Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

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Apex Predator
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Apex Predator » Sun Feb 16, 2020 9:38 pm

I've been watching (just not enough):

A Moment in the Reeds (2018): Ending looked like it was leading to some drama, but it was just another tease. Typical, because too much of Moment was full of scenes that could have been hacked out in favor of a better movie. There's something there about a Finnish student home from France for the summer who falls for a Syrian handyman who's there to help his father fix the cabin. But when it's not content with numbing your brain with dull dialogue, there's a couple of scenes that feel like they came from a racier project. Lose this one in the reeds. D-

Z-O-M-B-I-E-S (2018): It's like a Disneyfied version of West Side Story but with zombies in place of the Sharks. A nuclear accident caused by lime soda has turned some citizens of a high-falutin town into zombies. But thanks to technology, knockoff Fitbits turns the zombies into placated kids with green hair. And now they're being admitted to the high school with the unaffected kids. The whole metaphor of integration is clumsy, but some of the songs are catchy and the film is just innocent fun. C+

See a film from the 1001 films to see before you die
See a Vincente Minnelli film

The Band Wagon (1953)
Fred Astaire plays a song and dance man on the wrong side of stardom who might have found a comeback vehicle thanks to two friends in the Broadway world. Things seem to be going when Broadway's number one star/director agrees to direct and they're able to get a top ballerina to play Astaire's co-lead. But thanks to a misunderstanding, the director believes the play is going to be a modern version of Faust. But it's a long and bumpy road from New Haven to New York.

It feels a bit too much like 42nd Street at times. But Astaire and Cyd Charisse have some nice chemistry together, Nanette Fabray provides some amusing moments and Jack Buchanan some more serious ones. There's some nice musical highlights (That's Entertainment, Shine on Your Shoes, Girl Hunt Ballet) and Astaire's charm and Charisse's moves carry this one a good ways. B.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Wooley » Sun Feb 16, 2020 9:40 pm

kgaard. wrote:
Sun Feb 16, 2020 7:39 pm
A film with a title that starts with the letters C or D: Candyman

I enjoyed this a lot. I'm not sure that whatever this film is trying to say about race entirely comes across, except I guess that maybe white people should be more wary about sticking their noses into black culture.
Unless you want to become a legendary, if horrible, figure yourself?
In any event, the darkly romantic atmosphere, which is helped considerably by a tone-setting Philip Glass score and a nailed-on performance by Tony Todd, carries the movie a long way.
I'd be interested to hear your response to my write-up of it from October. It's the second film on this page: https://corrierino.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=890
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Takoma1
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Feb 17, 2020 12:25 am

kgaard. wrote:
Sun Feb 16, 2020 7:39 pm
A film with a title that starts with the letters C or D: Candyman

I enjoyed this a lot. I'm not sure that whatever this film is trying to say about race entirely comes across, except I guess that maybe white people should be more wary about sticking their noses into black culture.
I think that it's about race but also about (the very related) social class system.

Cabrini Green is treated almost as another country (for both the main character and her black upper-middle class colleague).

EDIT: It's also one of my favorite horror movies. I think that the scary aspects and visuals stand on their own. And I'd rather have a race/class critique be a little subtle than clunkily try to take center stage (especially when you're talking about a film written and directed by someone who is not from those subgroups).
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Takoma1 » Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:15 am

The Irishman and Marriage Story are both on services I have, and yet I find that I am profoundly uninterested in them.

So I think I might just shell out a few bucks to rent Parasite. Don't get me wrong, I love Bong Joon-ho and I really want to see it, but money is tight and I was hoping to rent it from the library.

I'm also having some trouble with the DR category. Nothing streaming is really grabbing my interest. Any leads?
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Apex Predator » Mon Feb 17, 2020 2:57 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:15 am
The Irishman and Marriage Story are both on services I have, and yet I find that I am profoundly uninterested in them.

So I think I might just shell out a few bucks to rent Parasite. Don't get me wrong, I love Bong Joon-ho and I really want to see it, but money is tight and I was hoping to rent it from the library.

I'm also having some trouble with the DR category. Nothing streaming is really grabbing my interest. Any leads?
I found a few on Amazon Prime:
Todo Incluido
Hibana
Republic of Color
Locas y Atrapadas
My Favorite Little Angel
The South of Innocence
Al Fin y Al Cabo
Detective Willy
Sand Dollars

Tubi:
Pulso
Ponchao
Dos Policias en Apuros
Buscando al Zorro
Kanibaru
Camino a Higuey

Also, maybe check your library app?
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:09 pm

The Dominican Republic has a thriving film industry centered on comedies, or at least that's what we get a lot here, but to be honest, I've never felt compelled to watch any. A lot of people I know loved the Sanky Panky series, but I don't see it available streaming.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by kgaard. » Wed Feb 19, 2020 10:22 pm

Wooley wrote:
Sun Feb 16, 2020 9:40 pm
I'd be interested to hear your response to my write-up of it from October. It's the second film on this page: https://corrierino.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=890
I think you're right on about the complex dynamics, and equally, I would agree with Takoma that it is better to err on the side of subtlety than brassy Statements of Intent. It's all rather meta, isn't it? That is, largely white filmmakers telling a story about invading black culture is arguably itself an invasion of culture. I don't think it's done without awareness though. Where I wonder particularly about what to take away from the film is
Helen's ascension to urban legend herself. Is this a self-aware wink at the history of white culture swallowing and regurgitating black culture? Or is just the thing itself, without the wink?
I will say it doesn't matter a great deal to me, I'm fine with the ambiguity, and I appreciate what the film is trying to do.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Thu Feb 20, 2020 1:16 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:15 am
The Irishman and Marriage Story are both on services I have, and yet I find that I am profoundly uninterested in them.

So I think I might just shell out a few bucks to rent Parasite. Don't get me wrong, I love Bong Joon-ho and I really want to see it, but money is tight and I was hoping to rent it from the library.
I thought Marriage Story was pretty good, but I feel you on The Irishman. Then again, it is known that I'm not the more enthusiastic Scorsese fan here, so there's that also.

Anyway, I'm also looking forward to Parasite, but might wait for the cheapest alternative (Redbox or streaming free).
Takoma1 wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 1:15 am
I'm also having some trouble with the DR category. Nothing streaming is really grabbing my interest. Any leads?
Taking a cue from Apex Predator's list of recommendations, for which I'm thankful, I heartily endorse Sand Dollars. Really solid and well acted drama, starring Geraldine Chaplin (yeah, Charles' daughter! Didn't know that).
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Takoma1 » Thu Feb 20, 2020 1:33 am

Thief wrote:
Thu Feb 20, 2020 1:16 am
I thought Marriage Story was pretty good, but I feel you on The Irishman. Then again, it is known that I'm not the more enthusiastic Scorsese fan here, so there's that also.

Anyway, I'm also looking forward to Parasite, but might wait for the cheapest alternative (Redbox or streaming free).
Stories about the mob and stories about troubled marriages are like some of my least favorite stories. I get that "It's not what it's about, it's how it's about it", but I just find the premises deeply, DEEPLY uninteresting.

Also, someone kills a chicken in The Irishman so nope.
Taking a cue from Apex Predator's list of recommendations, for which I'm thankful, I heartily endorse Sand Dollars. Really solid and well acted drama, starring Geraldine Chaplin (yeah, Charles' daughter! Didn't know that).
Good! I was really not loving the Tarantino knock-off crime "thriller" I was 20 minutes into.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Jinnistan » Thu Feb 20, 2020 1:42 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Thu Feb 20, 2020 1:33 am
Also, someone kills a chicken in The Irishman so nope.
Fake news.
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Wooley
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Wooley » Thu Feb 20, 2020 2:01 am

kgaard. wrote:
Wed Feb 19, 2020 10:22 pm
I think you're right on about the complex dynamics, and equally, I would agree with Takoma that it is better to err on the side of subtlety than brassy Statements of Intent. It's all rather meta, isn't it? That is, largely white filmmakers telling a story about invading black culture is arguably itself an invasion of culture. I don't think it's done without awareness though. Where I wonder particularly about what to take away from the film is
Helen's ascension to urban legend herself. Is this a self-aware wink at the history of white culture swallowing and regurgitating black culture? Or is just the thing itself, without the wink?
I will say it doesn't matter a great deal to me, I'm fine with the ambiguity, and I appreciate what the film is trying to do.
It's a good question.
But I agree with you, I think by that point, the film has done enough and that question can be explored, but it's also fine if it's not.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Wooley » Thu Feb 20, 2020 2:04 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Thu Feb 20, 2020 1:33 am
Stories about the mob and stories about troubled marriages are like some of my least favorite stories. I get that "It's not what it's about, it's how it's about it", but I just find the premises deeply, DEEPLY uninteresting.
I'm with you on this, I am really, really over mob movies, especially since, as you point out "it's how it's about it", which every filmmaker now knows and takes as their cue to try to be artistes with it and it's just exhausted. I'm not interested anymore. I am much kinder on the troubled marriages, but still have seen enough of them I'm not sure how many more I need to see, especially as someone who lived one. Although I really do like watching Johansson be better than anyone seems to want her to be.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Takoma1 » Thu Feb 20, 2020 2:43 am

Wooley wrote:
Thu Feb 20, 2020 2:04 am
I'm with you on this, I am really, really over mob movies, especially since, as you point out "it's how it's about it", which every filmmaker now knows and takes as their cue to try to be artistes with it and it's just exhausted. I'm not interested anymore. I am much kinder on the troubled marriages, but still have seen enough of them I'm not sure how many more I need to see, especially as someone who lived one. Although I really do like watching Johansson be better than anyone seems to want her to be.
I will still watch them from time to time, but something like Blue Valentine is a great example of me appreciating direction, acting, all of it. And yet not really wanting to ever revisit it or think back on it that often. I have nothing against such stories, but there are types of conflict I find interesting and those that just don't click with me. Often I'll be enticed in by a director or actor I like, but the stories themselves just don't vibe.

Mob movies, to me, always have a hint of almost . . . fantasy to them? Like some admiration about the power these men have is mixed in with the tsk tsk element of them killing/intimidating/manipulating people. It's weird, because I can watch other films that slightly glamorize crime (like where the protagonist is an assassin or a thief) and don't get as indignant.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Thu Feb 20, 2020 2:56 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Thu Feb 20, 2020 2:43 am
Mob movies, to me, always have a hint of almost . . . fantasy to them? Like some admiration about the power these men have is mixed in with the tsk tsk element of them killing/intimidating/manipulating people. It's weird, because I can watch other films that slightly glamorize crime (like where the protagonist is an assassin or a thief) and don't get as indignant.
I'd say that The Irishman serves as a good response to this as this element becomes less and less prevalent as the film goes on. Although, I understand why you're not interested in this film.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Takoma1 » Thu Feb 20, 2020 3:11 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Thu Feb 20, 2020 2:56 am
I'd say that The Irishman serves as a good response to this aspect as this element becomes less and less prevalent as the film goes on. Although, I understand why you're not interested in this film.
The "wish fulfillment" is something I was aiming more at other films.

I mean, I have not heard from anyone who did not like (or love) The Irishman. I entirely believe that it's a good film by any metric, and it's nice to hear that it doesn't glamorize mob life.

It's weird--the universal opinion seems to be that this year's crop of best picture nominees is really strong, and yet I'm not drawn to many of them for various reasons. I did love Little Women, though, and I'm really excited for Parasite.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Thu Feb 20, 2020 3:30 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Thu Feb 20, 2020 3:11 am
The "wish fulfillment" is something I was aiming more at other films.

I mean, I have not heard from anyone who did not like (or love) The Irishman. I entirely believe that it's a good film by any metric, and it's nice to hear that it doesn't glamorize mob life.

It's weird--the universal opinion seems to be that this year's crop of best picture nominees is really strong, and yet I'm not drawn to many of them for various reasons. I did love Little Women, though, and I'm really excited for Parasite.
Ok, gotcha. Down the road though, if you change your mind about The Irishman, you might find it to be a pleasant surprise. I can't say too much about this without spoiling the film, but I think people who don't care for the wish fulfillment found in a number of mob films would really appreciate the way it handles this.

I'm one of the people who really likes the Best Picture nominees for this year (although, I haven't seen Ford v Ferrari or Jojo Rabbit). Parasite and Once Upon a Time in Hollywood are both outstanding, 1917, The Irishman, Little Women, and Marriage Story are also really good, and while I'm not as sold on Joker as I initially was, I still think it has some really good moments throughout and that it's one of the only superhero films which I can see myself revisiting down the road. Parasite (my favorite of this year), winning Best Picture, is the cherry on the cake for me.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Takoma1 » Thu Feb 20, 2020 3:40 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Thu Feb 20, 2020 3:30 am
Ok, gotcha. Down the road though, if you change your mind about The Irishman, you might find it to be a pleasant surprise. I can't say too much about this without spoiling the film, but I think people who don't care for the wish fulfillment found in a number of mob films would really appreciate the way it handles this.

I'm one of the people who really likes the Best Picture nominees for this year (although, I haven't seen Ford v Ferrari or Jojo Rabbit). Parasite and Once Upon a Time in Hollywood are both outstanding, 1917, The Irishman, Little Women, and Marriage Story are also really good, and while I'm not as sold on Joker as I initially was, I still think it has some really good moments throughout and that it's one of the only superhero films which I can see myself revisiting down the road. Parasite (my favorite of this year), winning Best Picture, is the cherry on the cake for me.
My reaction "against" The Irishman is largely related to the constraints of this specific challenge (yeah, I know it's a small, non-mandatory challenge that's just about fun), meaning that I need to watch one of the BP nominees in the next week. Like most well-reviewed films, I'm sure I'll make it around to The Irishman eventually. I'm just kind of bummed that the two films available on streaming services that I have are the two I find least appealing on the list of BP noms.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Thu Feb 20, 2020 4:02 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Thu Feb 20, 2020 3:40 am
My reaction "against" The Irishman is largely related to the constraints of this specific challenge (yeah, I know it's a small, non-mandatory challenge that's just about fun), meaning that I need to watch one of the BP nominees in the next week. Like most well-reviewed films, I'm sure I'll make it around to The Irishman eventually. I'm just kind of bummed that the two films available on streaming services that I have are the two I find least appealing on the list of BP noms.
Okay, I see what you mean.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Takoma1 » Sat Feb 22, 2020 9:13 pm

Sand Dollars

I know that Thief, and possibly also Apex, has watched this one.

I really liked it, and I appreciate the recommendation.

Anne is a European woman who spends a lot of time in the Dominican Republic thanks to her infatuation with the much-younger Noeli. From the start it's established that Noeli histles for a living, receiving "gifts" of cash and jewelry from the various people she seduces. Noeli's boyfriend does not entirely endorse this practice, but they need the money. As Anne and Noeli get closer to a planned trip to Paris, Noeli must question whether she truly does want to leave her home (and boyfriend) for a more long-term relationship with Anne. Anne, on the flip side, knows that she is being used by Noeli, and we see her struggle with her pride and emotional well-being.

So first, a funny side-note: Sometimes as I'm watching a film a line of dialogue or a camera shot will suddenly give me the strong impression of "Oh, a man definitely wrote this!" or "Oh, this was definitely directed by a woman!". I kept wavering with this film only to discover that it was both co-written and co-directed by a man and a woman.

Anyway, that gets partly into something that I really liked about the film: its empathy for all of its characters. It would have been really easy for any of the characters to fall into one-dimension land. Especially Noeli's boyfriend who, despite seeming like kind of a loser to me, is not necessarily a bad person. His jealousy of Noeli's other sexual relationships is understandable, as is his anger when he learns that Noeli is planning
to go abroad with Anne to have the baby that she conveniently forgot to tell him about. It's never brought up that it might not be his, so I wasn't sure if he was in denial about that possibility or if maybe he didn't know that Noeli also seduced men.
The film is able to generate a lot of emotional suspense because you can see that it is literally impossible for each character to get what they want. Someone will lose out, and no one is "bad" enough to deserve it.

I also really liked the way that the film showed the dynamic of how Anne related her relationship to other people. At times she plays it off as normal, but other times the cracks show, such as when someone asks how old Noeli is (because the relationship is 3 years old at this point), and Anne either lies or tells the truth as she breaks eye contact and says "I don't know". A friend of mine was recently shocked to find out that a friend of hers (a man in his early 40s) is set to get married to a girl he met on the internet. She lives in Cuba. She is 18 or 19. And she talked in part about his wavering between admitting it seems sketchy (from multiple angles) and defiance that it's different because she's Cuban and thus "more mature".

And this goes into another dynamic I liked in the film. While it's not as explicitly explored, there is a the element of wealthy (or moderately/relatively wealthy) Europeans (ie white people) and the way that they use/enjoy the resources (including the people) in a place like the DR (Just to be really clear: I mean places that are considered non-European tourist destinations, the kind of places where white tourists seem to assume that the regular rules do not necessarily apply). Would Anne have been as unabashed about jumping into a relationship with a girl who looks like she could even still be in her teens (the actress seems to have been 20 at the time of filming) if she were back in her home country?

In all I really liked the film and I especially appreciated how it ended. A good find, guys!
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Sun Feb 23, 2020 12:57 am

Told you it was good. My thoughts here in my quickies for the middle of the month...

A film with an African-American cast: DOLEMITE
This was perhaps my first trip into the blaxploitation subgenre. The film follows the titular character, played by Rudy Ray Moore. Dolemite is a pimp who gets out of jail to seek revenge on his rival that sent him to prison, Willie Green (played by the film director, D'Urville Martin). "Objectively" speaking, the film is a cavalcade of hilarious mediocrity: a weak story, silly dialogue, mediocre performances, clunky fight coreographies... but dammit, if there isn't an endearing attraction to the film's roughness and its unconventional "hero". Moore is far from the greatest thespian, but he does have the necessary confidence and swagger for the role. Also, although the pace is uneven, I don't think it ever got boring. Certainly an interesting watch. Grade: B

A film featuring the name of a couple in its title: HAROLD AND MAUDE
I had seen this film's title on countless lists, but I had never bothered to read its premise. So imagine my surprise when I realized what it was about. On one side, we have Harold (Bud Cort), an 18-year old obsessed with death and suicide, which he expresses in the most quirky and extravagant ways much to the dismay of his snobbish mother. On the other side, we have Maude (Ruth Gordon), a 79-year old woman that shares some of Harold's obsessions and quirks, but expresses them in more vivacious ways. The two meet and form an unlikely bond that helps each of them deal with their personal issues. First, I like how the film manages to seamlessly move from comedy to drama, without losing a beat. The premise might be risky and the issues presented are serious, but it manages to tread that fine line admirably. This is mostly thanks to the performances of Cort and Gordon, both of which have an excellent chemistry. Their relationship is so touching and honest, that you can't help but fall in love with them. I do feel that the conclusion could've been executed better, could've packed more of a punch, but I couldn't help but smile at the last shot. Grade: A-

A film with the world "Love" in its title: LOVE STORY
This was another nice surprise. A film that you see listed frequently among romantic films, but one that I had never explored. It follows college "preppie" Oliver Barrett IV (Ryan O'Neal) as he meets and falls in love with Jenny Cavilleri (Ali McGraw), a girl from "the other side of the tracks" that has a quick tongue and clever wit. To be honest, I was expecting something more "sappy" but, although the film does fall into some "traps" of the genre, it feels more genuine and down to Earth than I expected. The thing that caught my attention from the very first scene, and what I think carries the film all the way, is the snappy dialogue and the wonderful chemistry between O'Neal and McGraw. Their conversations are so enjoyable to see and they play so well off each other that the film rarely loses momentum. The cast is rounded out by Ray Milland and John Marley, as the couple's respective fathers, each of which deal with the relationship between their children in very different ways. I do think that the last act development feels a bit forced and cliché, but once again, the lead actors carry it through. Grade: A-

A film from the Dominican Republic: SAND DOLLARS
The film follows Anne (Geraldine Chaplin), an older European woman visiting the Dominican Republic, where she is in a relationship with Noeli (Yanet Mojica), a younger woman that is actually in the relationship just for the money. I pretty much echo Takoma's sentiments. The film cares enough about its characters to put everything in perspective and let us see things from each of their eyes. It is also helped by the great performances of Chaplin (who I didn't know was Charlie's daughter, although now that I know it, it's all I can see. The resemblance is uncanny) and Mojica, who surprisingly, had not acted before. Both actresses manage to imbue their characters with the necessary emotion and gravitas to make them feel real and honest, and their struggles genuine. The film does hit a bit of a patch during the middle, when Noeli "disappears" for a bit, while we get to see Anne hanging out with some American and European friends. My other complain would be that, for the way the film ended, I wished the film would've given a bit more attention to the character of Noeli's boyfriend. Other than that, this was a fine film. Grade: A-

A film featuring football prominently: THE LONGEST YARD
The film follows Paul Crewe (Burt Reynolds), a middle-aged, former football star that has turned into an alcoholic. When he is caught drunk driving after beating his girlfriend, he is sent to prison, where he is forced to lead a football game between the immates and the guards. The first hurdle that the film has is the way it introduces us to Crewe, who we see physically abusing of his girlfriend in the first scene, and although this is what sends him to jail, we never see him have an actual moment of reckoning about that. Regardless of that, Reynolds is perfectly cast, and plays Crewe with the necessary coolness. The rest of the cast fits the necessary stereotypes, with Eddie Albert as the "evil warden", Ed Lauter as the "evil guard", and James Hampton as the "good pal". Despite the cliché in the characterizations, most of them are solid and the film does manage to switch between serious and silly rather well. That said, I do feel that the film loses a bit of its edge in the last act, avoiding any complex detour, with things pretty much going the way you expect them to. Grade: B
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:08 am

Thief wrote:
Sun Feb 23, 2020 12:57 am
A film from the Dominican Republic: SAND DOLLARS
The film follows Anne (Geraldine Chaplin), an older European woman visiting the Dominican Republic, where she is in a relationship with Noeli (Yanet Mojica), a younger woman that is actually in the relationship just for the money. I pretty much echo Takoma's sentiments. The film cares enough about its characters to put everything in perspective and let us see things from each of their eyes. It is also helped by the great performances of Chaplin (who I didn't know was Charlie's daughter, although now that I know it, it's all I can see. The resemblance is uncanny) and Mojica, who surprisingly, had not acted before. Both actresses manage to imbue their characters with the necessary emotion and gravitas to make them feel real and honest, and their struggles genuine. The film does hit a bit of a patch during the middle, when Noeli "disappears" for a bit, while we get to see Anne hanging out with some American and European friends. My other complain would be that, for the way the film ended, I wished the film would've given a bit more attention to the character of Noeli's boyfriend. Other than that, this was a fine film. Grade: A-
I thought that ultimately the film was more about Anne than Noeli, which is why more time with the boyfriend isn't as necessary. I think it's enough to know he's kind of a dope, but he's not abusive or over-the-line.

How did you interpret the
final shot of the film with her walking through the streets. Is she cruising for another lover, or has she finally snapped out of it and is actually enjoying her surroundings (in contrast to earlier when she was in the club but couldn't enjoy herself because she was looking for Noeli)?
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:13 am

Takoma1 wrote:
Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:08 am
I thought that ultimately the film was more about Anne than Noeli, which is why more time with the boyfriend isn't as necessary. I think it's enough to know he's kind of a dope, but he's not abusive or over-the-line.

How did you interpret the
final shot of the film with her walking through the streets. Is she cruising for another lover, or has she finally snapped out of it and is actually enjoying her surroundings (in contrast to earlier when she was in the club but couldn't enjoy herself because she was looking for Noeli)?
I felt the latter. I suppose different people might perceive it in different ways, but I felt that...
...the experience might have been enough for her to realize that the relationship might not be right for various reasons, and that Noeli leaving with her boyfriend was ultimately the best thing for them. The little dance and twirl she does in the end feels like her being alone AND happy with herself.
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Takoma1
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:16 am

Thief wrote:
Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:13 am
I felt the latter. I suppose different people might perceive it in different ways, but I felt that...
...the experience might have been enough for her to realize that the relationship might not be right for various reasons, and that Noeli leaving with her boyfriend was ultimately the best thing for them. The little dance and twirl she does in the end feels like her being alone AND happy with herself.
That's what I thought, too. But then again, I'm always looking for that happy conclusion!
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:34 am

Thief wrote:
Sun Feb 23, 2020 12:57 am
A film featuring the name of a couple in its title: HAROLD AND MAUDE
I had seen this film's title on countless lists, but I had never bothered to read its premise. So imagine my surprise when I realized what it was about. On one side, we have Harold (Bud Cort), an 18-year old obsessed with death and suicide, which he expresses in the most quirky and extravagant ways much to the dismay of his snobbish mother. On the other side, we have Maude (Ruth Gordon), a 79-year old woman that shares some of Harold's obsessions and quirks, but expresses them in more vivacious ways. The two meet and form an unlikely bond that helps each of them deal with their personal issues. First, I like how the film manages to seamlessly move from comedy to drama, without losing a beat. The premise might be risky and the issues presented are serious, but it manages to tread that fine line admirably. This is mostly thanks to the performances of Cort and Gordon, both of which have an excellent chemistry. Their relationship is so touching and honest, that you can't help but fall in love with them. I do feel that the conclusion could've been executed better, could've packed more of a punch, but I couldn't help but smile at the last shot. Grade: A-
Huge fan of that one. I've seen it a number of times and it never ceases to amaze me. Out of curiosity, what are your issues with the ending?
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:48 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:34 am
Huge fan of that one. I've seen it a number of times and it never ceases to amaze me. Out of curiosity, what are your issues with the ending?
It's minor, but I felt that...
...the rate at which we find out about Maude taking the pills and what follows is too abrupt, and treated from a distance, literally and figuratively. Considering how emotional and touching the film is, I felt that there could've been more emotion drawn from the moment.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Sun Feb 23, 2020 2:18 am

Thief wrote:
Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:48 am
It's minor, but I felt that...
...the rate at which we find out about Maude taking the pills and what follows is too abrupt, and treated from a distance, literally and figuratively. Considering how emotional and touching the film is, I felt that there could've been more emotion drawn from the moment.
It is certainly abrupt,
but I wasn't as bothered with it as I originally was when I revisited the film as knowing that Maude planned to kill herself from the start of the film allowed me to treat the scenes leading up to her birthday (such as the escalation of their relationship and the talk of Harold marrying her) as the buildup to her death. I also find the ending really moving, so this outweighs whatever quibbles I have.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Sun Feb 23, 2020 6:42 pm

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Sun Feb 23, 2020 2:18 am
It is certainly abrupt,
but I wasn't as bothered with it as I originally was when I revisited the film as knowing that Maude planned to kill herself from the start of the film allowed me to treat the scenes leading up to her birthday (such as the escalation of their relationship and the talk of Harold marrying her) as the buildup to her death. I also find the ending really moving, so this outweighs whatever quibbles I have.
Yeah, like I said, it was a minor issue. It didn't bother me that much. And like I said in my quickie, I had to smile at the ending.
I mean, the whole crashing his hearse down a cliff is far from subtle, but it works, mostly because seeing Harold take out his banjo and start playing a tune as he happily walks away was as fitting an ending as I could've thought. I loved it.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Tue Feb 25, 2020 6:05 pm

Thief wrote:
Thu Feb 13, 2020 3:06 am
For those interested, second episode is out...

Thief's Monthly Movie Loot - Episode 2 (February 10, 2020)
Put another episode out, if anyone's interested...

Thief's Monthly Movie Loot - Episode 3 (February 24, 2020
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Apex Predator » Sat Feb 29, 2020 7:10 pm

One day left and there's a possibility I might get to another one/two I've started.

Non-list fare:
The Raven (1943)
French drama about a doctor who ends up in a smear campaign through anonymous letters signed by The Raven. But who is the Raven and what does he/she want? There is a feeling of dread as letters pop up in unexpected places...such as a funeral wreath and falling from the church balcony. Perhaps it might prove useful in the future if I take a nap before watching a film on Saturday night. The end result had its moments, but I think I was able to piece together who it was...and I'm normally not good at that sort of thing. C+

List Fare:
Hell's Hinges (1916)
See a film made in the 1910s

Odd mix of Western and religion concerns itself with a young pastor who is out of his depth as he is assigned to a parish in the Wild West town of Hell's Hinges. A gunfighter (William S. Hart) is tasked with running him off, but one look at the pastor's sister causes him to rethink his attitudes and belief system. Kind of leans heavily on the melodrama at times, but it does ask some heady questions for a 1916 film and there's some good action setpieces that make you think it was made in the 1920s or even the early 1930s. Hart reminds me of a stern Tim Blake Nelson for what its worth. B-

Cutie and the Boxer (2013)
See a film starting with C or D
See a film featuring a couple in the title

Unconventional marriage between two Japanese artists in New York. The boxer of the title gets all the press and fame as he can do paintings wearing boxing gloves with sponges on the outside or metal sculptures. Meanwhile, Cutie struggles to get her artistic endeavors noticed. But when he goes on a trip to Japan to sell some of his art, Cutie decides to work on some drawings that might reflect on their life together. Although the music is a bit too obvious with its use of emotions and they do leave some questions unanswered, the documentary does do a good job at covering both their marriage and the uneasy balance between life and art. B
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by kgaard. » Sat Feb 29, 2020 10:34 pm

A comedy film: The Shop Around the Corner

Ernst Lubitsch's romantic comedy is excellently, perhaps impeccably made. It deftly balances comic hijinks with pathos, and Jimmy Stewart and Margaret Sullavan have charm to burn.

But.
Alfred Kralik (Stewart) is corresponding with a woman by mail. They've never met, but he loves her intellect, her knowledge, her wit. In the meantime, a new woman, Klara Novak, has begun to work at his shop, and the two quickly rub each other the wrong way. The major turn of the film's plot occurs about halfway through, when Alfred discovers that Klara is his unknown correspondent. From here on, the plot of the film relies heavily not so much on misunderstanding, but deception. That's a problem for me, because while Stewart's folksiness goes a long way, he's still ultimately manipulating Klara for his own ends. Their ultimate coming together is not implausible but it is worrisome. Don't start your relationship by lying to your girlfriend!
Of course, the movie is funny, it is (in its way) charming, it is well-made. It's not the first film whose sociological qualities don't hold up under scrutiny. YMMV.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Sun Mar 01, 2020 3:29 am

I got bit by the short month. I'm down two films, but at least I started them! Yesterday, I started Jojo Rabbit for the Oscar category, but didn't finish it (dozing on and off, not the film's fault) and today was a bit of a hectic day where I wasn't home at all. I did start The Princess and the Frog a while ago, but won't be able to finish it either. My plan is to finish both films tomorrow, which I think is fair :shifty:
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Takoma1 » Sun Mar 01, 2020 3:38 am

While I am both competitive and a rule-follower, it looks like we'll be having a Parasite film night next weekend, so I'm not going to sit through The Irishman or Marriage Story just to tick that box. (Also, I saw Little Women a few weeks ago, so . . . ).

This February challenge was really good for me! A lot of pleasant surprises, a lot of films I really enjoyed, a handful of blah movies but nothing that I hated watching or had to force myself to finish. Here's how they stack up:

Highly Recommended
A sequel (second parts only): Prom Night 2
A film with the number 2 (Two, Second, etc.) in its title: Gruesome Twosome
A film with a title that starts with the letters C or D: Captain Kronos Vampire Hunter
A film set in New Orleans (Mardi Gras, February 25): JD’s Revenge
A film with the world "Love" in its title: Love Gilda
A film with an African-American cast (Black History Month): Dolemite
A film from the Dominican Republic (Independence Day, February 27): Sand Dollars

Worth Checking Out
A film from Vincente Minnelli (born on February 28): Father’s Little Dividend
A film featuring football prominently (Super Bowl, February 2): Head Games
A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #2 (i.e. 12, 426, 712): Les vacances de Monsieur Hulot
A comedy film: Next Floor; Just Neighbors
A film from the 1910s: Two Knights of Vaudeville

Meh
A film that features the President of the US as a prominent character (President's Day, February 17): Elvis and Nixon
A film featuring the name of a couple in its title: David & Lisa
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Apex Predator » Sun Mar 01, 2020 11:15 pm

While I'm polishing off my films I started in February (and finishing up the Country Music movie on PBS), I did manage to see 6 films in February.

Not worth it:

A Moment in the Reeds---Unless you like a little sex with boring dialogue and a film that wastes its dramatic potential, then don't bother.

They were alright:

Z-O-M-B-I-E-S--- There's some awkward comparisons between zombies being let into a human school for the first time and the civil rights experience that I choose not to think about. But for mindless fun with a few decent songs that plays like West Side Stories with some zombies, one can do worse on a rainy night.

The Raven---There's a claustrophobic atmosphere in play in this small town where a doctor is victimized by this letter writing campaign by a writer known only as the Raven. Highlights include scenes where the letters fall in unexpected places. But the back and forth between the doctor and two women get a bit tiresome...oh, and I was able to guess who The Raven was!

Hell's Hinges---This drama that mixes western tropes and religion gets a bit prone to melodrama. But it does have a surprising amount of nuance in dealing with one man's conversion in 1916 and William S. Hart reminds you of a more intense Tim Blake Nelson as we head towards a surprising climax.

Recommended:

Cutie and the Boxer---This documentary does leave you with some unanswered questions (such as bringing up the son's alcoholism one minute and never again). But the film does capture the uneasy balance between art and life as well as an unconventional relationship between the much older Boxer and the younger Cutie (at least they met at a somewhat appropriate age?).

The Band Wagon---In a lot of ways, this reminded me a bit too much of 42nd Street in its plot. But this film does capture the easy charisma of Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse who proves to be a talented sparring partner/dancer in her own right. Kinda dug how they did that one montage towards the end leading to that big sequence that puts a new spin on Sam Spade novels.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by kgaard. » Mon Mar 02, 2020 3:33 am

A film from the 1910s: The Immigrant (1917)

Bless the Criterion Channel. I watched this one with my son--it's slapstick fun with empathy for the immigrant experience, all of which seems valuable these days.

A sequel (second parts only): The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian

These are some of my favorite books from my childhood. Caspian is one of the weaker outings, though, to be honest, and the movie doesn't do the book any favors. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe benefited greatly from the talents of James McAvoy and Tilda Swinton, but there's no one comparable to do the heavy lifting here (Peter Dinklage is smothered in makeup, and they do sneak in Swinton for a cameo but it's hardly enough). It's just ... blah. Just a blah, inoffensive, not too interesting and overlong film. Had they bothered to spend more time going deeper into the characters--the film is ostensibly about faith (or the lack of it)--they might have had something here, but they resorted instead to long but stakes-free CGI action sets. Disappointed, but not surprised.

A film with the number 2 (Two, Second, etc.) in its title: Two Thousand Maniacs!

I mean, it's not good really, but it's kind of fascinating as an artifact, I guess? As a concept, Southerners rising to wreak terrible revenge on damned Yankees opens the door to some interesting thematic opportunities to explore. Of course, the movie is entirely uninterested in exploring those opportunities: it's all just an excuse for over-the-top gore and light titillation. I can't help but sort of admire the film's relentless focus on delivering the goods. It's not really my kind of thing, but I totally get why it's some people's kind of thing.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Captain Terror » Mon Mar 02, 2020 4:29 am

A film with a title that starts with the letters C or D:
The Color Out of Space :down:
Convict's Code :down:
Destroy All Monsters :up:
The Dark Crystal :up: (watched it twice, actually)

A comedy film: Better Off Zed :up:
A sequel (second parts only): Dracula's Daughter :up:
A film featuring the name of a couple in its title: Gretel & Hansel :up: (cheating?)
A film set in New Orleans (Mardi Gras, February 25): Always For Pleasure :up:
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Mon Mar 02, 2020 3:37 pm

Barely squeaked by this month. Like I said, a bit of a cheat, but I finished my last two films yesterday, both of which I had started on the 28 and the 29. Anyway, here are my thoughts on the last 5...

A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #2 (i.e. 12, 82, 912): FITZCARRALDO (#682)
My third Herzog film, this one follows the titular character (Klaus Kinski), an European obsessed with building an opera house in a remote city in the Amazon, which he plans to do in the most extravagant way; by transporting a huge steamship through the woods. Like Aguirre, this film portrays the madness of a character as he fights against nature. In many ways, I think the madness of the main character here is more palpable and close to us than Aguirre's, and Kinski is excellent in the role. The other most notable performances are Claudia Cardinale as Fitzcarraldo's lover, as well as the few of his companions that remain loyal to him. Although all of the performances are solid, the show clearly belongs to Kinski. But Herzog's direction also steals the show. There's an incredibly tense sequence as the boat is about to enter the Pachitea River which I can say is one of the most tense film sequences I've experienced. I wish the film would've gone deeper into the psyche of the lead character; I felt that it shied away from exploring his obsession and its implications more, but I still think it was a neatly directed and acted film. Grade: A-

A film from Vincente Minnelli: THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL
My fourth Minnelli film, it has a bit of a misleading title which makes it sound as merely a story of love, but it is a bit more than that. The film is the story of one man, Jonathan Shields (Kirk Douglas), an ambitious and selfish film producer, and his relationship with three different characters: his best friend and director (Barry Sullivan), an actress and eventual lover (Lana Turner), and a screenwriter (Dick Powell). The story is told in three flashbacks as we see Shields rise to fame and how he burns anyone close to him in the process. Each act packs a different punch, showing the extent of Shields' ruthlessness and self-involvement, and it is neatly portrayed by Douglas. The other three actors are great, but Turner and Powell in particular shine. In many ways, Shields' story is an extension of the story of Hollywood and its irresistible appeal, regardless of the consequences. So far, I've liked/loved everything I've seen from Minnelli, but this one might be my new favorite. Grade: Still going between an A- or A

A film that features the President of the US as a prominent character: VANTAGE POINT
Aaaand whatever good run I had this far came to a screeching halt with this one. The film follows Thomas Barnes (Dennis Quaid), a Secret Service agent assigned to protect the President of the US (William Hurt) during a summit in Spain. The film starts with an assassination attempt on the President, which is followed by two separate explosions creating chaos. It then goes back and retells the story from several points of view (or "vantage points") to fill in the blanks of what happened. Among those whose points of view we experience are Barnes' partner (Matthew Fox), Barnes' Spanish equivalent (Eduardo Noriega), and an American tourist (Forest Whitaker), among several others. There is some novelty in the premise, but unfortunately, it is worn down to the nub, and there's also not much else to grab onto. The film attempts to draw surprise and/or emotion from several twists and turns, but they don't work cause we have no emotional investment to any character; we've just met everybody. The "big twist" in particular packs no punch cause we don't know the people involved, so it just gets a shrug. The direction by Pete Travis does show some flairs of energy, but it can't do much with a weak story and poor execution. Grade: C-

A film nominated for a Best Picture Academy Award this year: JOJO RABBIT
Now this one is more like it! The film follows the titular character (Roman Griffin Davis), a young boy in Nazi Germany that is an enthusiastic member of the Hitler Youth, much to the dismay of his (secretly) anti-Nazi mother (Scarlett Johansson). Meanwhile, Jojo channels his jingoism and nationalist feelings with conversations with his imaginary friend, Adolf Hitler (Taika Waititi), but finds himself challenged when he discovers his mother has been hiding a Jewish girl (Thomasin McKenzie). This is another great example of a film dealing with a serious topic and themes in a humorous and moving way. The character of Jojo is a perfect portrayal of an insecure, indoctrinated boy trying to come to terms with what he thinks are his beliefs, and Davis' performance is an excellent one. McKenzie and Johansson and are also great in their respective roles, with the former being an excellent counterpart to Davis' Jojo, and the latter excellently portraying a kind of weary spunkiness, as she tries to show his son what really matters while trying to protect him. Finally, Waititi is hilarious in his laid-back, slightly bonkers portrayal of "Hitler". But his true strength is in the way he handles the camera and how he handles important moments, like the dinner conversation between Jojo and his mother, or their conversation in the riverbed, or the reveal towards the last act. I have to say, that was one of the most devastating gut punches I've felt recently on a film, and it brought me to tears. I was looking forward to watching Parasite for this category, but I'm so glad I went with this one instead. Strongly recommended. Grade: Still torn between an A and an A+

A film set in New Orleans: THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG
To close the month, I went with one I had been looking forward for a while. One of Disney's latest hand-drawn animated efforts, the film follows Tiana (Anika Noni Rose), a working class girl from New Orleans that dreams of opening her own restaurant. When a selfish but disowned prince (Bruno Campos) arrives to New Orleans, both he and Tiana end up turned into frogs by voodoo witch Doctor Facilier (Keith David). The outline of the premise isn't that novel, as Tiana and Naveen have to run against the clock to return to town on time to break the spell, while meeting an assorted array of creatures on their way. What sets it apart is a bit of the execution, with Tiana not being the stereotypical girl that's looking for a prince, but rather for independence. That message does get a bit muddled towards the end as Tiana, surprise, falls in love with Naveen, but it still manages to subvert a few of the typical tropes of the genre. Most of the voice performances are solid, and the film is entertaining enough, but never becomes that memorable. There are also a couple of nice songs, but none of them stick for too long. It is an enjoyable ride, but it lacks a bit of oomph and spectacle. Grade: B
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Mon Mar 02, 2020 3:41 pm

Second month's done. Here's what I went with...

A film with the number 2 (Two, Second, etc.) in its title: The Two Popes
A film with a title that starts with the letters C or D: D.O.A.
A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #2 (i.e. 12, 82, 912) Fitzcarraldo (#682)
A film from the 1910s: A Dog's Life
A comedy film: How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World
A sequel (second parts only): How to Train Your Dragon 2
A film nominated for a Best Picture Academy Award this year: Jojo Rabbit
A film featuring the name of a couple in its title: Harold and Maude
A film with the world "Love" in its title: Love Story
A film with an African-American cast (Black History Month): Dolemite
A film featuring football prominently (Super Bowl, February 2): The Longest Yard
A film that features the President of the US as a prominent character (President's Day, February 17): Vantage Point
A film set in New Orleans (Mardi Gras, February 25): The Princess and the Frog
A film from the Dominican Republic (Independence Day, February 27): Sand Dollars
A film from Vincente Minnelli (born on February 28): The Bad and the Beautiful

This was a pretty great month. With the possible exception of Vantage Point, everything I saw was pretty good/great. My favorite, though, was Jojo Rabbit. All the bunch of romantic films I saw (Harold and Maude, Love Story, Sand Dollars, The Bad and the Beautiful) were also pretty good.

The worst? Well, Vantage Point, obviously.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Captain Terror » Mon Mar 02, 2020 3:51 pm

Thief wrote:
Mon Mar 02, 2020 3:37 pm

A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #2 (i.e. 12, 82, 912): FITZCARRALDO (#682)
My third Herzog film, this one follows the titular character (Klaus Kinski), an European obsessed with building an opera house in a remote city in the Amazon, which he plans to do in the most extravagant way; by transporting a huge steamship through the woods. Like Aguirre, this film portrays the madness of a character as he fights against nature. In many ways, I think the madness of the main character here is more palpable and close to us than Aguirre's, and Kinski is excellent in the role. The other most notable performances are Claudia Cardinale as Fitzcarraldo's lover, as well as the few of his companions that remain loyal to him. Although all of the performances are solid, the show clearly belongs to Kinski. But Herzog's direction also steals the show. There's an incredibly tense sequence as the boat is about to enter the Pachitea River which I can say is one of the most tense film sequences I've experienced. I wish the film would've gone deeper into the psyche of the lead character; I felt that it shied away from exploring his obsession and its implications more, but I still think it was a neatly directed and acted film. Grade: A-
I HIGHLY recommend the making-of documentary Burden of Dreams. I've probably watched it twice as many times as I've watched the actual film. Spoiler alert: Kinski and Herzog are both insane. :)
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Mon Mar 02, 2020 4:21 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Mon Mar 02, 2020 3:51 pm
I HIGHLY recommend the making-of documentary Burden of Dreams. I've probably watched it twice as many times as I've watched the actual film. Spoiler alert: Kinski and Herzog are both insane. :)
Yeah, a lot of people have recommended it to me. It's on my "to watch" list.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Tue Mar 03, 2020 3:25 pm

New categories coming soon!
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Captain Terror » Tue Mar 03, 2020 4:37 pm

Thief wrote:
Tue Mar 03, 2020 3:25 pm
New categories coming soon!
My birthday is in March, if you need category ideas.

"A Film With More Than One Tarantula:"
"A Film From the 1001 Movies To Avoid At All Costs list:"

Just spitballin' here... :)
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Tue Mar 03, 2020 5:21 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Tue Mar 03, 2020 4:37 pm
My birthday is in March, if you need category ideas.
Happy early birthday 🎂
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Tue Mar 03, 2020 6:56 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Tue Mar 03, 2020 4:37 pm
My birthday is in March, if you need category ideas.

"A Film With More Than One Tarantula:"
"A Film From the 1001 Movies To Avoid At All Costs list:"

Just spitballin' here... :)
Image


(Happy birthday, whenever it is!)
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Wed Mar 04, 2020 8:56 pm

Thief wrote:
Tue Feb 25, 2020 6:05 pm
Put another episode out, if anyone's interested...

Thief's Monthly Movie Loot - Episode 3 (February 24, 2020
Fourth episode is out!

Thief's Monthly Movie Loot - Episode 4 (February 29, 2020)
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Wed Mar 04, 2020 9:03 pm

And finally!... categories for March

A film with the number 3 (Three, Third, etc.) in its title:
A film with a title that starts with the letters E or F:
A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #3 (i.e. 13, 230, 820)
A film from the 1920s:
A documentary film:
The third part on a film franchise:
A film with a prominent deaf character (Deaf History Month):
A film from Bosnia and Herzegovina (Independence Day, March 1):
A film where the phone is crucial to the plot (Alexander Graham Bell Day, March 7):
A film directed by a woman (Int'l Women's Day, March 8):
A film with a woman's name in its title (Int'l Women's Day, March 8):
A film based on a Shakespeare play (Shakespeare Week, March 16):
A film with the word "Spring" in its title (March 20):
A film about aliens or alien abductions (Alien Abduction Day, March 20):
A film from or with Warren Beatty (born March 30):
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Takoma1 » Wed Mar 04, 2020 10:29 pm

All of these on Amazon unless otherwise noted.

A film with the number 3 (Three, Third, etc.) in its title: 3 Days of the Condor; Taking of Pelham 123; The Third Eye (awesome Psycho knockoff!)
A film with a title that starts with the letters E or F: Eu cand vreau sa fluier, fluier; Every Day; Farewell My Lovely; Fear in the Night; Fine Dead Girls; First Reformed; Freeway
A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #3 (i.e. 13, 230, 820) Dr Mabuse (streaming on Criterion Channel)--probably a lot of good ones that aren't streaming "free"
A film from the 1920s: The Extra Girl; The Thief of Bagdad
A documentary film: The Imposter; Three Identical Strangers (Hulu)
The third part on a film franchise: Maniac Cop 3?
A film with a prominent deaf character (Deaf History Month): A Quiet Place; The Quiet
A film from Bosnia and Herzegovina (Independence Day, March 1): No Man's Land (for rental)
A film where the phone is crucial to the plot (Alexander Graham Bell Day, March 7): Sorry Wrong Number (Criterion); Sorry to Bother You (Hulu)
A film directed by a woman (Int'l Women's Day, March 8): Spy Who Dumped Me; Mirror Mirror
A film with a woman's name in its title (Int'l Women's Day, March 8): Nina Forever
A film based on a Shakespeare play (Shakespeare Week, March 16): Macbeth (2015); Much Ado About Nothing (1993)
A film with the word "Spring" in its title (March 20): Spring in a Small Town
A film about aliens or alien abductions (Alien Abduction Day, March 20): Endless (Netflix); Annihilation; Liquid Sky
A film from or with Warren Beatty (born March 30):
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Wed Mar 04, 2020 11:58 pm

A film with the number 3 (Three, Third, etc.) in its title: Close Encounters of the Third Kind
A film with a title that starts with the letters E or F: F For Fake, The Florida Project
A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #3: Shadows #342
A film from the 1920s: Greed
A documentary film: The Emperor's Naked Army Marches On
The third part on a film franchise: Men in Black 3
A film with a prominent deaf character (Deaf History Month): The Tribe
A film from Bosnia and Herzegovina (Independence Day, March 1): Once Upon a Time in Anatolia
A film where the phone is crucial to the plot (Alexander Graham Bell Day, March 7): Non-Stop
A film directed by a woman (Int'l Women's Day, March 8): The House is Black (it's available on youtube).
A film with a woman's name in its title (Int'l Women's Day, March 8): Viridiana
A film based on a Shakespeare play (Shakespeare Week, March 16): Chimes at Midnight, Throne of Blood
A film with the word "Spring" in its title (March 20): Late Spring
A film about aliens or alien abductions (Alien Abduction Day, March 20): Goke, Body Snatcher From Hell
A film from or with Warren Beatty (born March 30): Heaven Can Wait
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Thu Mar 05, 2020 2:50 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Wed Mar 04, 2020 10:29 pm
All of these on Amazon unless otherwise noted.

A film with the number 3 (Three, Third, etc.) in its title: 3 Days of the Condor; Taking of Pelham 123; The Third Eye (awesome Psycho knockoff!)
A film with a title that starts with the letters E or F: Eu cand vreau sa fluier, fluier; Every Day; Farewell My Lovely; Fear in the Night; Fine Dead Girls; First Reformed; Freeway
A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #3 (i.e. 13, 230, 820) Dr Mabuse (streaming on Criterion Channel)--probably a lot of good ones that aren't streaming "free"
A film from the 1920s: The Extra Girl; The Thief of Bagdad
A documentary film: The Imposter; Three Identical Strangers (Hulu)
The third part on a film franchise: Maniac Cop 3?
A film with a prominent deaf character (Deaf History Month): A Quiet Place; The Quiet
A film from Bosnia and Herzegovina (Independence Day, March 1): No Man's Land (for rental)
A film where the phone is crucial to the plot (Alexander Graham Bell Day, March 7): Sorry Wrong Number (Criterion); Sorry to Bother You (Hulu)
A film directed by a woman (Int'l Women's Day, March 8): Spy Who Dumped Me; Mirror Mirror
A film with a woman's name in its title (Int'l Women's Day, March 8): Nina Forever
A film based on a Shakespeare play (Shakespeare Week, March 16): Macbeth (2015); Much Ado About Nothing (1993)
A film with the word "Spring" in its title (March 20): Spring in a Small Town
A film about aliens or alien abductions (Alien Abduction Day, March 20): Endless (Netflix); Annihilation; Liquid Sky
A film from or with Warren Beatty (born March 30):
Seen the ones in red. There are a couple that I'm interested in, like Dr. Mabuse and The Thief of Bagdad (which I remember starting years ago and not finishing it, for some reason). I've also heard/read a lot of good things about Sorry to Bother You, but I don't even know what it's about. Will have to consider it.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Thu Mar 05, 2020 2:51 pm

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Wed Mar 04, 2020 11:58 pm
A film with the number 3 (Three, Third, etc.) in its title: Close Encounters of the Third Kind
A film with a title that starts with the letters E or F: F For Fake, The Florida Project
A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #3: Shadows #342
A film from the 1920s: Greed
A documentary film: The Emperor's Naked Army Marches On
The third part on a film franchise: Men in Black 3
A film with a prominent deaf character (Deaf History Month): The Tribe
A film from Bosnia and Herzegovina (Independence Day, March 1): Once Upon a Time in Anatolia
A film where the phone is crucial to the plot (Alexander Graham Bell Day, March 7): Non-Stop
A film directed by a woman (Int'l Women's Day, March 8): The House is Black (it's available on youtube).
A film with a woman's name in its title (Int'l Women's Day, March 8): Viridiana
A film based on a Shakespeare play (Shakespeare Week, March 16): Chimes at Midnight, Throne of Blood
A film with the word "Spring" in its title (March 20): Late Spring
A film about aliens or alien abductions (Alien Abduction Day, March 20): Goke, Body Snatcher From Hell
A film from or with Warren Beatty (born March 30): Heaven Can Wait
Only seen one of this list, but there are a couple I've been meaning to watch for a while. Most notably Throne of Blood. There are a couple here that I hadn't even heard of, so I will do some research. Thanks!
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Thu Mar 05, 2020 3:05 pm

For what it's worth, these are some of my plans...
Thief wrote:
Wed Mar 04, 2020 9:03 pm
And finally!... categories for March

A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #3 (i.e. 13, 230, 820) Lot of good options here.
A film from the 1920s: The Passion of Joan of Arc, Sunrise, The Phantom of the Opera, The Unknown
A documentary film: Burden of Dreams, The 13th
The third part on a film franchise: Before Midnight
A film with a prominent deaf character (Deaf History Month): Children of a Lesser God
A film from or with Warren Beatty (born March 30): Bonnie and Clyde
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