Three Honkies the Hard Way

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Colonel Kurz
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Sun May 08, 2011 1:54 pm

Mod Hip wrote: Oh, I didn't actually watch all of that :shifty:
Well, you watched the film...
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Ah, did not realize. At first utterance it sounded like a regularly badass cowboy nickname, then I put it together and thought, "Oh, well that just doesn't work in his favor at all, does it?"
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Sun May 08, 2011 1:58 pm

Yeah, just checked that out - now kinda curious, particularly considering the time period of the character's prolificness. I read several pulpy westerns when I was living out on the border of Wyoming and Montana but they were all fairly bland, only memorable for the mood they conveyed befitting my own surroundings.
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Gort » Mon May 09, 2011 4:26 am

Gort wrote: Finally, you include one that stars someone who was in one of my videos.
Mod Hip wrote:Oh?
I thought I'd told you that story before.
Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Mon May 09, 2011 11:03 am

Can you tell it again, please, maybe just for my benefit? :)
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Blevo » Mon May 09, 2011 3:45 pm

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A Hero Ain't Nothin' but a Sandwich

Y’all shouldn’t be fuckin’ around with that herb, that stuff just takes up all of your strawberry incense while you try to cover up the smell. That is all it takes to convince a thirteen year old Benjie to take up heroin in Ralph Nelson’s A Hero Ain’t Nothin’ but a Sandwich. This film doesn’t rely on heavy camp or exploitation for its power, but instead in the brazenly melodramatic. It is borderline ridiculous in its dramatics, but the surprisingly solid and honest performances keep it from going too far off the deep end.

We follow the whip-smart Benjie through the streets of South Central Los Angeles as he tries to sort out his place in the world. He feels a strong misplaced resentment toward the world because he was abandoned by his father and his stepfather Butler won’t just let him be. He tries to overcome his resentment through drugs, but it doesn’t take long for him to go from splitting his first seventy five cent joint to jacking heroin in to his veins. He is trying desperately to fill a hole that he feels from the lack of his father and the lack of positive black role models in the here and now. He feels that all of the great deeds done by the black community are all in the past and the sports stars and musicians offer little in the way of comfort. He has a surprisingly cynical world view for someone so young, but the film portrays him as a product of his time.

The film puts a face on the drug problem plaguing South Central LA in the seventies. This isn’t a latch-key kid that turns to drugs because of a lack of parental involvement or caring adults, this is a kid with a pretty strong family unit and a relatively stable home environment. He doesn’t appreciate the positive male role model he has in Paul Winfield’s Butler, but this is normal behavior for any kid that is forced in to a situation such as his. His father had left town and now he has to deal with this usurper that is trying to be the king of the castle. The problem is that there ain’t no kings, just a couple of jacks tryin’ to do right by their queen.

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Paul Winfield gives a solid and honest performance as the jazz musician/mechanic Butler, who is just trying to figure out his own place in the world. He isn’t a stereotypical over-the-top symbol of black empowerment; he’s just a jack of spades makin’ his way through the world the best he knows how. A young Larry B. Scott gives a fantastic performance as the young Benjie. He’s already world weary at thirteen and his seemingly mature perspective and golden tongue will soon be tempered by the harsh realities of the streets. It blew my mind a bit when I looked in to Larry B. Scott and found out that he had played Lamar Lattrell in the Revenge of the Nerds movies.

This is really a story that needs the long format of its original novel form, or at least an extended TV miniseries. It is a tad ridiculous that this previously clean kid would be jacking heroin within the first fifteen minutes of the film and some of the characterizations of the black empowerment crowd are slightly dated, but it really toes a fine line between honest and ridiculous. It is definitely worth a look, despite any flaws that it might possess. It may not have that over the top entertainment factor that the other films in this thread possess, but it houses some solid performances.

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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Mon May 09, 2011 3:59 pm

Sounds pretty good. I should have known prior to watching Mario Van Peebles' "Panther" that South Central was flooded with hard drugs by the government to compromise the black power movement, but now that I do know that the oft-seen drug aspects of these films seem all the more relevant (makes me want to give another chance to "Superfly", which I found myself underwhelmed with until the sweet slow motion finale when I watched it a fair number of years ago).
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Blevo » Mon May 09, 2011 6:03 pm

I love film titles where you can almost hear the non existent but powerfully indignant "God Damn" in them. A Hero Ain't Nothin' but a God Damn Sandwich etc.
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Mon May 09, 2011 6:07 pm

Did You Hear About the God Damn Morgans?

Wait...
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by MadMan » Mon May 09, 2011 10:26 pm

Sold, man. 8-)
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Mon May 09, 2011 10:39 pm

I think you mean solid. ;)
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by MadMan » Mon May 09, 2011 10:53 pm

Colonel Kurz wrote:I think you mean solid. ;)
I thought I was missing a letter. I blame The Man for this.
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Mon May 09, 2011 10:57 pm

I'd think you ignorant if you didn't.
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Tue May 10, 2011 11:37 pm

Whoops, missed these before. Didn't mean to be rude and not respond.
Colonel Kurz wrote:Well, you watched the film...
Ha, yeah, so since I didn't watch all of the fan trailer I linked to (only up to the halfway mark, I think... got the impression it was only the plot set-up what with its inclusion of almost the full "You're the maid and you're the chauffeur" scene but it was still the best thing I could find on YouTube) I thought you were quoting a line you were remembering from a past viewing. Whatever the case, definitely one of the film's best lines. I'm still not over how totally nutso it all is. And on top of it all, I mean... sickle-cell anemia? WHAT!? Baaaahahaha....
Gort wrote:I thought I'd told you that story before.
I... should... well, now that I think of it it does ring some bells. Sorry I forgot :(
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Tue May 10, 2011 11:46 pm

Mod Hip wrote: And on top of it all, I mean... sickle-cell anemia? WHAT!? Baaaahahaha....
Didn't one of the Mobb Deep members have that growing up and have 2pac mock him for it?
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Wed May 11, 2011 12:55 am

Colonel Kurz wrote: Didn't one of the Mobb Deep members have that growing up and have 2pac mock him for it?
Wouldn't know. Nothing funny about the affliction, of course... but it's tacked on so absurdly, added to the fact that the confessing actress (the "you're the maid" woman from the fan trailer) is so very clearly whitebread (I thiiink that's actually supposed to be "white bred" - makes more sense, anyway - but I like "whitebread").
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Gort » Wed May 11, 2011 2:06 am

Colonel Kurz wrote:Can you tell it again, please, maybe just for my benefit? :)
Mod Hip wrote:I... should... well, now that I think of it it does ring some bells. Sorry I forgot
I should write this out in a little file and save it for copy/paste.

A few months after this film and a year or so before this film, I created a year-end video for an international airline food caterer. There was a Staff Consultant at that company, 'A' (I didn't make up the job title, and I'll just use her initial) who had graduated from Humes High school in Memphis with this guy, and she wanted to know if it would be okay to use him as the on-camera host and voice-over narrator.

I had no objection. He wore his shades, of course, and I joked that he was far more recognizable as Isaac Hayes wearing the shades than he was when he took them off. I have never published this photograph before. A week or so after the shoot, 'A', whose face is blurred because I haven't seen her since 1995, so I can't secure her permission to post her image, sent me this autographed photo. The ink is actually a silver gel pen, but it looks very un-silvery in the scan.
to-tom-isaac-hayes.jpg
Obviously, my main motive for not showing the photo is to conceal the goofy face and weird stance that I was caught in, mid-explanation when the photo was snapped. We were moving into the conference room because I thought that would be a better background for the stand-ups. Hayes recorded his voice-over from my teleprompter roll, but later he re-recorded the voice-over portions in a studio out west somewhere. I remember Denver, but that probably isn't correct. I later heard from the consultant that he had used that tape to audition for a role in South Park. I had never heard of South Park.

In a couple minutes video he recorded to say hello to my two young (at the time) sons, he mentioned things he'd done, and among them were Shaft, and Robin Hood Men in Tights. He didn't mention Flipper, of course, until after we recorded that little fan-vid. I didn't know they were re-making Flipper. He told me off camera, when I mentioned it, that he wasn't exactly proud of Truck Turner, but he didn't say why. In fact, he spoke as if he were trying to get into acting, which is why I brought up the Turner film in the first place. I've never seen it, by the way. About the role in Flipper he simply said that he was going to audition for a small part in the film, but he was pretty sure he'd get it. He also actually thanked me for the chance to do a voice-over in the corporate video because he'd like to get into voice-over work. He did have a distinctive voice, after all.

I showed the little video to my sons, and they watched it and asked who the old guy was. I compared him to a big star of their day and said it would be like getting a video from him. A few months later when the boys and I were watching Robin Hood Men in Tights, my older son started staring at the character Asneeze. Finally he crawled up to the screen, poked a finger up to Hayes's image and said, "Daddy, that's the guy who made that tape for us!" I grinned and said, "Yeah." At that moment he was impressed. Not before. Ha ha. Later on, when Flipper was out he recognized Hayes again.

And that's the story of the second time I got to visit with Isaac Hayes. The first time, was the night he was in this: "Hayes became a supporter of, and later a performer in, “An Evening of Soul,” created by the Department of Theatre and Communication professor Erma Clanton. In 1972, after he had gained national fame with his theme music for the movie “Shaft,” Hayes and his musical entourage performed with the production," and my girlfriend and I stood in line a while to speak to him. He acted like he was the person who was honored to have all these people walking up to meet him, and he didn't rush anyone away. He must have stood there for over an hour shaking hands and smiling at people. And he still had the same spirit about him when he was the on-camera talent for my forgettable corporate production.
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Gort/YTMN left the forum due to trolling on August 25, 2018.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

Rematch Resurrection Catalog for Rounds 1-4 New post 180721 -- YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread.
Thread Resurrected 21 Jul 2018. Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)


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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Wed May 11, 2011 2:25 am

Sounds lovely. Him too.
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Wed May 11, 2011 2:59 am

Nice, Gort. I agree, he's far more recognizable with his sunglasses on, ha. Wonder why he's not particularly proud of Truck Turner... his performance, perhaps, which is basically just him being his cool self and delivering lines as opposed to doing a character? Dunno, best uneducated guess.
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Sat May 14, 2011 10:36 pm



Anybody can control a woman's body, see, but the key is to control her mind.

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A genre classic of which I again owned and loved the soundtrack for years before I saw the movie itself. Which is why I placed several songs of it throughout this post for your pleasure. Willie Hutch created what I also consider to be a genre classic, with among other delicious tracks one of the best songs ever to be created in a blaxploitation context, Brother's Gonna Work It Out (It's the last song on the album, in the movie and hence in this post). It's use of the song in the movie is a little disappointing, because on the album it features a slow intro and dialogue from earlier in the film, and when that dialogue and music came along I was so psyched for the rest of the song to kick in... and it didn't. Instead, that only happens at the end credits. This experience is all I remember from the first time I saw it, together with a lot of disappointment and indifference. I felt that this thread was a good opportunity. This time around, I also noted the times when the soundtrack is used to very good effect, such as in the dream/rise of Goldie montage sequence, scored by the appropriate "Slick" (not featured, but you can find it on 'Tube). Goldie is hustler turned pimp who, after being set up and doing five years in jail sets out to 'rule' his neighborhood by pimping. Or macking, as the locals say. He gives all the young kids a fat monthly allowance, as long as they stay in school and out of trouble, respects his competitors but will come down violently one anyone messing with his business. Two policemen constantly harass out of racist hatred, but also because they think they are the rightful 'rulers' of the 'hood. The mob won't let him just do his thing, but wants to control him by making him a drug runner for them. His brother is leader of the local militia/neighborhood watch that is trying to clean up the place of all criminals. And his mother wants him to go back to church. The more power and wealth Goldie acquires, the more people are trying to work on his downfall. Or, as the old adage goes, mo' money, mo' problems.


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The Mack offers insight into the actual world of ghetto pimps (see the quote at the top, for instance), partly thanks to the involvement of real pimps, and portrays this business in realistic detail, but goes beyond that. It explores the subterranean community within the world of prostitution. There is the “Players' Picnic”, a sunday social gathering where those in the business play baseball, eat barbecue and have fun, with children playig and couples arguing over trifle matters. There is sense of normalcy, despite the outfits, and that's the point. These pimps and prostitutes, so often parodied in blaxploitation, are regular folk with families and who like a company picnic. It's these touches that give this lowbudget movie shot on location an authenticity and even respect. It also gives the women in the film a representation outside of their occupation, which is welcome within the apparent mysogynist portrayal of women in this film as either whores or women to be 'turned'. Because otherwise, the only time they're allowed to be something more is before Goldie does his thing, i.e. charming them into working for him on the streets. Goldie, meanwhile, is getting his expensive goat pulled on by just about everybody. His brother wants him to be a militant, his mother wants him to be a good Christian, his friends want him to be a mack, the cops want him to be a criminal and the mob wants him to be a junkie (again). These are the roles that Goldie has available to him, and in many respects, the only options young black men felt were open to them in the early 1970's. These are differing, and often conflicting signs as what a man is to do with his life, and Goldie is likewise caught up in these dilemmas.

The pimp may seem like an odd choice for a hero, but this draws on the black underground oral tradition of the trickster, a folkloristic character that moves between two worlds, neither god nor men, good nor evil, hero nor villain but "representing the permeability of life, the process of change." In the early '70's, many black kids wanted to emulate the tricksters: sticking it to the Man, having a lot of money but no 'normal' job and women at their beck and call. According to many theorists of the post-civil rights black youth culture, the pimp was the emblem for emulation. No film embodies this emulation better than The Mack. Of course, it's pleasures are sometimes also simpler, such as the music, the generally good performances (by a coked out Richard Pryor, among others) with Max Julien leading the pack in all possible ways, or the Player's Ball, including an election for the best garb, but it's intelligent script and cultural subtext are what elevates The Mack to the very top of the blaxploitation genre.
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Leda » Sat May 14, 2011 10:44 pm

I love the visual format of these reviews. Content too, though I am very very inexperienced regarding this genre. I mean - taking those screencaps must have taken ages, nevermind putting the whole review together. Appreciation!
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by dreiser » Sat May 14, 2011 10:51 pm

I need to see The Mack.
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Like Someone in Love (Kiarostami, 2012) 4/10
Killing Them Softly (Dominik, 2012) 2/10
The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (Pal/Levin, 1962) 6/10
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New Rose Hotel (Ferrara, 1998) 3/10
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Sat May 14, 2011 10:52 pm

His brother wants him to be a militant, his mother wants him to be a good Christian, his friends want him to be a mack, the cops want him to be a criminal and the mob wants him to be a junkie (again). These are the roles that Goldie has available to him, and in many respects, the only options young black men felt were open to them in the early 1970's. These are differing, and often conflicting signs as what a man is to do with his life, and Goldie is likewise caught up in these dilemmas.

The pimp may seem like an odd choice for a hero, but this draws on the black underground oral tradition of the trickster, a folkloristic character that moves between two worlds, neither god nor men, good nor evil, hero nor villain but "representing the permeability of life, the process of change." In the early '70's, many black kids wanted to emulate the tricksters: sticking it to the Man, having a lot of money but no 'normal' job and women at their beck and call. According to many theorists of the post-civil rights black youth culture, the pimp was the emblem for emulation. No film embodies this emulation better than The Mack.
:heart:

Glad that one played better for you on a rewatch - I was all but thoroughly impressed by it upon my first (and, so far, only) viewing. I did feel it dwindled in act three... to the point that now I honestly can't remember what happened... and I must have turned it off once the credits hit because I don't recognize "Brother's Gonna Work It Out", which I greatly thank you for introducing me to. It'll be damn tough for anything on any blaxploitation soundtrack to top "Down & Out in New York City" by James Brown from "Black Caesar" for me, but this is a sweet-ass sweet tune that is already coming considerably close.
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Sat May 14, 2011 10:57 pm

Six reviews in and with the exception of "A Hero Ain't Nothin' but a Sandwich" I'm finding it interesting how bold reds are heavily relied upon for catching eyes in these films' posters http://corrierino.com/forum/viewtopic.p ... 53#p688453
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Sat May 14, 2011 11:09 pm

Mod Hip wrote:It'll be damn tough for anything on any blaxploitation soundtrack to top "Down & Out in New York City" by James Brown from "Black Caesar" for me, but this is a sweet-ass sweet tune that is already coming considerably close.
Seems I was out shining shoes by tuesday noon.
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Sun May 15, 2011 12:32 am

Colonel Kurz wrote:Seems I was out shining shoes by tuesday noon.
Well gee, thanks, now I just have to listen to it. :D
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Thu May 19, 2011 6:42 pm

New phone, new ringtone... Isaac Hayes' "End Theme" from "Truck Turner" is doing quite nicely. This threadbump is brought to you by an impending review for a Fred Williamson movie from 1973.
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Thu May 19, 2011 9:36 pm

Bolt, Gibbs or Charley? 8-)
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Thu May 19, 2011 9:59 pm

Image

"Ah, chocolate man. He say alright to call him chocolate man. Chocolate with nuts, he say."
If one were to pick a sole male figure to signify the blaxploitation wave, chances are so good they can hardly be called "chances" that Fred Williamson would come out on top every time, if not for his reliability as a badass at least for the great quantity of films he headlined. "That Man Bolt" is one that gets by largely on Williamson badassery. Were there a less charismatic star here there'd be very little worth watching. The eclectic Henry Levin, whose directorial filmography charts back to the '40s and includes "Journey to the Center of the Earth", helmed "Bolt" in 1973 with television veteran David Lowell Rich, though it wouldn't seem either gentleman brought much beyond your average, serviceable exploitation direction. Boiled down, title character Jefferson Bolt (mistakenly and humorously called "Lincoln Bolt" in IMDb's synopsis) is the black James Bond, a charming mother with an affinity for hi jump kicks and a knack for getting out of traps and enduring torture. His best "gadget" is his mean attitude, which he frequently launches in the droopy faces of his staunch, British bosses who do condescendingly and obligatorily rib him for his blackness. The character has little to no reason or backing from his surrounding, unengaging picture, the only technically interesting aspect of which is the repeated use of a certain editing technique that I believe was somewhat forward for its time (the commencement of a scene, while a character's plan for said scene is still unfolding, carried over from the previous scene as a voiceover segue... for all I know this has been used since the '30s, but I don't think it came into prominence until the early 2000s).

One occasional feature of these films is a non-narrative musical interlude, typically set in a club, highlighting an up-and-coming artist performing a song or two. "Blacula", for example, features The Hues Corporation (of "Rock the Boat" notoriety and whose Bernard St. Clair Lee died last month) enthusiastically belting one of their three songs from the film's soundtrack, the invigorating "There He Is Again". Some may also be familiar with Hammer's decidedly funky early '70s entry in their Dracula franchise, "Dracula AD 1972", and its opening party sequence featuring The Stoneground, who offer up "You Better Come Through" and "Alligator Man". "That Man Bolt" takes the cameo nature of these appearances a bit further as Bolt's arrival in a club and subsequent recognition by the performer, here Teresa Graves of the Doodletown Pipers (who also appeared in "Black Eye" with Williamson the following year), decides the next song (lyrics of which declare "I'm so glad to see you here in my part of town") before the performer actually becomes a short-lived love-interest-with-a-history character.


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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by MrCarmady » Thu May 19, 2011 10:01 pm

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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Thu May 19, 2011 10:01 pm

Thanks :) *edits in*
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Thu May 19, 2011 10:04 pm

There's a pretty good quote in this one's trailer, too (I actually watched the whole thing this time!)... would have used it had it not been for the "chocolate man" one.
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Thu May 19, 2011 10:13 pm

There's more than one! His kicks don't look half bad either.
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Thu May 19, 2011 10:18 pm

Colonel Kurz wrote:There's more than one! His kicks don't look half bad either.
For the most part, he's quite the convincing pretend-martial artist.

And you're right, I almost forgot about the "I've been acupunctured!" line :P
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Fri May 20, 2011 6:30 pm

Image

"If you pull another stunt like this, this nigger is gonna own you!"
With a purposeful neglect of story beyond the basics of "Rip Torn and Rip Torn's friends are trying to kill Jim Brown and Jim Brown's friends", 1972's "Slaughter" almost goes to show that with enough soulful funk and righteous attitude you don't need so bothersome an element as a story to give the post-"Sweetback", post-"Shaft" crowds what they craved. Once, however, the energy surge has worn from the capturing opening title sequence (accompanied by Billy Preston's title theme, also heard in brief more recently in the oddly punctuative Hugo Stiglitz interlude of "Inglourious Basterds"), we realize just how little there is to "Slaughter" and we begin, rapidly, to grow bored.

Once again, the white villains' racist remarks come forced, with little motive beyond riling up black audience members. Jim Brown endures these comments, knowing he'll soon be giving their speakers what they've got coming (with the help of frequently utilized yet seldom effective distorted lens effects), and he does a suitable job - the camera does like him - but I greatly prefer his turn in the same year's more folky and relevant "Black Gunn" (co-starring Martin Landau as a villainous car salesman).

Director Jack Starrett went on to head up what was to be the first capitalization on both the Black Power movement and second-wave feminism, "Cleopatra Jones" (which, also bland, barely gets by on a few poppy moments and Bernie Casey's Bernie Caseyness), but the picture was beat to its own punch by its original, cast-aside producer, Larry Gordon, and director Jack Hill with the fast-tracked yet vastly superior icon of soul cinema that made Pam Grier a star, "Coffy".


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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Sun Sep 04, 2011 1:03 am

Image

Mááán... I thought we was all capitalists. Free enterprise, you dig?

In terms of clothes, Willie Dynamite has got to be the most extravagant pimp I can remember right now. The outrageous outfits alone are worth the price of admission. But there's much more to Willie D. than the fashion that's so grand it almost hurts your eyes. And I'm not even talking about the great soundtrack by J.J. Johnson with vocals by Martha Reeves, the solid acting by Roscoe Orman in the title role (Gordon on Sesame Street after this movie!) and Diana Sands as his foe, or the great dialogue. This is largely an indictment of runaway American capitalism with pimping standing in for big business. The pimps and the drug dealers are the businessmen in this film that hides a daring political stance behind it's colorful clothing. In the beginning there's a sort of pimp/dealer council that wants to collectivize the New York business so that everybody can keep making money while police pressure increases. Willie is the only one to refuse, because he is the number one pimp with the best 'product' and thinks himself better than the rest. Big mistake. The capitalism he completely puts his trust in chews him up and spits him out.

There's a social worker, Cora, a former prostitute and junkie, who tries to wrestle girls from Willies 'stable'. Specifically a young girl named Pashen. Cora is in bed with the D.A., the police routinely attack/arrest Willie, who is now their main target and any time this takes up his complete attention the collective moves in on him and his women. Willie Dynamite's belief in the invincibility of his unfettered capitalist enterprise leads to his, Pashen's en and his mother's downfall. It's not so much his own fate (he loses all his clothes and a flamboyant car while his assets are frozen pending investigation) but that of those who get caught up in his game that makes him realize the costs of his Fordist principles of doing business. Scenes where young Pashen is surrounded by ragged whores who look much older than their age also make their point, as does the song "King Midas" on the soundtrack. Willie Dynamite was financed as a big budget version The Mack, and it shares with that film not only the funk but also a deeper meaning and interesting subtext.
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by dreiser » Sun Sep 04, 2011 1:07 am

This thread is still active?!
"I hate the dark, the sharks liars. And the stems of cherry..."

Like Someone in Love (Kiarostami, 2012) 4/10
Killing Them Softly (Dominik, 2012) 2/10
The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (Pal/Levin, 1962) 6/10
The Dark Past (Mate', 1948) 7/10
New Rose Hotel (Ferrara, 1998) 3/10
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Sun Sep 04, 2011 1:09 am

For your viewing, reading and listening pleasure, baby.
Mod Hip wrote:We've each selected a number of blaxploitation films we've not yet seen to view and report on at our own pace along with several already-beloved titles to highlight as entries in the soul cinema canon.
You dig? :P
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Willow » Sun Sep 04, 2011 1:14 am

Imma have to watch this Willie Dynamite.
recently seen
Gun Crazy (Joseph H. Lewis, 1950)
Sansho the Baliff (Mizoguchi, 1954)
Outer Space (Tscherkassky, 1999)
Seven Chances (Keaton, 1925)
Battleship Potemkin (Eisenstein, 1925)


My Random Screencaps blog
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by dreiser » Sun Sep 04, 2011 1:14 am

You're one bad mothafu...
Shut your mouth!
"I hate the dark, the sharks liars. And the stems of cherry..."

Like Someone in Love (Kiarostami, 2012) 4/10
Killing Them Softly (Dominik, 2012) 2/10
The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (Pal/Levin, 1962) 6/10
The Dark Past (Mate', 1948) 7/10
New Rose Hotel (Ferrara, 1998) 3/10
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Sun Sep 04, 2011 2:33 am

Colonel Kurz wrote:You dig? :P
:heart:

And it seems from your reaction it seems highly likely I will also dig Willie Dynamite. Even just from those screenshots I'll never look at "Gordon" the same way again!
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Sun Sep 04, 2011 10:23 pm

How's your pace coming along?
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Sun Sep 04, 2011 10:26 pm

Colonel Kurz wrote:How's your pace coming along?
I'm not exactly black by popular demand, but "Tongue" and "Space is the Place" have been on the docket for a whiile.
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Fri Sep 09, 2011 2:43 pm

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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Blevo » Fri Sep 09, 2011 2:57 pm

God I'm such a slacker. It can't be helped, it's a generational thing.
Wandering Soul of Derninan

Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Wandering Soul of Derninan » Fri Sep 09, 2011 3:01 pm

The music...I can see the light...

AVENGE ME!
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Fri Sep 09, 2011 3:26 pm

Couldn't pick:

He was dead, now he wanders, don't take nothing from nobody
Oh, he's back, bad, scared of nothing, yeah
He's so bad, they call him Dern
He's a Dern, Derninan!


He can slack, can't be helped, don't take nothing from nobody
Oh, he runs, his, own company, yeah
He's so bad, they call him boss
He's a boss, boss Blevo!
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Blevo » Fri Sep 09, 2011 3:30 pm

I lol'd
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Fri Jan 27, 2012 8:50 pm

http://reeltimepodcast.org/2012/01/26/r ... ck-cinema/

A summary of important current events filtered through an open letter by Spike Lee co-writer James McBride, relevant to this hibernating thread's interests.

I strongly encourage anyone with the time to give it a click and check out the links to the Shadow & Act blog that far further detail the situation.
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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Mod Hip » Thu Feb 09, 2012 7:38 pm

Image
The heat's on in the street... but Sheba's doing the cooking, and any cat in her way is gonna get fried!

I can occasionally be bad about watching but a portion of a film, getting a presumed vibe then writing the title off as viewed if I feel I've been there and done that with little else to glean. I perpetrated this with "Sheba, Baby" several years back, and with this mentality figured checking it out again would place it under the "rewatch" category. I had previously deemed it another "Coffy" retread a la "Foxy Brown", but where many identical plot points are indeed present the picture actually shares more in common with "Friday Foster" and is original enough to widely prove my initially hasty interpretation as fallacy.

"Sheba" represents in its individuality so much of what I love about blaxploitation, from the nearly ever-present Monk Higgins funk seeming to emanate from slammin' Pam Grier's mere presence and the immediately grabbing storyline of an ethical family's empathetic financial struggle, to the presentation of its titular character as uniquely strong in both the everyday and the extraordinary (I.E. givin' the gun-brothers the frizzies) to a general extent that defies the bounds of "exploitation". The themes at hand are relevant for all, and rarely if ever rely on matters of race or cultural idiosyncrasy. The racial themes are subtle, rendering it merely circumstantial that the established entrepreneurs (headed by D'Urville Martin as, well, let's just call him Prince George, you follow me?) taking on small-time competition generates a black versus black scenario. Then, one must point out the poignancy in the fact that above it all a white man is orchestrating the conflict to his benefit. When you're after the top banana, you peel off the skin!

To look deeper, one might also make note of the Louisville setting. Like Arthur Marks' also Grier-starring "Bucktown", "Sheba" brings prominent blackness to unexpected locales, spreading the soul like jam across a crusty country, beyond the traditional urban settings of New York City, etcetera. Grier's character in "Bucktown" never had a car as bitchin' as the one in "Sheba", though... and that's coming from one rarely impressed with cars.

How come the soul wave shot so rapidly downhill from 1975 forth? I hesitate to accuse the surface normalcy in "Sheba" as a trend, but there is the fact we're still dealing with today as evidenced through filmmakers' recent issues getting non-white casts funded or distributed in the mainstream - a majority of audiences are less keen on seeing brown faces performing normal tasks. Roles for non-whites in mainstream films are tailored to their respective races' stereotypes and narrative tropes, while pictures outside the mainstream fail to gain support even from their own communities. It goes without saying, I'm glad we have the independent scene, and that the offerings from it are looking better and better.

It suffices to say, the groovy and exciting "Sheba, Baby" makes me happy, endearingly stilted performances and all. I need more films like "Sheba, Baby" in my life. Thankfully, there are plenty more where it came from.


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Re: Three Honkies the Hard Way

Post by Colonel Kurz » Thu Feb 09, 2012 7:45 pm

That hit the spot.
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