Zippy comedy about a newspaper editor (Cary Grant) desperate not to lose his star reporter (Rosalind Russell) to an Albany insurance salesman (Ralph Bellamy). While this is going on, convicted murderer Earl Williams (John Qualen) protests his conviction and even escapes from prison.

The dialogue crackles with funny material, the chemistry between Grant and Russell is potent, and the film zips through its runtime easily (hard to believe this was the same story that Switching Channels did decades later). Ethics aren't an easy thing to find for these reporters who will do just about anything for an exclusive scoop.

I do wish Bellamy offered more of a challenge as the salesman. He seems sweet enough, even though the chemistry with Russell is pretty lukewarm in comparison.

It's worth its reputation and then some. A- or B+
Yeah, always enjoy this one. Rosalind Russell was pretty amazing in everything she did and she nearly steals this whole movie from Grant.
Ralph Bellamy made a pretty good career out of being the dopey other man (see the absolutely hilarious The Awful Truth for another great example).
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Wooley » Mon Dec 02, 2019 4:34 pm

Thief wrote:
Mon Dec 02, 2019 3:08 pm
Here are my quickies for the last five films of the month...

Vampyr (1932) Visually impressive and mesmerizing, but I'm still trying to figure out some things about the narrative and the story. I might ask something about it on another post, but I'm confused by some things. Anyway, story aside, I think it's obvious that the visuals and the atmosphere here are the ones in the driver's seat, and I really, really enjoyed that aspect. I thought it was really impressive and reminded me that I should get off my butt and finally watch Passion of Joan of Arc. Grade: A-, with potential to go higher.

A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving (1973) I'm not ashamed to admit this was a throwaway choice, but I wanted to make time for other films. Anyway, I've always been a Snoopy fan so I enjoyed it. Very simple, fun, and charming. Not much more to say.

Black Christmas (1974) Effectively creepy and moody with some disturbing visuals/moments. I really liked the direction in this and how it embraced its dark tone. I might have appreciated a bit more fleshing out of some of the characters, mostly the sorority girls since only Jess, and to some extent Barb, are fleshed out. By the way, Kidder was really good in her role. Grade: B+

Midsommar (2019) Still trying to make up my mind about this one. Like Vampyr, and well Hereditary, I found it visually impressive through most of its duration. However, I have some issues with the story that seem to get bigger the more I think about it. I think there are some issues with characters motivations, the character of Pelle is a bit problematic in how he is used and "developed", and the film might be a bit overlong, but it still manages to leave an impression. Might write a bit more about it later. Grade: For now, a high B+ that could go either way as I wallow in it.
I agree Vampyr was lush and mesmerizing and confusing.

Love Charlie Brown Thanksgiving for its charm, simplicity, and the the Guaraldi/Snoopy&Woodstock team-up.

I really like Black Christmas, as I said in my Horrorthon, although I had some minor quibbles.

Totally agree on Midsommar, seems to achieve what it sets out to, and beautifully, but seriously cheats on character motivation to get there. I probably go a little lower than you with a B+/B, but it's an averaged score because I'd give it an A+ in some areas and maybe as low as a D in some others.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Wooley » Mon Dec 02, 2019 4:36 pm

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Mon Dec 02, 2019 3:22 pm
I think Midsommar has actually gone down for me a bit since watching it. I had a good time with it when I first saw it and I found the final half hour or so to be great fun, but after I thought more about the realism of certain character motivations, I came to the conclusion that it wasn't quite as good as I initially thought. I think I posted this somewhere else, but I was surprised that all the characters didn't leave after the
cliff jumping
scene. After witnessing something like that, I think most people would want to get out of there right away. I also wasn't sold on the reasons the characters who ended up staying gave as to why they should still stick around. It seemed like Aster had to sacrifice a degree of realism for the story to progress the way it did.
Yes, and the characters' responses to that event weren't baffling, they were bullshit. To make the whole thing work. If that bullshit happens as it would really happen, the movie would be over right then.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Wooley » Mon Dec 02, 2019 4:39 pm

Thief wrote:
Mon Dec 02, 2019 3:39 pm
I agree.

SPOILERS for Midsommar
The motivation of the thesis was weakly presented, particularly for Christian... and like I mentioned, the character of Pelle really needed either more fleshing out or more screentime for how important he ends up being. As for Dani, I'm still trying to make up my mind about her but on the surface, it felt like her motivations are blurred between feeling the acceptance and understanding of a community (which she does, on that "communal wailing" scene) and her feelings of disappointment and/or revenge towards Christian, which I think were poorly executed.
Again, the more I think about it and the more I write about it, the less successful I feel it was.
Agreed.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Apex Predator » Mon Dec 02, 2019 8:49 pm

Wooley wrote:
Mon Dec 02, 2019 4:25 pm
Yeah, always enjoy this one. Rosalind Russell was pretty amazing in everything she did and she nearly steals this whole movie from Grant.
Ralph Bellamy made a pretty good career out of being the dopey other man (see the absolutely hilarious The Awful Truth for another great example).
I think it was Russell who insisted on her character being made strong, practically an equal to Grant. And I think that was the best move they could make because it makes the back and forth so much more effective.

Will agree with Takoma in that she loved reporting more than either man.
But wait, didn't she all but agree to another marriage with Grant by the end of the film? Agreeing to spend their honeymoon in Albany, quite possibly with Bellamy's character and his mother, instead of Niagara Falls because of that strike? What was all that about?
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Thief » Mon Dec 02, 2019 8:58 pm

These are the categories for December!

A film with the number 12 (Twelve, Twelfth, Dozen, etc.) in its title:
The last film from any deceased director you like:
The last Best Picture winner you haven't seen:
A film with a title that starts with the letters W, X, Y or Z:
A film from the current IMDb 250 whose ranking includes the #12 (i.e. 12, 112, 212): (see list here)
A film from the 2010s:
A TV film:
A Christmas or Holiday film:
A film with "Winter" in its title:
A film from Fritz Lang (born December 5):
A film featuring Ninjas (Int'l Ninja Day, December 5):
A film from Finland (Independence Day, December 6):
A film set in a mine or cave (National Miners Day, December 6):
A film featuring a horse prominently (National Horse Day, December 13):
A film about children or featuring them prominently (Int'l Children's Day, December 13):

Fire away!
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Mon Dec 02, 2019 9:44 pm

A film with the number 12 (Twelve, Twelfth, Dozen, etc.) in its title: 12 Angry Men (the 1997 remake)
The last film from any deceased director you like: L'Argent
The last Best Picture winner you haven't seen: It's Green Book for me
A film with a title that starts with the letters W, X, Y or Z: Young Frankenstein
A film from the current IMDb 250 whose ranking includes the #12 (i.e. 12, 112, 212): Unforgiven #127
A film from the 2010s: Burning
A TV film: American Movie
A Christmas or Holiday film: The Shop Around the Corner
A film with "Winter" in its title: Winter Light
A film from Fritz Lang (born December 5): The Testament of Dr. Mabuse
A film set in a mine or cave (National Miners Day, December 6): The Descent
A film featuring a horse prominently (National Horse Day, December 13): The Black Stallion
A film about children or featuring them prominently (Int'l Children's Day, December 13): The Young and the Damned
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Apex Predator » Mon Dec 02, 2019 11:58 pm

These are the categories for December!

Quick question for TV. Would Netflix/Amazon Prime count as TV (if it didn't go into theaters)?

A film with the number 12 (Twelve, Twelfth, Dozen, etc.) in its title: 12 Angry Men (1957)
The last film from any deceased director you like: The Osterman Weekend (1982), although I might go with Imitation of Life (1959) again.
The last Best Picture winner you haven't seen: Green Book (2019)
A film with a title that starts with the letters W, X, Y or Z: Zodiac (2007), Zapped (2014), You Get Me (2017), XXX: State of the Union (2005)
A film from the current IMDb 250 whose ranking includes the #12 (i.e. 12, 112, 212): Downfall (2004)
A film from the 2010s: Should have enough options. Might go Knives Out or The Irishman (2019)
A TV film: ???
A Christmas or Holiday film: The Christmas Chronicles (2018), A Christmas Prince: The Royal Wedding (2018), The Grinch (2018), Holiday in the Wild (2019), Home for the Holidays (1995), It's a Wonderful Life (1946/rewatch), A Christmas Cruise (2017), Holiday Inn (1942)
A film with "Winter" in its title: Winter on Fire (2015), Winter Kills (1979), Winter's Bone (2010/rewatch), After Winter, Spring (2015), Dead of Winter (1987), Warren Miller's Endless Winter (1995)
A film from Fritz Lang (born December 5): Tough film noir choice here: Scarlet Street (1945) or The Big Heat (1952)
A film featuring Ninjas (Int'l Ninja Day, December 5): Ninja Assassin (2009), TMNT (2007), Five Elements Ninjas (1982), Ninja Apocalypse (2014)
A film from Finland (Independence Day, December 6): Devil's Bride (2016), Concrete Night (2014), Lapland Odyssey (2010), Heavy Trip (2018), A Moment in the Reeds (2017)
A film set in a mine or cave (National Miners Day, December 6): Cave (2016), Time Trap (2018), Finding Altamira (2016), The 7 (2012), The Last Descent (2016)
A film featuring a horse prominently (National Horse Day, December 13): Walk Ride Rodeo (2019), Midnight Stallion (2012), A Gift Horse (2015), Painted Horses (2017)
A film about children or featuring them prominently (Int'l Children's Day, December 13): Monster House (2006)
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Takoma1 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 12:03 am

Apex Predator wrote:
Mon Dec 02, 2019 11:58 pm
These are the categories for December!

Quick question for TV. Would Netflix/Amazon Prime count as TV (if it didn't go into theaters)?
I would consider those films as basically "made-for-TV" movies and I'd count them. For example, Brittany Runs a Marathon was a Prime release, but it was on par with most theater-released comedies I've seen in the last ten years.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Apex Predator » Tue Dec 03, 2019 12:20 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 12:03 am
I would consider those films as basically "made-for-TV" movies and I'd count them. For example, Brittany Runs a Marathon was a Prime release, but it was on par with most theater-released comedies I've seen in the last ten years.
Except Brittany did get a theatrical release.

But thanks for giving me a quick answer as I'm trying to work on downloading titles for this month. :up:
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Takoma1 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 1:07 am

A film with the number 12 (Twelve, Twelfth, Dozen, etc.) in its title: Short Term 12 is on Amazon Prime and I think it's criminally underseen. The cast is fantastic (anchored by an amazing performance by Brie Larson, but also including Rami Malek, LaKeith Stanfield, John Gallagher, and Stephanie Beatriz), the story is powerful. I'm going to keep recommending this one until you all watch it, darn it!!

The last film from any deceased director you like: I'm going to watch The Man in the Moon. I would highly recommend White Dog (if you can find it!). I'll also point out that Bunuel's That Obscure Object of Desire is available on Prime.

The last Best Picture winner you haven't seen: Oh, barf. It's Green Book for me. I do not want to pay $7 to rent it, so here's hoping the library has it!

A film with a title that starts with the letters W, X, Y or Z: All of these are on Prime: Yumeji, Young Adult, You Were Never Really Here (THIS ONE IS SO GOOD!), X: The Man with X-Ray Eyes, Witness for the Prosecution, Wake in Fright

A film from the current IMDb 250 whose ranking includes the #12 (i.e. 12, 112, 212): I mean, Forrest Gump, To Kill a Mockingbird, or Before Sunrise. I actually haven't seen the latter, so I'll try to track it down.

A film from the 2010s: All on Prime: Samsara, Blood Brother, The Handmaiden, Short Term 12, Pride, The Man from Nowhere (a personal favorite!), I am Not Your Negro, The Barkley Marathons, The Florida Project, The Invisible War, Mud, Chef, Side Effects, First Reformed, Kings of Summer, If I Want to Whistle I Whistle, Joe, The Fits, Christmas Again, Marjorie Prime, The Spy Who Dumped Me, The Hatred

A TV film: Temple Grandin, Citizen X (this movie is great!), There's Something Wrong with Aunt Diane, When Billie Beat Bobby

A Christmas or Holiday film: Prancer, Jack Frost (the horror one, good times!), Santa Claus Conquers the Martians, A Child's Christmas in Wales, The Merry Gentleman, Christmas Again, Big Business (Laurel and Hardy short), Christmas Time (2017)

A film with "Winter" in its title: Dead of Winter, Winter's Bone

A film from Fritz Lang (born December 5): Scarlet Street and You Only Live Once are both on Prime. I haven't seen the latter.

A film featuring Ninjas (Int'l Ninja Day, December 5): According to the IMDb nothing ninja-related that I've seen is on Prime. I might watch Ninja: Shadow of a Tear (I like Scott Adkins) or Five Elements Ninjas

A film from Finland (Independence Day, December 6): Aside from Rare Exports, I can't find much for free.

A film set in a mine or cave (National Miners Day, December 6): My Bloody Valentine, The Strangeness

A film featuring a horse prominently (National Horse Day, December 13): Town Called Panic, Unbranded, Wild Hearts Can't Be Broken (not free)

A film about children or featuring them prominently (Int'l Children's Day, December 13): Paperhouse, The Florida Project, Prancer, 4 Little Girls, Valentine Road, Blood Brother
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Apex Predator » Tue Dec 03, 2019 1:29 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 1:07 am
A film with the number 12 (Twelve, Twelfth, Dozen, etc.) in its title: Short Term 12 is on Amazon Prime and I think it's criminally underseen. The cast is fantastic (anchored by an amazing performance by Brie Larson, but also including Rami Malek, LaKeith Stanfield, John Gallagher, and Stephanie Beatriz), the story is powerful. I'm going to keep recommending this one until you all watch it, darn it!!

The last film from any deceased director you like: I'm going to watch The Man in the Moon. I would highly recommend White Dog (if you can find it!). I'll also point out that Bunuel's That Obscure Object of Desire is available on Prime.

The last Best Picture winner you haven't seen: Oh, barf. It's Green Book for me. I do not want to pay $7 to rent it, so here's hoping the library has it!

A film with a title that starts with the letters W, X, Y or Z: All of these are on Prime: Yumeji, Young Adult, You Were Never Really Here (THIS ONE IS SO GOOD!), X: The Man with X-Ray Eyes, Witness for the Prosecution, Wake in Fright

A film from the current IMDb 250 whose ranking includes the #12 (i.e. 12, 112, 212): I mean, Forrest Gump, To Kill a Mockingbird, or Before Sunrise. I actually haven't seen the latter, so I'll try to track it down.

A film from the 2010s: All on Prime: Samsara, Blood Brother, The Handmaiden, Short Term 12, Pride, The Man from Nowhere (a personal favorite!), I am Not Your Negro, The Barkley Marathons, The Florida Project, The Invisible War, Mud, Chef, Side Effects, First Reformed, Kings of Summer, If I Want to Whistle I Whistle, Joe, The Fits, Christmas Again, Marjorie Prime, The Spy Who Dumped Me, The Hatred

A TV film: Temple Grandin, Citizen X (this movie is great!), There's Something Wrong with Aunt Diane, When Billie Beat Bobby

A Christmas or Holiday film: Prancer, Jack Frost (the horror one, good times!), Santa Claus Conquers the Martians, A Child's Christmas in Wales, The Merry Gentleman, Christmas Again, Big Business (Laurel and Hardy short), Christmas Time (2017)

A film with "Winter" in its title: Dead of Winter, Winter's Bone

A film from Fritz Lang (born December 5): Scarlet Street and You Only Live Once are both on Prime. I haven't seen the latter.

A film featuring Ninjas (Int'l Ninja Day, December 5): According to the IMDb nothing ninja-related that I've seen is on Prime. I might watch Ninja: Shadow of a Tear (I like Scott Adkins) or Five Elements Ninjas

A film from Finland (Independence Day, December 6): Aside from Rare Exports, I can't find much for free.

A film set in a mine or cave (National Miners Day, December 6): My Bloody Valentine, The Strangeness

A film featuring a horse prominently (National Horse Day, December 13): Town Called Panic, Unbranded, Wild Hearts Can't Be Broken (not free)

A film about children or featuring them prominently (Int'l Children's Day, December 13): Paperhouse, The Florida Project, Prancer, 4 Little Girls, Valentine Road, Blood Brother
If it weren't for me having 12 Angry Men saved for this occasion, I might have seen Short Term 12. Darn. :P

You might find Green Book on Redbox. At least it's not $7.

I think I've decided on Zodiac for the W-Z selection. Hadn't seen it and I think I listed it among the titles I most wanted to see for that year.

Will recommend The Fits, I Am Not Your Negro and Invisible War among the 2010s titles. All three are excellent.

Looks like we're both seeing the same Ninja film? Twins! :D

Give Prime another go for Finnish titles. It looks like the better choice for those over Netflix with way more titles. Although Rare Exports does also work as a Christmas film. ;)
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Takoma1 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 1:58 am

Apex Predator wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 1:29 am
If it weren't for me having 12 Angry Men saved for this occasion, I might have seen Short Term 12. Darn. :P
Boo!
I think I've decided on Zodiac for the W-Z selection. Hadn't seen it and I think I listed it among the titles I most wanted to see for that year.
Zodiac is great. I almost recommended it, but I thought everyone had seen it.
Give Prime another go for Finnish titles. It looks like the better choice for those over Netflix with way more titles. Although Rare Exports does also work as a Christmas film. ;)
There are some good ones on the Criterion Channel, which I know most people here do not have.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Takoma1 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:37 am

A film featuring Ninjas (Int'l Ninja Day, December 5): Ninja: Shadow of a Tear

It's no secret that I'm a fan of Scott Adkins when it comes to B-level (or, um, C-level) action fare. Adkins just has a fundamental athletic ability that means no matter how thin the plot or how broad the acting, there's always something entertaining on screen when the action sequences roll around.

This one, unfortunately, is plotted REALLY thinly. The story opens with Adkins and his wife. I mean, she's so perfect and adorable that she practically says, "So should I put myself in the fridge or what?". Adkins is the victim of an attempted mugging, and later that night his wife is killed while he is out getting her food. (She's pregnant because of course she is). Adkins goes to recover at the dojo of a good friend of his, but as he tries to track down his wife's killer he stumbles into the operation of a dangerous and sadistic drug lord.

I'd say that this was mid-tier Adkins for me. I read in the trivia section that he injured himself filming and had to use a stunt double for certain sequences. I'm not sure if that's why some of the fight sequences have a different flow to them. Adkins excels at high, impossible kicks and dancer-like movements. This comes through really strongly in three of the actions sequences, but the rest don't feel quite right.

In terms of the plot, it moves in a predictable, almost workmanlike way. My favorite, and most human, part of the film is when Adkins arrives at the dojo, still grieving his wife. A practice sparring session with a student turns intense and personal. The student accidentally strikes Adkins in the face (and his immediate, fearful "Sorry!!" is probably the most believable line reading in the whole film) and then it gets really ugly really quickly as Adkins (completely inappropriately) takes the student down. But later this same student takes over a menial job for Adkins, silently absolving him of his inappropriate behavior and communicating that he understands his grief. It's a moment of actually building connection between characters and it's something that the rest of the film misses. Obviously with a recently deceased pregnant wife there's no love interest, and the film never quite finds the emotional anchor that it needs. The villains never have much personality, so it's hard to work up much passion about the different showdowns.

Overall this film was fine, but it lacked the spark that it would need to be something I'd want to revisit.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Rock » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:48 am

I take it you've seen the first Ninja? I think I preferred that one by a bit. The sequel is stronger on a technical level, but I didn't find its mystery plot had as much momentum as the more straightforward story in the original. I also really like the subway action scene.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Thief » Tue Dec 03, 2019 3:11 pm

Thief wrote:
Mon Dec 02, 2019 3:08 pm
Vampyr (1932) Visually impressive and mesmerizing, but I'm still trying to figure out some things about the narrative and the story. I might ask something about it on another post, but I'm confused by some things. Anyway, story aside, I think it's obvious that the visuals and the atmosphere here are the ones in the driver's seat, and I really, really enjoyed that aspect. I thought it was really impressive and reminded me that I should get off my butt and finally watch Passion of Joan of Arc. Grade: A-, with potential to go higher.
Ok, so to add more on this... I feel a bit dumb for maybe getting this wrong? but maybe I'm not alone.
Was Allan Gray supposed to be a vampire or not? I was a bit confused towards the end when he saw himself in the coffin. I'm reading some sites where it says it was one of his visions/hallucinations, but for some reason, it made some sense to me the other way. The fact that the film focuses on the scythe-wielding "farmer" in the beginning of the film also makes it seem as if this is the point where he died? and has seen death pass him by? or he somehow missed the "boat"? Also, in the ending, after he rescues the young woman (I forgot her name), they end up walking in the woods towards "the light", which reminded me the title card where it said something about vampires not being "free" until they have a "proper death", or something along that line. The servant killing the doctor was him avenging the murders.
I might be waaaaaay off the mark, but that's what I got from the ending. I feel a bit dumb asking but that's how it is.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Wooley » Tue Dec 03, 2019 3:48 pm

Thief wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 3:11 pm
Ok, so to add more on this... I feel a bit dumb for maybe getting this wrong? but maybe I'm not alone.
Was Allan Gray supposed to be a vampire or not? I was a bit confused towards the end when he saw himself in the coffin. I'm reading some sites where it says it was one of his visions/hallucinations, but for some reason, it made some sense to me the other way. The fact that the film focuses on the scythe-wielding "farmer" in the beginning of the film also makes it seem as if this is the point where he died? and has seen death pass him by? or he somehow missed the "boat"? Also, in the ending, after he rescues the young woman (I forgot her name), they end up walking in the woods towards "the light", which reminded me the title card where it said something about vampires not being "free" until they have a "proper death", or something along that line. The servant killing the doctor was him avenging the murders.
I might be waaaaaay off the mark, but that's what I got from the ending. I feel a bit dumb asking but that's how it is.
I think all of that makes sense. I've seen the movie twice and read the "plot synopsis" from different sources several times and I still couldn't really tell a friend what the story really is. I've decided to stop trying to make sense of it and just let it flow.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Slentert » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:07 pm

I saw Vampyr in a theater once, without subtitles, never fully understood what was happening but loved it nonetheless.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Takoma1 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 8:54 pm

Rock wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:48 am
I take it you've seen the first Ninja? I think I preferred that one by a bit. The sequel is stronger on a technical level, but I didn't find its mystery plot had as much momentum as the more straightforward story in the original. I also really like the subway action scene.
I was going to say yes, but I don't think that I actually have. There was a period where I was putting on action films to fall asleep to, and thus saw the first 18 minutes of about five or six different films.

I'll keep an eye out for it if it pops up on Prime or another service I have.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by crumbsroom » Tue Dec 03, 2019 10:29 pm

Would understanding Vampyr more comprehensively make it better or worse?

For me the answer to this is clear.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Tue Dec 03, 2019 10:37 pm

I don't know if I'd like the film less if I understood what it was all about, but considering that I care more about the visuals and the mood it conveys over the various turns in the story, I'm fine with not understanding it.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by crumbsroom » Tue Dec 03, 2019 10:48 pm

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 10:37 pm
I don't know if I'd like the film less if I understood what it was all about, but considering that I care more about the visuals and the mood it conveys over the various turns in the story, I'm fine with not understanding it.
I find understanding things, or giving them a clearer narrative ground, can anchor even the strangest films in reality.

I prefer a film like this to float above all of that.

And it is miraculous floater.

Possibly the best
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:13 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 10:48 pm
I find understanding things, or giving them a clearer narrative ground, can anchor even the strangest films in reality.

I prefer a film like this to float above all of that.

And it is miraculous floater.

Possibly the best
Understandable. I've experienced a similar thing a few times in the past.

Out of curiosity, how do you feel about interpreting, say, David Lynch films?
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by crumbsroom » Wed Dec 04, 2019 12:18 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:13 pm
Understandable. I've experienced a similar thing a few times in the past.

Out of curiosity, how do you feel about interpreting, say, David Lynch films?
To be perfectly honest, I don't really like breaking any films down into their thematic or metaphorical or there whatsits elements at all. If there is something deeper happening in a film, I am fine feeling it out instinctively and emotionally. I am not personally interested in much intellectual heavy lifting. It always feels labored and it always saps the energy out of a film for me. Not that I haven't read really interesting critiques of films that do this. But I'm not going to. Either can't or don't' want to, and they are the same difference to me. Films exist in the moment and if I find myself using a decoder ring for them, blah, I'm out.

But I do particularly hate this when it happens with movies that play with surrealism. It doesn't belong there as far as I'm concerned. So, yeah, I'm not fan of breaking down an Inland Empire or Lost Highway. Sure, there are elements in a Eraserhead, and especially in Mulholland Drive, that beg to be interpreted. But I don't think you really need to dig very deep to get the general gyst of what Lynch was going for narratively or emotionally in them. But when people start feeling the need to fit every one of his misshapen puzzle pieces into a unified whole, I want to bury my head under a pillow. Hate it.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Takoma1 » Wed Dec 04, 2019 1:11 am

A film with "Winter" in its title: Dead of Winter

In a cold open, a woman with a bag of money nervously makes her way to her car, only to be strangled by a man hiding in her backseat who then removes her ring finger with a pair of clippers.

Flash to an aspiring actress named Katie. Leaving her boyfriend (husband?) behind in their small apartment (that they share with her brother?), she's off to an audition. When she gets there, a startled producer tells her she'd be perfect for a different role: an actress has stormed off set and they need an immediate replacement. With the promise of $3000 (and possibly $9000 more to follow), Katie agrees to go with the man to a remote home to audition.

Once there, the man who hired her, Murray, introduces her to the wheelchair-bound employer, Dr. Lewis. They give Katie an extensive makeover, dying and cutting her hair. They have her learn and film a scene. We later see that this scene (clearly alluding to the attack in the car) is sent to a mysterious woman. Slowly we learn that the dead woman was part of a blackmail scheme, and the two men are using Katie as leverage. She grows more and more frightened as they keep her captive and the threat of the mysterious woman looms as well.

In terms of a premise, this was kooky and yet in the realm of a fun idea. The idea of slowly realizing your isolation is pretty horrible, and there are some legitimately tense, frightening, and even gruesome moments as the two men play out their scheme.

But the characters . . . OH MY GOD.

Let's start with Katie's boyfriend, Rob. He is the worst. In the beginning, he assures Katie that he'll get her new headshot ready (he is a photographer) . . . only he hasn't. Then he's petulant when she calls him out on this. When she gets the audition and will have to be away for a few days, he literally pouts like a child. When she tries to talk to him, he continuously raises his camera up and takes pictures of her. Can you imagine trying to have a conversation with a person and they keep taking pictures of your face? It's one of the strongest feelings I've ever had of wanting to reach through the screen and punch someone in the face. And the fact that he gets to play hero/good guy at the end of the film made me doubly angry.

Then there's Katie herself. Look, I don't know what I'd do in her position. She's been drugged and terrorized. But at the same time--she's easily about the same size as Murray. Dr. Lewis is confined to a wheelchair. And yet she never mounts much of a physical defense. At one point she could seemingly just run away and she just doesn't. The worst part is when she gets access to a phone. Instead of calling the police, she calls her boyfriend. In the one moment that made me sort of appreciate him, he tells her to hang up and call the police. Over and over, but she instead just gives him vague, nonsensical information about where she's being held. He finally hangs up on her so that she'll call the cops. There are parts where you think, okay, I could see myself making that mistake if I was scared and confused. But there are also a ton of parts where she just does dumb stuff and it makes no sense.

This was okay, but I wish I'd liked the characters more so that I could roll with the outlandish premise.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Wed Dec 04, 2019 5:14 am

crumbsroom wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 12:18 am
To be perfectly honest, I don't really like breaking any films down into their thematic or metaphorical or there whatsits elements at all. If there is something deeper happening in a film, I am fine feeling it out instinctively and emotionally. I am not personally interested in much intellectual heavy lifting. It always feels labored and it always saps the energy out of a film for me. Not that I haven't read really interesting critiques of films that do this. But I'm not going to. Either can't or don't' want to, and they are the same difference to me. Films exist in the moment and if I find myself using a decoder ring for them, blah, I'm out.

But I do particularly hate this when it happens with movies that play with surrealism. It doesn't belong there as far as I'm concerned. So, yeah, I'm not fan of breaking down an Inland Empire or Lost Highway. Sure, there are elements in a Eraserhead, and especially in Mulholland Drive, that beg to be interpreted. But I don't think you really need to dig very deep to get the general gyst of what Lynch was going for narratively or emotionally in them. But when people start feeling the need to fit every one of his misshapen puzzle pieces into a unified whole, I want to bury my head under a pillow. Hate it.
To some extent, I share that viewpoint. For me though, I'd actually say I get more out of certain complex films, surrealist works, and some of David Lynch's films when I provide interpretations which I'm comfortable with for them (provided that they feel open to being interpreted that is). That way, I can feel the power of them in addition to knowing what it is which is making me feel the individual emotions. With Eraserhead, I think I get the most out of the film when I both think of interpretations for it and feel the power of the images. Otherwise, I can't help but think about the meanings of certain sequences while watching it and feel like there are some themes in it which I'm not noticing. With another recent example, I also saw Upstream Color and, while I cared more about the trauma angle of it, I was still curious as to how the larva business in it worked. After I understood it, I watched it again and predominantly paid attention to the trauma angle since I didn't have to ask the same questions to myself on the larva/flower stuff which I asked on my first viewing. It was more of a "Let me get that out of the way" response. Of course though, there are some films which I'm comfortable with feeling rather than analyzing such as Vampyr for instance. I just don't feel this way with every complex, metaphorical, esoteric, etc. film I watch.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Thief » Wed Dec 04, 2019 4:54 pm

crumbsroom wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 10:48 pm
I find understanding things, or giving them a clearer narrative ground, can anchor even the strangest films in reality.

I prefer a film like this to float above all of that.

And it is miraculous floater.

Possibly the best
Oh, trust me, I agree with you. My questions about Vampyr are not "deal breakers", so to speak, but me trying to dig into what happened. I've had similar reactions to films like Persona or Eraserhead and I find discussing the "plot" and its possibilities to be a lot of fun. It's not something that infuriates me or that has me on the fence about it.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Takoma1 » Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:16 am

A film with a title that starts with the letters W, X, Y or Z: Wheelman

This was a quick and mostly satisfying actioner.

A man (unnamed as far as I can tell, and only credited as "Wheelman"), played by Frank Grillo, picks up a couple of guys for a bank heist. But while the men are inside the bank, he receives a call from who he believes is the man behind the job. This man tells him that the robbers are going to kill him at the drop, and directs him to take the money and drive away. Unable to get in touch with his friend, Clay, who actually set up the job, the Wheelman drives off with the cash.

The first forty minutes or so are full of confused, menacing, and tense phone calls as Wheelman juggles his rebellious teen daughter, Clay, and the mysterious caller. It soon becomes clear that there are multiple interests at play, and Wheelman is trapped in the middle. Wheelman owes the local mob for taking care of his family while he was incarcerated, and so he mus balance his desire to keep them happy against his need not to be sent back to jail.

In the second half of the film, the pieces all fall into place more clearly and there's a a more well-defined trajectory to the end of the story.

About 90% of the film takes place inside of the car, a decision that sometimes feels really clever and other times strains against that limitation. I've seen plenty of movies that spend almost all of their time with a single character in a limited setting (the recent Locke comes to mind), but here I felt it worked to only decent effect. The conversations between the Wheelman and his sulking daughter were frustrating to listen to (I mean, they felt sort of real, but also pretty annoying!). Possibly to help distinguish the different voices on the phone, one man always has loud jazz playing behind him. I feel like the dynamic of the phone calls could have been polished a bit.

The biggest surprise of the film comes toward the end when the Wheelman actually interacts with his daughter. With someone else on screen to play off of, Grillo comes much more to life. He has surprisingly good chemistry with the actress playing the daughter, and their scenes together give the film some much needed humanity and spark. They also (thank god) refine the character of the daughter. We get to see the desperation in her face when she experimentally swears at her father, and realize just how fearful and unsettled her life has been and the horrible uncertainty about whether or not he'll be going back to jail.

This one is on Netflix and it's a fast watch. It isn't amazing, but it is solid.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Apex Predator » Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:42 am

I decided to conduct a poll on Facebook to see which Fritz Lang film noir to see this month. And as of now, one jumped out in front.

The Big Heat (1953)
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Wooley » Thu Dec 05, 2019 1:21 pm

Apex Predator wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:42 am
I decided to conduct a poll on Facebook to see which Fritz Lang film noir to see this month. And as of now, one jumped out in front.

The Big Heat (1953)
It's great.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Takoma1 » Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:44 am

A TV film: Sharknado

I do enjoy the occasional so-bad-it's-good, and this one almost hit the mark.

Yes, I smiled a bit at the multiple references to Jaws ("Six men went into the water. One little girl came out. Sharks got the rest."). Yes, some of the "bad" acting was fun ("Noooo!" *pause* "Noooooo!").

But you know what? Mostly I just felt bad for the sharks. It's not their fault they get swept up in a tornado. And everyone in the film slowly being won over to the side of "Yeah, now I hate sharks too!" was just kind of depressing.

I will pay the film this one compliment: it actually had Ian Ziering portrayed as his age (ie he has two children, one of whom is at least 20 years old), and it has the sense to know that the "love interest" who is 30 years his junior isn't a good idea. Her slowly finding out, one scene at a time, that he is an adult with a past is kind of funny ("You have a wife?!" "You have a daughter?!" "You have a son?!"), as is the speedy transference of her affections to his son.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Fri Dec 06, 2019 3:10 am

What would you guys say are some of the best so-bad-it's-good films out there?
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Takoma1 » Fri Dec 06, 2019 3:33 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Fri Dec 06, 2019 3:10 am
What would you guys say are some of the best so-bad-it's-good films out there?
Troll 2 is the classic answer, but it is a good one.

In terms of intentionally so-bad-it's-good, I really enjoyed Velocipastor.

There's a vampire romance called To Die For (I think) that I laughed my way through several years ago.

Then there are all those you get to see through things like MST3K or Rifftrax. From the newest series they do two movies called Wizard of the Lost Kingdom that seem like enjoyably bad garbage.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Dec 06, 2019 5:14 am

Things is the best so bad it's good movie. Because it's so bad it's bad. And so bad and so bad and so bad.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by crumbsroom » Fri Dec 06, 2019 5:20 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Fri Dec 06, 2019 3:33 am
Troll 2
I love this movie.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Stu » Fri Dec 06, 2019 7:25 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Fri Dec 06, 2019 3:10 am
What would you guys say are some of the best so-bad-it's-good films out there?
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Thief » Fri Dec 06, 2019 3:22 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:44 am
A TV film: Sharknado

I do enjoy the occasional so-bad-it's-good, and this one almost hit the mark.

Yes, I smiled a bit at the multiple references to Jaws ("Six men went into the water. One little girl came out. Sharks got the rest."). Yes, some of the "bad" acting was fun ("Noooo!" *pause* "Noooooo!").

But you know what? Mostly I just felt bad for the sharks. It's not their fault they get swept up in a tornado. And everyone in the film slowly being won over to the side of "Yeah, now I hate sharks too!" was just kind of depressing.

I will pay the film this one compliment: it actually had Ian Ziering portrayed as his age (ie he has two children, one of whom is at least 20 years old), and it has the sense to know that the "love interest" who is 30 years his junior isn't a good idea. Her slowly finding out, one scene at a time, that he is an adult with a past is kind of funny ("You have a wife?!" "You have a daughter?!" "You have a son?!"), as is the speedy transference of her affections to his son.
So absurdly bad, but fun. I think the second, and maybe the third one, embrace more the absurdity/comedy premise thus feeling maybe more successful? or at least as successful as you can consider a Sharknado film.

Anyway, my favorite part of the Fin/Nova relationship is when she cocks her shotgun and he just leers at her and says "I'm not gonna lie. It's kinda hot when you do that."

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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Thief » Fri Dec 06, 2019 3:24 pm

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Fri Dec 06, 2019 3:10 am
What would you guys say are some of the best so-bad-it's-good films out there?
Manos: The Hands of Fate deserves to be seen. Also, Who Killed Captain Alex? *nudge, nudge, Apex*
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Apex Predator » Fri Dec 06, 2019 6:43 pm

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Fri Dec 06, 2019 3:10 am
What would you guys say are some of the best so-bad-it's-good films out there?
Yes, thank you, Thief. Who Killed Captain Alex is full of incompetent fun that'll put a smile on your face.

But I'd also argue in favor of Miami Connection. A bunch of orphans who live in a house while attending Central Florida in Orlando and who form a rock band at night while taking on ninjas driving motorbikes, the overprotective brother of one orphan's love interest, and a rival band jealous of their success. It's taekwondo, rock n roll fun!
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Apex Predator » Fri Dec 06, 2019 6:45 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:44 am
A TV film: Sharknado

I do enjoy the occasional so-bad-it's-good, and this one almost hit the mark.

Yes, I smiled a bit at the multiple references to Jaws ("Six men went into the water. One little girl came out. Sharks got the rest."). Yes, some of the "bad" acting was fun ("Noooo!" *pause* "Noooooo!").

But you know what? Mostly I just felt bad for the sharks. It's not their fault they get swept up in a tornado. And everyone in the film slowly being won over to the side of "Yeah, now I hate sharks too!" was just kind of depressing.

I will pay the film this one compliment: it actually had Ian Ziering portrayed as his age (ie he has two children, one of whom is at least 20 years old), and it has the sense to know that the "love interest" who is 30 years his junior isn't a good idea. Her slowly finding out, one scene at a time, that he is an adult with a past is kind of funny ("You have a wife?!" "You have a daughter?!" "You have a son?!"), as is the speedy transference of her affections to his son.
I liked this one a bit better than you did.

But there was one moment where it got to be too silly/stupid for its own good and it was the scene with the bus driver.
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Thief
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2019

Post by Thief » Fri Dec 06, 2019 6:48 pm

Apex Predator wrote:
Fri Dec 06, 2019 6:43 pm
Yes, thank you, Thief. Who Killed Captain Alex is full of incompetent fun that'll put a smile on your face.

But I'd also argue in favor of Miami Connection. A bunch of orphans who live in a house while attending Central Florida in Orlando and who form a rock band at night while taking on ninjas driving motorbikes, the overprotective brother of one orphan's love interest, and a rival band jealous of their success. It's taekwondo, rock n roll fun!
Oh yeah! Had that one in mind but forgot to mention it. The songs, man! :D
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