Maiden's Voyage

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Shieldmaiden
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Tue Jul 29, 2014 7:36 pm

Colonel Kurz wrote:Angelica.
Ah, thanks! Somehow I completely forgot about that one!
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Tue Jul 29, 2014 7:39 pm

Wow, a wall of text! Too bad it's spam. :P
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Beau » Tue Jul 29, 2014 8:24 pm

I thought it was filmwise.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Tue Jul 29, 2014 8:51 pm

Haha. But Filmwise never posts in my thread. :(
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Maiden's Voyage: Two from Yugoslavia

Post by Shieldmaiden » Fri Aug 01, 2014 9:14 pm

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    • For some reason, I watched two back-to-back from Yugoslavia this week. I've had images from the first one (above) stuck in my head for years, simply from reading B-Side's writeup here (credit where it's due). And it didn't disappoint. Like its improbably beautiful leads, I Even Met Happy Gypsies, is always a pleasure to look at. After setting a few story strands into motion, Petrovic doesn't worry much about plot. But does he need to? With images like these and music and melodrama, I'm inclined to say, no. On the other hand, if his intention is to portray a colorful, violent community that closes ranks to outsiders, he accomplishes his goal rather perfectly.

      Underground (pictured below) is quite a different story: a three-hour slapstick war epic with plot to spare. I thought I knew what to expect from this one, and for the first third or so, I was right. Then BANG! the wacky buddy movie turns into a tragi-comedy of betrayal and exploitation, weighed down with some Forrest Gumpish historical nonsense. Then, kaBOOM! it changes again, this time into an even more pessimistic vision of modern humanity coming apart at the seams, strengthened with a dose of mystical weirdness. It's rarely as funny as it thinks it is, but it's always fascinating to look at, and the characters are memorable through every incarnation. You might assume the betrayal story line is symbolic of abuse of power in a country built of bitter factions, but political satire doesn't seem to be Kusturica's aim. His strength is in manic energy, used to great cynical effect and relieved only briefly by gorgeous evocative images, such as the moment a boy of twenty first sees the sun, or the sight of refugee-laden trucks looming in the fog. I especially like the absurd way he manages to tie the break-up of Yugoslavia into the WWII story – a clock tampering subplot spirals into absurdly long lifespans, a cellar hideout spawns a wonderful underground network connecting all the cities of Europe. Beautiful! Even the overly sentimental ending can't take away from that.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Circus Freak » Sat Aug 02, 2014 10:56 am

Should say something. Don't know what.

My opinion of Underground is similarly confused, in that I'm not sure how much I actually like it but it's interesting and fun and good and stuff. You didn't mention the music or the theatre scene either.

Politically, my brief summary of it is that Kusturica's a Yugoslavist so the betrayal is his way of suggesting that Yugoslavia only failed because of individual greed or corruption and not because it was a flawed idea all along, hence the lack of specificity in terms of factions and ethnicities. But I agree with you that it doesn't really work as political satire and is best seen as an enjoyable farrago. This is why I can never talk about it without instinctively comparing it with Taxidermia, the nihilistic Hungarian equivalent whose satire is razor-sharp.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sat Aug 02, 2014 2:19 pm

Circus Freak wrote:Politically, my brief summary of it is that Kusturica's a Yugoslavist so the betrayal is his way of suggesting that Yugoslavia only failed because of individual greed or corruption and not because it was a flawed idea all along, hence the lack of specificity in terms of factions and ethnicities. But I agree with you that it doesn't really work as political satire and is best seen as an enjoyable farrago. This is why I can never talk about it without instinctively comparing it with Taxidermia, the nihilistic Hungarian equivalent whose satire is razor-sharp.
OK, yes, that makes sense. The only time that became explicit was in the sappy final scene, which didn't really work for me. But, I guess it wasn't aimed at me, or anyone outside the conflict. And, as they floated off, I did get a little thrill of understanding at the image of an ideal, united Yugoslavia existing only in memory.

Taxidermia sounds hard to watch.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Circus Freak » Sat Aug 02, 2014 6:40 pm

Shieldmaiden wrote:OK, yes, that makes sense. The only time that became explicit was in the sappy final scene, which didn't really work for me. But, I guess it wasn't aimed at me, or anyone outside the conflict. And, as they floated off, I did get a little thrill of understanding at the image of an ideal, united Yugoslavia existing only in memory.

Taxidermia sounds hard to watch.
I like the final scene. Bizarrely, I remember being reminded of it when I watched The Tree of Life's ending, and I'll take sappy over insufferably humourless any time.

I learned long ago that Taxidermia isn't recommendable, so consider my mentioning of it a necessary aside.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sat Aug 02, 2014 7:34 pm

Yes, I thought of Tree of Life when I saw this. And, sure, sappy > whatever was going on in that one, haha. I've seen something else recently with a metafictional celebration at the end... oh, yeah, Os Canibais! And, of course, Zulawski likes that kind of thing, as well.
Circus Freak wrote:I learned long ago that Taxidermia isn't recommendable, so consider my mentioning of it a necessary aside.
Noted. :P
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Epistemophobia » Sat Aug 02, 2014 8:43 pm

Circus Freak wrote:Should say something. Don't know what.
my life
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sat Aug 02, 2014 9:19 pm

:)

Are you a fan of either of those two Oliveiras, Bear?
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Epistemophobia » Sat Aug 02, 2014 9:46 pm

I like Maria de Medeiros.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sat Aug 02, 2014 9:56 pm

Haha. Yeah, she's adorable.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by MrCarmady » Thu Aug 07, 2014 1:01 am

Remember loving Underground but remember little else, disappointingly. Should start watching proper movies again...
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Aug 07, 2014 12:09 pm

MrCarmady wrote:Remember loving Underground but remember little else, disappointingly.
I admire it plenty, but I can't say I love it. It's surprisingly thought-provoking for something so mad-cap, though, and I may feel more affection on a rewatch.
Should start watching proper movies again...
I can't skip over this. Yes. Don't make me beg. :(
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Maiden's Voyage: Arizona Dream

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Aug 07, 2014 2:53 pm

Speaking of rewatches, I just revisited Kusturica's Arizona Dream, a lovable, goofy Jerry Lewis-Johnny Depp-Vincent Gallo comedy that hits all the right wistful notes when it's not veering into undercooked melodrama. I had the impression the above trio were improvising most of the time; there's a real feeling of family history there, of complex love-hate relationships underlying all their interactions. And, while it's nowhere near the visual feast of Underground, there are many moments of beauty, including this lovely echo:

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Maiden's Voyage: Szamanka

Post by Shieldmaiden » Wed Aug 13, 2014 8:15 pm

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Haha, this movie! Imagine if Ethel in La femme publique had shed her tiny skirt altogether, jumped around like a monkey on the street, and eaten out of the cat's bowl; Szamanka is almost a caricature of a Zulawski film (though I admit it would be hard to tell). But Iwona Petry is so consistently, believably manic, the music so alternately jarring and overwhelming (those drums), the camera so tight on their faces (and other parts), that it achieves Enter the Void-like levels of immersiveness. I'd heard nothing about this film, here or anywhere on the web, and, honestly, I was a little afraid it would be La fidélité again, Zulawski-lite. So I was quite relieved to find the main character so dangerously weird. Raised (as we learn, almost literally) by wolves, Wloszka (the Italian) has no manners, no discipline, not even motor control. Like her lovers, we have only one way into her head: her fierce appetites. Michal, the only one who can satisfy her, finds himself slowly losing his sanity, demonstrated by an ominous tendency to confuse Wloszka and the szaman in his laboratory. As entertaining as all this is, I can't help feeling it's a little shallow. The words of the peat bog oracle feel significant, but the idea of sex as power exchange isn't very deep, after all. But there's so much to enjoy on the surface! Besides the visceral/emotional content of the musical cues, I loved the visual echoes (the fiery color at the factory and in the lovers' skin, the blind-white transitions that hint at catastrophe), as well as the constant (visual and plot) expressions of a chaotic new Poland. And, maybe that's depth enough!

And, since we're on the topic, things I've said about other Zulawskis, in the order in which I love them (at the moment). And I do love them all!

My Nights Are More Beautiful Than Your Days
On the Silver Globe
Possession
L’important c’est d’aimer
Boris Godounov
La note bleue
La femme publique
Diabel
The Third Part of the Night


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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Epistemophobia » Thu Aug 14, 2014 7:07 am

Pretty.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by wigwam » Thu Aug 14, 2014 11:24 am

My favorite Zulawski :heart:
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Aug 14, 2014 2:32 pm

Right now I'd put it in the top three, right after Silver Globe, but that might be because my head is still filled with it. Honestly, though, it's probably the one I'll rewatch the most. :)
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Aug 14, 2014 2:39 pm

Fun fact: Szamanka is in IMDb, but it can't be found on a title search. For some reason, it just isn't there!
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by wigwam » Thu Aug 14, 2014 2:50 pm

it's very rewatchable, also sometimes when i'm panicking in public I think abt (feel like?) Iwona Petry, it's one of those gets-under-my-skin movies
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Aug 14, 2014 5:00 pm

Aw. I feel more like the peat bog man, haha. No, there's definitely something about her, for a character who's so wordless and (seemingly) blank. I really liked her. (Well, up until the very end, I guess.)
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Maiden's Voyage: Steve Erickson

Post by Shieldmaiden » Mon Aug 18, 2014 3:40 pm

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I keep thinking I've found the ultimate in mournful nostalgia, then discovering (or remembering) something even more ultimate, haha. But, I believe we're finally getting close, here, at least in terms of my personal history with the concept. I read Steve Erickson's first three novels long ago, more than once, in fact, the better to absorb their dreamlike beauty and piercing longing for things lost to time and reality. At his best (and in these books, that's most of the time), his tales ring with a familiar poetry, like half-remembered songs on the radio next door, cadences that match the beat of your heart. For some reason, I've only just now gotten around to his fourth novel, Arc d'X, which turns out to be very much in the same vein as the previous three, astounding in parts, and probably the most thematically satisfying of the set. I'll avoid the u-word, but I think it's obvious that Erickson belongs in this thread!

Very much a first novel, Days Between Stations is the most uneven of the four, but, it gets a lot of mileage out of a few great images and a story tailor-made for cinephiles: a towering masterpiece of silent film has been lost – denied a screening by its own maker, and forgotten over time. The love triangle that frames and echoes the filmmaking subplot is less intense and hampered by excruciating sex scenes, but still saturated with loss and regret.

An excerpt:
When he placed a candle on the shelf across the room from him and lit its wick, he came to realize that in fact everything he saw was a flat surface, like a screen—that in fact dimension was an illusion. Everything was a flat surface and the pinpoints of light, whether from a candle on the shelf or a gaslamp above the street, were punctures in that surface—gashes made by somebody behind the screen. He realized then that beyond everything he saw there was an entire realm of blazing sunfire, and that colors were only the silhouettes of people in that realm—walking, eating, dancing, doing whatever they were doing behind the screen. It astonished him that everyone failed to realize they were just figures on a tapestry, the shadows of something else.
Rubicon Beach is a more assured, ambitious book, and still my favorite of the four. It juggles the stories of a struggling screenwriter, a beautiful woman from a remote village on the Amazon, a reclusive librarian in a flooded city, and a mathematician/mystic from the Midwest. More poetry than prose, it manages to ground its vivid characters in emotional reality even as their lives slide into the fantastic. The post-apocalyptic hints of Days are fleshed out here, turning the strangely beautiful ruins of Los Angeles into a poignant ode to lost opportunities everywhere.

A brief glimpse:
Sometimes one must live half a lifetime before he understands the silences of half a lifetime before—sometimes, if it's someone like me. Sometimes, if it's someone like you, one understands from the first the silences of a lifetime to come, the silences that come at the end; and one emulates them early, so as to recognize them later. I hear the call of your knife over the songs of a zombie city. I cast myself in flight for the decapitation of my own guilt, to live where I once died, to resurrect my passion, my integrity, my courage from out of my own grave. Those things that I once thought dead. By the plain form of my delirium I will blast the obstruction of every form around me into something barely called shadow. I sail. I swim to you. I know the water.
Erickson plays a new game in Tours of the Black Clock, a daring alternate history that makes futuristic fantasy seem tepid by comparison. To be honest, it makes most things seem tepid by comparison! Clock is a crazy, epic adventure in which Hitler is distracted from the war by his personal pornographer, and the whole 20th century is twisted and transformed.

I love the energy of this one:
My name is Banning Jainlight, the voice continues. The year is 1917; I am born. I remember it. I remember leaving her, the rush of it, my mother banning me from her, though it wasn't she who named me. That was my other mother. I had two. I remember the long fall down such a short red passageway, as I fell I saw troops on the march, fields afire and black cannons in the sun, riots in the alleys of Russia and messiahs in the dunes of eastern deserts, and one fallen angel after another pulling himself up onto the face of a new hour. First one hand is visible then the second, nails grasping desperately for a hold of something, then the top of the head comes into sight, then the glistening brow, the harsh straining eyes, the grimacing mouth as he pulls himself up and finally hoists his body the rest of the way, lying there on the face of a new hour heaving for air. After the first, the rest come one by one, the fallen angels. They've come to change everything.
My perspective on Arc d'X may be slightly skewed by the fact that I've just finished it. In some ways it feels a lot more mature than the previous three, but, then, that might have something to do with the reader, ha. Again, he uses a vivid alternate history (this time Thomas Jefferson and the French Revolution), mixed with an even more dystopic Los Angeles, as well as a few new twists, including a writer named Erickson in a weird, expectant Berlin. Though the stories that intertwine are all about mistakes and loss, I get a definite sense of hope from this one. Our (actual) world has not collapsed in a Year 2000 disaster, after all, so some of what he mourns must still be within our grasp. Beauty can turn up in the strangest places; the worst of crimes may have unintended consequences; and the flip side of a lifetime of regret is memory and celebration.

Just a taste:
For all of her life her beauty had taken away with one hand the freedom it offered with another; for all her life it had unlocked with one hand the chains the other had bound to her; and she didn't want to be beautiful anymore. She had never believed in it anyway. She believed every man who had called her beautiful was a liar or a fool, either not to be taken seriously or to be taken seriously only for how he meant to possess her. She didn't want her body anymore, she didn't want her face; she would happily leave her witchy incandescent eyes on the pillow, her watery dreamwracked mouth in his hand, where he could hold it like a coin or a plum or a small animal and believe its kiss was a gift of the soul rather than a twitch of the nervous system. She would leave behind the bits of her beauty like souvenirs, and she'd leave the shell of herself to the thing inside her that could devour what she was but not who she was, while she went to a place where the static of love meeting freedom was not to be confused with history.

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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Mon Aug 18, 2014 10:56 pm

No Steve Erickson fans here? I didn't think he was that obscure. :(

Was just reading this.
Multiple narrative threads do not make Erickson unique in terms of narrative style, but his challenging use of these threads also sets him apart from DeLillo. Even when DeLillo moves back and forth between narrative lines, he is clear and straightforward. You quickly know where you are, and throughout each novel a certain rhythm of sectional movement is established. Erickson will stay in a narrative line for sixty or seventy pages, building up intensity and suspense nicely, and switch without warning to another narrative. Suddenly we’re in another world, or we’ve moved from third person to first, or we’re following a different character around, waiting for the connections to come clear. As a result, Erickson defies reader expectation more thoroughly than DeLillo ever does. If he’s the secret heir of DeLillo, he’s also the not-so-secret heir of Doctor Who, Jean-Luc Godard, and David Lynch.
Lynch isn't actually a very good filmic comparison. I'd say he's more Wong Kar Wai.

I was really hoping someone here would have experience with later Erickson. I picked up The Sea Came in at Midnight a few years ago and wasn't impressed. I could probably be convinced to try again, though.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Beau » Mon Aug 18, 2014 11:04 pm

Shieldmaiden wrote:No Steve Erickson fans here? I didn't think he was that obscure. :(

Was just reading this.
Lynch isn't actually a very good filmic comparison. I'd say he's a more Wong Kar Wai.

I was really hoping someone here would have experience with later Erickson. I picked up The Sea Came in at Midnight a few years ago and wasn't impressed. I could probably be convinced to try again, though.
I think the comparison is based on what Lynch does in Mulholland Drive and Lost Highway, suddenly switching to different characters (or warped imaginary versions of the same characters) half-way through. In that sense, I think the comparison is apt, though I know nothing about Erickson nor did I know he actually existed. But if he writes literary post-apocalyptic narratives, I'm on board with that.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Tue Aug 19, 2014 12:04 am

Beau wrote:I think the comparison is based on what Lynch does in Mulholland Drive and Lost Highway, suddenly switching to different characters (or warped imaginary versions of the same characters) half-way through. In that sense, I think the comparison is apt, though I know nothing about Erickson nor did I know he actually existed.
Yeah, I can see why he said Lynch, but since Erickson's schtick isn't as disconcerting or creepy as it is just piling on different layers or types of longing/loss, 2046 or Ashes of Time seem like better examples of switching stories mid-stream. Plus, I didn't want to get Lynch fans too excited, haha.
But if he writes literary post-apocalyptic narratives, I'm on board with that.
I think you'd like him. :)
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by LEAVES » Tue Aug 19, 2014 4:05 pm

I started reading The Sea Came In At Midnight and it creeped me out, mostly because I was thinking that someone had to willfully write it. Creepy.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Tue Aug 19, 2014 4:47 pm

Yeah, I didn't even finish that one, but I don't remember why. Wasn't there something about a suicide cult? Obviously, I'm only vouching for his first four.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Beau » Wed Aug 20, 2014 3:19 am

I have no idea what your avatar is LEAVES, but I applaud it.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by LEAVES » Wed Aug 20, 2014 3:51 am

Beau wrote:I have no idea what your avatar is LEAVES, but I applaud it.
Kimbra + PURPLE

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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Trip » Wed Aug 20, 2014 3:56 am

Never did see Szamanka.
Please TRIP and Die
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Beau » Wed Aug 20, 2014 3:56 am

If that's the same Kimbra that popped up during my quick Google Image Search, she's significantly more stunningly gorgeous than your avatar implies, although that is, of course, no attack on the obvious quality of the avatar itself. I also discovered, with some pause, that she's younger than I am, which, of course, at this point, is not saying really that much, because plenty of famous people are younger than I am, which obviously only drives home the point of my rising age. Thankfully, we have Gort around to drive up the forum average on that end. Thanks Gort!
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by LEAVES » Wed Aug 20, 2014 4:02 am

Beau wrote:If that's the same Kimbra that popped up during my quick Google Image Search, she's significantly more stunningly gorgeous than your avatar implies, although that is, of course, no attack on the obvious quality of the avatar itself. I also discovered, with some pause, that she's younger than I am, which, of course, at this point, is not saying really that much, because plenty of famous people are younger than I am, which obviously only drives home the point of my rising age. Thankfully, we have Gort around to drive up the forum average on that end. Thanks Gort!
Yeah, but...

Object 1
Object 2
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Beau » Wed Aug 20, 2014 4:22 am

That is how I imagine I sing when I'm in the shower. I've been told the reality doesn't match my imagination, sadly.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Trip » Wed Aug 20, 2014 4:52 am

Heard the new one, LEAVES? 90s Music <3
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by LEAVES » Wed Aug 20, 2014 6:08 am

Trip wrote:Heard the new one, LEAVES? 90s Music <3
Not the whole thing, but I like parts of that song a lot. The live performances of basically anything, with the looping pedals and the solo guitar and whatever else she decided to do, was so much better than the stuff on the last album... I'm more excited for the stuff that's not on the album. Going to a show that she's playing soon, though, so that should be fun.

Also, this is the totally wrong thread. Continue, though, they can't evict us!
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Thu Aug 21, 2014 12:07 am

LEAVES wrote:Also, this is the totally wrong thread. Continue, though, they can't evict us!
Heh. It's the new M&M.
Trip wrote:Never did see Szamanka.
Why not? It goes down easy.


EDIT: This next one's not a favorite, exactly, though it's 'notable,' certainly. And I have words I need to say about it, so.
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Maiden's Voyage: Visitor Q vs. Teorema

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sat Aug 23, 2014 3:33 am

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Visitor Q is a veeeery strange mixture of family melodrama, dystopian comedy, TV parody, and gleeful shock tactics. The humor is so dark it's often invisible to me (of course), though what I did notice was mostly in the sound effects (the slurping, the cork popping, hahahaha). In my attempt to understand it, I actually watched Teorema; from which I concluded that Miike likes humanity a lot more than Pasolini does (er, did). Miike's Visitor may have more painful methods of enlightenment, but his results are therapeutic, not punishing. And, the film is very much the same; despite all the vaunted taboo-breaking, Visitor Q is the easier film to watch. The crazy exaggeration of dysfunction that Miike's film (let's be honest) revels in never feels wholly unfamiliar, because the emotional responses to root causes (bullying, abuse, failure) are commonplace, while Pasolini's stunted saints and sinners are alien and opaque (and a little boring). But, lest I give the impression that I didn't like it at all, I must say this for the Pasolini:
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Circus Freak » Sat Aug 23, 2014 10:41 am

I'd never have guessed when I deliberately didn't recommend Taxidermia to you that you'd soon be watching Visitor Q (and describing it as a comparatively easy watch in reference to another film). But the point about a director's underlying view of humanity is an important one, albeit one I'm not sure I grasped when I saw Visitor Q as a teenager and rolled my eyes at how perverted it was.
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Sat Aug 23, 2014 3:25 pm

Haha. Sometimes I surprise myself. And, truly, I've seen much worse. Nobody ate anyone else's face, for one thing. I'll get to Taxidermia, too. Give me time.

And, yeah, his humanity is the key. Short of out-and-out face-eating, I often find myself responding to the feelings underneath, rather than the surface craziness. I think Zulawski taught me that.

Hey, no one liked my eloquent defense of Teorema? Haha. And, yeah, I'm sure this wasn't the best way to introduce myself to Pasolini (through a Miike lens), but everyone has to start somewhere.
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Maiden's Voyage: Under the Skin

Post by Shieldmaiden » Mon Sep 01, 2014 1:32 pm

Image Image
  • I'm not sure what to say about Under the Skin. I like movies that lure me into their strange spaces and trick me into taking off all my clothes... no, wait! I mean, the enveloping colors and sounds, the things noticed and things ignored – all of it here invites me to sink into a thick goo of alien perception. And it worked for me, especially the sound. That amazing score! I think it's interesting that people are divided as to whether Johansson's character is feeling something like human emotions. We're led into that trap, of course, by 'her' very human appearance, though there's very little in the way of expression on her face. We're directed to presume her thoughts with sound cues and, more daringly, colors. Personally, I think those thoughts are more ethical than than emotional, but who knows? Is curiosity an emotion? Fear, now, that's an emotion I think she definitely feels, and it's not hard to imagine that particular emotion bridging species.
    Did anyone else think her alien body is possibly still alive at the end? The ash on the camera lens shot could be her point of view.
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JediMoonShyne
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Re: Maiden's Voyage: Under the Skin

Post by JediMoonShyne » Mon Sep 01, 2014 2:53 pm

Shieldmaiden wrote:And it worked for me, especially the sound.
Perhaps the best part.

It's mentioned in the extras that the alienating noise used at the very beginning is actually distorted audio from Johansson's speech tests. :heart:
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Shieldmaiden
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Re: Maiden's Voyage: Under the Skin

Post by Shieldmaiden » Mon Sep 01, 2014 3:31 pm

JediMoonShyne wrote:It's mentioned in the extras that the alienating noise used at the very beginning is actually distorted audio from Johansson's speech tests. :heart:
Oh, cool!
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Trip
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Trip » Mon Sep 01, 2014 3:43 pm

She becomes everywhere.
Please TRIP and Die
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Colonel Kurz
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Colonel Kurz » Mon Sep 01, 2014 3:56 pm

Trip wrote:She becomes everywhere.
:fresh:
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Shieldmaiden
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Mon Sep 01, 2014 4:56 pm

I don't get it.

EDIT: Oh. Lucy. Never mind. :)
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Trip
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Trip » Mon Sep 01, 2014 5:54 pm

Her?
Please TRIP and Die
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Shieldmaiden
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by Shieldmaiden » Mon Sep 01, 2014 6:11 pm

Haha. I guess we know how the next Avengers movie will end.
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MrCarmady
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Re: Maiden's Voyage

Post by MrCarmady » Wed Sep 10, 2014 6:59 pm

You'll never guess what I just watched!
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