Eighty Eight Takes

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Trip
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Trip » Mon Sep 19, 2011 10:45 am

Fucker, it's your turn.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by JediMoonShyne » Mon Sep 19, 2011 5:12 pm

Image
It is impossible to underestimate the difficulty, given the sumptuousness and timelessness of its visuals, that comes with selecting or championing one individual scene from a film like Andrei Tarkovsky's Nostalghia. The short, slowed down, black-and-white sequences in particular, which Tarkovsky uses to differentiate between past and present, are so meticulously crafted and visually sharp that one wonders exactly how indeed they were captured given the technology of 25 years ago. Much of Nostalghia is set within the historic Tuscan village of Bagno Vignoni, in the centre of which stands what is known as St. Catherine's Pool: a rectangular spa, "fed by the clear warm water spring that is the literal and physical font of fame for this ancient place." As Robert Bird mentions in his insightful study Andrei Tarkovsky: Elements of Cinema, it would be fruitless to separate this particular long take from any others found here, or indeed from the narrative whole, but it is important to note its belonging to a group of sequences, all of which are shot in or around the bath and which echo one another. The last of which, a long take of almost nine minutes that sees Gorchakov struggle across the drained pool with a candle, is described by Tarkovsky as "displaying an entire human life in one shot", and also "the finest shot I ever made."
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Oaktown » Mon Sep 19, 2011 8:41 pm

Still have not seen that :(.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Das » Mon Sep 19, 2011 8:47 pm

That Tark <3

Also, Rivette is 200% French as far as French filmmakers go. That's a good one from him.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Epistemophobia » Mon Sep 19, 2011 9:55 pm

That shot had a huge impact on me when I first saw it many years ago. Perfection.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Hank » Mon Sep 19, 2011 10:37 pm

Nostalghia :heart:
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Trip
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Trip » Mon Sep 19, 2011 11:39 pm

Glorious. I must revisit that.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by johnson » Tue Sep 20, 2011 1:14 am

I love Tarkovsky so much. :)
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Von Samuel » Tue Sep 20, 2011 5:36 am

Not my favorite Tark, but what a wonderful shot.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by JediMoonShyne » Tue Sep 20, 2011 6:21 am

Image
With this opening sequence from his 2008 film, The Sky, the Earth and the Rain, Chilean director José Luis Torres Leiva lays down the thematic groundwork that will serve as a strong foundation throughout. A wooded hill, thick with early morning fog and the distinctive smell of Autumn is the setting. Golden leaves crinkle and fall as the camera pans slowly to the right, tracking the energetic forms of a young girl and her dog as they bound over dew-laden grass. A sharp whistle is followed by a fleeting pant, but soon they exit the frame and are gone, leaving us with nothing but weak birdsong, muffled by the wheezing wind that passes through the aged limbs of a great tree. Seclusion and loneliness are of course the prevailing themes here, and Torres Leiva uses a multitude of different techniques - there are many lengthy tracking shots such as this one that feature the main character walking to and from home - to further these feelings and complement the subdued, late autumnal, eventually wintry landscape. "I'm interested mainly in speaking about solitude and isolation but not as negative consequence, rather as an internal process of learning", the director is quoted as saying.
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Epistemophobia » Tue Sep 20, 2011 6:54 am



Great.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by JediMoonShyne » Tue Sep 20, 2011 7:13 am

Mine's prettier.

I mean, look at the framing!
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Trip » Tue Sep 20, 2011 9:07 am

Both indelible shots.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Trip » Tue Sep 20, 2011 9:56 am

The next one's a necessity.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by JediMoonShyne » Tue Sep 20, 2011 9:51 pm

Image
In their Cultures of Exile: Images of Displacement, authors Wendy Everett and Peter Wagstaff talk about the "exile" that technological advances in contemporary cinema have imposed upon the viewer. This exile from a "pure image", as Everett and Wagstaff describe it, leaves audiences unwittingly disconnected and is something that director Chantal Akerman looks to address through her use of long takes and static shots in the 1975 film Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles. Still, this lack of camera movement and staunch refusal by Akerman to provide dramatic close-ups or subjective imagery consistently and successfully keeps us the viewer at a certain distance from her eponymous housewife and her plight. This particular scene, which shows her preparing and sipping from a cup of coffee, has always stood out for me because of one brief instant in which Delphine Seyrig's protagonist, lost in a moment of reverie, almost looks directly into the camera. Ultimately, it is the length of the takes that gives Jeanne Dielman its true sense of duration; giving the impression, as the above authors have noted, of a "presentation of life rather than a representation."
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Epistemophobia » Tue Sep 20, 2011 9:53 pm

I'm partial to the dinner preparation myself. :P
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Fist » Tue Sep 20, 2011 9:55 pm

How do you choose a single shot from that?
I Watch Films, But...
In a word, I think that, far from favoring directors’ formal inventiveness, widescreen, instead, stifles it. It is, I’m more and more persuaded, if not the only, at least the main culprit for the expressive poverty of the image today. - Eric Rohmer
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Epistemophobia » Tue Sep 20, 2011 10:02 pm

That one is probably the most emblematic.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Blevo » Tue Sep 20, 2011 10:16 pm

Epistemophobia wrote:I'm partial to the dinner preparation myself. :P
Boiling potatoes.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Oaktown » Wed Sep 21, 2011 3:23 am

That Levia film looks stunning. I don't think I have heard of it before now.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by JediMoonShyne » Wed Sep 21, 2011 6:24 am

One thing about Jeanne Dielman that I've never really considered but have been thinking about since rewatching the film recently: Akerman's static camera plays a hugely important role here, since it echoes the existence of Jeanne herself. In each interior shot the camera is constant and stationary. We can follow Jeanne while she is in view, see the lights from outside and hear the occasional noise of cars, etc., but ultimately we are stuck. We are trapped with the stationary camera, unable to get up and move around so as to follow events more closely, just as Jeanne is imprisoned in her role as housewife.
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Trip » Wed Sep 21, 2011 6:27 am

Well, yeah.

My next two entries are by the same director :/
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Ace » Wed Sep 21, 2011 6:32 am

From the same film?
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Trip » Wed Sep 21, 2011 6:36 am

Of course not.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by JediMoonShyne » Wed Sep 21, 2011 7:36 pm

“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by dreiser » Wed Sep 21, 2011 7:56 pm

Delphine.
"I hate the dark, the sharks liars. And the stems of cherry..."

Like Someone in Love (Kiarostami, 2012) 4/10
Killing Them Softly (Dominik, 2012) 2/10
The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (Pal/Levin, 1962) 6/10
The Dark Past (Mate', 1948) 7/10
New Rose Hotel (Ferrara, 1998) 3/10
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Trip » Thu Sep 22, 2011 12:48 am

Image
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Trip » Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:10 am

Anyone? No? Ugh, it stuns me.

Of course, I almost chose the Irm Hermann hand-on-the-glass shot because WOW.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Fist » Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:23 am

Oooooh, knew that film would show up. Not the shot I was expecting. Still amazing. They're all kind of that brilliant.
I Watch Films, But...
In a word, I think that, far from favoring directors’ formal inventiveness, widescreen, instead, stifles it. It is, I’m more and more persuaded, if not the only, at least the main culprit for the expressive poverty of the image today. - Eric Rohmer
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by dreiser » Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:42 am

I'd rather see a different Fassbinder sequence.
"I hate the dark, the sharks liars. And the stems of cherry..."

Like Someone in Love (Kiarostami, 2012) 4/10
Killing Them Softly (Dominik, 2012) 2/10
The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (Pal/Levin, 1962) 6/10
The Dark Past (Mate', 1948) 7/10
New Rose Hotel (Ferrara, 1998) 3/10
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Trip » Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:44 am

dreiser wrote:I'd rather see a different Fassbinder sequence.
OH I'M SORRY
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Fist » Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:45 am

I THINK you made a lovely choice, Trip.
I Watch Films, But...
In a word, I think that, far from favoring directors’ formal inventiveness, widescreen, instead, stifles it. It is, I’m more and more persuaded, if not the only, at least the main culprit for the expressive poverty of the image today. - Eric Rohmer
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Trip » Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:46 am

Magic Fister wrote:I THINK you made a lovely choice, Trip.
ur spesh
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by B-Side » Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:46 am

Was gonna post a clip or two from The Last Laugh. Was worried you may have it coming up on the list. Didn't bother to check shot length.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by dreiser » Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:46 am

Trip wrote: OH I'M SORRY
Something from Berlin Alexanderplatz perhaps?
"I hate the dark, the sharks liars. And the stems of cherry..."

Like Someone in Love (Kiarostami, 2012) 4/10
Killing Them Softly (Dominik, 2012) 2/10
The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (Pal/Levin, 1962) 6/10
The Dark Past (Mate', 1948) 7/10
New Rose Hotel (Ferrara, 1998) 3/10
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Trip » Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:48 am

Brightside wrote:Was gonna post a clip or two from The Last Laugh. Was worried you may have it coming up on the list. Didn't bother to check shot length.
Nope. I failed to check it. I think it's such a beautifully shot film, though. I remember the opening vividly, with the hotel and the rain and the taxis.
Dreiser wrote:Something from Berlin Alexanderplatz perhaps?
Naw. But another Fass is coming up after Jedi's entry.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by dreiser » Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:49 am

Trip wrote:Naw. But another Fass is coming up after Jedi's entry.
Awesome.
"I hate the dark, the sharks liars. And the stems of cherry..."

Like Someone in Love (Kiarostami, 2012) 4/10
Killing Them Softly (Dominik, 2012) 2/10
The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (Pal/Levin, 1962) 6/10
The Dark Past (Mate', 1948) 7/10
New Rose Hotel (Ferrara, 1998) 3/10
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Quite-Gone Genie » Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:50 am

Trip wrote:Naw. But another Fass is coming up after Jedi's entry.
Possibly from Martha?
"So, you see, he was condemned to walk in darkness a quadrillion kilometres (we've adopted the metric system, you know)..."
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by B-Side » Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:50 am

Trip wrote:Nope. I failed to check it. I think it's such a beautifully shot film, though. I remember the opening vividly, with the hotel and the rain and the taxis.
The opening was spectacular. And yes, it is very well shot. I think I deleted it last night after I watched it, but if for some reason I didn't, I'll post a clip or two.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Trip » Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:51 am

Quite-Gone Genie wrote:Possibly from Martha?
No, but omg that shot where they pass each other and are pulled into a swirl of attraction, camera included. One of his best moments.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by B-Side » Thu Sep 22, 2011 1:57 am

Brightside wrote:The opening was spectacular. And yes, it is very well shot. I think I deleted it last night after I watched it, but if for some reason I didn't, I'll post a clip or two.
I still have it. A clip or two forthcoming.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Bandy Greensacks » Thu Sep 22, 2011 2:40 am

I'M CONTRIBUTING

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Trip
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Trip » Thu Sep 22, 2011 2:41 am

Haha, should watch that.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Bandy Greensacks » Thu Sep 22, 2011 2:46 am

Trip wrote:Haha, should watch that.
I've seen only that and Pastoral, but that was more than enough to come to the conclusion that Terayama is a master of the form. The Boxer actually looks more interesting to me than Throw Away Your Books, since it's such a departure from his other work.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by B-Side » Thu Sep 22, 2011 3:10 am

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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Trip » Thu Sep 22, 2011 3:17 am

God damn. Murnau was visionary. That word has been ruined, but whatever.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Bandy Greensacks » Thu Sep 22, 2011 3:19 am

Trip wrote:God damn. Murnau was a visionary. That word has been ruined, but whatever.
FROM VISIONARY DIRECTOR ZACH SNYDER

I need to see some Murnau. I need to see anything from the '20s, really.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by B-Side » Thu Sep 22, 2011 3:20 am

Trip wrote:Anyone? No? Ugh, it stuns me.

Of course, I almost chose the Irm Hermann hand-on-the-glass shot because WOW.
Just watched it. Brilliant. One of the best so far.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by B-Side » Thu Sep 22, 2011 3:20 am

Trip wrote:God damn. Murnau was visionary. That word has been ruined, but whatever.
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Re: Eighty Eight Takes

Post by Trip » Thu Sep 22, 2011 3:24 am

Bandy Greensacks wrote:I need to see some Murnau. I need to see anything from the '20s, really.
City Girl has some of the most beautiful lighting ever. Sunrise is a masterpiece of everything. Tabu is more realist than those but is at heart romanticist. I don't remember Noseratu. Must watch more.
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