Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

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Wooley
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Wooley » Fri Jun 26, 2020 11:21 am

The Nameless Two wrote:
Fri Jun 26, 2020 11:12 am
Like, you understand that Takoma is not the only woman who posts here, correct? I'm not really speaking for myself here, I said nothing wrong by asking for clarification. All you needed to do was offer me some clarification and instead you went on the defense? Why? Just own up to it, man
Adorable parry. You opened with "Weird post", indicating that I had said something wrong that I should feel awkward or uncomfortable about, intentionally trying to put me on the defensive. Which you didn't, as, while you call it "the defensive", I actually went on the offensive to stop you before you tried to dominate the conversation completely, as I have seen you do to others on this forum many times. You seem to be doing better lately but I don't intend to engage in your grandstanding.
I don't know what you're on about, and I don't really care. If you're looking for a weird post, look to your own that started this. There was no reason for it. If you wanted to know if I thought Takoma was the only woman on here (which I obviously did when I posted that) all you had to do was politely ask or simply correct me, if it's that big an issue for you.
So try one of those. Or don't. I have no intention of engaging in another Nameless drama-session. Peace.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by The Nameless Two » Fri Jun 26, 2020 11:24 am

Wooley wrote:
Fri Jun 26, 2020 11:21 am
Adorable parry. You opened with "Weird post", indicating that I had said something wrong that I should feel awkward or uncomfortable about, intentionally trying to put me on the defensive. Which you didn't, as, while you call it "the defensive", I actually went on the offensive to stop you before you tried to dominate the conversation completely, as I have seen you do to others on this forum many times. You seem to be doing better lately but I don't intend to engage in your grandstanding.
I don't know what you're on about, and I don't really care. If you're looking for a weird post, look to your own that started this. There was no reason for it. If you wanted to know if I thought Takoma was the only woman on here (which I obviously did when I posted that) all you had to do was politely ask or simply correct me, if it's that big an issue for you.
So try one of those. Or don't. I have no intention of engaging in another Nameless drama-session. Peace.
It was a weird post, better than "incredibly stupid post", no? That's the truth of the matter, how in the world did you get this far under the assumption that Takoma is the only woman who posts or even reads this forum? Some of these threads have MILLIONS of views. How in the world did you not process this? I'm sorry, but you are not doing yourself any favors here
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Captain Terror » Fri Jun 26, 2020 12:00 pm

The Nameless Two wrote:
Fri Jun 26, 2020 11:24 am
It was a weird post, better than "incredibly stupid post", no? That's the truth of the matter, how in the world did you get this far under the assumption that Takoma is the only woman who posts or even reads this forum? Some of these threads have MILLIONS of views. How in the world did you not process this? I'm sorry, but you are not doing yourself any favors here
I've encountered 5 female posters. Two of them rarely post, one only posts in a specific thread that I never read, and you're number 4. There are many threads in which Takoma is (was) the only woman actively posting. It's entirely plausible for a person to have conversed with only one woman in their time here.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by The Nameless Two » Fri Jun 26, 2020 12:06 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Fri Jun 26, 2020 12:00 pm
I've encountered 5 female posters. Two of them rarely post, one only posts in a specific thread that I never read, and you're number 4. There are many threads in which Takoma is (was) the only woman actively posting. It's entirely plausible for a person to have conversed with only one woman in their time here.
Fair say, I believe that we have three "active" female posters at this point, I could be wrong but it's certainly more than one. You can see where I am getting at here where it's, like, what exactly are we doing? Why is it when these kinds of societies boil down we are left with a bunch of men and a few women? Uncomfortable is right, like, here I am going off about my trans identity for what feels like a couple weeks now and am I just deaf dumb and blind? Maybe don't answer that question :shifty:
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Fri Jun 26, 2020 1:47 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Fri Jun 26, 2020 12:00 pm
I've encountered 5 female posters. Two of them rarely post, one only posts in a specific thread that I never read, and you're number 4. There are many threads in which Takoma is (was) the only woman actively posting. It's entirely plausible for a person to have conversed with only one woman in their time here.
I second this completely.

As for the discussion, I know it's a public forum, but as the author of this thread, I would be thankful if Nameless and Wooley (and whoever else) would settle their differences elsewhere and leave this free of non-film confrontations.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by The Nameless Two » Fri Jun 26, 2020 1:55 pm

Thief wrote:
Fri Jun 26, 2020 1:47 pm
I second this completely.

As for the discussion, I know it's a public forum, but as the author of this thread, I would be thankful if Nameless and Wooley (and whoever else) would settle their differences elsewhere and leave this free of non-film confrontations.
I'm okay with having my dialog in here deleted, I totally agree and I apologize
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Captain Terror » Sat Jun 27, 2020 1:26 pm

A horror film: Dr Cyclops (1940)
This is a relatively minor film I guess, but it's one of the most prominent horror films of the Golden Era that I'd never seen before, so I blind-bought the BluRay and I'm glad I did. It's an early Technicolor film from the director of King Kong about a mad scientist that shrinks people to Barbie-size. The requisite encounters with now-giant cats, dogs, spiders etc ensue. The oversized sets are well done, and there's lots of neat sci-fi gizmos that look like they're lifted from old Astonishing Stories magazine covers. And the BluRay looks gorgeous.


Any film that starts with the letters K or L:
A film about fathers:
Life Begins At Eight-Thirty (1942)

Part of my ongoing B-Movie project, I came across this one during my Irving Pichel marathon. About a formerly-respected stage actor who's now battling alcoholism and Ida Lupino as his lame* daughter who has neglected her own happiness to care for him. Enter handsome playwright Cornel Wilde who attempts to revive the actor's career while also encouraging Ida to break free from her dreary existence. The depiction of the alcoholic is pretty well-handled I thought. More realistic than I'd expect from the era. This is one of those nice surprises that occasionally pop up. I wouldn't encourage anyone to run out and find it, but I'm glad I watched it. This is what's fun about these blind-watches.

* "lame" in this case means she wears one large black shoe and has an imperceptible limp which I'm pretty sure Ida forgot she was supposed to have from time to time. And yet, everyone talks about her like she's Quasimodo.


A film with a repeated word in its title (Repeat Day, June 3): Who Killed Who?
Bought the recently-released Tex Avery Blu Ray Volume 1 which includes this gem, which can be found in my cartoon thread. Now I'm praying that Volume 2 includes "Cock-a-Doodle-Dog", aka The Funniest Thing 8-Year-Old Me Ever Saw.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Sat Jun 27, 2020 5:10 pm

The Nameless Two wrote:
Fri Jun 26, 2020 1:55 pm
I'm okay with having my dialog in here deleted, I totally agree and I apologize
No need to apologize. I don't think we have the ability to delete posts, but that's ok.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Sat Jun 27, 2020 5:12 pm

Thief wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 2:08 pm
For those listening, here's the link for Episode 14 of my podcast...

Thief's Monthly Movie Loot - Episode 14 (June 15, 2020)
Forgot to share this; came out yesterday....

Thief's Monthly Movie Loot - Episode 15 (June 25, 2020)
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Apex Predator » Sun Jun 28, 2020 11:40 pm

Let's just jump back on the topic.

See a film with a 6 in the 1001 films to see before you die (#61)---June

M (1931)
In this intense Fritz Lang thriller, a child murderer (Peter Lorre) finds himself the target in a massive manhunt in Berlin by cops...and the criminal element who want him gone just so they can go back to their lives. Lorre runs the full range of emotions here from menacing to pathetic and a strong supporting cast keep you enraptured from the opening credits to the final words. You won't think the same of In the Hall of the Mountain King after this. A
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Mon Jun 29, 2020 2:02 pm

That's a good one. Loved it.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Wooley » Tue Jun 30, 2020 3:34 am

Apex Predator wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 11:40 pm
Let's just jump back on the topic.

See a film with a 6 in the 1001 films to see before you die (#61)---June

M (1931)
In this intense Fritz Lang thriller, a child murderer (Peter Lorre) finds himself the target in a massive manhunt in Berlin by cops...and the criminal element who want him gone just so they can go back to their lives. Lorre runs the full range of emotions here from menacing to pathetic and a strong supporting cast keep you enraptured from the opening credits to the final words. You won't think the same of In the Hall of the Mountain King after this. A
That's the movie I started my movie thread (which I've mostly abandoned) a year and a half ago, a first-viewing. I saved it for SO long because it just didn't seem like a movie could live up to that level of reputation. But it do.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Tue Jun 30, 2020 3:39 am

Apex Predator wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 11:40 pm
Let's just jump back on the topic.

See a film with a 6 in the 1001 films to see before you die (#61)---June

M (1931)
In this intense Fritz Lang thriller, a child murderer (Peter Lorre) finds himself the target in a massive manhunt in Berlin by cops...and the criminal element who want him gone just so they can go back to their lives. Lorre runs the full range of emotions here from menacing to pathetic and a strong supporting cast keep you enraptured from the opening credits to the final words. You won't think the same of In the Hall of the Mountain King after this. A
Yeah, really great film for sure. It contains several shades of perfection, in fact.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Tue Jun 30, 2020 5:14 pm

One of the things I admire the most about the film is how it manages to add a layer of empathy and tragedy for a character that would be otherwise considered an "irredeemable, despicable creature", which is impressive for the time. The film doesn't take an easy out with the character of Beckert, but rather forces us to look at what he's going through. It's bold and the only other film I can think of that does something similar is maybe Peeping Tom.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Wooley » Wed Jul 01, 2020 3:20 am

Thief wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 5:14 pm
One of the things I admire the most about the film is how it manages to add a layer of empathy and tragedy for a character that would be otherwise considered an "irredeemable, despicable creature", which is impressive for the time. The film doesn't take an easy out with the character of Beckert, but rather forces us to look at what he's going through. It's bold and the only other film I can think of that does something similar is maybe Peeping Tom.
No, it really blew my mind how much the movie is about the corrupt society around this killer and then in the end he still has to be judged as a killer. Fascinating shit.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Wed Jul 01, 2020 6:35 am

My favorite thing about it was how most of the conflicts in the latter half of the film arose due to the faults of the police station in terms of how they resorted to raiding apartments with paper thin evidence to catch the killer. That the crime lords
proved much more effective at capturing Beckert
than the police station brought out and highlighted their inadequacy. When I initially saw the film, it oftentimes felt like one perfect scene/sequence after another.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Wed Jul 01, 2020 3:26 pm

Wooley wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 3:20 am
No, it really blew my mind how much the movie is about the corrupt society around this killer and then in the end he still has to be judged as a killer. Fascinating shit.
Yeah, that's the other layer for me because the people judging Beckert are, after all, criminals as well.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Wed Jul 01, 2020 6:38 pm

Once again, finishing in the nick of time. Most of these were pleasant surprises, some of them because I hadn't heard of them, others because I expected them to be boring or mediocre, but here they are...

A freebie for the kids: AGENT F.O.X.
Started this batch with something for the kids and, boy, was it a bad one. The film is an animated Chinese production and it follows the titular spy as he is sent to retrieve a mysterious amulet from Carrot Town, which is inhabited by rabbits. But as he infiltrates the town and is mistaken for another rabbit, he realizes that the other rabbits might not be as bad as he was led to believe. That's about as much sense I can make of this. The film has almost no strengths whatsoever, the plot is nonsensical as the script keeps throwing random things on top of the other for no reason whatsoever, there is little to no thrill to how things unfold, and the English dubbing had an off timing to its delivery. If anything, I would say that the set design of the buildings in Carrot Town was cool, so I'm gonna be lenient and give them half a point for that. But parents out there, heed my advice, stay away from this. Grade: D-

A film with the number 6 (Six, Sixth, etc.) in its title: MR. SIX
This was a rather interesting watch. Another Chinese production, this one follows the titular character (Feng Xiaogang), an aging kingpin or enforcer of sorts that has had control and respect over the streets of Beijing through the years. When his teenage son ends up clashing with a young street-racing gang, Mr. Six steps up to defend him, sparking a potential fight between both groups, but most importantly highlighting his frailty and age. It's important to point this right out of the gate; this is not an action film, and this is not a crime film, or at least not in the sense that we might be used to. The film is more of an introspective drama about what it means to get old and to be out of touch, or left behind by new generations. It is about father and son relationships and about past regrets. If you come at it with those expectations, you will probably enjoy it. Xiaogang's performance is great as he conveys a combination of toughness with weariness and regret. The other performances are good/solid, but Mr. Six is the most interesting and complex. There is some of a shift towards the last act that in some ways deviates the plot from what we might have expected, and the ending is definitely anti-climatic, but in many ways, still very much in tone with the spirit of the film. Grade: B+

A film from the Philippines: MARIA
Found out that Netflix had a bunch of Filipino films available so I settled for this action vehicle. It follows the titular character (Cristine Reyes), a former assassin now living a family life away from crime. But when she is spotted by a former associate, she is forced to face her past once again. If you think that the premise sounds derivative from other action films, well, that's because it is. The film really doesn't bring anything new to the table and borrows a lot from films like John Wick. But as far as the action and the fight choreography goes, I thought they were very well executed. The direction was solid as well and the story, as derivative as it might be overall, still managed to surprise me with one or two things. If anything, the film's biggest flaw is the performances. Reyes is not great, but is competent, but the other lead performances were borderline cringey, with Maria's husband and the two main henchmen being the biggest offenders. Still, for a film I knew nothing about and had no expectations whatsoever, I enjoyed it. Grade: B

A film with the word "Summer" in its title: SPRING, SUMMER, FALL, WINTER... AND SPRING
The film follows the life of a Buddhist monk from childhood to adulthood, while using the titular seasons to signal the passing of time and each particular phase in the life of the character. The film, which is written and directed by Kim Ki-duk, features a deliberately slow pace and sparse dialogue; actually I think there was no dialogue in all the last hour. Despite that, the film manages to grab your attention with its gorgeous scenery and direction, but moreover with the emotional, silent performances of the characters. There are no big twists or reveals, no emotional speeches, no sentimentality and no judgments. Instead the director just puts its story forward and lets it flow. Apparently there is a lot of use of Buddhist symbology, which I've read some of, but still that doesn't affect the films impact and poignancy for those that don't know about their meanings. It's quite beautiful. Grade: A-

A film about LGBTQ+ lifestyles: THE WATERMELON WOMAN
This film follows Cheryl (played by writer/director Cheryl Dunye) as a semi-fictionalized version of herself - a young, aspiring, black, Lesbian filmmaker - that is captivated by a 30s-40s black actress and decides to do a film about her, who she was and her career. As a result, this leads her to discover and explore her own identity both as a black woman and as a Lesbian. If that sounds like a lot of tags, it's intentional. The film puts a lot of emphasis in how we and the people around us create our identities and categorize those around us, whether it is for a film, a casting, or to spend our lives with. The performances here are mostly subpar and Dunye's direction is not flashy, but there is an honesty and realness she brings to the film that is endearing and makes the film work. I also admire the effort put to create the whole image and persona of the fictional "watermelon woman". You can see there was extensive care put in making those old clips and images feel real, to the point that I thought they were. This film is not necessarily a masterpiece, but I would say it's definitely worth a watch. Grade: B

A film set in Hawaii: BLUE HAWAII
This was my first Elvis Presley film and I have to admit, I braced myself for the worst. Fortunately, this wasn't as bad as I expected. The film follows Chad Gates (Presley) who returns home to Hawaii after 2 years in the Army. Upon his return, he finds himself clashing with his strict parents (Roland Winters and Angela Lansbury) who want him to follow the family business, and his girlfriend (Joan Blackman) who is encouraging him to follow his own path. Sure, the plot is very cliché and formulaic, but it is saved by Presley's charm and charisma. Most of the songs are catchy and fun to listen to, even if they are not memorable. Lansbury is also excellent as his annoying mother, and she steals every scene she's in. There are several aspects of it that feel dated, perhaps a bit racist and misogynistic, but none that I found to be particularly offensive. Finally, the film is a tad overlong as it adds an unnecessary subplot about a group of high schoolers that end up smitten with Presley as he takes them on a tour around Hawaii, which sorta deviates the plot, but other than that, I thought it was fun. Grade: C+

So that's the end of June!
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Wed Jul 01, 2020 6:59 pm

So this is how June ended...

A film with the number 6 (Six, Sixth, etc.) in its title: Mr. Six
Any film that starts with the letters K or L: Killing Them Softly
A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #6 (i.e. 16, 621, 906): Gallipoli (#668)
A film from the 1950s: To Catch a Thief
A horror film: Overlord
A film about fathers: High Life
A film about LGBTQ+ lifestyles (LGBT Pride Month): The Watermelon Woman
A film with Marilyn Monroe (born June 1): Home Town Story
A film with a repeated word in its title (Repeat Day, June 3): Eye for an Eye
A film about friendship/best friends (Best Friend Day, June 8): The Lighthouse
A film with a herb or spice in its title (Herbs and Spices Day, June 10): Rosemary's Baby
A film set in Hawaii (King Kamehameha Day, June 11): Blue Hawaii
A film from Philippines (Independence Day, June 12): Maria
A film with the word "Summer" in its title (June 20): Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
A film about a meteor (Meteor Day, June 30): Night of the Comet

Freebie for me: Uncut Gems
Freebie for the kids: Agent F.O.X.

Had a couple of freebies so I ended up with 17 watches (18, if I count that I saw The Lighthouse twice).

If I were to choose a favorite for the month, it would probably be High Life, with The Lighthouse and Uncut Gems close.

Least favorite, easily Agent F.O.X. which was horrible.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Wed Jul 01, 2020 6:59 pm

I'll post the categories for July in a while...
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Apex Predator » Thu Jul 02, 2020 2:09 am

Thanks to an internet outage that lasted a day and a half, I ended up stuck at 7. But no films half started and hey, the top's pretty good!

Not recommended:

6 Underground (2019)---Self-made billionaire fakes his death and creates a team to right wrongs. I guess there's potential there...think Ocean's Six or Mission: Improbable? Too bad it gets lost in the Bayhem as this group gets caught up in a regime change in a Middle Eastern country. Good thing their newest member is a former Army sniper with regrets of being unable to save his men from terrorists. Cliches abound. The best Bay films had a charismatic lead or interesting team. This one has Ryan Reynolds struggling to prove he's a good guy and Melanie Laurent who IS interesting, but she's stuck in a will they or won't they romance. And trying to throw in regime change and show shots of carnage only make the film worse. Like it or not, he's become the new Uwe Boll. D-

Created Equal: Clarence Thomas in His Own Words (2020)---Seen largely so I can claim another 2020 title and it was on Independent Lens. Much like Underground, this had potential...most of us just know the justice from the hearings which got rocked when Anita Hill pressed sexual harassment charges on him but not for much else. It's interesting to find out about his childhood or how he converted from being a radical Democrat into a conservative Republican. But as he recounts what happened with the whole confirmation hearings, he allows himself to play the victim of liberalism while maintaining defiance on succeeding despite them. The film takes a wrong turn straight into Farenhype 9/11 territory as he jokes with interns late...all four of them are white and from elite schools. I guess he learned nothing from his struggles? D

Recommended:

Dragonheart: Vengeance (2020)---I expected little heading into this and I was pleasantly surprised. Jack Kane plays a young man who witnesses his parents slaughtered by four barbarians and he seeks revenge. With the help of a swordsman for hire and the reluctant help of an ice dragon (Helena Bonham Carter), they seek to help him get his vengeance. But the journey comes with some twists in the road. A nice degree of professionalism starting with Carter's performance helps out and the story handles both the funny moments and the more touching ones well. Not bad for the fifth entry in a franchise that's 25 years old (and the third direct to DVD one, to boot)! B-

Run Silent, Run Deep (1958)---Clark Gable is eager to get back on a sub after his last one was blown up by Japanese sailors. So he pulls rank and takes a sub that was supposed to be Burt Lancaster's. Burt gets chosen to be Clark's first mate and try to get his crew on board with him. All is well until they learn what might be their new assignment. There are numerous tense moments (and the Japanese aren't painted as villains, just people on the other side). The two stars play well off of each other and there's a solid supporting cast. Some third act stuff and an air of familiarity kind of work against it. But it's still not bad. B-

Definitely recommended:

The Wicker Man (1973)---Slow burn horror concerns an upstanding cop from Scotland (Edward Woodward, The Equalizer) as he tries to find out what happened to a girl who's gone missing in a small island community. As he continues his search, he bristles against the pagan activities of the townspeople. Perhaps he can seek help from Lord Summerisle (Christopher Lee)? It's all about the atmosphere as it proves to be as chilly as the setting. Britt Ekland comes through with a memorable dance as the innkeeper's daughter. The atmosphere keeps drawing you in until the memorable climax. Maybe a song or two gets repeated once too many times, but can't complain with the results. B+

Some Like It Hot (1959)---Two struggling musicians find themselves in deep water after accidentally witnessing a mafia massacre. They agree on a job that will take them hundreds of miles away from Chicago to sunny Florida. The catch? They have to dress up and pretend to be women. Because Billy Wilder is director/writer, a sharp script is a given. The interplay between Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis really clicks. As Sugar Kane, Marilyn Monroe proves to be good looking and also effective at playing dumb much like Judy Holiday in Born Yesterday. Joe E. Brown plays one smitten suitor to a T. One scene of violence turns into a laugh killer late and the ending is a giant shrug. But so much of this works that you really don't mind. A-

M (1931)---A child murderer is wanted by cops all over Berlin. But it turns out that the criminal element wants him as well because he's ruining their racket by constant police raids. Peter Lorre runs the whole gamut as the killer while Fritz Lang directs this as one part crime drama and one part tense thriller. You feel it as the clock clicks and people are searching for him. There's plenty of food for thought in this script, but the atmosphere keeps drawing you in up until the climax. *chefs kiss* A
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by kgaard. » Thu Jul 02, 2020 10:33 pm

The rest of my June movies:

A horror film: Us

I have mixed feelings on this one. Peele has a vivid style (although at times it seems that his influences are too present), but the film feels like too much but also not enough. Peele has so much he wants to say--about America, about race and class, about privilege and responsibility, about double selves--but none of it seems fully formed. There a lot to unpack--from references to Hands Across America and the Bible to the casual class markers (a boat, an AI home assistant) to the mirrors on top of mirrors--but when unpacked I'm not really sure what I'm looking at. Is the movie a portent of a bloody French-style revolution where the underclass rise up to replace their masters? Does the reveal
that Red is actually Adelaide and Adelaide Red suggest that the rebellion only occurs because one of the underclass stepped out of her place? What does her survival in the context of the world's apparent collapse then mean?
I will give it this much at least: better to have the flaw of too many ideas than not enough (looking at you, X-Men: First Class).

A film from the 1950s: An American in Paris

I wrote about this in another thread, but I am not a big fan of the "May/December" romances that are so prevalent in movies from this era (and, well, all eras). This is not the most egregious example of it, but the movie is problematic in other ways. The romantic quadrangle involves two couples in which partner is tethered by obligation: Gerry (Gene Kelly) is obligated to Milo (Nina Foch) because she is sponsoring his art career, and Lise (Leslie Caron) is obligated to Henri (Georges Geutary) because he kept her safe (as a child!) during the war. These "obligations" have not aged well: Gerry feels emasculated by "owing" a woman because heaven forbid a woman be the provider, and Lise owing literally herself as payment for a moral act undermines the morality of that act.

But look, that aside, the movie is pretty fun! The dancing is great, the colors are vivid, and the choice to close the film with a wordless 17-minute ballet is the kind of odd dreamlike display that I like to watch movies for. It does leave poor Milo kind of hanging, though.

Any film that starts with the letters K or L: Knives Out

For a huge Agatha Christie fan like me, this was actually a lot of fun. In some ways, more enjoyablethan a straight Christie adaptation because it can't suffer in comparison to the book. The social/political commentary is extremely on the nose, and Rian Johnson isn't quite the master of the mystery puzzle that Christie was, but I am here for Daniel Craig's ridiculous accent, and a story that manages to smash together old mystery tropes like Victorian mansions and quirky detectives with modern accessories like cell phones and alt-right trolls.

A film with a repeated word in its title (Repeat Day, June 3): Madeline's Madeline

A story of how stories are told, and who is in control of the telling. It takes some getting into, with its fractured narrative about a teen with apparent mental illness who is struggling to retain her sense of self while performing in an experimental theater group. At the same time she is coming of age, attracted to boys and sex, pulling away from her mother even as the director of the theater troupe assumes a controlling influence over her life, incorporating her life into the art the group is creating. I'm a sucker for stuff like this, movies about process and art and artifice, and the performances are (as they need to be) excellent, especially Helena Howard as Madeline. Also, I'm fairly certain that the title is a reference to Proust and his madeleine, and I'm an even bigger sucker for Proust.

A film with the word "Summer" in its title (June 20): Smiles of a Summer Night

The Swedish sex comedy I never knew I needed in my life! The "May December" shenanigans are handled well here (even if one can't say the same for Bergman's personal life), but mostly this is an entertaining farcical romp with a dark edge.

A film about a meteor (Meteor Day, June 30): Deep Impact

Not as obnoxious as the same year's Armaggedon (which I spent a ridiculous amount of money to watch in a London theater while waiting for my then-girlfriend to get off work), this is a fairly paint-by-numbers movie that is only occasionally successful in the lives of its characters as they approach The End. But I also really enjoy dopey disaster movies so I'm pretty forgiving of its flaws. I do kinda wish they had let Morgan Freeman wear his earring as President, though.

To sum up:

Yes, watch this!: Madeline's Madeline, Smiles of a Summer Night

Sure, sure: Us, An American in Paris, Knives Out

Maybe?: Deep Impact

No, bad movie!: X-Men: First Class
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Fri Jul 03, 2020 1:33 am

kgaard. wrote:
Thu Jul 02, 2020 10:33 pm
A horror film: Us

I have mixed feelings on this one. Peele has a vivid style (although at times it seems that his influences are too present), but the film feels like too much but also not enough. Peele has so much he wants to say--about America, about race and class, about privilege and responsibility, about double selves--but none of it seems fully formed. There a lot to unpack--from references to Hands Across America and the Bible to the casual class markers (a boat, an AI home assistant) to the mirrors on top of mirrors--but when unpacked I'm not really sure what I'm looking at. Is the movie a portent of a bloody French-style revolution where the underclass rise up to replace their masters? Does the reveal
that Red is actually Adelaide and Adelaide Red suggest that the rebellion only occurs because one of the underclass stepped out of her place? What does her survival in the context of the world's apparent collapse then mean?
I will give it this much at least: better to have the flaw of too many ideas than not enough (looking at you, X-Men: First Class).
I was a huge fan of this. It really got to me, way more than Get Out, which I was mostly lukewarm towards. I remember posting a lengthy analysis of it here or in another forum which touches on some of the issues you brought up, but I can't seem to find it. Anyway, I can understand your complains about all the things Peele wants to say, but I mostly saw it as a metaphor about class, and how the actions of one "group" are connected to the actions of the other.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Fri Jul 03, 2020 2:07 am

This is the list of the categories for July...

A film with the number 7 (Seven, Seventh, etc.) in its title:
Any film that starts with the letters M or N:
A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #7 (i.e. 17, 470, 718):
A film from the 1960s:
A musical:
A blockbuster film:
A film with "America" in its title:
A film about sharks (Shark Week):
A film with "Kiss" in its title (Int'l Kissing Day, July 6):
A film from Argentina (Independence Day, July 9):
A film with "World" in its title (World Population Day, July 11):
A film set in France (Bastille Day, July 14):
A film about chaos and disorder (Pandemonium Day, July 14):
A film from Gus Van Sant (born July 24):
A western film (Day of the Cowboy, July 27):
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Wooley » Fri Jul 03, 2020 4:50 pm

kgaard. wrote:
Thu Jul 02, 2020 10:33 pm
The rest of my June movies:

A horror film: Us

I have mixed feelings on this one. Peele has a vivid style (although at times it seems that his influences are too present), but the film feels like too much but also not enough. Peele has so much he wants to say--about America, about race and class, about privilege and responsibility, about double selves--but none of it seems fully formed. There a lot to unpack--from references to Hands Across America and the Bible to the casual class markers (a boat, an AI home assistant) to the mirrors on top of mirrors--but when unpacked I'm not really sure what I'm looking at. Is the movie a portent of a bloody French-style revolution where the underclass rise up to replace their masters? Does the reveal
that Red is actually Adelaide and Adelaide Red suggest that the rebellion only occurs because one of the underclass stepped out of her place? What does her survival in the context of the world's apparent collapse then mean?
I will give it this much at least: better to have the flaw of too many ideas than not enough (looking at you, X-Men: First Class).
I agree with you completely. Peele does a great routine here but then fails to stick the landing and makes the whole thing seem not quite baked. Lot of great ingredients but but the bread doesn't rise. The ingredients don't really come together. Other food references.
I was pretty disappointed, there's so much good going on but you really have to tie a movie like this up pretty well, either with a neat, closed ending or a wide-open one, but I don't think you can stumble, like this one did, to something in between.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Wooley » Fri Jul 03, 2020 4:53 pm

Thief wrote:
Fri Jul 03, 2020 1:33 am
I was a huge fan of this. It really got to me, way more than Get Out, which I was mostly lukewarm towards. I remember posting a lengthy analysis of it here or in another forum which touches on some of the issues you brought up, but I can't seem to find it. Anyway, I can understand your complains about all the things Peele wants to say, but I mostly saw it as a metaphor about class, and how the actions of one "group" are connected to the actions of the other.
This is what I love about discussion and about this forum. So many people here with obviously good taste and depth of knowledge and experience with absorbing films, yet we can still see things so differently and have these varied points of view to discuss.
The moment Get Out closed I thought to myself, "Holy shit, did I just watch a straight-up first-film masterpiece?"
The moment Us finished I thought to myself, "And there's the sophomore slump."
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Fri Jul 03, 2020 5:11 pm

My only issue with Us was with all the logistical errors in it. I enjoyed the film a good bit, but it seemed like Peele either forgot or didn't bother to think of any of the plot holes/details which didn't make any sense that could've been ironed out with more editing.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Wooley » Fri Jul 03, 2020 5:30 pm

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Fri Jul 03, 2020 5:11 pm
My only issue with Us was with all the logistical errors in it. I enjoyed the film a good bit, but it seemed like Peele either forgot or didn't bother to think of any of the plot holes/details which didn't make any sense that could've been ironed out with more editing.
That was a problem.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Fri Jul 03, 2020 5:36 pm

With that being said, however, I'll still point out that I think Us is a pretty good, if not a really good film in spite of its issues and I hope Peele's next film will iron out these issues and get him back on track.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Apex Predator » Fri Jul 03, 2020 6:32 pm

Early plans for July:

A film with the number 7 (Seven, Seventh, etc.) in its title: 7 Boxes (2012)
Any film that starts with the letters M or N: Murder Mystery (2019)/Men Women Children (2014) (I'll probably dance around this until I find a solution)
A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #7 (i.e. 17, 470, 718): Akira (1988)
A film from the 1960s: Easy Rider (1969)
A musical: West Side Story (1961)
A blockbuster film: Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018)
A film with "America" in its title: American Sniper (2014)
A film about sharks (Shark Week): 47 Meters Down (2017)
A film with "Kiss" in its title (Int'l Kissing Day, July 6): Kiss and Cry (2017)
A film from Argentina (Independence Day, July 9): Invisible (2017)
A film with "World" in its title (World Population Day, July 11): The World of Kanako (2014)
A film set in France (Bastille Day, July 14): Nothing to Hide (2018)
A film about chaos and disorder (Pandemonium Day, July 14): Goodbye World (2014) (not sure if I got the topic right, but it did mention chaos in the synopsis, so maybe?)
A film from Gus Van Sant (born July 24): Drugstore Cowboy (1989)
A western film (Day of the Cowboy, July 27): Slow West (2015)
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Wooley » Fri Jul 03, 2020 7:01 pm

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Fri Jul 03, 2020 5:36 pm
With that being said, however, I'll still point out that I think Us is a pretty good, if not a really good film in spite of its issues and I hope Peele's next film will iron out these issues and get him back on track.
I (grumble) concur.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by kgaard. » Fri Jul 03, 2020 7:40 pm

Peele has a lot of things to say and is always trying to do something interesting, even if he's not fully successful, so from that standpoint alone his movies (so far) are worth watching. I feel the same about Ana Lily Amanpour--I thought that A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night was fantastic but was nonplussed by The Bad Batch. But like Peele, she's trying shit, and I respect that.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Fri Jul 03, 2020 8:29 pm

Yeah, I think it's too early to call for Peele. We'll just have to wait and see how his next film is.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Fri Jul 03, 2020 10:55 pm

Wooley wrote:
Fri Jul 03, 2020 4:53 pm
This is what I love about discussion and about this forum. So many people here with obviously good taste and depth of knowledge and experience with absorbing films, yet we can still see things so differently and have these varied points of view to discuss.
The moment Get Out closed I thought to myself, "Holy shit, did I just watch a straight-up first-film masterpiece?"
The moment Us finished I thought to myself, "And there's the sophomore slump."
LOL, if I were to summarize my reaction to both in a similar way, it would be...

Get Out, "This is good, but not as good as people make it to be."
Us, "Holy shit, this guy's for real!"

So yeah, it's pretty interesting and cool how different people react in different ways to the same films.

Anyway, I'm pissed that I don't have some details as fresh as I would like in my mind, but I will ramble anyway with some of the things I really liked about Us. Maybe the rambling might seem like conceding some of the things you said (lot of things to say, none of them fully realized, etc.) but like I said, it really, really worked for me, to the point that I still have it on my 2019 Top 3.

<rambling>
Technically speaking, the direction is top-notch. Peele knows his craft, knows how to move the camera and uses a lot of clean, neat-looking shots.

All of the performances range from pretty good to great, especially if you add the fact that most of them had to perform dual roles.

I love the metaphor of the connection between the "upper" class and the "lower" class, and how the actions of one impact the others (There's also a similar parallel in Parasite there). Also, how the "lower" class ends up forgotten. Then there's the symbolism of the scissors to "cut" the connection.

Re: that connection, there's also the point that that impact can be negative or positive ("And to think, if it weren't for you... I never would've danced at all.")

I also loved the way Peele balanced the mystery and horror, with the lighter and/or more humorous side. I laughed or at least chuckled a lot with the film. From Gabe's attempt to intimidate the invaders ("If you wanna get crazy, we can get crazy!") to the family tallying up their kills later, to the whole "Ophelia, call the police!" scene.

I thought the whole "Hands Across America" thing was odd but interesting. I see it as an event that was ultimately insignificant and unsuccessful, but left an obvious mark in Red. And I see their decision to use that event as a symbol, or a way of saying "You couldn't do it, but we could". In some ways it can be a metaphor on how, despite being dismissed often, the "lower" class are the ones that do the hard work and are essential (there's also a COVID parallelism there).

</rambling>

Like I said, there were a lot more things I had in my mind shortly after I saw it that have escaped me with time. But the film really left an impression in me.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Wooley » Sat Jul 04, 2020 6:28 am

kgaard. wrote:
Fri Jul 03, 2020 7:40 pm
Peele has a lot of things to say and is always trying to do something interesting, even if he's not fully successful, so from that standpoint alone his movies (so far) are worth watching. I feel the same about Ana Lily Amanpour--I thought that A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night was fantastic but was nonplussed by The Bad Batch. But like Peele, she's trying shit, and I respect that.
AGWHAaN was the shit. I haven't seen The Bad Batch. But I agree with your point overall. After Get Out, I'm holding Peele to a pretty high standard.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by kgaard. » Sat Jul 04, 2020 3:48 pm

A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #7 (i.e. 17, 470, 718): Aliens (#734)

It doesn't quite live up to the original for me, but there's no shame in that as the original is one of my all-time favorites, a just about perfect SF horror film. Wisely, Cameron changes genres to war/action, a tonal shift that keeps the story fresh even as Ripley finds herself in a too-familiar scenario. Paul Reiser's slithery corporate weasel is perhaps a bit much as the human face of villainy that imagines he can bend reality to his will by somehow converting the xenomorphs into weapons... or perhaps he would be if our own reality hadn't shown the actual potential for for grasping malice combined with stupidity (one can easily imagine this administration suggesting we "find a way to live with" the xenomorphs).
The film also evolves from its roots with the '80s emphasis on the nuclear family (as opposed to the original's "final girl") asserting itself in the surviving "family" unit.
It would be a kind ending for Ripley, if only the other '80s force of late-stage capitalism would ever allow her lasting peace.

Edit: Sorry, I had meant to spoiler that bit--I'd expect most people here have seen this by now, but yu never know.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Sat Jul 04, 2020 6:38 pm

kgaard. wrote:
Sat Jul 04, 2020 3:48 pm
A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #7 (i.e. 17, 470, 718): Aliens (#734)

It doesn't quite live up to the original for me, but there's no shame in that as the original is one of my all-time favorites, a just about perfect SF horror film. Wisely, Cameron changes genres to war/action, a tonal shift that keeps the story fresh even as Ripley finds herself in a too-familiar scenario. Paul Reiser's slithery corporate weasel is perhaps a bit much as the human face of villainy that imagines he can bend reality to his will by somehow converting the xenomorphs into weapons... or perhaps he would be if our own reality hadn't shown the actual potential for for grasping malice combined with stupidity (one can easily imagine this administration suggesting we "find a way to live with" the xenomorphs).
The film also evolves from its roots with the '80s emphasis on the nuclear family (as opposed to the original's "final girl") asserting itself in the surviving "family" unit.
It would be a kind ending for Ripley, if only the other '80s force of late-stage capitalism would ever allow her lasting peace.

Edit: Sorry, I had meant to spoiler that bit--I'd expect most people here have seen this by now, but yu never know.
Was this a first-time watch?

Anyway, about Paul Reiser's character...
It is probably now widely known, but I remember seeing this on TV or VHS back in the day and being truly surprised by the reveal. That scene when he turns off the monitor of the infirmary as we realize that he locked Ripley and Newt was excellent. At the time I saw it, I thought that Cameron sold really well the fact that he was really a good guy that cared about Ripley. The casting was genius because I associated him with comedies and the good dad from My Two Dads, so that also helped to have him end up as the "bad guy".

So maybe now it is widely know that he's a weasel, but back then, I felt this was executed perfectly.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by kgaard. » Sat Jul 04, 2020 8:04 pm

Thief wrote:
Sat Jul 04, 2020 6:38 pm
Was this a first-time watch?

Anyway, about Paul Reiser's character...
It is probably now widely known, but I remember seeing this on TV or VHS back in the day and being truly surprised by the reveal. That scene when he turns off the monitor of the infirmary as we realize that he locked Ripley and Newt was excellent. At the time I saw it, I thought that Cameron sold really well the fact that he was really a good guy that cared about Ripley. The casting was genius because I associated him with comedies and the good dad from My Two Dads, so that also helped to have him end up as the "bad guy".

So maybe now it is widely know that he's a weasel, but back then, I felt this was executed perfectly.
I’d seen it at least a couple of times. Certainly going in with the knowledge of what happens colored my perception of Reiser’s character, but I do agree that Cameron did a good job of drawing it out.
I will note that before the scene you mentioned Ripley had confronted Burke about sending the colonists out to look for the xenomorph ship, so we had a pretty clear sense of Burke’s motives.
One funny thing about watching this now is that Burke frequently refers to things costing “millions” of dollars. Which makes me feel like Number Two in Austin Powers, like, “That’s actually not a lot of money?” It really doesn’t matter, but it made me laugh.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Mon Jul 06, 2020 2:38 am

Apex Predator wrote:
Fri Jul 03, 2020 6:32 pm
Early plans for July:

A film with the number 7 (Seven, Seventh, etc.) in its title: 7 Boxes (2012)
Any film that starts with the letters M or N: Murder Mystery (2019)/Men Women Children (2014) (I'll probably dance around this until I find a solution)
A film from the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list whose ranking includes the #7 (i.e. 17, 470, 718): Akira (1988)
A film from the 1960s: Easy Rider (1969)
A musical: West Side Story (1961)
A blockbuster film: Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018)
A film with "America" in its title: American Sniper (2014)
A film about sharks (Shark Week): 47 Meters Down (2017)
A film with "Kiss" in its title (Int'l Kissing Day, July 6): Kiss and Cry (2017)
A film from Argentina (Independence Day, July 9): Invisible (2017)
A film with "World" in its title (World Population Day, July 11): The World of Kanako (2014)
A film set in France (Bastille Day, July 14): Nothing to Hide (2018)
A film about chaos and disorder (Pandemonium Day, July 14): Goodbye World (2014) (not sure if I got the topic right, but it did mention chaos in the synopsis, so maybe?)
A film from Gus Van Sant (born July 24): Drugstore Cowboy (1989)
A western film (Day of the Cowboy, July 27): Slow West (2015)
The only ones I've seen from this bunch are Akira (pretty cool film), West Side Story (might be essential, but I wasn't crazy about it. Weak leads, strong supporting performances), Solo (competent, but lifeless), and 47 Meters Down (meh... has some moments, but not much)
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Apex Predator » Mon Jul 06, 2020 4:31 am

Thief wrote:
Mon Jul 06, 2020 2:38 am
The only ones I've seen from this bunch are Akira (pretty cool film), West Side Story (might be essential, but I wasn't crazy about it. Weak leads, strong supporting performances), Solo (competent, but lifeless), and 47 Meters Down (meh... has some moments, but not much)
Considering Akira is like my fourth anime film, that's a good sign right there.

Not as locked in to West Side Story as you'd think. I do have other options available.

Solo and 47 Meters Down are there largely because I want to catch them before they expire. Of those two, 47 is more likely to stay because I've heard good things.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Mon Jul 06, 2020 2:13 pm

I was looking for films with the word "Seven" in its title, and there were a few that caught my eye. Any word on these?

7 Days (2010)
The House of Seven Gables (1940)
The House of Seven Corpses (1974)
The Devil Has 7 Faces (1971)
The Red Queen Kills 7 Times (1972)

All of those are on Prime, except Seven Gables, which is on Tubi. The original Magnificent Seven is also on Prime, but I'm wary to see that one before rewatching Seven Samurai, which I'm afraid to say I was a bit lukewarm towards (but that means it is another option to watch).
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Mon Jul 06, 2020 2:42 pm

Same with films with the word "Kiss" in its title. Here's what I've found so far...

The Death Kiss (1932)
A Kiss Before Dying (1956)
Vampire's Kiss (1988)
The Naked Kiss (1964)
Kiss of the Tarantula (1976)

Again, those are available mostly on Prime. I think I'm leaning towards The Naked Kiss, but I'm open to other suggestions.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Mon Jul 06, 2020 2:57 pm

I might as well continue with the others! How about those with "World" in the title?

It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963)
The Lost World (1925)
Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010)
The New World (2005)
Futureworld (1976)

Ghost World is also on Prime, which I haven't seen in almost 20 years, so I wouldn't mind a rewatch, but I think I should stop dallying around Scott Pilgrim and finally watch. It's on Netflix, and the others are mostly on Prime, but The New World is on Vudu.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Mon Jul 06, 2020 3:04 pm

And just to round out the title ones, here's what I found for "America"...

The American President (1995)
American Ultra (2015)
American Gigolo (1980)

These three were all on Prime and/or Hulu.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Mon Jul 06, 2020 3:11 pm

Thief wrote:
Mon Jul 06, 2020 2:57 pm
I might as well continue with the others! How about those with "World" in the title?

It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963)
The Lost World (1925)
Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010)
The New World (2005)
Futureworld (1976)

Ghost World is also on Prime, which I haven't seen in almost 20 years, so I wouldn't mind a rewatch, but I think I should stop dallying around Scott Pilgrim and finally watch. It's on Netflix, and the others are mostly on Prime, but The New World is on Vudu.
I haven't seen a lot of the films you listed, but I can at least vouch for the quality of The New World if that matters any.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Mon Jul 06, 2020 3:25 pm

My experience with Malick has been more or less mixed, so I'm not sure if I want to jump into one of his films for the moment, whereas Scott Pilgrim seems like something I'd be more willing to dive in these days. Plus, The New World is almost 3 hours, which makes it tougher for me to get through. But I'll keep the recommendation in my backpocket. Thanks!
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Mon Jul 06, 2020 3:37 pm

More questions... my experience with Gus Van Sant has been limited to his mainstream films (To Die For, Good Will Hunting, Psycho, and Finding Forrester), but here's what I can find available streaming...

Drugstore Cowboy (Prime/Tubi)
Gerry (Tubi)
Paranoid Park (Hulu)
Restless (Prime)
Promised Land (Netflix)
The Sea of Trees (Netflix)
Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far on Foot (Prime)

Any recommendations on these?
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Mon Jul 06, 2020 3:51 pm

Thief wrote:
Mon Jul 06, 2020 3:37 pm
More questions... my experience with Gus Van Sant has been limited to his mainstream films (To Die For, Good Will Hunting, Psycho, and Finding Forrester), but here's what I can find available streaming...

Drugstore Cowboy (Prime/Tubi)
Gerry (Tubi)
Paranoid Park (Hulu)
Restless (Prime)
Promised Land (Netflix)
The Sea of Trees (Netflix)
Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far on Foot (Prime)

Any recommendations on these?
Gerry was pretty solid, though it's an acquired taste for sure. Paranoid Park didn't work for me, but it has its fans, and it's definitely more accessible than Gerry. You might enjoy it more than I did. Have you seen Elephant? I have a fairly strong opinion of that film. If you're not able to find it streaming anywhere, I'd keep an eye out for it.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by MrCarmady » Mon Jul 06, 2020 3:52 pm

Drugstore Cowboy is good. I love Scott Pilgrim but it's quite a divisive film, you either buy into its humour / aesthetic or it can be pretty off-putting. Plus the protagonist is a real piece of shit. Vampire's Kiss is one of my favourite movies of all time, it has the funniest performance of one of the funniest actors alive. People who put it in the 'so bad it's good pile' are spectacularly missing the point.
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Re: Thief's Monthly Film Challenge 2020

Post by Thief » Mon Jul 06, 2020 3:58 pm

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Mon Jul 06, 2020 3:51 pm
Gerry was pretty solid, though it's an acquired taste for sure. Paranoid Park didn't work for me, but it has its fans, and it's definitely more accessible than Gerry. You might enjoy it more than I did. Have you seen Elephant? I have a fairly strong opinion of that film. If you're not able to find it streaming anywhere, I'd keep an eye out for it.
It's the first one I checked, not because I know much about it, but because it's the one I see more often associated with Van Sant (out of his mainstream ones). Unfortunately it's not streaming free. Of the ones available, I think Paranoid Park and Promised Land are the ones that sound more like my thing. Still, both Gerry and The Sea of Trees sound intriguing. I'm preeeetty sure I saw Drugstore Cowboy back in the 1990s, but if I did, I don't remember it at all. We'll see.
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