Maiden's Voyage

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Trip
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Trip » Sun Jul 21, 2013 9:01 pm

Le Havre does lovely things with teal, red and yellow. Meaningful things!
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Shieldmaiden
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sun Jul 21, 2013 9:03 pm

Sold!
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Macrology
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Macrology » Sun Jul 21, 2013 10:21 pm

Shieldmaiden wrote:I've only seen two by Jarmusch (Dead Man and Limits of Control) and I can't say I'm a fan.

Drifting Clouds next, then!
Whoa whoa whoa. How can you not like Dead Man?

Also, everyone's always over the moon about Drifting Clouds, but it didn't do much for me. It's good, but certainly not the best I've seen by him.
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Shieldmaiden
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sun Jul 21, 2013 10:34 pm

Macrology wrote:Whoa whoa whoa. How can you not like Dead Man?
I liked it well enough, I guess. More than Limits, certainly. I can't offer any defense, though. I saw it a long time ago.
Also, everyone's always over the moon about Drifting Clouds, but it didn't do much for me. It's good, but certainly not the best I've seen by him.
OK, what is?
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MrCarmady
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by MrCarmady » Sun Jul 21, 2013 10:59 pm

I haven't seen this one, but my favourite so far is Shadows in Paradise, and I'm pretty sure you'd like it.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by snapper » Sun Jul 21, 2013 11:01 pm

I don't like Dead Man
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by mystery meat » Sun Jul 21, 2013 11:36 pm

gotta question the usefulness of people who don't like Dead Man. it's just one of those movies.
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Shieldmaiden
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sun Jul 21, 2013 11:47 pm

mystery meat wrote:gotta question the usefulness of people who don't like Dead Man.
I'm quite useful for other things, though!
MrCarmady wrote:I haven't seen this one, but my favourite so far is Shadows in Paradise, and I'm pretty sure you'd like it.
Got it. We've completely rearranged my Netflix queue today. :)
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Trip
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Trip » Sun Jul 21, 2013 11:48 pm

Shieldmaiden wrote:I'm quite useful for other things, though!
Cooking, cleaning, making babies, shutting up.

/bry
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Trip » Sun Jul 21, 2013 11:52 pm

Also, Take Care of Your Scarf, Tatiana!
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Shieldmaiden
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sun Jul 21, 2013 11:54 pm

Trip wrote:/bry
Haha, you stole his favorite joke. I had a slightly different list in mind. :)

Oh! That's Kaurismäki? Best title ever!
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by dreiser » Mon Jul 22, 2013 1:51 am

Shieldmaiden wrote: He has two Joan Crawford movies on there!
And the western is a masterpiece.
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Maiden's Voyage: Kathapurushan

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Jul 26, 2013 12:25 am

Image Image

Kathapurushan is another charulata recommendation, and it's a delight. It's a very, very beautiful film, the rich greens of jungle and field cradling what might be the loveliest house in film, which Adoor plays like an instrument – catching our eye with warm colors through doorways, pulling our gaze deeper with running children and sunlight. This is the story of young Kunjunni, a boy with a stutter and a golden smile, from birth to middle age; but it opens up to include his extended family, including servants and friends, as well as the political turmoil of the times. The episodic storytelling took me by surprise, with its deft repetitions and evocative framing story. The household routines seem only to lull and entertain, but, by the time Kunjunni is grown, it's clear that every story beat has had a purpose, every emotional development has been earned. And, as we move with him through hardships and happiness, we mourn and rejoice like members of the family, our hearts filled with things worth fighting for.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage: Kathapurushan

Post by charulata » Fri Jul 26, 2013 2:47 am

Shieldmaiden wrote: The household routines seem only to lull and entertain, but, by the time Kunjunni is grown, it's clear that every story beat has had a purpose, every emotional development has been earned. And, as we move with him through hardships and happiness, we mourn and rejoice like members of the family, our hearts filled with things worth fighting for.
that, exactly :heart:
those interactions between kunjunni & meenakshi .. *sigh*
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Re: Maiden's Voyage: Kathapurushan

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Jul 26, 2013 3:33 am

charulata wrote:those interactions between kunjunni & meenakshi .. *sigh*
:)

The actor who played Kunjunni as an adult hasn't done anything else. One child role and then this.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by charulata » Fri Jul 26, 2013 3:42 am

Well, I was just telling my mom about how much you liked Kathapurushan and then mentioned this post to her :) She tells me that the actor, Viswanathan was the son of a close family friend of Adoor's. So the only two films he's acted in are both Adoor films. Mom also added something about how she'd read that doing Kathapurushan and working with Adoor made him quit his less interesting day job to take up a career in design and graphics.. which is what he does now apparently.

My mom with all the lurid Malayalam cinema gossip :D :heart:
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Jul 26, 2013 3:51 am

Haha! That's lurid all right. :D

Please tell your mom I said thank you!
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by flieger » Fri Jul 26, 2013 3:55 am

Lovely appreciation, Shieldmaiden.

Thank your mum, char. I often wondered what Viswanathan's deal was... :heart:
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Maiden's Voyage: Chronic City

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Aug 02, 2013 1:02 am

  • Image
Jonathan Lethem's Chronic City is another misunderstood book, criticized variously for being unrealistic, unsympathetic, shallow, silly, unbelievable – all attributes that are integral to the plot, let alone themes. The story is an amusing jumble of pot-smoking, eBay, hiccups, and conspiracy theories that emerges from the fog of an alternate Manhattan, where everything is wrong, but no one notices. No one, that is, but the oddly charming Perkus Tooth, an eccentric music critic and writer of liner notes for Criterion, who serves as our grumpy guide through the silliness of society (Manhattan as Twitter), while he probes for the real conspiracies behind the chatter.

Perkus is the heart of the book, but not its narrator. Lethem has set himself a writerly challenge by making the narrator Perkus's friend, the bland and clueless Chase. This means he must walk a tightrope of restraint and dramatic irony, all the while creating the illusion of an accidental poetry. And it works! We never forget he's an uneducated guy in a world crammed with data, his empty head rattling with half-remembered facts and words he’s never seen in print. Even if you’re smarter than Chase, biting wit and mammoth vocabulary at your fingertips, this is a familiar feeling, and one that fits neatly into the book's themes. Perkus cuts out pictures and words from newspapers and magazines for his poster board “broadsides”; his friend Oona ghostwrites the news into a more palatable shape; and, in a nice meta touch, Lethem acknowledges in an end note that he's borrowed whole sentences from other writers. Sampling? Tributes? Does it matter? On the internet, everything's been said before – and tagged, indexed, searched and said again.

But, stop. This is what I'm really trying to say: as wacky as Lethem's story is, it's steeped in familiarity. It's a cartoon world, but the emotions are real, we get that thrill of recognition. We've all been overwhelmed, anesthetized, paranoid, lied to, we've all lost someone we loved. Though the words may hang on the tip of our tongue, we know what he's talking about!

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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by charulata » Fri Aug 02, 2013 2:21 am

:heart: :heart: :heart:

Thank you for recommending it to me. I absolutely loved it. The names... "Chase Insteadman" is such a great name and Perkus Tooth is now one of my favorite fictional characters. All the names really... "The Hawkman" :D Also, I am completely with you on the narration.

I think one of my favorite things about it is how lightly he handles all the simulacrum / illusion stuff. None of that ever came across as oh-so-clever to me at all. And all of that stuff is always subservient to the characters. And I never expected it to be so warm somehow, which it has an undertone of throughout I think, but even with all that I didn't expect the ending to pack such an emotional wallop. That just blew me away really.
Shieldmaiden wrote: But, stop. This is what I'm really trying to say: as wacky as Lethem's story is, it's steeped in familiarity. It's a cartoon world, but the emotions are real, we get that thrill of recognition. We've all been overwhelmed, anesthetized, paranoid, lied to, we've all lost someone we loved. And though the words may hang on the tip of our tongue, we know what he's talking about!
:fresh:
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Aug 02, 2013 2:28 am

charulata wrote:And I never expected it to be so warm somehow, which it has an undertone of throughout I think, but even with all that I didn't expect the ending to pack such an emotional wallop. That just blew me away really.
Yay! I'm glad you liked it. Yeah, it has a lot of heart (if you love Perkus, anyway. Apparently a lot critics didn't.) I was devastated at the end. Even that wrap-up, with Chase and Ava. <3
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Notes from Underground » Fri Aug 02, 2013 9:58 am

You've done good job selling Chronic City for me (pot-smoking, eBay, hiccups, conspiracy theories), but is it a suitable starting point for someone who hasn't read anything by Lethem before? I guess The Fortress of Solitude is a more obvious place to begin, or Motherless Brooklyn. Or Gun, with Occasional Music. I don't know. Authors need to write less.
"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Aug 02, 2013 2:30 pm

I don't know why it wouldn't be a good starting point. I think a lot of people would have liked it better if they hadn't been expecting another Fortress of Solitude. I'm always terrible at this question though. I read them in a random order and have my favorites, and that's all I know!

Here's what I've read, ranked:

Fortress of Solitude
Chronic City
Men and Cartoons
(mostly for the novella This Shape We're In, which is only in the paperpack edition)
As She Climbed Across the Table
Gun, with Occasional Music
Motherless Brooklyn
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Notes from Underground
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Notes from Underground » Fri Aug 02, 2013 2:56 pm

Rankings are always very useful. I now know definitely not to start with Motherless Brooklyn or Gun, with Occasional Music, for example. I guess I'll go with Chronic City because the premise interests me more.

Thanks for the help. Expect to hear my thoughts in a few years.
"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Aug 02, 2013 3:01 pm

Notes from Underground wrote:I now know definitely not to start with Motherless Brooklyn or Gun, with Occasional Music, for example.
I like Gun. And everyone else likes Motherless Brooklyn more than I do. But Chronic City is a great choice.
Thanks for the help. Expect to hear my thoughts in a few years.
Ha. I'll be waiting. :)
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Maiden's Voyage: Mason & Dixon

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Aug 09, 2013 4:02 pm

  • Image
      • Does Britannia, when she sleeps, dream? Is America her dream?– in which all that cannot pass in the metropolitan Wakefulness is allow’d Expression away in the restless Slumber of these Provinces, and on West-ward, wherever ’tis not yet mapp’d, not written down, nor ever, by the majority of Mankind, seen,– serving as a very Rubbish-Tip for subjunctive Hopes, for all that may yet be true,– Earthly Paradise, Fountain of Youth, Realms of Prester John, Christ’s Kingdom, ever behind the sunset, safe till the next Territory of the West be seen and recorded, measur’d and tied in, back into the Net-Work of Points already known, that slowly triangulates its Way into the Continent, changing all from subjunctive to declarative, reducing Possibilities to Simplicities that serve the ends of Governments,– winning away from the realm of the Sacred, its Borderlands one by one, and assuming them unto the bare mortal World that is our home, and our Despair.
It's tempting not to write a thing about Mason & Dixon, but simply to quote sentence after sentence until you're all forced to succumb to its charms. And, really, if the passage above doesn't tickle your fancy with its clever conceit and grammatical analogy, don't even bother. I was captivated, not only by tour-de-force sentences, but by the thick mélange of biography, science-fiction and silliness. This was my first Pynchon, and nothing had prepared me for its barrage of elaborate jokes and its onion-like layers of nested metafictional tomfoolery. There's so much meaty fun here, like the invisible robot duck, the reverse werewolf, the book-within-the-book, and oh! that beautiful alternate ending, offering constant entertainment. Yet, it's serious at the same time – lovely, thought-provoking, and, truly melancholy. It's grown markedly in my mind since I finished it. I know I’ll read it again someday and enjoy it even more.
      • “Gentlemen,” advises this ominous Shadow, “– you have fallen, willy-nilly, among a race who not only devour Astronomers as a matter of habitual Diet, but may also make of them vile miniature ‘Sandwiches,’ and lay them upon a mahogany Sideboard whose Price they never knew, and then forget to eat them. Your only hope, in this room, is to impersonate so perfectly what they assume you to be, that instincts of Predation will be overcome by those of Boredom.”

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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Fist » Fri Aug 09, 2013 4:04 pm

Pynchon is probably next on my plate but I haven't decided where to start. I feel like I should with V. Or Gravity's Rainbow but that one intrigues me the most.
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Shieldmaiden
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Aug 09, 2013 4:13 pm

I never read (or watch) in logical order. And it hasn't hurt me yet. :)
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Bandy Greensacks » Fri Aug 09, 2013 5:53 pm

The last time I actually sat down to read a novel for enjoyment, I was in college and did so only because I had a few hours to kill between classes.

I remember reading The Stranger, No Exit, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sleep and Ubik, in particular. That was... 6-7 years ago. Sad. I envy those who can still find the time and a quiet enough space to read.

I was always interested in Pynchon, but never really got around to him.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Aug 09, 2013 6:14 pm

Bandy Greensacks wrote:Sad. I envy those who can still find the time and a quiet enough space to read.
I don't have much time or quiet, but I carry a book everywhere I go so I can read whenever there's down time -- standing/sitting in lines, waiting for people to show up, things to start. I'd read at traffic lights if they were just a little longer. :P
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by MrCarmady » Fri Aug 09, 2013 6:55 pm

I read little during term time, because there's so much academic reading as it is, but otherwise, I don't really understand how people claim not to be able to focus on a book, a complicated film requires as much focus, if not more, since you have to focus continuously and can't put on other music unless you're watching a silent or something.
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Shieldmaiden
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Aug 09, 2013 7:21 pm

Just a guess, but I think people have differing levels of focus on film. I don't know how to watch without taking it all in (dialogue, plot, sound), but I don't think that's true for everyone, and it just keeps playing, unlike a book.
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Shieldmaiden
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Maiden's Voyage: The Saddest Music in the World

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Aug 09, 2013 7:24 pm

Image Image

The Saddest Music in the World was a lovely little surprise. Before this I'd seen only My Winnipeg, which was good but didn't have the magic of this one. The same wildly subjective camera is used here to more interesting effect, as though the whole world were a dream. Of course, the color changes and smeared-lens effects reminded me of Sokurov, though here they seem more clearly intended to signal a mental space of memory and dream. Logic or not, these are gorgeous images, though constantly offset with a campy energy and humor. Those beer-filled legs, that musical extravaganza! The trick is in the way all the madcap pieces – ridiculous subplots, melodic themes, visual playfulness – come together in the end to make something sad and nostalgic, and just a little bit sweet.
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Bandy Greensacks
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Bandy Greensacks » Fri Aug 09, 2013 8:13 pm

I either watch films intently (and still end up not analyzing or discussing them, most of the time) or I read books intently. That's a mental choice I make, even if it seems nonsensical. One or the other is always being ignored.

And right now, it's more about film and TV than anything else
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Circus Freak » Fri Aug 09, 2013 8:20 pm

I was going to put myself in the "terrible at reading" category, but the fact that I've completed both Gravity's Rainbow and Mason & Dixon in the last three years suggested otherwise, so I renamed it the "terrible at remembering" category, which then gave me a convenient excuse not to actually say anything substantial about the latter novel. I liked it too, but then you already knew that.

I find it amusing that everything appears to remind you of Sokurov, or is it that Sokurov reminds you of everything? Based on my limited experience with Maddin, however, I can understand the comparison in this case. He's one of those filmmakers I encountered briefly, liked a bit and then forgot existed without properly exploring his filmography. I feel like this may have been a mistake.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Aug 09, 2013 8:21 pm

Bandy Greensacks wrote:That's a mental choice I make, even if it seems nonsensical. One or the other is always being ignored.
Fair enough. And far better than my low periods where I can't seem concentrate on either one.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Aug 09, 2013 8:26 pm

Circus Freak wrote:I find it amusing that everything appears to remind you of Sokurov, or is it that Sokurov reminds you of everything? Based on my limited experience with Maddin, however, I can understand the comparison in this case.
Haha. It's always understandable, though. Everything comes back to Sokurov. Or Fassbinder. Except, come to think of it, Sokurov and Fassbinder never remind me of each other.
I feel like this may have been a mistake.
I'll definitely be seeing more Maddin soon.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by MrCarmady » Fri Aug 09, 2013 8:29 pm

That looks fun. I didn't get much out of My Winnipeg but I love The Heart of the World, especially his choice of music for that. Haven't seen anything else...
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Aug 09, 2013 8:38 pm

Oh, whoops, I lied. I've seen a short, also: Odin's Shield Maiden.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by B-Side » Fri Aug 09, 2013 11:01 pm

ironic that you'd forget you watched that film in particular
no longer on hiatus from movies(!)

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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Bandy Greensacks » Fri Aug 09, 2013 11:09 pm

Because she goes by Shieldmaiden, right?
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by B-Side » Fri Aug 09, 2013 11:09 pm

no

because she has aids
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sat Aug 10, 2013 12:35 am

B-Side wrote:ironic that you'd forget you watched that film in particular
Haha. Yes. :oops:
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Beau » Mon Aug 12, 2013 12:54 am

I've already bought three huge Pynchon novels. I only have to actually read them. But they're in my library!
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Beau » Mon Aug 12, 2013 12:57 am

Reading is easier than watching movies. I can read whenever, wherever. Movies I have to sit down and have two hours of free time. I also have to be awake enough to take in those hours and have my mind not shut down midway. Books are like, hey, come here, read me a bit, then fall asleep. I'll always be with you, Beau. Always right there with you in your man purse. And there they are. Movies, no, they're not so generous. They're like cats. They're out there, living their lives, and you have to go to them. And I don't always find the damn time, damn films.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Mon Aug 12, 2013 11:33 pm

Beau wrote:Books are like, hey, come here, read me a bit, then fall asleep. I'll always be with you, Beau. Always right there with you in your man purse. And there they are.
My books tell me they'd rather be with Beau. :P
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by LEAVES » Tue Aug 13, 2013 1:49 am

If I don't read consistently, which is always, and don't mark my page, which is never, then I will spend more time re-reading to try to find out where I left off than I will actually reading, so I end up reading every book 2-3 times. Films I usually either watch in whole or give up on and forget about entirely.

As for Pynchon, I have read two, and they were the same book, only the first was longer and better and the second wasn't even good. Too much crying.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Tue Aug 13, 2013 2:18 am

LEAVES wrote:If I don't read consistently, which is always, and don't mark my page, which is never, then I will spend more time re-reading to try to find out where I left off than I will actually reading, so I end up reading every book 2-3 times.
PM me your address and I will send you some beautiful purple bookmarks. :D
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by wigwam » Tue Aug 13, 2013 2:21 am

i have this thing that creeps me out where i'll open the book and look right where i left off, and even in 20+ years of literacy i never trust myself that it's accurate and read back some but it's always in the right spot, i creep myself out and then i doubt myself and then i prove to myself that i'm dumb and then i read
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Shieldmaiden
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Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 2:19 pm

Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Tue Aug 13, 2013 2:43 pm

That happens to me sometimes too, minus all the doubt and anxiety. :P

But, really, bookmarks, people!
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