새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Discuss anything you want.
Post Reply
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Sun Oct 24, 2010 10:19 pm

Image
There is a particular breed of romance drama that, as Derek Elley of Variety notes, has been almost obsessively plucked at by Korean cinema and its filmmakers since the mid-nineties. These love stories, and the films in which they are unwound, like to show the power of love when traversing the borders of time and space. We are presented with stories, such as the one found in Chang Yoon-hyun's The Contact, for example, in which a male and female protagonist might go the entire length of a film's run-time without actually seeing one another, only to meet up during some climactic and ultimately serendipitous moment towards the end. Other films go even further: Kim Jeong-gwon's Ditto, for example, depicts a romance in which the two parties communicate between different periods in time; 1979 and 2000, whereas Lee Hyun-seung's Il Mare shows characters living two years apart, but corresponding using a mysterious mail box that appears to be the work of some time-travelling postal service. All of these films look to avoid the conventions of your usual romance or romantic comedy film by playing with its core elements, yet are contradictory in that they always do so as a means to fostering an ultimately heartwarming traditional payoff at the end of the film. Song Hae-sung's Failan, which also portrays a love story that involves two main characters who have no physical contact, clearly isn't concerned with such things - despite being marketed as the contrary.

Failan, which was adapted from the latter's best-selling novel Love Letter by Song Hae-sung and Japanese writer Jiro Asada, stars Choi Min-sik and Cecilia Cheung as a gangland loser and desperate immigrant respectively. Cheung's Failan, after whom the film is named, is a Chinese woman of Korean descent who comes to her land of origin in search of remaining family. On discovering they have emigrated to Canada, she must arrange a fake marriage in order to stay in the country, and this is where Choi's Kang-jae comes in. Korean gang culture is a typical central theme in some of the country's most successful films, usually where action and violence are involved. However, that particular sub-world and its vices has also been used to great effect by a number of socially conscious writers and directors - Lee Chang-dong's Green Fish and Kwak Kyung-taek's Friend, to give but two very different examples - in order to effectively comment on the disintegration of Korean society at the turn of the century. Despite existing as two people with opposing personalities, beliefs, and ideas on the importance of love, both Failan and Kang-jae are drawn towards the fleeting moment in which their lives briefly intertwine. Failan is an unassuming film that professes the importance of companionship, even to those who might not see it as an entirely necessary element in a life already cluttered with loss, pain and desperation.
Image Image
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
Cult Icon
Posts: 2164
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 9:59 pm

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Cult Icon » Mon Oct 25, 2010 3:16 am

Always wanted to see that one. Also, I bought a bootleg of Epitaph ages ago but the subtitles were so bad I couldn't watch it. That happens to me a lot. :/
I'll see you in the trees...
User avatar
Shieldmaiden
Posts: 7517
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 2:19 pm

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Shieldmaiden » Mon Oct 25, 2010 3:31 am

I've had Failan in my 'Saved' queue for three years now. I don't think Netflix is going to get it. :(

ledfloyd wrote:i watched barking dogs never bite this afternoon. i found it relatively unremarkable. there's the occasional glimpse of his dark humor or the directoral style that would make his other films so great, but it felt like a great idea for a short stretched out to feature length.
I liked it! It was silly fun, but I laughed a lot! And, Bae Doo-na is a favorite of mine.
Lazzaro felice - Cabin in the Sky - An Autumn Afternoon

Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Sono | My Bookshelf
User avatar
ledfloyd
Posts: 9040
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 8:25 pm

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by ledfloyd » Mon Oct 25, 2010 3:35 am

Shieldmaiden wrote:I liked it! It was silly fun, but I laughed a lot! And, Bae Doo-na is a favorite of mine.
she's cute
User avatar
Shieldmaiden
Posts: 7517
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 2:19 pm

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Shieldmaiden » Mon Oct 25, 2010 4:10 am

ledfloyd wrote:she's cute
I meant her acting abilities. :D But, she is very cute. That polar bear poster is just about the cutest thing I've ever seen!
Lazzaro felice - Cabin in the Sky - An Autumn Afternoon

Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Sono | My Bookshelf
User avatar
ledfloyd
Posts: 9040
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 8:25 pm

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by ledfloyd » Mon Oct 25, 2010 4:11 am

Shieldmaiden wrote:I meant her acting abilities. :D But, she is very cute. That polar bear poster is just about the cutest thing I've ever seen!
acting skills what?
she's great in air doll
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Mon Oct 25, 2010 6:26 am

Oh, she's lovely.

Image Image
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
Trip
Posts: 70527
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:47 am

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Trip » Mon Oct 25, 2010 9:27 am

I have that one. But you know this, stalker.
Please TRIP and Die
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Mon Oct 25, 2010 9:34 am

Trip wrote:I have that one. But you know this, stalker.
Now would be a good time to watch it, silly.
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
Trip
Posts: 70527
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:47 am

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Trip » Mon Oct 25, 2010 9:34 am

JediMoonShyne wrote: Now would be a good time to watch it, silly.
I agree.
Please TRIP and Die
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Mon Oct 25, 2010 2:08 pm

Trip wrote: I agree.
Have you seen any 2010 releases, yet?

I'm looking forward to the big three: Lee Chang-dong's Poetry, Im Sang-soo's The Housemaid remake and Kim Ji-woon's I Saw the Devil.

Image Image Image
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
DaiKamonohashi
Posts: 615
Joined: Tue May 25, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Jawjuh
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by DaiKamonohashi » Mon Oct 25, 2010 2:34 pm



"My heart and mind are as they were when I was a child. Then I loved to play with toys and read stories of magic. I still do. My wish is only to make life happier and more beautiful for those who will go and see my films of fantasy."

-Eiji Tsuburaya
User avatar
Trip
Posts: 70527
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:47 am

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Trip » Mon Oct 25, 2010 2:50 pm

JediMoonShyne wrote: Have you seen any 2010 releases, yet?
:\
You don't read my posts, do you?
Please TRIP and Die
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Mon Oct 25, 2010 3:07 pm

Trip wrote: :\
You don't read my posts, do you?
I guess not. :P

I remember you mentioning that Poetry was online, and Bear saying that The Housemaid was good. That's all.
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
Trip
Posts: 70527
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:47 am

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Trip » Mon Oct 25, 2010 3:17 pm

JediMoonShyne wrote: I guess not. :P

I remember you mentioning that Poetry was online, and Bear saying that The Housemaid was good. That's all.
I saw Poetry at MIFF, and it was one of the best I saw. Slow burning, quite sentimental but not at all cloying or manipulative, and quietly profound. The Housemaid I watched back when it leaked. Much less tedious than the original, I enjoyed its sleek widescreen modernity and the shifting of sympathy was an intriguing update. But it was nonetheless totally ridiculous and I could easily leave it.

The other of course is HaHaHa, which is possibly my favourite film of his and certainly one of the best pictures of the year. Thoroughly Rohmerian, very funny.
Please TRIP and Die
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Mon Oct 25, 2010 6:06 pm

Trip wrote: I saw Poetry at MIFF, and it was one of the best I saw. Slow burning, quite sentimental but not at all cloying or manipulative, and quietly profound. The Housemaid I watched back when it leaked. Much less tedious than the original, I enjoyed its sleek widescreen modernity and the shifting of sympathy was an intriguing update. But it was nonetheless totally ridiculous and I could easily leave it.

The other of course is HaHaHa, which is possibly my favourite film of his and certainly one of the best pictures of the year. Thoroughly Rohmerian, very funny.
See, in that case I'd say it was probably jealously that caused me to erase it from my memory. :oops:

I'm very exciting to see Poetry, though will probably wait until this thread us over before finally sitting down and attempting to absorb it. I always find that it takes at least three watches of his films in order to take everything in. As for Hong Sang-soo, I hope my allusion to Mike Leigh's Naked will push you to watch The Day a Pig Fell Into the Well, too. It's quite unnerving how depressing that film made me feel. It's utterly hopeless. What did you make of Like You Know It All and Night and Day, by the way? Another thing I was going to ask - and excuse me if you've already mentioned it - is whether you've seen any films by Kim So-yong. I purposefully excluded her work in the creation of this thread, mainly because most of her films are American co-productions. I've heard that both In Between Days and Treeless Mountain are worth a watch, however. She writes and produces stuff with her husband, Bradley Rust Gray, who is the guy behind The Exploding Girl.

Image Image
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
Epistemophobia
Posts: 29797
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 12:21 am
Location: London
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Epistemophobia » Mon Oct 25, 2010 7:03 pm

JediMoonShyne wrote:Oh, she's lovely.
I'm a fan.
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Mon Oct 25, 2010 11:02 pm

Image

Image Image Image Image
Image Image Image Image
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
Cult Icon
Posts: 2164
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 9:59 pm

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Cult Icon » Mon Oct 25, 2010 11:41 pm

In Between Days is alright. Toronto has never looked more depressing.
I'll see you in the trees...
User avatar
ledfloyd
Posts: 9040
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 8:25 pm

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by ledfloyd » Tue Oct 26, 2010 12:25 am

i didn't care much for treeless mountain.
User avatar
Trip
Posts: 70527
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:47 am

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Trip » Tue Oct 26, 2010 3:56 am

JediMoonShyne wrote: See, in that case I'd say it was probably jealously that caused me to erase it from my memory. :oops:

I'm very exciting to see Poetry, though will probably wait until this thread us over before finally sitting down and attempting to absorb it. I always find that it takes at least three watches of his films in order to take everything in. As for Hong Sang-soo, I hope my allusion to Mike Leigh's Naked will push you to watch The Day a Pig Fell Into the Well, too. It's quite unnerving how depressing that film made me feel. It's utterly hopeless. What did you make of Like You Know It All and Night and Day, by the way? Another thing I was going to ask - and excuse me if you've already mentioned it - is whether you've seen any films by Kim So-yong. I purposefully excluded her work in the creation of this thread, mainly because most of her films are American co-productions. I've heard that both In Between Days and Treeless Mountain are worth a watch, however. She writes and produces stuff with her husband, Bradley Rust Gray, who is the guy behind The Exploding Girl.
I want to watch The Day the Pig but your comment on KG put me off getting it for now. Subtitle sync problems blegh. Like You Know It All was my first of his, and naturally it was all new to me. So my opinion on that isn't too reliable. I did find it slow and kinda amusing and it has a two-part structure of sorts that intrigued me the most, though subsequent viewings of his other films lead me to believe that was one of his weakest structural efforts. But as a film about a director and the business it has value amongst his other work. Night and Day was strong. Again, very Rohmerian. It's even in France and there are allusions to Rohmer: the date title screens, the use of the girl's feet (Claire's Knee), the complex and awkward web of relationships among 20/30 somethings, etc.

Seen nothiong by Kim So-yong. Since none of my trustworthy sources even mention her, I'm assuming she's not really worth watching. Also I think I saw a trailer for Treeless and I did not want.

A question: Are you picking the best you've seen for each letter?
Please TRIP and Die
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Tue Oct 26, 2010 6:21 am

Image
Gang-oriented stories are these days an integral and unavoidable part of Korea's cinematic landscape, but it wasn't always the case. Since the arrival of the second New Wave at the beginning of the nineties, many filmmakers have looked to use this world of violence as a mere backdrop for the action and deception that would unfold on the screen, but others have used it to serve different purposes. With Lee Myung-se's Nowhere to Hide and Kim Ji-woon's A Bittersweet Life, for example, the directors used such gangster elements for stylistic exploration. Lee Chang-dong's Green Fish, on the other hand, uses it to form a critique of the social system: it presents organised crime and corruption as a product of Korea's rapidly growing economy, as well as showing the consequent deterioration of morality and the traditional family. Green Fish traces the descent of a young man named Mak-dong (played by Han Suk-kyu, who would later star in Christmas in August) as he returns to his home town in search of a fresh start after two years of compulsory military service. On the train ride home, Mak-dong runs into a mysterious woman who unwittingly leads him into a fist fight against three goons. Left with only a fragrant scarf and fleeting image of hair and lips, Mak-dong sets out towards the looming and intimidating form of nearby Seoul in order to find out more about this distant and alluring female figure.

In an interview for a local magazine conducted in 1999, Lee Chang-dong recounts the reaction by an overseas Korean councilor after a screening of Green Fish at an international festival: "A film like that, which shows the shame and ugliness of our country to foreign audiences, undermines years of our efforts to promote Korea overseas in the blink of an eye". Such is the director's ability to successfully illustrate the state of contemporary Korean society - a society that proudly celebrates its newfound materialism - by using a single, unassuming story. As with his later work, Peppermint Candy, Lee's Green Fish warns against modernisation by vividly depicting the corruption and violence that may breed like bacteria under social conditions in which growth is considered more important than distribution. And, just like the protagonist in Peppermint Candy, Mak-dong is an innocent figure caught up in this new world of compromised morality. He is however the perfect figure to subject to such an experience, since his absence gives him a wide-eyed quality; almost as though all of this had happened overnight. The director goes to even further lengths to show this gulf between old and new: the most jarring of which is the grey office blocks he uses to throw Mak-dong's humble childhood home into shadow. Green Fish tells us, quite emphatically, that there is no room for the small dream or indeed the small dreamer in Korean society at the time.
Image Image
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:42 am

Trip wrote:I want to watch The Day the Pig but your comment on KG put me off getting it for now. Subtitle sync problems blegh. Like You Know It All was my first of his, and naturally it was all new to me. So my opinion on that isn't too reliable. I did find it slow and kinda amusing and it has a two-part structure of sorts that intrigued me the most, though subsequent viewings of his other films lead me to believe that was one of his weakest structural efforts. But as a film about a director and the business it has value amongst his other work. Night and Day was strong. Again, very Rohmerian. It's even in France and there are allusions to Rohmer: the date title screens, the use of the girl's feet (Claire's Knee), the complex and awkward web of relationships among 20/30 somethings, etc.

Seen nothiong by Kim So-yong. Since none of my trustworthy sources even mention her, I'm assuming she's not really worth watching. Also I think I saw a trailer for Treeless and I did not want.

A question: Are you picking the best you've seen for each letter?
Answer: Not particularly, no. It's a combination of films I've been meaning to see, films I've been meaning to rewatch, and films that are my only real option - Epitaph is the only film that starts with "E", for example. Some of my choices are influenced by the importance of said films in the advancement and development of post-New Wave Korean cinema and its industry: Shiri, for example, is a film I didn't care for a great deal after seeing it a few years ago, but I will rewatch it for "S" since it is probably the most important single movie of the New Wave. It practically broke the door down for everyone else - or, at least, it was the one film that delivered the killer blow, shattering box office records and basically ensuring financing for a whole new line of domestic productions. I'm also trying to mention each important director at least once, though Hong Sang-soo will probably feature at least thrice.

As I mentioned on KG, there is a synced, single-CD rip of The Day a Pig Fell Into the Well here. The subtitles are poor but passable, as they are with Green Fish. I actually tried to replace the ruined rip on KG, but the moderators turned it down since there wasn't much improvement - other than the fact the subtitles on the current rip are un-syncable. So, that particular rip will stay on KG, and a generation of Korean film-lovers will be made to watch the second half of the film without any idea of what the characters are saying. I'm very interested in your comparison to Rohmer, as I've seen little of his work. In fact, all I've seen is The Collector, but I remember absolutely nothing about it. Must watch more. Where do you suggest I go next? Claire's Knee?
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
Trip
Posts: 70527
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:47 am

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Trip » Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:58 am

JediMoonShyne wrote: Answer: Not particularly, no. It's a combination of films I've been meaning to see, films I've been meaning to rewatch, and films that are my only real option - Epitaph is the only film that starts with "E", for example. Some of my choices are influenced by the importance of said films in the advancement and development of post-New Wave Korean cinema and its industry: Shiri, for example, is a film I didn't care for a great deal after seeing it a few years ago, but I will rewatch it for "S" since it is probably the most important single movie of the New Wave. It practically broke the door down for everyone else - or, at least, it was the one film that delivered the killer blow, shattering box office records and basically ensuring financing for a whole new line of domestic productions.

As I mentioned on KG, there is a synced, single-CD rip of The Day a Pig Fell Into the Well here. The subtitles are poor but passable, as they are with Green Fish. I actually tried to replace the ruined rip on KG, but the moderators turned it down since there wasn't much improvement - other than the fact the subtitles on the current rip are un-syncable. So, that particular rip will stay on KG, and a generation of Korean film-lovers will be made to watch the second half of the film without any idea of what the characters are saying. I'm very interested in your comparison to Rohmer, as I've seen little of his work. In fact, all I've seen is The Collector, but I remember absolutely nothing about it. Must watch more. Where do you suggest I go next? Claire's Knee?
Thanks for the thorough answer.
Oh, I wasn't aware signing up for that Asian torrent site was open, heh. I'll register and grab it. Thanks for warning us about the crappy KG one, too.

It's funny, La Collectionneuse is my least favourite Rohmer, and I've seen...17 of them. Claire's Knee is an excellent place to "start", seeing as it's so typical of him. So yes. Don't avoid his wonderful period films, however, like Perceval and The Lady and the Duke. They differ in their opposition to the naturalism of his contemporary pictures, having purposefully obvious art-designed environments. But this won't help so much in further understanding Hong Sang-soo, who takes more from Rohmer's Moral Tales and Comedies & Proverbs. Also Woody Allen.

Also, seen this? I have yet to.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0108192/
Please TRIP and Die
Sir Inception Sucks Foot

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Sir Inception Sucks Foot » Tue Oct 26, 2010 8:38 am

I just saw Poetry earlier this evening. Another winner for the director. Green Fish I haven't seen in a long time so I can't comment. Will watch again.

I'm grabbing Barking Dogs Never Bite.

Treeless Mountain is on my DVR as is another Korean crime movie called Bloody Ties.

All that I'll get to eventually (years, decades, who knows).

Nice write ups by the way.
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:14 am

Image

Image Image
Image Image
Image Image
Image Image
Image Image
Image Image
Image Image
Image Image
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
Trip
Posts: 70527
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:47 am

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Trip » Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:15 am

Please TRIP and Die
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:26 am

704 x 400? Yeah, that's the same copy I linked you to.

You're so going to hate this movie, I can see it coming. Still, bums:

Image
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
Trip
Posts: 70527
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:47 am

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Trip » Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:33 am

I like bums.
Please TRIP and Die
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:39 am

Trip wrote:I like bums.
Asian ones?

Also, I really want that lamp.
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
Trip
Posts: 70527
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:47 am

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Trip » Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:54 am

JediMoonShyne wrote: Asian ones?
I don't discriminate against bums.
Also, I really want that lamp.
You're gay.
Please TRIP and Die
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Tue Oct 26, 2010 10:15 am

I've spent a lot of time talking about "contemporary Korean society" in the last few write-ups. It is a society that, during the nineties, was experiencing a great deal of development and consequent change. One thing I haven't mentioned thus far is the influence upon this rapidly changing society by western countries and their cultures, fashions and trends. Most of the films featured have been the work of socially conscious directors, and as such I've noticed a handful of attempts by each to show how such western influences affect their characters. In Kim Ki-duk's Birdcage Inn, for example, the daughter attempts to block out her difficult home life by retiring to her small bedroom plastered with Leonardo DiCaprio posters and doing homework while listening to Radiohead: the typical evening of an American or European teenage girl growing up during the nineties, one might assume. In Hong Sang-soo's The Day a Pig Fell Into the Well, on the other hand, the character of Dong-woo is sitting in his seedy motel room contemplating his flawed marriage - just before an incident down the hallway pushes him to call a prostitute - when he suddenly gets up and turns the television on in search of a distraction. With no small amount of irony, Hong has his character greeted by the dysfunctional American family when his TV set flickers into life.

Image Image
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
Shieldmaiden
Posts: 7517
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 2:19 pm

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Shieldmaiden » Tue Oct 26, 2010 2:23 pm

Green Fish is at the top of my queue, but Netflix just skipped over it. Hopefully soon!
JediMoonShyne wrote:I hope my allusion to Mike Leigh's Naked will push you to watch The Day a Pig Fell Into the Well, too. It's quite unnerving how depressing that film made me feel. It's utterly hopeless.
I thought A Virgin Stripped Bare and Woman is the Future were both pretty depressing. If this one is worse... :(
Lazzaro felice - Cabin in the Sky - An Autumn Afternoon

Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Sono | My Bookshelf
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Tue Oct 26, 2010 3:39 pm

Trip wrote:Also, seen this? I have yet to.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0108192/
I haven't, no, though it is part of my shortlist. Also, Im Kwon-taek has been around for a while. I'm more interested in Korean filmmakers who debuted in the nineties - you know, products of that particular period. At least, I am for this particular thread. Still, I've been meaning to watch his Strokes of Fire for a while.
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Wed Oct 27, 2010 6:11 am

Image

Image Image Image Image
Image Image Image Image
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
Circus Freak
Posts: 1399
Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 4:57 pm

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Circus Freak » Wed Oct 27, 2010 4:24 pm

The fact that I've seen two of the films in that grid surprises me. The Good, the Bad and the Weird is understandable, the one next to it...not so much. I used to be even more random with my film choices, I think, but that was a while ago, so if you're expecting to remember what I thought of it, then don't.

I would say "keep up the good work", but I don't need to because it's Jedi.
User avatar
Trip
Posts: 70527
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:47 am

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Trip » Wed Oct 27, 2010 4:27 pm

Do you mean A Good Lawyer's Wife, Circus? I recently grabbed that myself.
Please TRIP and Die
User avatar
Circus Freak
Posts: 1399
Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 4:57 pm

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Circus Freak » Wed Oct 27, 2010 4:35 pm

Yes. You just grabbed it for the pegging scene, didn't you?
User avatar
Trip
Posts: 70527
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:47 am

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Trip » Wed Oct 27, 2010 4:58 pm

Circus Freak wrote:Yes. You just grabbed it for the pegging scene, didn't you?
I didn't know about this or anything in it, actually.
Please TRIP and Die
User avatar
Epistemophobia
Posts: 29797
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 12:21 am
Location: London
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Epistemophobia » Wed Oct 27, 2010 7:25 pm

Great stuff.
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Wed Oct 27, 2010 10:01 pm

Image
A man perches on a park bench, tears quietly rolling down his cheeks as the world passes him by. His eyes are aimed downwards, brow furrowed in concentration, hands clutching a tattered book. Suddenly, the man comes to his senses and looks up. Life going on around him slides back into focus as he self-consciously looks about him, wiping away the tears with a quick hand. "A real love story...", the character explains in an earlier scene, "... is so sad that it breaks your heart." Jung Ji-woo's Happy End stars Choi Min-sik as Min-gi, an alienated husband and father who spends the time he is supposed to be out job-hunting looking for the perfect "happy end" among the romance and mystery novels of his local book store. He attempts to apply these ideal endings to his own life, but this is made all the more difficult by the adulterous actions of his wife Bora (Po-ra), played by Jeon Do-yeon, who is in the midst of a passionate affair with a younger man. Min-gi's inability to find a job has emasculated him in the eyes of his wife, and the director only puts ourself on her side of the table by allowing us to observe Min-gi doing grocery shopping, cooking and the laundry - all very unconventional in patriarchal Korea. Min-gi's imagination is forever wandering, and it isn't long before he begins to suspect his wife's extramarital activities. Ultimately, it is this imagination of his that influences the direction of the plot in Happy End, which hurtles towards a shocking conclusion.

During the final scenes of Happy End, in the calm following the film's bloody climax, Choi Min-sik's character Min-gi can be seen leaving Seoul by train. He sits in the carriage, a bag of nerves, playing with an elastic band so as to sooth his troubled conscience. Across from him sits a little boy, whose puzzled look suggests incredulity at the array of different shapes Min-gi effortlessly coaxes out of the same elastic band. This elastic band, along with a handful of plot elements, bring to mind one of Korea's most famous films, Kim Ki-young's The Housemaid (1960), and it can be noted that both films deal with trouble in the domestic space, as well as the differences between genders regarding sexuality and desire. With Happy End, Jung Ji-woo does a good job of justifying his characters' actions: that is, he doesn't present them as despicable or flawed human beings. They are human, and express humanly needs and wants. Min-gi seeks a higher level of emotional resonance in his literature, whereas Bora's tender affair is needed to quench her own sexual thirst. In doing so, both characters renounce their parental responsibilities, though society encourages us to side against the mother, for it is she who should be looking after the baby. Min-gi eventually finds his perfect ending, though his literal awakening as Happy End closes is one of a number of hints that cause us to question whether his fruitful imagination didn't simply run away with him on this particular occasion.
Image Image
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Thu Oct 28, 2010 6:49 am

Circus Freak wrote:The fact that I've seen two of the films in that grid surprises me. The Good, the Bad and the Weird is understandable, the one next to it...not so much. I used to be even more random with my film choices, I think, but that was a while ago, so if you're expecting to remember what I thought of it, then don't.

I would say "keep up the good work", but I don't need to because it's Jedi.
Ah, but did the poster influence your decision? I know it did mine.
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
Subhadip
Posts: 1041
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 9:35 am

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Subhadip » Thu Oct 28, 2010 6:52 am

This thread is slightly more than good. :oops:
Sir Inception Sucks Foot

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Sir Inception Sucks Foot » Thu Oct 28, 2010 6:56 am

Guns n Talks is pretty hilarious. Nothing great. Green Chair is awesome. Good The Bad The Weird is good but not great. I haven't seen The Good Lawyer's Wife but The President's Last Bang from the same director is very good. A true story that you would never believe.

I haven't seen Happy End but I have Oldrich Lipsky's Happy End and will watch soon.
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Thu Oct 28, 2010 7:32 am

Sir Lucious Left Foot wrote:Guns n Talks is pretty hilarious. Nothing great. Green Chair is awesome. Good The Bad The Weird is good but not great. I haven't seen The Good Lawyer's Wife but The President's Last Bang from the same director is very good. A true story that you would never believe.

I haven't seen Happy End but I have Oldrich Lipsky's Happy End and will watch soon.
I second your thoughts on The President's Last Bang. Great little film. Didn't think much to The Good, the Bad, the Weird, but then I'm not the biggest Kim Ji-woon fan.

You would enjoy Happy End, I'm sure. Good soundtrack.

“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
User avatar
ledfloyd
Posts: 9040
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 8:25 pm

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by ledfloyd » Thu Oct 28, 2010 7:41 am

i just watched a tale of two sisters, it's quite good.
User avatar
Frogtown
Posts: 8606
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 10:07 pm
Location: Moon & Antarctica

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Frogtown » Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:27 am

ledfloyd wrote:i just watched a tale of two sisters, it's quite good.
Such an overbearingly sense of dread in that one. Very effective horror film.
Sir Inception Sucks Foot

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Sir Inception Sucks Foot » Thu Oct 28, 2010 10:16 am

JediMoonShyne wrote: You would enjoy Happy End, I'm sure. Good soundtrack.
I will look out for the movie.

On a side note, Oldrich Lipsky's Happy End is filmed completely in reverse. All the actors had to learn every line of dialogue backwards. Part of the Czech surrealist movement. You should see some of his movies.
User avatar
Trip
Posts: 70527
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:47 am

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by Trip » Thu Oct 28, 2010 10:19 am

Lipsky's Happy End is really weird. So, very Czech.
Please TRIP and Die
User avatar
JediMoonShyne
Posts: 22425
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:26 am
Location: Cittàgazze
Contact:

Re: 새 물결 운동 - An A to Z of Contemporary Korean Cinema

Post by JediMoonShyne » Thu Oct 28, 2010 3:15 pm

Trip wrote:Lipsky's Happy End is really weird. So, very Czech.
I was hoping you would be able to tell us exactly which episode of The Simpsons that is.
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision
Post Reply