Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

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Popcorn Reviews
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Tue Jun 25, 2019 1:56 am

Lawrence of Arabia is outstanding. I love that film to death. I loved Stagecoach quite a lot when I first saw it, but after I read about the animal cruelty involving the horses, I'm not sure I'll ever watch it again (or, at least, for a long time). As for Blue Velvet, what were your issues with Rosselini's character?

Also, I'm glad to see this thread still alive.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Stu » Tue Jun 25, 2019 6:47 am

Apex Predator wrote:
Tue Jun 25, 2019 1:43 am
1. Lawrence of Arabia (1962)---Sweeping epic about a British never-do-well who bonds with the Arabs that he's working with and comes up with a daring military strategy that might win a war. The visuals are darned good and the performances by Peter O'Toole and Omar Sharif are superb. Only regret is that I didn't see this on the big screen. A+
LoA is one of my all-time favorites too, so I'm glad to see you joining me and Popcorn in its particular cult, Apex :D
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Slentert » Tue Jun 25, 2019 8:39 am

Apex Predator wrote:
Tue Jun 25, 2019 1:43 am
6. Blue Velvet (1986)---The way they treat Isabella Rosselini's character is very odd. And there's a glorified Heineken commercial in here at one point. But what kind of plays out like a preview of sorts to Twin Peaks zips when Frank Booth (Dennis Hopper) shows up. He's like a dash of nitrous oxide inserted into the film. B-
I recently saw Blue Velvet on the big screen. You have to know, I live in Belgium, which is a country that is very proud of its beer, and Heineken, a Dutch beer, is like a national punchline. There are so many jokes of which the clou is always a variation on "Heineken tastes like piss". So when Frank Booth said "Heineken? Fuck that shit!" it got a way bigger than laugh than it would probably get anywhere else in the world.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Thief » Tue Jun 25, 2019 12:36 pm

Apex Predator wrote:
Tue Jun 25, 2019 1:43 am
February 2019:

It Was OK:

7. Frankenstein (1910)---This short takes some bold liberties from the original Mary Shelley novel. Some kinda click, some don't. But the transformation scene is cool in a rock star sorta way and reminded me of a similar scene in Rocky Horror. C-

6. Blue Velvet (1986)---The way they treat Isabella Rosselini's character is very odd. And there's a glorified Heineken commercial in here at one point. But what kind of plays out like a preview of sorts to Twin Peaks zips when Frank Booth (Dennis Hopper) shows up. He's like a dash of nitrous oxide inserted into the film. B-

Good:

5. Stagecoach (1939)---The comic relief is a bit broad. The banker character never feels like he's in the same movie. And I've heard the horses got treated shoddily. But the film comes alive when the Ringo Kid (John Wayne) appears. Not yet into the routine that could get parodied, he gives at times a nicely done performance as the criminal with a heart. Plus, one of the first "Gather a bunch of random people in a vehicle and see what happens" movies! B

4. To Sir With Love (1967)---Might make for a good double-bill with Class of 1984. Sidney Poitier gives a good performance as an American engineer turned teacher who tries to reach out to students by treating them like adults. And it's nice to see Patricia Routledge in a role that doesn't involving failed attempts to climb in status. B

3. I Am Evidence (2017)---Not only does this documentary serve as a wake up call to people about criminals getting away because rape kits aren't being tested in a timely manner, it also manages to put people and faces to these stories as they attempt to rise above what happened years before. They also make good use of Mariska Hargitay who narrates (and explains how a series of letters while working in Law and Order: SVU caused her to get involved). B+

Great:

2. Won't You Be My Neighbor? (2018)---Documentary showcases how a Presbyterian priest in training from Pennsylvania figured out the power of television and decided to use it to educate children on morality and kindness. It also explores how he was able to save public TV and inform kids about the Vietnam War, specially abled people, and the assassination of Robert Kennedy. We need somebody like him in this world NOW. A

1. Lawrence of Arabia (1962)---Sweeping epic about a British never-do-well who bonds with the Arabs that he's working with and comes up with a daring military strategy that might win a war. The visuals are darned good and the performances by Peter O'Toole and Omar Sharif are superb. Only regret is that I didn't see this on the big screen. A+
I saw several of those within the last year (Frankenstein, Lawrence, Stagecoach) and I would probably rank them in a similar way.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Captain Terror » Tue Jun 25, 2019 1:02 pm

Apex Predator wrote:
Tue Jun 25, 2019 1:43 am
1. Lawrence of Arabia (1962) Only regret is that I didn't see this on the big screen. A+
https://www.fathomevents.com/events/tcm ... rabia-1962

Big screen! I'm goin'. :up:
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Wooley » Tue Jun 25, 2019 3:54 pm

Apex Predator wrote:
Tue Jun 25, 2019 1:43 am
February 2019:

It Was OK:

7. Frankenstein (1910)---This short takes some bold liberties from the original Mary Shelley novel. Some kinda click, some don't. But the transformation scene is cool in a rock star sorta way and reminded me of a similar scene in Rocky Horror. C-

I'm a big fan of this one.


4. To Sir With Love (1967)---Might make for a good double-bill with Class of 1984. Sidney Poitier gives a good performance as an American engineer turned teacher who tries to reach out to students by treating them like adults. And it's nice to see Patricia Routledge in a role that doesn't involving failed attempts to climb in status. B

I thought this one was a pretty pleasant, if dated, surprise.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Tue Jun 25, 2019 5:27 pm

Captain Terror wrote:
Tue Jun 25, 2019 1:02 pm
https://www.fathomevents.com/events/tcm ... rabia-1962

Big screen! I'm goin'. :up:
Noted. May have to swap out an off day to see this, but it'll be worth it.

Plus from reading the description, I have to presume that Ben Mankiewicz is introducing the film and closing it.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Tue Jun 25, 2019 5:30 pm

Slentert wrote:
Tue Jun 25, 2019 8:39 am
I recently saw Blue Velvet on the big screen. You have to know, I live in Belgium, which is a country that is very proud of its beer, and Heineken, a Dutch beer, is like a national punchline. There are so many jokes of which the clou is always a variation on "Heineken tastes like piss". So when Frank Booth said "Heineken? Fuck that shit!" it got a way bigger than laugh than it would probably get anywhere else in the world.
To be honest, I don't like beer period. I've tried Budweiser and Coors, and they taste similar.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Tue Jun 25, 2019 5:39 pm

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Tue Jun 25, 2019 1:56 am
Lawrence of Arabia is outstanding. I love that film to death. I loved Stagecoach quite a lot when I first saw it, but after I read about the animal cruelty involving the horses, I'm not sure I'll ever watch it again (or, at least, for a long time). As for Blue Velvet, what were your issues with Rosselini's character?

Also, I'm glad to see this thread still alive.
I'm trying to revive it. It'll be easier than trying to revive my Netflix blog.

My issues with Isabella Rosselini's character basically came down to
inconsistencies in how they treated her "Frank hurts me. I like it! Now hurt me" character arc. One minute, you're supposed to be sympathetic to her as you can see she's been through the wringer with her kidnapped son and husband. The next, it almost feels like she's getting joy out of messing with Kyle Mclachlan's character. Perhaps it's something I'm missing, but I could never get a bead on her.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Slentert » Tue Jun 25, 2019 5:53 pm

Apex Predator wrote:
Tue Jun 25, 2019 5:30 pm
To be honest, I don't like beer period. I've tried Budweiser and Coors, and they taste similar.
Oh, I don't drink any alcohol period, so I'm with you on that, but it is almost a religion back here. Beer, fries and soccer are the Holy Trinity.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Wed Jun 26, 2019 12:13 am

Slentert wrote:
Tue Jun 25, 2019 5:53 pm
Oh, I don't drink any alcohol period, so I'm with you on that, but it is almost a religion back here. Beer, fries and soccer are the Holy Trinity.
If I do drink these days, it's a Crown Royal whiskey and Coke. Last time's been over a year, though.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Wed Jun 26, 2019 2:27 am

Apex Predator wrote:
Tue Jun 25, 2019 5:39 pm
I'm trying to revive it. It'll be easier than trying to revive my Netflix blog.

My issues with Isabella Rosselini's character basically came down to
inconsistencies in how they treated her "Frank hurts me. I like it! Now hurt me" character arc. One minute, you're supposed to be sympathetic to her as you can see she's been through the wringer with her kidnapped son and husband. The next, it almost feels like she's getting joy out of messing with Kyle Mclachlan's character. Perhaps it's something I'm missing, but I could never get a bead on her.
I'd have to revisit the movie to formulate a better response. I don't remember a whole lot about the film, but I remember liking it quite a lot. I look forward to reading more of your write-ups in this thread though.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Tue Jul 02, 2019 7:15 pm

One more month to go. Will start proper write-ups with April's entries (all 3 of them):

Not recommended:

12. Julius Caesar (2017)---I've seen this on stage at Murray and it clicked so well with me (I think it might be Shakespeare's best). So it pains me to say that this production from the UK which had some interesting ideas (the prison setting, a cast consisting of women, attempts to place this in the modern era) but shoddy execution. When you start imagining this as a Late Shift type movie where Regis Philbin is plotting the death of Ryan Seacrest, something has gone terribly wrong. Replete with an ending that just happens. Clearly not a noble and just film. D

11. Scapegoat (2009)---Speaking of the UK, here's a TV movie about a lawyer in a no-win situation. He's hired to prove that a soldier accused of murder is insane to keep him from suffering the death penalty. But other than the nightmare of having a defense that isn't even bothering to fight for you (the dead woman is the daughter of one of London's finest), there isn't nearly enough there even as he confronts them towards the end. On the other hand, there's an interesting film out there about a family of investigators who double as exposition centers! D

10. The Liberator (2014)---Simon Bolivar gets his life story of his conquests on the battlefield and the bedroom told in this Supposedly the director was influenced by Hugo Chavez, but despite its NC-17 rating (!), the film struggles because they portray Simon as perfect even when he's on his various exiles. Edgar Ramirez tries, but this feels too conventional and too sterile. For some reason, we also have a Iwan Rheon sighting. D

It was OK:

9. Hotel Transylvania 3 (2018)---It's a typical Sandler film as he and his friends decide to go on a special monster cruise where love and danger loom on the horizon. But for some reason, this feels a bit better than his live action stuff. At times, director Genndy Tartakovsky threatens to take this film in some odd, weird directions. He doesn't succeed, but maybe it's because he's not working with one of his usual suspects which causes him to be better than normal. C-

8. The Three Stooges in Orbit (1962)---We're stuck with Curly Joe instead of Curly proper. But the three portray TV actors who need ideas to save their show and they may luck into things when their new landlord happens to be an inventor. Unfortunately, he also believes that Martians are about to invade Earth. It's fun to see military brass get pies blown into their faces. It feels like it's padded, but there's enough laughs to make this an OK weekend rainy watch. C

7. The Future Perfect (2017)---An experimental film to be sure, with the end result modestly successful. An immigrant from China struggles in Argentina because she doesn't know the language. She works at a supermarket while taking lessons that lead to various possibilities. I wasn't a huge fan of the constantly shifting timeline. But there are its pleasures as the stories they're reading/performing start coming to life. C+

Recommended:

6. The Theory of Everything (2014)---Thankfully, less unforced errors here than in The Imitation Game. But the biopic of Stephen Hawking (Eddie Redmayne) and his marriage to fellow student Jane (Felicity Jones) seems too conventional from the (too many) montages to its focus on the sudsy family drama which gives short shrift to the mathematician and his ideas. I went ugh at one scene, but I do feel both actors did fine in tough roles. B-

5. Jane Eyre (1943)---For some reason, I get the story of this one confused with Wuthering Heights. Jane is a poor, mistreated orphan who ends up at a rough boarding school. Years later, she works as a governess for the quiet, brooding Mr. Rochester (Orson Welles) which may possibly turn to love if she can overcome his secret. Even though that's Elizabeth Taylor as her bestie at the boarding school, I think they spent too much time there and not enough having us believe the romance. B-

4. She's Gotta Have It (1986)---Spike Lee's first film has a quiet, confident energy about it as it showcases Nola who has three men who appeal to her in different ways. Things take a turn around Thanksgiving when the men ask her to decide between them. Perhaps it was the Brooklyn setting or the black and white (except for one scene), but this mostly works. Except for one ugly scene that even Spike regrets and that almost got me to shut the film off. At least, it ends well enough. B-

3. Ella Brennan: Commanding the Table (2017)---Speaking of confident women, this documentary showed the struggle and rise of Ella Brennan, who built an empire of a restaurant and due to family reasons had to start over at the Commander's Palace. Not only is it content with showing the history of things she started in New Orleans (such as the whole chef phenomenon for starters), it also examines the efforts of her and her family to keep things on top even as she starts to wind things down herself. Tasty. B

2. The Freshman (1926)---First Harold Lloyd film I've seen and still pretty darned good as he tries to fit into the college scene, flounders, and finds an opportunity for redemption during the big game. What clicked for me is that Lloyd looks like an everyman sort of person and we can feel him as he tries out this persona he picked up from a film and the shame as a big party he throws goes oh so wrong. B

1. Ernest and Celestine (2013)---The friendship between a grouchy musician bear and an orphaned mouse who retrieves teeth shouldn't happen...it's forbidden in both worlds. But the joy of this animated film is that each of them find a way to make the other better. B
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Wooley » Wed Jul 03, 2019 10:40 pm

Apex Predator wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 7:15 pm

3. Ella Brennan: Commanding the Table (2017)---Speaking of confident women, this documentary showed the struggle and rise of Ella Brennan, who built an empire of a restaurant and due to family reasons had to start over at the Commander's Palace. Not only is it content with showing the history of things she started in New Orleans (such as the whole chef phenomenon for starters), it also examines the efforts of her and her family to keep things on top even as she starts to wind things down herself. Tasty. B
Obviously, this one's quite the big deal in my town right now.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Jinnistan » Thu Jul 04, 2019 4:17 am

Apex Predator wrote:
Wed Jun 26, 2019 12:13 am
If I do drink these days, it's a Crown Royal whiskey and Coke.
Hunter Thompson considered this a "crime against nature". He only drank Crown on ice.

On the existing audio tapes from his Las Vegas adventures, he has a mini-tantrum on his lawyer Oscar Zeta Acosta for mixing his Crown with coca cola. (All of "The Gonzo Tapes" are on Youtube, but in unsegmented clips, so I'm not going to bother tracking down the exact moment, but it's pretty funny.)
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Thu Jul 04, 2019 6:18 pm

Jinnistan wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 4:17 am
Hunter Thompson considered this a "crime against nature". He only drank Crown on ice.

On the existing audio tapes from his Las Vegas adventures, he has a mini-tantrum on his lawyer Oscar Zeta Acosta for mixing his Crown with coca cola. (All of "The Gonzo Tapes" are on Youtube, but in unsegmented clips, so I'm not going to bother tracking down the exact moment, but it's pretty funny.)
Well, I'm with his lawyer on this one.

I've tried a different brand of whiskey with some Mountain Dew knockoff, and ugh.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Takoma1 » Thu Jul 04, 2019 10:04 pm

Apex Predator wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2019 7:15 pm

5. Jane Eyre (1943)---For some reason, I get the story of this one confused with Wuthering Heights. Jane is a poor, mistreated orphan who ends up at a rough boarding school. Years later, she works as a governess for the quiet, brooding Mr. Rochester (Orson Welles) which may possibly turn to love if she can overcome his secret. Even though that's Elizabeth Taylor as her bestie at the boarding school, I think they spent too much time there and not enough having us believe the romance. B-
Have you read the novel? I would highly recommend it. The relationship between Jane and Rocherster is incredibly messed up, something that even as a 16 year old I was able to recognize. I go back and forth on just how much Bronte knew what she was doing in this regard. I've seen two different film versions of the story and they never are able to capture the complexity of what happens in Jane's head. The parts at the boarding school are incredibly important because it's where Jane's anger at the world gets turned into something else. It's actually a huge chunk of the novel, and a lot of film versions overly shorten that sequence (I get why, but still).

The main problem with the "romance" is just how often (and with so little regret) Rochester lies to Jane. He's unapologetically manipulative. Jane's life is such a rollercoaster of cruelty and kindness. It's nice to see her assert herself in the end, despite the fact that she's way too good for Rochester. I think that it's hard to make their relationship look romantic, especially to a modern audience. The text itself always has a biting edge to it, and I think that when movies try to tell the story as a straightforward romance, it always feels a bit unconvincing.

(If you have read much from the Brontes, I highly recommend Kate Beaton's comics about them, like this one, this one or this one.)
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Fri Jul 05, 2019 6:54 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 10:04 pm
Have you read the novel? I would highly recommend it. The relationship between Jane and Rocherster is incredibly messed up, something that even as a 16 year old I was able to recognize. I go back and forth on just how much Bronte knew what she was doing in this regard. I've seen two different film versions of the story and they never are able to capture the complexity of what happens in Jane's head. The parts at the boarding school are incredibly important because it's where Jane's anger at the world gets turned into something else. It's actually a huge chunk of the novel, and a lot of film versions overly shorten that sequence (I get why, but still).

The main problem with the "romance" is just how often (and with so little regret) Rochester lies to Jane. He's unapologetically manipulative. Jane's life is such a rollercoaster of cruelty and kindness. It's nice to see her assert herself in the end, despite the fact that she's way too good for Rochester. I think that it's hard to make their relationship look romantic, especially to a modern audience. The text itself always has a biting edge to it, and I think that when movies try to tell the story as a straightforward romance, it always feels a bit unconvincing.

(If you have read much from the Brontes, I highly recommend Kate Beaton's comics about them, like this one, this one or this one.)
I'm going to guess that I haven't. Although I did have a penchant for reading classic novels as a kid, it doesn't sound like I've read either Eyre or Heights.

I think part of the reason that Jane gravitates towards Rochester is that he seems like the first person who shows her any sort of kindness...in clear contrast to her family life and the boarding school. I think part of the problem lies in the secret itself which unfortunately manifests itself in the most inopportune time. It probably doesn't help that there's a playfully cruel back and forth between Jane and Rochester at the beginning which makes it harder to believe the romance when it starts to blossom.

It is nice that Jane starts to stand up for herself towards the end. I mean, I get that being an orphan girl in the time period doesn't exactly give you a lot of options. But it's sad that she has to more or less just place her needs and desires in her heart and just lock them away as she gets blasted for being willful and not penitent enough.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Takoma1 » Fri Jul 05, 2019 7:34 pm

Apex Predator wrote:
Fri Jul 05, 2019 6:54 pm
I think part of the reason that Jane gravitates towards Rochester is that he seems like the first person who shows her any sort of kindness...in clear contrast to her family life and the boarding school. I think part of the problem lies in the secret itself which unfortunately manifests itself in the most inopportune time. It probably doesn't help that there's a playfully cruel back and forth between Jane and Rochester at the beginning which makes it harder to believe the romance when it starts to blossom.
And this is where film versions always do a disservice to the text.

Jane is mistreated by her family and by some of the people at the school. But she is treated kindly by Helen and by her teacher, Miss Temple. The school undergoes a reform while Jane lives there and she becomes a teacher at the school. She gets bored being at the school (where she's lived for 8 years), and wants to venture out in the world.

Rochester plays some really dumb, cruel mind games with Jane. Considering the difference in their ages and the power imbalance between them (employer/employee), it comes off particularly bad.

I'm comfortable with regarding their relationship as one of lust or infatuation, but it's not my notion of romance. Especially with the doom and gloom that hangs over their happy ending.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:01 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Fri Jul 05, 2019 7:34 pm
And this is where film versions always do a disservice to the text.

Jane is mistreated by her family and by some of the people at the school. But she is treated kindly by Helen and by her teacher, Miss Temple. The school undergoes a reform while Jane lives there and she becomes a teacher at the school. She gets bored being at the school (where she's lived for 8 years), and wants to venture out in the world.

Rochester plays some really dumb, cruel mind games with Jane. Considering the difference in their ages and the power imbalance between them (employer/employee), it comes off particularly bad.

I'm comfortable with regarding their relationship as one of lust or infatuation, but it's not my notion of romance. Especially with the doom and gloom that hangs over their happy ending.
Yeah, that wasn't part of the film. Helen was there (she was played by Liz Taylor in one of her earliest appearances). But there was no kindly teacher. The closest thing this film offered was Dr. Rivers, who rescued the girls from the rain. I think he was in the film again towards the end telling Jane about her aunt being sick.

Now she did stay in the school. But in this film, she turns down a teaching job to take on a job as a governess.

Rochester is cruel at times (definitely with the "interview" for starters), but I don't quite get why he went on and did what he did considering his secret. You think he would have said something or put a stop to something, but nah.

Yeah, that ending does come a bit conveniently...as well as leading to some clashes of tone. Yay?
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:35 pm

April Morning (1988, TV)

As the film opens, there's thick tension between the British soldiers who patrol the areas around Concord and Lexington in Massachusetts. They harass Solomon Chandler (Rip Torn) and make him give up his shipment. Several of the male people in town, most notably Joseph Simmons (Robert Urich) are working on a strongly worded document to send the British.

Meanwhile, Moses (Tommy Lee Jones) and wife Sarah (Susan Blakely) do their best to raise their young son Adam (Chad Lowe). He has a thing for Joseph's daughter Ruth (Meredith Salenger). But he's also looking for the love and affection of Moses, something that is he's slow to give his son.

The townspeople decide to confront the British by standing up to them later the next morning (perhaps it has to do with Paul Revere showing up with a horse the previous night). Adam signs up which concerns Moses (who's a bit skeptical about this confrontation but also now worried for his song). But he doesn't stop him and decides to try to teach him to survive.

For the most part, the cast led by Jones, Urich and Torn are fine. There's some tension that gets built as we see the group of men stand face to face with the British army. The romance between Lowe and Salenger is sweet.

But the film never takes advantage of these dramatic moments. Something happens that causes the British to open fire. But nobody confronts the person responsible...even though he had been ranting about if for a while.

Not helping is Lowe's performance. It could be the way Adam is written. But instead of stepping up with the events, he spends too much time crying and moping. It's the most Chad Lowiest Chad Lowe performance around, but I don't think it's a good thing.

Overall, this just feels like a missed opportunity. At least, thanks to to Hallmark name, it's pretty bloodless.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Sat Jul 27, 2019 2:23 am

The Milky Way (1936)

For the second time this year, I catch a film by Harold Lloyd. It's the classic tale of a milkman who while defending his sister's honor from some guys ends up "knocking out" the middleweight champ.

He tries to clear things up but before you can say "When the legend becomes fact, print the legend", he gets a boost to his popularity and in frustration, the champ's manager decides to build him up into a boxer in the plans to force a rematch where the champ regains his pride. He doesn't want to at first, but agrees after his horse gets sick.

A lot of the beats from The Freshman appear in The Milky Way (the silly dance he borrows from the movie in Freshman becomes a technique to avoid punches in Way; there's a scene where he tries to become a big shot). For the most part, they're still funny because he hadn't lost his everyman look (and it doesn't hurt that his voice sells this as well).

The film leads to a conclusion that is left wanting and there are some elements that don't play well. But at the same time, when a visual gag clicks, it's hilarious.

Overall, this wins by decision.

Next: Amazon exclusive with two musicians in a drama.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Mon Jul 29, 2019 6:15 pm

Guava Island (2019)

Deni (Donald Glover) works as an afternoon DJ for a radio station who tosses in an occasional ad for Red Cargo, the primary business for a small Caribbean nation. He's also a musician who is working on a festival to entertain the town.

His girlfriend Kofi (Rihanna) is a seamstress who also works for Red Cargo putting together clothes along with good friend Yara (Letitia Wright). She also has something to tell Deni when he gets some free time.

But Deni's problems begin when tycoon Red Cargo (Nonso Anozie) gets wind of the festival and tries to get Deni to pull the plug (he believes it will wear down his workers who supposedly work 7 days a week), When he refuses, a chain of events is set into motion that will affect the lives of Deni, Kofi, Red Cargo and everyone else on the island.

I dug the animated folk tale at the beginning that told how Deni and Kofi first fell in love as kids (he aspired to write her a song that was as lovely as she was). The use of Summertime Magic and This is America both get interesting new looks. The two leads are easy to root for. And Cuba looks lovely.

But, a film that is supposedly about how an artist can affect change in a small island and how its people can fight back against a banana republic and a dictator for a leader is pretty heady stuff. For a 56 minute film, it ultimately proves too ambitious for its runtime.

Also, I didn't care for the ending:
Not so much the "We got our day off" line or what caused it to happen. But more the story that Kofi was telling towards the very end of the film. It makes you feel like it was starting to cut off just as it was getting good. And it wasn't like they were running out of time. Again, this was 56 minutes. You had plenty of spare time to show this or reveal this in a way that didn't feel like a cheat.
I've seen people compare this to Purple Rain.

Wrong Prince film.

This feels way more like Under the Cherry Moon. The only thing missing was being in black and white.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Thief » Mon Jul 29, 2019 7:29 pm

Heard so much people talking about that film, but I don't even know what it's about.

Thanks for the review.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Wed Jul 31, 2019 9:00 pm

Don't take my word for it, Thief.

Guava Island does have 78 percent on the Tomatometer and it has a 6.8 out of 10 on IMDB.

So a lot of people liked it. I just didn't.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Wed Jul 31, 2019 9:22 pm

Four Sisters and a Wedding (2013)

Four sisters make a vow as children that if God can save the marriage of their parents that they'll love each other...and their new baby brother.

Years later, the youngest sister and schoolteacher Gabbie brings back her sisters: eldest Teddie who everyone thinks is a teacher, but is working as a housekeeper in Madrid, Bobbie who works as a communications manager in New York and who's dealing with her boyfriend's daughter who apparently hates her, and Alex who works as a film director with a boyfriend who loves to play around the field.

They all come back to prevent youngest brother CJ's marriage to Princess, the daughter of a wealthy spa owner. Although they try various things to end this union, maybe the time together will bring them all closer and have them deal with their various issues (which also includes one sister stealing another sister's man years before).

The comedy here works at times. Whether it's a frenetic game of charades with stakes involved or one sister's attempt to find out about what goes on inside the spa, I laughed a decent amount.

Also, it does a good job of showing that Princess and her family were decent people. From her attempts at making breakfast following one of his sister's schemes didn't work out so well to the hurt felt by the parents when they find out about the investigation, you get to feel for them as well.

But what doesn't work so well is the feels. The film quickly dives into melodrama which can be entertaining at times, but it also undercuts the moments that were supposed to be heartfelt. The tone is all over the map. It feels like a Tyler Perry film only instead of religion, there's more melodrama.

Another thing that didn't click was the matriarch of Princess's family. She came across mostly as a refugee from a third rate soap opera with her overacting and insistence on trilling everything. I think she was supposed to be a comic point at times, but it just felt off.

Oh, and the film kept switching from Tagalong to English, even among characters that supposedly shouldn't know English. Sorry may be universal, but it kinda took away from the magic.

Overall, the film felt more like an A-list film from the Philiippines than the last time I saw one: the cheesy Grandmother's House.

It was entertaining enough, but too many problems keep me from recommending it. C-

Next: Family reconciliation on the high seas.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Mon Aug 12, 2019 10:52 pm

Dude, I'm still waiting on my visa to the Netherlands from 2017...
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Wed Aug 14, 2019 8:42 pm

Like Father (2018)

Like a few others who read and post here, I've been doing Thief's list each and every month. So when the category of spent significant time on a boat showed up, I thought of this one. Honestly was thinking about seeing it since I first heard about it. And you know about killing two birds with one stone, right?

Anyway, Rachel (Kristen Bell) is a workaholic ad executive who is on the verge of a big promotion. She works so hard that she's trying to wrap things up shortly before getting married to Owen (Jon Foster). But the wedding is a no-go when Owen has enough of putting work ahead of everything and walks away.

Witnessing this is her estranged father Harry (Kelsey Grammar). She shares his gene for putting work above everything else, a trait that cost him his family.

Harry meets her at her apartment where they fight before reluctantly agreeing to drinks. Before you can say "Drunk on a Cruise", the two end up on what would have been her honeymoon cruise with Owen.

While there's some initial confusion from their tablemates at the cruise, eventually the ice between Harry and Rachel starts to thaw as they find things in common. And Rachel finds some good chemistry with Canadian teacher Jeff (Seth Rogen). But there's also secrets that need to be revealed and decisions that need to be made.

Although this manages to avoid being a generic romcom, it manages to be a generic father-daughter bonding experience instead. It also manages to be a promotional tool for Royal Caribbean which gets some prominent time including various activities on the boat and outside (such as a waterfall sequence and ziplining).

Luckily, the characters manage to largely avoid the same fate as the plot and story. The gay couple, the older couple, the African American couple, and even the young newlyweds which briefly become rivals all feel a bit thin, but avoid stereotyping. The emotions between Rachel and Harry occasionally delve into melodramatics, but it feels like it's based on behavior and feelings that are certainly understandable and feel real.

Overall, it's something that you might could consider if you're looking for a quick and easy pick-me-up on a rainy weekend day. Just keep those expectations in check. C-
Also, it might help to explain that director Lauren Miller is married to Seth Rogen in case you were wondering how he agreed to do this.
Next: A woman's quest for answers and how it affects others in a small town.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Thu Aug 15, 2019 11:05 pm

Before I review the Three Billboards movie, I do want to list Cinema International's films for Fall 2019. Maybe some of you have seen these?

Hunt for the Wilderpeople (2016)
Mademoiselle Paradis (2017)
At Eye Level (2016)*
Westwind (2011)*
Architects (1990)*
Transit Camp Friedland (2015)
This is Our Land (2018)
Shoplifters (2018)
Electric Shadows (2004)
Altiplano (2010)

The * signifies that it's part of a German film festival.

Thoughts? Recommendations?
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Slentert » Fri Aug 16, 2019 7:57 am

I have only seen Hunt for the Wilderpeople and Shoplifters, but both are highly recommended.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Torgo » Fri Aug 16, 2019 2:27 pm

I also vote for Hunt for the Wilderpeople. It's funny and charming as heck. Thank goodness for Taika Waititi.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Fri Aug 16, 2019 6:20 pm

Yeah, I was strongly leaning towards those two.

I'll try to see as many as I can of those, though. This is Our Land looks intriguing and Electric Shadows could be up my alley.

Also, I think this is happy 1,000th post!
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Tue Aug 20, 2019 7:33 pm

I thought I was banned from posting here, but apparently, I just can't post here at school for some reason?

Anyway...

3 Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

When Mildred (Frances McDormand) is frustrated by the lack of progress the police has made towards the brutal murder of her daughter, she rents three rarely used billboards and demands answers from the force.

This upsets the chief of police Bill Willoughby (Woody Harrelson) who is fighting cancer while still working and racist deputy Jason Dixon (Sam Rockwell) who don't take kindly to being called out. This leads to an ugly game of tit for tat as each side tries to make the other pay.

I do feel like the performances from McDormand, Harrelson, and Rockwell all the way down to minor roles played by Clarke Peters and Brendan Sexton were well done. It plays mostly as a dark drama with moments of gallows humor. Director Martin McDonagh does keep things moving right down to the final act.

But the writing was frustrating at times. I think the argument that Dixon is somehow absolved of his racist/prejudiced behavior doesn't hold up. Although I think you could make the case that they did attempt to excuse it at one point by shifting the blame.

Don't click the spoiler unless you've seen this already:
He does become slightly less bad by the end. In contrast, Mildred goes from understandable to shrill (there might be a teeny bit of a redemption towards the end). The scene towards the end when she reveals something to Jason and it basically gets shrugged off bothered me. Considering odds are good that you're still recovering from what happened that night, I don't think it would be so easy to do.

I mean I could see them arguing that somehow comparing Mildred with Jason makes for an interesting drama and a third act which somehow has both of them eating out in similar restaurants (she is on a date with James, who helped her with an alibi for a certain event late in the film while Jason is watching a possible suspect). C'mon film, that's just a bit too lazy although credit should be given for not giving the film an easy way out of their primary conflict.

And for those wondering, I do suspect the guy Jason was shadowing was sincere in making the confession that he did. But I think it occurred during his service in Afghanistan. Wonder if that road trip will eventually sort that out or not.
Overall, it wasn't a bad film by any means. But I do feel like the writing had some issues and that kept me from fully enjoying this one. B-

Next: A fed attempts to find out whether a teacher is being honest about who he is...and was.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Thief » Wed Aug 21, 2019 5:53 pm

I've been hesitating to check that one. I seem to have some trouble with McDonagh's handles the tone of his films. I ended up warming up to In Bruges later, but initially, it felt a bit off. Seven Psychopaths was more quirky and fun on a first watch, but I'm also not crazy about it. I will eventually get to it, but I'm not rushing it.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Takoma1 » Wed Aug 21, 2019 7:00 pm

Thief wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 5:53 pm
I've been hesitating to check that one. I seem to have some trouble with McDonagh's handles the tone of his films. I ended up warming up to In Bruges later, but initially, it felt a bit off. Seven Psychopaths was more quirky and fun on a first watch, but I'm also not crazy about it. I will eventually get to it, but I'm not rushing it.
Have you seen any of his brother's films? They have a similar sensibility but I think they are more empathetic and just overall better films. Would most recommend Calvary, but The Guard is quite good as well.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Wed Aug 21, 2019 7:03 pm

I loved Three Billboards when I saw it in the theater, but I'm a bit worried about revisiting it as I feel I may have liked it more than I should have. As for the tone, I thought some of the sentimental moments were off-putting, but I remember enjoying the tone overall. Apex raised some good points. I get that the film's goal is to twist your expectations around. I'm just worried that some of the character decisions will feel unrealistic.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Wed Aug 21, 2019 7:22 pm

Thief wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 5:53 pm
I've been hesitating to check that one. I seem to have some trouble with McDonagh's handles the tone of his films. I ended up warming up to In Bruges later, but initially, it felt a bit off. Seven Psychopaths was more quirky and fun on a first watch, but I'm also not crazy about it. I will eventually get to it, but I'm not rushing it.
I wouldn't rush. It'll still be there when you're ready to see it. :up:
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Thief » Wed Aug 21, 2019 7:32 pm

Takoma1 wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 7:00 pm
Have you seen any of his brother's films? They have a similar sensibility but I think they are more empathetic and just overall better films. Would most recommend Calvary, but The Guard is quite good as well.
I haven't. I remember you, or someone else, recommending Calvary on my thread, but I haven't seen it yet.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:08 pm

The Stranger (1946)

Charles Rankin (Orson Welles) is settled in a small Connecticut town as a prep school teacher. He's on the verge of marrying Mary (Loretta Young), daughter of a Supreme Court judge. He even works on the town clock tower trying to get that fixed.

But one day, a problem emerges in the form of Konrad Meinike, a Nazi who claims to know Charles. When Konrad begs him to repent and confess, Charles kills him and buries him.

Problem is that Konrad didn't come alone. He's being trailed by Mr. Wilson (Edward G. Robinson) of the UN War Crimes Commission who suspects Charles is really Franz Kindler, a war criminal.

Will Mr. Wilson be able to prove his suspicion? Will his wife get wise to who she is marrying?

The Stranger is very good at what it does. It manages to ramp up the tension while letting us know these people. And a few others such as Mary's brother Noah and the drugstore clerk who wonders why a little black bag is still at his general store. There may have been some cuts made by the studio, but it actually plays to its advantage by keeping the plot moving and raising tension.

Although a couple of Welles's ideas sounds intriguing, particularly the beginning and the casting of Agnes Moorhead in the role of Robinson, the end result crackles in its efficiency.
,
There's another thing notable about the film:
The film actually uses footage from a documentary showcasing footage of Nazi concentration camps. It's used by Wilson to place doubt in the mind of Mary. To be fair, other things have not added up for her such as the death of her dog Red under suspicious circumstances. The big thing to remember is that this is the first time almost anybody had a chance to see this for themselves. As it turns out, Welles had seen it a few months before in a discussion in front of the United Nations and was moved by it.
The performances are strong across the board. Depending on what he has to do, Welles is in top form here. Edward G. Robinson gives a toned down performance but you can still feel the urgency. As the woman somewhat in the middle, Young is fine. There's some memorable speeches by Welles at a dinner party and Robinson in a living room towards the end.

Perhaps one could make the argument that if there was a bit more time, it could have given Charles a chance to breathe. It almost feels a tad rushed at times. And there's a scene or two that kind of goes wrong in the third act largely because you'd think people would know what they do and not place themselves up in bad situations. But they do.

But for the most part it holds up well. Hopefully, someone uses this one as the thriller in one of Thief's categories because I'd like to get into this one again.

A-

Next: A wedding takes a turn.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:18 pm

One Red Nose Day and a Wedding (2019)

Although I've heard things about Red Nose Actually (such as Hugh Grant dancing to Hotline Bling), it took a few months to find it on a video website (I think it was Vimeo?). But even though I hadn't seen Love Actually, I managed to enjoy it anyway.

It was a short done for Red Nose Day which is a British charity thing that America's latched onto for the last couple of years.

The same can't be said here. I think it's more or less a requirement that you've see Four Weddings and a Funeral before seeing this one.

Basically, twenty five years after the events of the first film, pretty much everyone (Grant, Andie MacDowell, Kristen Scott Thomas) returns for a wedding.

But who's getting hitched?

Unlike Actually, which managed to keep things interesting with several storylines (including one where Rowan plays an all too eager store clerk), Wedding is pretty much what's on the tin. We're at one wedding and after its conclusion, this short is over with.

The majority of the jokes appear to be Atkinson as Father Gerald struggling to conduct the ceremony. Its heart is in the right place, but it doesn't make for a funny short.

Charity probably deserves better. Feel free to turn down this RSVP.

D

Next: The fracturing of a marriage...
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Takoma1 » Thu Aug 22, 2019 1:31 am

Thief wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 7:32 pm
I haven't. I remember you, or someone else, recommending Calvary on my thread, but I haven't seen it yet.
I would place Calvary and The Guard well over both In Bruges and Seven Psychopaths. (Though I do have to admit that I really admire the early scenes of In Bruges, especially the playground conversation between Farrell and Gleeson which is a stand-out, amazing work of art.)

Calvary is much more of a drama/thriller.

The Guard is more of a dark comedy, and it probably the most comparable to In Bruges and Seven Psychopaths in terms of that odd tone.

They are both just so good and both anchored by solid performances by Gleeson. I think that they deserve to be much more widely seen than they are. It bugs me every time In Bruges comes up.
Apex Predator wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:08 pm
The Stranger (1946)
The Stranger is some good old fashioned post-war noir goodness.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Thief » Thu Aug 22, 2019 2:43 pm

Apex Predator wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:08 pm
The Stranger (1946)

Charles Rankin (Orson Welles) is settled in a small Connecticut town as a prep school teacher. He's on the verge of marrying Mary (Loretta Young), daughter of a Supreme Court judge. He even works on the town clock tower trying to get that fixed.

But one day, a problem emerges in the form of Konrad Meinike, a Nazi who claims to know Charles. When Konrad begs him to repent and confess, Charles kills him and buries him.

Problem is that Konrad didn't come alone. He's being trailed by Mr. Wilson (Edward G. Robinson) of the UN War Crimes Commission who suspects Charles is really Franz Kindler, a war criminal.

Will Mr. Wilson be able to prove his suspicion? Will his wife get wise to who she is marrying?

The Stranger is very good at what it does. It manages to ramp up the tension while letting us know these people. And a few others such as Mary's brother Noah and the drugstore clerk who wonders why a little black bag is still at his general store. There may have been some cuts made by the studio, but it actually plays to its advantage by keeping the plot moving and raising tension.

Although a couple of Welles's ideas sounds intriguing, particularly the beginning and the casting of Agnes Moorhead in the role of Robinson, the end result crackles in its efficiency.
,
There's another thing notable about the film:
The film actually uses footage from a documentary showcasing footage of Nazi concentration camps. It's used by Wilson to place doubt in the mind of Mary. To be fair, other things have not added up for her such as the death of her dog Red under suspicious circumstances. The big thing to remember is that this is the first time almost anybody had a chance to see this for themselves. As it turns out, Welles had seen it a few months before in a discussion in front of the United Nations and was moved by it.
The performances are strong across the board. Depending on what he has to do, Welles is in top form here. Edward G. Robinson gives a toned down performance but you can still feel the urgency. As the woman somewhat in the middle, Young is fine. There's some memorable speeches by Welles at a dinner party and Robinson in a living room towards the end.

Perhaps one could make the argument that if there was a bit more time, it could have given Charles a chance to breathe. It almost feels a tad rushed at times. And there's a scene or two that kind of goes wrong in the third act largely because you'd think people would know what they do and not place themselves up in bad situations. But they do.

But for the most part it holds up well. Hopefully, someone uses this one as the thriller in one of Thief's categories because I'd like to get into this one again.

A-

Next: A wedding takes a turn.
I liked this film quite a bit. However, I think I mentioned this to someone else here, but it feels like two films in one, probably because of studio meddling or clashes between the actors. You can pretty much see Welles' sensibilities on one side and the studio/audience wants/needs on the other. It's still pretty solid, though.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Thu Aug 22, 2019 5:05 pm

Thief wrote:
Thu Aug 22, 2019 2:43 pm
I liked this film quite a bit. However, I think I mentioned this to someone else here, but it feels like two films in one, probably because of studio meddling or clashes between the actors. You can pretty much see Welles' sensibilities on one side and the studio/audience wants/needs on the other. It's still pretty solid, though.
I think you were telling me this in your thread.

Welles didn't have a lot of leverage when he signed up as director of this. It was sort of a last chance (his first film in 4 years). But he did have an incentive to get this on time and under budget: the studio behind this would give him 4 films and more carte blanche if he succeeded and if the film made its money back.

The studio hired Ernest Nims as editor; he was known as someone who would cut out anything extraneous from the narrative...including the beginning. Although Welles didn't have control over that part, he was able to rewrite the script, including the scenes at the drugstore and hire Citizen Kane's production designer to help build the small town you see in the film.

Although the studio pulled the plug on the deal, The Stranger was a box office smash which allowed him to direct the film noir The Lady from Shanghai in 1947 and Shakespearean drama MacBeth in 1948.
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Re: Apex Predators Film Thread Volume 2 0

Post by Apex Predator » Thu Aug 29, 2019 7:07 pm

Aveslizer wrote:
Thu Aug 29, 2019 9:28 am
As you may know this feature was available in MIUIv5 and we have lost it when MIUIv6 released. It is very basic feature, shouldnt be missing from MIUI.
Please consider...thx a lot

.
And where's my visa to the Netherlands? Been waiting for 2 years now. :x
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Thu Aug 29, 2019 8:06 pm

A Separation (2011)

The film opens as Simin (Leila Hatami) argues in front of a judge that she wants a divorce from Nader (Payman Naadi). Her goal is to head to America with their daughter Termeh (Sarina Farhadi) so they can start to have a better life. But the judge turns her down, so she just moves over to her parent's place.

Nader decides he can't leave due to his father ailing and possibly losing his memory. So in order for him to continue work, he decides to hire someone to sit in during the daytime hours. His choice is Razieh (Sareh Bayat), a married woman who is pregnant but decides not to reveal it. In part because her family needs the money and because the job doesn't seem particularly strenuous.

But things take a turn when Nader confronts Razieh about some of the things she's doing in her job and it eventually turns into a full blown family feud that heads to court...

Well done drama that keeps you watching through the twists and turns of the story.

A-

Next: Like watching paint dry.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Wooley » Fri Aug 30, 2019 4:03 am

Apex Predator wrote:
Thu Aug 29, 2019 8:06 pm

Next: Like watching paint dry.
Snow Falling On Cedars?
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Fri Aug 30, 2019 6:25 pm

Wooley wrote:
Fri Aug 30, 2019 4:03 am
Snow Falling On Cedars?
You know, I've never seen that one. But I'm afraid that it would be kind of like that.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Fri Aug 30, 2019 6:35 pm

Monrovia, Indiana (2018)

Documentary by Frederick Wiseman (Ex Libris) covers the day to day goings on in a small farming community. You get in the middle of civic meetings over annexing new property and the possibility of importing crime with it, a Lions Club meeting over adding some benches outside the public library, and a mattress sale for the local school.

It does an admirable job avoiding taking sides and it does respect those people who live there. Even those who would rather see the town die out due to fears about the people they represent facing a crime problem.

But alas, it's as dull as watching paint dry. I hate calling films dull and boring, but this will have to serve as an exception.

And at 2 and a half hours, it might serve as an alternative to C-Span in the insomniac trying to go to sleep sweepstakes.

D

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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Wooley » Fri Aug 30, 2019 10:19 pm

Apex Predator wrote:
Fri Aug 30, 2019 6:25 pm
You know, I've never seen that one. But I'm afraid that it would be kind of like that.
I read a review of it at the time that said "Paint Drying On Walls", but I wasn't able to find it.
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Re: Apex Predator's Film Thread Volume 2.0

Post by Apex Predator » Sat Aug 31, 2019 5:59 pm

From Here to Eternity (1953)

Prewitt (Montgomery Clift) transfers from a Louisiana base to one in Hawaii. He's a former trumpet player who spent time playing for the Old Guard in Washington DC (a high honor) before base politics caused him to quit and move. But it's his boxing prowess that intrigues Captain Holmes (Philip Hober) who wants him for his base team which is participating in the nationals in a few months. But Prewitt doesn't want to box...for reasons that become clear later on. So Holmes decides to make his life as difficult as possible.

Holmes's assistant Sergeant Holmes (Burt Lancaster) does try to make things fairer for Prewitt. But he has his hands full with Karen (Deborah Kerr), the neglected wife of Holmes. Prewitt befriends Private Angelo Maggio (Frank Sinatra), a soldier with a drinking problem who rubs Sgt. Judson (Ernest Borgnine), the prison warden, the wrong way. Prewitt also falls for a beautiful girl named Alma (Donna Reed) he meets at a soldier speakeasy. But fate has some interesting plans in store for them.

Although the film is known for a steamy kiss on the beach which was parodied in Airplane, the film is way more than that one moment. It's almost like a soap opera in how various stories ebb and flow like the tide on the beach.

There were some stuff edited from the book, but what did make the cut is still pretty impactful. The only issue I have involves a storyline quibble here or there.

This was a good film overall and I'm glad I got the chance to see this one.

B+

Next: Man comes home to tell his family something...only the problem is with the family.
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